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  • 1.
    Onufrey, Ksenia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berglund, Martina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bienkowska, Dzamila
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Norrman, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Digital tools for self-study and examination2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitalization and increased use of information and communication technology (ICT) are major change processes taking place in engineering education today. Self-study and examination are areas with high potential for beneficial use of digital ICT tools. Some advantages with such tools are that students' can continuously assess their own learning in relation to the course objectives while they also can provide an opportunity to meet the teachers' needs to control how the students absorb the course material. Moreover, automatic provision of quick or instant feedback through digital tools can stimulate students’ commitment and active learning and allow students greater flexibility in their learning process, with tests that can be conducted online regardless of time and space and can be repeated as needed. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how different types of ICT-based self-study and examination practices can be implemented in courses on topics such as project management, product development, and entrepreneurship, and build a knowledge base necessary for future systematic implementation of digital examinations. Our study is based on an educational development project at Linköping University, where we tested and evaluated different models and approaches for digital knowledge testing in a number of selected courses.We discuss both positive and potentially problematic aspects of the use of digital tools and conclude that successful implementation is dependent on well-planned integration of such tools into the overall course where different types of activities enhance each other. Thus, this study connects the areas of digital self- study and examination and provides examples of first steps on the way towards implementation of ICT-based examination practices.

  • 2.
    Elg, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Berglund, Martina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Ellström, Per-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Kock, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Tillmar, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Wallo, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Sustainable Working Life development through interactive research2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interactive research has emerged as a new approach to collaborative research in working life research, and it is characterized by a continuous joint learning process between the researchers and the practitioners. In this paper we argue that interactive research is a way to advance scientific knowledge about the development of new types of work arrangements and development of sustainable working life. We present the basic ideas and benefits of the interactive research approach, illustrated through a practical case, the HELIX Competence Centre and discuss potential limitation and challenges associated with this form of collaborative research.

  • 3.
    Berglund, Martina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Elg, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Kock, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Tillmar, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Wallo, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    HELIX Competence Centre – Knowledge for Sustainable Working Life2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to describe HELIX Competence Centre at Linköping University and its work to contribute to sustainable working life. Research in HELIX Competence Centre is based on an interactive approach between researchers from different disciplines and partner organizations, including industrial organizations, public organizations, labour market organizations, and civil society organizations. The research programme includes four research themes: 1) Sustainable development processes in industrial production systems; 2) Growth and development in small enterprises; 3) Sustainable, innovative, and coordinated health and welfare processes; and 4) Diversity and inclusion in working life. Other activities include seminars and partnership meetings with different topics and a yearly HELIX day. The research and activities led by HELIX Competence Centre constitute an approach to integrate social and economic sustainability, produce scientific knowledge, and add value to practice in the partner organizations.

  • 4.
    Karltun, Anette
    et al.
    Jonköping University, Sweden; KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Karltun, Johan
    Jonköping University, Sweden; KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Berglund, Martina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    HTO - A complementary ergonomics approach2017In: APPLIED ERGONOMICS, ISSN 0003-6870, Vol. 59, p. 182-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The field of human factors and ergonomics constitutes a strong potential in systems analysis, design and improvement. However, it is difficult to communicate its potential value. This paper addresses how the human-technology-organization (HTO) concept can be defined and supports the understanding, communication and development of the systems character and potential of human factors and ergonomics. Empirical examples from the authors experiences of working with the HTO concept in Ramp;D and teaching are illustrated, including its usefulness as: 1) a conceptual model; 2) an analysis framework; 3) a meta methodology; 4) a pedagogical tool; and 5) a design tool. The use of HTO provides guidance on how the system can be designed to better support health, individual and systems performance. It is further suggested that there is a strong potential for developing the theory, applications and methodological aspects of HTO. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 5.
    Berglund, Martina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Andersson, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hedbrant, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pavlasevic, Vanja
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Stålhand, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Understanding the user beyond ‘common sense’ – teaching Product Ergonomics to design engineering students2015In: Proceedings 19th Triennial Congress of the IEA, International Ergonomics Association , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multidisciplinary frameworks are needed to develop products that fit the human. Ergonomics is a multifaceted field that encompasses physical, cognitive and organizational aspects, and it is therefore a suitable subject to be taught to design engineering students.

    The objective of this paper was to describe and reflect upon how a systems perspective on Ergonomics is developed and conveyed in a course in Product Ergonomics to engineering students at the Design and Product Development (DPD) programme at Linköping University, Sweden. The paper is based on the authors’ experiences from teaching the course in Product Ergonomicsas well ason 52 students’ written reflections about their view on Ergonomics before and after taking the course.

    Means and ideas for teaching Ergonomics with a systems perspective included organizing a theoretical introduction into weekly themes and thereafter integrating and applying these themes in a product concept project under supervision of a multidisciplinary teacher team.

    The paper also reflects on how the systems perspective of Ergonomics is planned for and realized in the intended, implemented and attained curriculum.

  • 6.
    Wangwacharakul, Promporn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berglund, Martina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    Department of Production System Development, Swerea IVF, Mölnda l, Sweden.
    Gullander, Per
    Swerea IVF AB, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Cultural Aspects when Implementing Lean Production and Lean Product Development: Experiences from a Swedish Perspective2014In: Quality Innovation Prosperity, ISSN 1335-1745, E-ISSN 1338-984X, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 125-140Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Lean principles and methods, originating in a Japanese cultural context, have spread to a large number of companies throughout the world. The aim of this case study research is to identify and compare national cultural aspects that influence Lean Production and Lean Product Development implementation in Swedish companies. Data were collected through questionnaires, interviews and an industrial workshop with Swedish Lean practitioners. The study shows that some sub-areas in Lean, such as value definition, control systems, leadership, team development, knowledge management, and strategies, are highly dependent on contextual factors related to human, cultural and organizational aspects. These are related to the national culture and should be considered to a higher extent for successful sustainable implementation of Lean in different cultural contexts. As for implementing Lean in Sweden, national cultural characteristics, such as individualism, autonomy and supportive management style fit well with Lean thinking.

  • 7.
    Wangwacharakul, Promporn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berglund, Martina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    Swerea IVF, Department of Product Realization, Mölndal, Sweden / Chalmers University of Technology, Division of Production Systems. Department of Product and Production Development, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Quality management – a means to bridge cultural differences?2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The aim of the paper is to explore how quality management (QM) principles can be used to mitigate cross-cultural challenges in new product introduction across national borders.

    Design/Methodology/Approach – Data for this longitudinal case study were collected through semi-structured interviews in the planning phase, during and after a product introduction involving one Swedish and one Chinese company. In total, 35 interviews were conducted with employees and managers from several organizational functions in Sweden and China.

    Findings – Several challenges in the collaboration project were revealed that affected the product realization process. The study showed that QM dimensions may be used to handle the cross-cultural challenges. Strategy and leadership are essential in terms of top management support to set a high priority for the cross-cultural collaboration projects. The study demonstrated that lack of understanding of cultural differences negatively affected the product realization process and product quality, and that these outcomes could be mitigated by a QM approach. The means that may be used include continuous improvements, the development of measurement systems and the use of checklists. Employee development and involvement, finally, is an important QM dimension for cross-cultural management in order to set the same understanding and standards throughout the whole project.

    Practical implications – The results demonstrate the strong need to take a systematic approach to work on quality issues in cross-cultural collaboration contexts. Furthermore the study shows that specific attention needs to be paid to understanding cultural differences, as these may have significant impact on quality outcome. Knowledge about cultural characteristics should be integrated in the QM model and tools to mitigate cross-cultural challenges.

    Originality/Value of paper – This paper proposes the possibility of using quality management as a means to mitigate cultural challenges in cross-cultural product introduction.

  • 8.
    Berglund, Martina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pavlasevic, Vanja
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Andersson, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hedbrant, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Stålhand, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Theme-based assessment of education in design and product development2014In: Proceedings of the 10th International CDIO Conference, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One fundamental challenge in choosing an examination form to assess student achievements is to find an examination which, both encourages students to continuously elaborate the course content and constitutes a learning process itself. The objective of this paper is to share and reflect on the development and implementation of a new theme-based examination in a six credit course in Product Ergonomics given in the engineering programme Design and Product Development at Linköping University, Sweden. The course runs during four months and has two parts: one theoretical and one applied. The former focuses on theoretical ergonomic topics, models and methods while the latter is a project aiming at consolidating the students’ understanding of the theory by implementing the knowledge in a product development case. To encourage the students to adapt a deep learning approach, the traditional written mid-term exam for the theoretical part was abandoned and another concept developed. In the new concept, the theoretical part was split onto six weekly themes. Each theme was introduced at the beginning of the week by high-lighting main theories and models followed by a group-work assignment to be elaborated on by the students during the week. The theme was examined at the end of the week through a short written exam and a seminar to discuss and reflect upon the theme. From a student perspective, the positive outcome of the theme-based examination was peer learning and a more active learning style. The students appreciated the theme-based structure of the course. Occasionally, some students commented that weekly examinations could be perceived as stressful. The teachers perceived the students to be more acquainted with ergonomics theory and methods which increased the quality of the course project. The reported theme-based assessment is one example of implementing among others the CDIO syllabus parts 2.2 and 3.1and CDIO standards 8 and 11.

  • 9.
    Berglund, Martina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    Swerea IVF, Sweden Chalmers, Sweden .
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Safsten, Kristina
    Jonköping University, Sweden .
    New ways of organizing product introductions2012In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 41, p. 4856-4861Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to describe and reflect on an interactive research approach used to address the challenges on how to improve product introductions, the part of the product realization process associated with the transfer of a product from product development to serial production. In the interactive research approach, research results as well as improvement of practice are given equal importance. The collaboration between researchers and practitioners therefore addresses both the focus and the process of the change. The approach includes four main iterative steps: 1) mapping/diagnosis, 2) feedback of results, 3) participation in development activities, and 4) follow-up/evaluation. The paper reports findings from interactive research in one company within office product industry and one company group, consisting of three company units within the engine industry. Preliminary findings indicate that the participating companies afterwards work in a more structured way with product introductions and that the employees have gained deeper knowledge about product introductions as well as experienced the advantages of working across functional boundaries. Furthermore, the interactive research approach is suitable to run projects from an ergonomics perspective as it focuses on developing both practice and theory, it is human-centered, and it emphasizes broad participation from practitioners.

  • 10.
    Berglund, Martina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    Swerea IVF AB, Mölndal.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering.
    Development activities in product introductions – a cross functional approach2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Karltun, Johan
    et al.
    Industrial Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Berglund, Martina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Contextual conditions influencing the schedulers work at a sawmill2010In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 359-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This case study addresses the issue of how contextual conditions influence scheduling work in practice at a sawmill in Sweden. Based on observations and interviews, activity analysis was used to study the work activities of the main scheduler. It is shown how the contextual conditions related to constraints, either in the technical system and the technical scheduling tools used by the scheduler or in the social system, delimit the possible ways for the scheduler to perform his work. It is furthermore illustrated how the scheduler sometimes used the contextual conditions as a means to control the sawmill production. Moreover, the presence of the numerous uncertainties in the production process is shown. Finally, the study demonstrates that the schedulers thorough knowledge, experience, and skills of both the technical and the social systems had immense influence in his ability to perform during daily scheduling work.

  • 12.
    Berglund, Martina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Guinery, Jane
    Nottingham University Business School.
    Karltun, Johan
    Tekniska Högskolan i Jönköping.
    The Unsung Contribution of Production Planners and Schedulers at Production and Sales Interfaces2010In: Behavioral Operations in Planning and Scheduling / [ed] Jan C. Fransoo, Toni Wäfler and John Wilson, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2010, p. 47-81Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human and organizational factors have a substantial impact on the performance of planning and scheduling processes. Despite widespread and advanced decision support systems, human decision makers are still crucial to improve the operational performance in manufacturing industries. In this text, the state of the art in this area is discussed by experts from a wide variety of engineering and social science disciplines. Moreover, recent results from collaborative studies and a number of field cases are presented. The text is targeted at researchers and graduate students, but is also particularly useful for managers, consultants, and system developers to better understand how human performance can be advanced.Show more Show less

  • 13.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Berglund, Martina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    Swerea IVF AB, Mölndal.
    Preparatory production activities and learning during product introduction2009In: Proceedings of The International 3'rd Swedish Production Symposium, SPS '09, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Berglund, Martina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial ergonomics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Projekt upplärning: att lära sig kamma post kräver sin tid2008In: Forskarroller i interaktivt utvecklingsarbete: Om samverkansprocesser för ergonomiska förbättringar, Gunnela Westlander (red.), Linköping: Avdelningen för industriell arbetsvetenskap, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Linköpings universitet , 2008, 1, p. 91-110Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Projekt Upplärning är en ”avknoppning” av ett litet experiment om  postsorteringen som gjordes i ett inledande skede av samverkan mellan Posten och forskarlaget vid Linköpings universitet.

  • 15.
    Berglund, Martina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Guinery, J.
    Operations Management Division, Nottingham University Business School, Jubilee Campus, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    The influence of production planners and schedulers at manufacturing and commercial interfaces2008In: Human Factors and Ergonomics in Manufacturing, ISSN 1090-8471, E-ISSN 1520-6564, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 548-564Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes empirical research undertaken to identify how production planners and schedulers in manufacturing businesses exert influence on employees in production and commercial departments. Through the analysis of observations and interviews conducted in four case studies, sources of power were identified and categorized. It was found that although production planners and schedulers often did not have formal authority, in practice they had considerable influence. In the main, their sources of influence resided in their access to information, company agendas, and influential arenas, as well as their knowledge and social skills. The discussion draws from the findings examining influencing behaviors and considering their implications. The findings inform associated research on the processes, behaviors, and roles that schedulers and planners perform at functional interfaces, in support of effective and responsive order fulfillment. © 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  • 16.
    Berglund, Martina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Karltun, Johan
    Tekniska Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Human, technological and organizational aspects influencing the production scheduling process2007In: International Journal of Production Economics, ISSN 0925-5273, E-ISSN 1873-7579, Vol. 110, no 1-2, p. 160-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study of scheduling work in practice addresses how the production-scheduling processes in four companies are influenced by human, technological, and organizational aspects. A conclusion is that the outcome of the scheduling process is influenced by the scheduler adding human capabilities that cannot be automated, by technical constraints in the scheduled production system and by the available scheduling software tools. Furthermore, the outcome is influenced not only by how the scheduling process is formally organized, but also by the scheduler's informal authority and the role taken to interconnect activities between different organizational groups. The findings from the study support a number of previous studies done on scheduling in practice whilst giving new insights into their interpretation.

  • 17.
    Wangwacharakul, Promporn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gullander, Per
    Swerea IVF AB, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    Swerea IVF AB, Mölndal, Sweden / Chalmers University of Technology, Division of Production Systems, Department of Product and Production Development, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berglund, Martina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The Influences of National Culture on Product Development and Industrialization: A Systematic Literature ReviewManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased globalization provides both opportunities and challenges. It requires the development of new means of collaboration within cross-national functional groups, processes, and projects related to product development and industrialization (PD&I). The objective of this paper is to review the relevant research on national cultural issues in the context of multicultural collaborations in PD&I. Findings are reported concerning national cultures, cultural challenges, and key findings show that previous research is mostly a comparison of different national cultures in a specific phase of PD&I. The review reveals that most studies have looked at crosscultural issues related to product development rather than industrialization. Furthermore, Power Distance, Individual vs. Group Identity, and relation to time and environment are considered to be key cultural factors that influence global collaboration, as they have impact on the innovative knowledge transfer process. Further research is suggested to examine cultural issues in relation to all aspects of PD&I, especially the industrialization process, which has only been the subject of a few research studies. A need to further explore cultural effects in the PD&I research field has also been identified. Future research should address how to utilize, integrate, and operationalize culture research into a wide span of business practices in different phases of the PD&I.

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