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  • 1.
    Barabas, György
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The coexistence problem revisited2017In: NATURE ECOLOGY and EVOLUTION, ISSN 2397-334X, Vol. 1, no 10, p. 1425-1426Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A new theoretical study warns against common misinterpretations of classical ideas on the limits to species diversity.

  • 2.
    Choong, Ferdinand X.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Bäck, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Schulz, Anette
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Edlund, Ulrica
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Stereochemical identification of glucans by oligothiophenes enables cellulose anatomical mapping in plant tissues2018In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 3108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Efficient use of plant-derived materials requires enabling technologies for non-disruptive composition analysis. The ability to identify and spatially locate polysaccharides in native plant tissues is difficult but essential. Here, we develop an optical method for cellulose identification using the structure-responsive, heptameric oligothiophene h-FTAA as molecular fluorophore. Spectrophotometric analysis of h-FTAA interacting with closely related glucans revealed an exceptional specificity for beta-linked glucans. This optical, non-disruptive method for stereochemical differentiation of glycosidic linkages was next used for in situ composition analysis in plants. Multi-laser/multi-detector analysis developed herein revealed spatial localization of cellulose and structural cell wall features such as plasmodesmata and perforated sieve plates of the phloem. Simultaneous imaging of intrinsically fluorescent components revealed the spatial relationship between cell walls and other organelles, such as chloroplasts and lignified annular thickenings of the trachea, with precision at the sub-cellular scale. Our non-destructive method for cellulose identification lays the foundation for the emergence of anatomical maps of the chemical constituents in plant tissues. This rapid and versatile method will likely benefit the plant science research fields and may serve the biorefinery industry as reporter for feedstock optimization as well as in-line monitoring of cellulose reactions during standard operations.

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  • 3.
    Cirtwill, Alyssa R.
    et al.
    Univ Canterbury, New Zealand; Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Dalla Riva, Giulio V.
    Univ Canterbury, New Zealand; Univ Canterbury, New Zealand.
    Baker, Nick J.
    Univ Canterbury, New Zealand.
    Ohlsson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Norstrom, Isabelle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wohlfarth, Inger-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Thia, Joshua A.
    Univ Canterbury, New Zealand.
    Stouffer, Daniel B.
    Univ Canterbury, New Zealand.
    Related plants tend to share pollinators and herbivores, but strength of phylogenetic signal varies among plant families2020In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 226, no 3, p. 909-920Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Related plants are often hypothesized to interact with similar sets of pollinators and herbivores, but this idea has only mixed empirical support. This may be because plant families vary in their tendency to share interaction partners. We quantify overlap of interaction partners for all pairs of plants in 59 pollination and 11 herbivory networks based on the numbers of shared and unshared interaction partners (thereby capturing both proportional and absolute overlap). We test for relationships between phylogenetic distance and partner overlap within each network; whether these relationships varied with the composition of the plant community; and whether well-represented plant families showed different relationships. Across all networks, more closely related plants tended to have greater overlap. The strength of this relationship within a network was unrelated to the composition of the networks plant component, but, when considered separately, different plant families showed different relationships between phylogenetic distance and overlap of interaction partners. The variety of relationships between phylogenetic distance and partner overlap in different plant families probably reflects a comparable variety of ecological and evolutionary processes. Considering factors affecting particular species-rich groups within a community could be the key to understanding the distribution of interactions at the network level.

  • 4.
    Cirtwill, Alyssa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Canterbury, New Zealand.
    Roslin, Tomas
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Sweden; Univ Helsinki, Finland.
    Rasmussen, Claus
    Aarhus Univ, Denmark.
    Olesen, Jens Mogens
    Aarhus Univ, Denmark.
    Stouffer, Daniel B.
    Univ Canterbury, New Zealand.
    Between-year changes in community composition shape species' roles in an Arctic plant-pollinator network2018In: Oikos, ISSN 0030-1299, E-ISSN 1600-0706, Vol. 127, no 8, p. 1163-1176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inter-annual turnover in community composition can affect the richness and functioning of ecological communities. If incoming and outgoing species do not interact with the same partners, ecological functions such as pollination may be disrupted. Here, we explore the extent to which turnover affects species' roles - as defined based on their participation in different motifs positions - in a series of temporally replicated plant-pollinator networks from high-Arctic Zackenberg, Greenland. We observed substantial turnover in the plant and pollinator assemblages, combined with significant variation in species' roles between networks. Variation in the roles of plants and pollinators tended to increase with the amount of community turnover, although a negative interaction between turnover in the plant and pollinator assemblages complicated this trend for the roles of pollinators. This suggests that increasing turnover in the future will result in changes to the roles of plants and likely those of pollinators. These changing roles may in turn affect the functioning or stability of this pollination network.

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  • 5.
    Collins, Matthew D.
    et al.
    School of Food Biosciences, University of Reading, Whiteknights, Reading RG6 6AP, UK.
    Routh, Joyanto
    Department of Geology and Geochemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Saraswathy, Ambujom
    Department of Geology and Geochemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Lawson, Paul A.
    School of Food Biosciences, University of Reading, Whiteknights, Reading RG6 6AP, UK.
    Schumann, Peter
    DSMZ – Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany.
    Welinder-Olsson, Christina
    Culture Collection, Department of Clinical Bacteriology, University of Göteborg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Falsen, Enevold
    Culture Collection, Department of Clinical Bacteriology, University of Göteborg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Arsenicicoccus bolidensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel actinomycete isolated from contaminated lake sediment2004In: International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology, ISSN 1466-5026, E-ISSN 1466-5034, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 605-608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An unknown Gram-positive, catalase-positive, facultatively anaerobic, non-spore-forming, coccus-shaped bacterium originating from sediment was characterized using phenotypic, molecular chemical and molecular phylogenetic methods. Chemical studies revealed the presence of a cell-wall murein based on ll-diaminopimelic acid (type ll-Dpm-glycine1), a complex mixture of saturated, monounsaturated and iso- and anteiso-methyl-branched, non-hydroxylated, long-chain cellular fatty acids and tetrahydrogenated menaquinones with eight isoprene units [MK-8(H4)] as the major respiratory lipoquinone. This combination of characteristics somewhat resembled members of the suborder Micrococcineae, but did not correspond to any currently described species. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing confirmed that the unidentified coccus-shaped organism is a member of the Actinobacteria and represents a hitherto-unknown subline related to, albeit different from, a number of taxa including Intrasporangium, Janibacter, Terrabacter, Terracoccus and Ornithinicoccus. Based on phenotypic and phylogenetic considerations, it is proposed that the unknown bacterium originating from lake sediment be classified as a new genus and species, Arsenicicoccus bolidensis gen. nov., sp. nov. (type strain CCUG 47306T=DSM 15745T).

  • 6.
    Druid, Linnea
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology.
    Thiele, David
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology.
    Vilda kulturväxtsläktingar: för framtidens föda2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Agriculture is facing several great challenges. The crops need, among other things, to be adapted to a changing climate. Here, the wild relatives of the crops, the crop wild relatives, are important since they carry a vast amount of genetic diversity. For the crop wild relatives to be used in the process of adapting and improving today’s crops, it is essential that they are conserved. This literature review aims to make a survey of the previous conservation efforts and the work that remains, as well as presenting the conservation efforts in Sweden. The review shows that several international conventions, conservation strategies, and collaborations have been significant for the conservation efforts. Some large seed collecting projects have been completed and, in some places, protected areas for crop wild relatives have been established. However, extensive conservation efforts are still required. Plans need to be actualized, projects funded, and political incentive increased. The Swedish conservation efforts are still at an early stage, but some progress has been made and work is in ongoing. Increasing awareness about crop wild relatives could result in their conservation receiving a higher status and increased funds. Biology teachers can make an important contribution to this by including crop wild relatives and their significance in class, for example by letting students work with questions concerning the security of the futures food production.

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    Druid och Thiele (2022) - Vilda kulturväxtsläktingar - för framtidens föda
  • 7.
    Ever Aguirre, Luis
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ouyang, Liangqi
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Elfwing, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hedblom, Mikael
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wulff, Angela
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Diatom frustules protect DNA from ultraviolet light2018In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 5138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The evolutionary causes for generation of nano and microstructured silica by photosynthetic algae are not yet deciphered. Diatoms are single photosynthetic algal cells populating the oceans and waters around the globe. They generate a considerable fraction (20-30%) of all oxygen from photosynthesis, and 45% of total primary production of organic material in the sea. There are more than 100,000 species of diatoms, classified by the shape of the glass cage in which they live, and which they build during algal growth. These glass structures have accumulated for the last 100 million of years, and left rich deposits of nano/microstructured silicon oxide in the form of diatomaceous earth around the globe. Here we show that reflection of ultraviolet light by nanostructured silica can protect the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in the algal cells, and that this may be an evolutionary cause for the formation of glass cages.

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  • 8.
    Gomez, Eliot
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Simon, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Surface Acoustic Waves to Drive Plant Transpiration.2017In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 45864Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emerging fields of research in electronic plants (e-plants) and agro-nanotechnology seek to create more advanced control of plants and their products. Electronic/nanotechnology plant systems strive to seamlessly monitor, harvest, or deliver chemical signals to sense or regulate plant physiology in a controlled manner. Since the plant vascular system (xylem/phloem) is the primary pathway used to transport water, nutrients, and chemical signals-as well as the primary vehicle for current e-plant and phtyo-nanotechnology work-we seek to directly control fluid transport in plants using external energy. Surface acoustic waves generated from piezoelectric substrates were directly coupled into rose leaves, thereby causing water to rapidly evaporate in a highly localized manner only at the site in contact with the actuator. From fluorescent imaging, we find that the technique reliably delivers up to 6x more water/solute to the site actuated by acoustic energy as compared to normal plant transpiration rates and 2x more than heat-assisted evaporation. The technique of increasing natural plant transpiration through acoustic energy could be used to deliver biomolecules, agrochemicals, or future electronic materials at high spatiotemporal resolution to targeted areas in the plant; providing better interaction with plant physiology or to realize more sophisticated cyborg systems.

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  • 9.
    Hagenblad, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Aloisi, Karolina
    Nordic Genet Resource Ctr NordGen, Sweden; Malmo Univ, Sweden.
    Marum, Petter
    Graminor AS, Norway.
    Ohlund, Linda
    Lantmannen, Sweden.
    Solberg, Svein Oivind
    Inland Norway Univ Appl Sci, Norway.
    Asdal, Asmund
    Nordic Genet Resource Ctr NordGen, Sweden.
    Palme, Anna
    Nordic Genet Resource Ctr NordGen, Sweden.
    Limited genetic changes observed during in situ and ex situ conservation in Nordic populations of red clover (Trifolium pratense)2023In: Frontiers in Plant Science, E-ISSN 1664-462X, Vol. 14, article id 1233838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: In situ and ex situ conservation are the two main approaches for preserving genetic diversity. The advantages and disadvantages of the two approaches have been discussed but their genetic effects have not been fully evaluated.Methods: In this study we investigate the effects of the two conservation approaches on genetic diversity in red clover. Seed samples collected from wild populations in Sweden and Norway in 1980, their subsequent generations created during seed regeneration at the gene bank and samples recollected from the same location as the original samples, were analyzed with microsatellite markers, alongside reference samples from cultivars.Results: Overall, there was a differentiation between cultivars and the wild material and between wild material from Sweden and Norway. In general, the original collections clustered together with the later generations of the same accession in the gene bank, and with the recollected samples from the same location, and the level of diversity remained the same among samples of the same accession. Limited gene flow from cultivated varieties to the wild populations was detected; however, some wild individuals are likely to be escapees or affected by gene flow.Discussion: In conclusion, there were examples of genetic changes within individual accessions both in situ and ex situ, as is also to be expected in any living population. However, we observed only limited genetic changes in both in situ and ex situ conservation over the generations included in this study and with the relatively large populations used in the ex situ conservation in the gene bank at NordGen.

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  • 10.
    Hagenblad, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Leino, Matti W.
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Chevalier barley: The influence of a world-leading malting variety2022In: Crop science, ISSN 0011-183X, E-ISSN 1435-0653, Vol. 62, no 1, p. 235-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the 19th century, Chevalier, said to have been developed from a single plant found in 1820, was the world-leading malting barley (Hordeum vulgare). The superior malting quality of Chevalier lead to its world-wide spread at the time of the development of the malting industry. In this study, we investigate how this cultivar was spread and adopted to Nordic seed systems of the time. Single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping of up to 155-yr-old museum specimens of historical grains labelled "Chevalier" and of Chevalier accessions preserved in genebanks, in total 282 individuals representing 47 accessions, allowed us to divide the accessions into four categories: True Chevalier, seed mixtures, crosses, and non-Chevaliers. Comparisons with previously genotyped Nordic landraces showed how, in the 19th century, Chevalier seed was mixed with locally produced landrace seed and cultivated together. We suggest that spontaneous outbreeding events gave rise to hybrids which were subsequently selected and propagated when resulting in superior genetic combinations. Such farmer-driven breeding activities would have preceded modern plant breeding but resembled the breeding principles that were later used, even though the scientific understanding of inheritance was not yet known.

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  • 11.
    Helsen, Kenny
    et al.
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium; Natl Taiwan Univ, Taiwan.
    Diekmann, Martin
    Univ Bremen, Germany.
    Decocq, Guillaume
    Univ Picardie Jules Verne, France.
    De Pauw, Karen
    Univ Ghent, Belgium.
    Govaert, Sanne
    Univ Ghent, Belgium.
    Graae, Bente Jessen
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Norway.
    Hagenblad, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liira, Jaan
    Univ Tartu, Estonia.
    Orczewska, Anna
    Univ Silesia, Poland.
    Sanczuk, Pieter
    Univ Ghent, Belgium.
    Van Meerbeek, Koenraad
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    De Frenne, Pieter
    Univ Ghent, Belgium.
    Biological flora of Central Europe: Impatiens glandulifera Royle2021In: Perspectives in plant ecology, evolution and systematics, ISSN 1433-8319, E-ISSN 1618-0437, Vol. 50, article id 125609Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents all current knowledge on the biology of the invasive therophyte Impatiens glandulifera Royle (Himalayan Balsam), and covers aspects of taxonomy, morphology, distribution, habitat requirements, ecology, life cycle, genetics, history of invasive spread, ecological impact and management. Although a few review papers have been published on this species in previous decades, a great deal of insights have been gained in the last three decades, owing to the species & rsquo; notorious reputation as one of the most problematic invasive species in Europe. This study consequently focusses on this novel information, with a particular focus on information from Central Europe.

  • 12.
    Karpaty Wickbom, Amanda
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    The effect of life history and weather on onset of flowering and length of flowering period of agricultural weeds2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10,5 credits / 16 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    With a warming climate and the usage of monocultures in food production it is possible we may face more issues concerning food insecurity in the future as pollinators struggle to find food in agricultural landscapes. Therefore, it is of value to know whether common agricultural weeds are important sources of food for pollinators. Pollinators are vital in the growing of food-crops and may depend on different agricultural weeds during their flying season. This study is based on observational citizen science data on the flowering of 24 agricultural weeds classified as useful to pollinators in the years 2008-2022. Data on first flowering and length of flowering was compared between life history classifications based on life span and time of germination. The results showed that while there is variation both between groups and within groups among the selected species, summer annuals are among the last to start flowering. Species classed as “summer and winter annuals”, i.e that can germinate either in spring or autumn, had a longer flowering period than the other classes. Winter annuals were first to flower while the perennials and “summer and winter annuals” differed more among each other. Weather dependency was also addressed by comparison over years. Overall, the selected species were not significantly affected by mean winter temperature, mean summer temperature or mean summer precipitation.

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  • 13.
    Kuhn, Jens H.
    et al.
    Integrated Research Facility at Fort Detrick (IRF-Frederick), Division of Clinical Research (DCR), National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health (NIH), B-8200 Research Plaza, Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD 21702, USA.
    Abe, Junya
    Ornamental Plants and Vegetables Research Center, Agricultural Research Department, Hokkaido Research Organization, Takikawa, Hokkaido, Japan.
    Adkins, Scott
    United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, US Horticultural Research Laboratory, Fort Pierce, FL, USA.
    Alkhovsky, Sergey V.
    D.I. Ivanovsky Institute of Virology of N.F. Gamaleya National Center on Epidemiology and Microbiology of Ministry of Health of Russian Federation, Moscow, Russia.
    Avšič-Županc, Tatjana
    Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Ayllón, María A.
    Centro de Biotecnología y Genómica de Plantas; Departamento de Biotecnología-Biología Vegetal, Instituto Nacional de Investigación y Tecnología Agraria y Alimentaria (INIA/CSIC), Campus de Montegancedo, Pozuelo de Alarcón; Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingeniería Agronómica, Alimentaria y de Biosistemas, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM), Madrid, Spain.
    Bahl, Justin
    Center for Ecology of Infectious Diseases, Department of Infectious Diseases, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Insitute of Bioinformatics, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA.
    Balkema-Buschmann, Anne
    Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Institute of Novel and Emerging Infectious Diseases, Greifswald-Insel Riems, Greifswald, Germany.
    Ballinger, Matthew J.
    Department of Biological Sciences, Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS,, Mississippi State, USA.
    Kumar Baranwal, Virendra
    Division of Plant Pathology, ICAR-Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi, India.
    Beer, Martin
    Institute of Diagnostic Virology, Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Greifswald-Insel Riems, Germany.
    Bejerman, Nicolas
    UFyMA, INTA-CONICET, Córdoba, Argentina.
    Bergeron, Éric
    Division of High-Consequence Pathogens and Pathology, Viral Special Pathogens Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    Biedenkopf, Nadine
    Institute of Virology, Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg, Germany.
    Blair, Carol D.
    Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA.
    Blasdell, Kim R.
    Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Australian Centre for Disease Preparedness, Geelong, VIC, Australia.
    Blouin, Arnaud G.
    Virology-Phytoplasmology Laboratory, Agroscope, 1260 Nyon, Switzerland.
    Bradfute, Steven B.
    University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM, USA.
    Briese, Thomas
    Center for Infection and Immunity, and Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, USA.
    Brown, Paul A.
    French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Heath Safety ANSES, Laboratory of Ploufragan-Plouzané-Niort, Ploufragan, France.
    Buchholz, Ursula J.
    RNA Viruses Section, Laboratory of Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Buchmeier, Michael J.
    Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA.
    Bukreyev, Alexander
    The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Galveston, TX, USA.
    Burt, Felicity
    Division of Virology, National Health Laboratory Service and Division of Virology, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, Bloemfontein, South Africa.
    Büttner, Carmen
    Division Phytomedicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Calisher, Charles H.
    Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA.
    Cao, Mengji
    National Citrus Engineering and Technology Research Center, Citrus Research Institute, Southwest University, Beibei, Chongqing, PR China.
    Casas, Inmaculada
    Respiratory Virus and Influenza Unit, National Microbiology Center, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain.
    Chandran, Kartik
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA.
    Charrel, Rémi N.
    Unite des Virus Emergents (Aix-Marseille Univ-IRD 190-Inserm 1207), Marseille, France.
    Kumar Chaturvedi, Krishna
    Centre for Agricultural Bioinformatics, ICAR-Indian Agricultural Statistics Research Institute, New Delhi, India.
    Chooi, Kar Mun
    The New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Limited, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Crane, Anya
    Integrated Research Facility at Fort Detrick, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD, USA.
    Dal Bó, Elena
    CIDEFI. Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias y Forestales, Universidad de La Plata, La Plata, Argentina.
    Carlos de la Torre, Juan
    Department of Immunology and Microbiology IMM-6, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA, USA.
    de Souza, William M.
    World Reference Center for Emerging Viruses and Arboviruses and Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Galveston, TX, USA.
    de Swart, Rik L.
    Department of Virology, Wageningen Bioveterinary Research, Lelystad, Netherlands.
    Debat, Humberto
    Instituto de Patología Vegetal, Centro de Investigaciones Agropecuarias, Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria (IPAVE-CIAP-INTA), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Unidad de Fitopatología y Modelización Agrícola, Córdoba, Argentina.
    Dheilly, Nolwenn M.
    UMR 1161 Virology ANSES/INRAE/ENVA, ANSES Animal Health Laboratory, Maisons-Alfort, France.
    Di Paola, Nicholas
    United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD, USA.
    Di Serio, Francesco
    Istituto per la Protezione Sostenibile delle Piante, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Bari, Italy.
    Dietzgen, Ralf G.
    Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD, Australia.
    Digiaro, Michele
    CIHEAM, Istituto Agronomico Mediterraneo di Bari, Valenzano, Italy.
    Drexler, J. Felix
    Institute of Virology, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Duprex, W. Paul
    School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
    Dürrwald, Ralf
    Robert Koch Institut, Berlin, Germany.
    Easton, Andrew J.
    School of Life Sciences, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK.
    Elbeaino, Toufic
    CIHEAM, Istituto Agronomico Mediterraneo di Bari, Valenzano, Italy.
    Ergünay, Koray
    Walter Reed Biosystematics Unit (WRBU), Smithsonian Institution, Museum Support Center, Suitland, MD, USA;Department of Entomology, Smithsonian Institution–National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), Washington, DC, USA;Department of Medical Microbiology, Virology Unit, Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey;One Health Branch, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR), Silver Spring, MD, USA.
    Feng, Guozhong
    China National Rice Research Institute, Hangzhou, PR China.
    Klingström, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Molecular Medicine and Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Annual (2023) taxonomic update of RNA-directed RNA polymerase-encoding negative-sense RNA viruses (realm Riboviria: kingdom Orthornavirae: phylum Negarnaviricota)2023In: Journal of General Virology, ISSN 0022-1317, E-ISSN 1465-2099, Vol. 104, no 8Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In April 2023, following the annual International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) ratification vote on newly proposed taxa, the phylum Negarnaviricota was amended and emended. The phylum was expanded by one new family, 14 new genera, and 140 new species. Two genera and 538 species were renamed. One species was moved, and four were abolished. This article presents the updated taxonomy of Negarnaviricota as now accepted by the ICTV.

  • 14.
    Kylin, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Finns det slemsvampar i havet?2013In: Fauna och flora : populär tidskrift för biologi, ISSN 0014-8903, Vol. 108, no 1, p. 9-9Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 15.
    Kylin, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Korndådran i Blistorp - beståndsutveckling under ett halvt sekel2016In: Botaniska Notiser, ISSN 1650-3767, Vol. 149, no 4, p. 27-31Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The population develoipment of ball mustard, Neslia paniculata, at a locality in Scania, southern Sweden, since the 1950s is discussed in relation to land use development.

  • 16.
    Kylin, Henrik
    SLU, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Några intressanta svenska fynd av slemsvampar (myxomyceter)1998In: Jordstjärnan, ISSN 0280-5057, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 19-20Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As first finds from Sweden are reported the slime moulds Reticularia splendens MORGAN, Comatricha longa PECK, Stemonitis lignicola NANN.-BREMEK., and Physarella oblonga (BERK. & M. A. CURTIS) MORGAN.

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  • 17.
    Kylin, Henrik
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Några intressanta svenska myxomycetfynd1997In: Windahlia: Journal of Mycology, ISSN 0282-082X, Vol. 22, p. 29-31Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Five species of myxomycetes are reported as new to Sweden viz. Badhamia affinis Rost., B. dubia Nann.-Bremek., Licea biforis Morgon, Physarum cf. stramimpes A. Lister and Physarum cf. mortomi Macbride. Three additional species rarely found in Sweden, Colloderma occulatum (Lippert) G. Lister, Dianema corticatum A. Lister and Macbrideola cornea (G. Lister & Gran) Alexopoulos, are reported from new localities.

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  • 18.
    Kylin, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bouwman, Henk
    Nort-West Uiversity, South Africa.
    Uptake Mechanisms of Airborne Persistent Organic Pollutants in “Plants” – Understanding the Biological Influence on the Deposition of Pops to Remote Terrestrial Ecosystems2014In: Organohalogen Compounds, ISSN 1026-4892, Vol. 76, p. 1207-1210Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 19.
    Kylin, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mitchell, David
    Upper Hartfield, Ease Sussex, England.
    Seraoui, El-Hacène
    Ambilly, France.
    Buyck, Bart
    National Museum of Natural History, Paris, France.
    Myxomycetes from Papua New Guinea and New Caledonia2013In: Fungal diversity, ISSN 1560-2745, E-ISSN 1878-9129, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 33-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a compilation of all myxomycetes recorded in Papua New Guinea (PNG) and New Caledonia (NC). Specimens were collected during field trips in September 1983 – January 1984 to both territories and in August 1991, October 2007, and April 2009 to NC. Bark and dung samples for moist chamber cultures were collected during the field trips in September 1983 – January 1984 (PNG and NC) and in August 1991 and October 2007 (NC). In addition, information from previous publications and unpublished specimens in the herbarium at the Plant Protection Instituted in Port Moresby, PNG, are included. A total of 180 species are reported. Of the 63 species from PNG 51 are new to the country, and 123 of the 149 species from NC are new to the territory.

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  • 20.
    Leino, Matti W.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Stockholm Univ, Sweden; Nord Museum, Sweden.
    Solberg, Svein O.
    Nord Genet Resource Ctr, Sweden; Inland Norway Univ Appl Sci, Norway.
    Tunset, Hanna Maja
    Norwegian Univ Sci and Technol, Norway.
    Fogelholm, Jesper
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Karlsson Strese, Else-Marie
    Nord Museum, Sweden.
    Hagenblad, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Norwegian Univ Sci and Technol, Norway.
    Patterns of Exchange of Multiplying Onion (Allium cepa L. Aggregatum-Group) in Fennoscandian Home Gardens2018In: Economic Botany, ISSN 0013-0001, E-ISSN 1874-9364, Vol. 72, no 3, p. 346-356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multiplying onion (Allium cepa L. Aggregatum-Group), commonly known as shallot or potato onion, has a long tradition of cultivation in Fennoscandian home gardens. During the last decades, more than 80 accessions, maintained as vegetatively propagated clones, have been gathered from home gardens in all Fennoscandian countries. A genetic analysis showed regional patterns of accessions belonging to the same genetic group. However, accessions belonging to the same genetic group could originate in any of the countries. These results suggested both short- and long-distance exchange of set onions, which was confirmed by several survey responses. Some of the most common genetic groups also resembled different modern varieties. The morphological characterization illustrated that most characters were strongly influenced by environment and set onion properties. The only reliably scorable trait was bulb skin color. Neither our morphological nor genetic results support a division between potato onions and shallots. Instead, naming seems to follow linguistic traditions. An ethnobotanical survey tells of the Fennoscandian multiplying onions as being a crop with reliable harvest, excellent storage ability, and good taste. An increased cultivation of this material on both household and commercial scale should be possible.

  • 21.
    Ludewig, Kristin
    et al.
    Universität Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany.
    Klinger, Yves P.
    Justus Liebig University Giessen, Giessen, Germany.
    Donath, Tobias W.
    Kiel University, Kiel, Germany.
    Bärmann, Lukas
    University of Trier, Trier, Germany.
    Eichberg,, Carsten
    University of Trier, Trier, Germany.
    Thomsen, Jacob Gadegaad,
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Görzen, Eugen
    Kiel University, Kiel, Germany.
    Hansen, Wiebke
    Justus Liebig University Giessen, Giessen, Germany.
    Hasselquist, Eliza M.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) Umeå, Umea, Sweden.
    Helminger, Thierry
    National Museum of Natural History Luxembourg, Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
    Kaiskog, Frida
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Emma
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Kirchner, Torsten
    Wildland-Stiftung Bayern, Oberelsbach, Germany.
    Knudsen, Carola
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Lenzewski, Nikola
    Universität Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany.
    Lindmo, Sigrid
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
    Milberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pruchniewicz, Daniel
    Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Wrocław, Poland .
    Richter,
    Biosphärenreservat Rhön, Oberelsbach, Germany.
    Sandner, Tobias M.
    Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg, Germany.
    Sarneel,, Judith M.
    Umea University, Umea, Sweden.
    Schmiede, Ralf
    Myotis Büro für Landschaftsökologie, Halle (Saale), Germany.
    Schneider, Simone
    National Museum of Natural History Luxembourg, Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
    Schwarz, Kathrin
    Kiel University, Kiel, Germany.
    Tjäder, Åsa
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Tokarska-Guzik,
    University of Silesia in Katowice, Katowice, Poland.
    Walczak, Claudia
    Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
    Weber, Odile
    National Museum of Natural History Luxembourg, Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
    Żołnierz, Ludwik
    Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Wrocław, Poland.
    Eckstein, Rolf Lutz
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Phenology of Lupinus polyphyllus from Central to Northern Europe2022Data set
    Abstract [en]

    Plant phenology, i. e. the timing of life cycle events, is related to individual fitness and species distribution ranges. Among the environmental factors, phenology is mostly driven by temperature and day length. Rapid adaptation of their phenology may also be important for the success of invasive plant species. Our main aim was to understand how the performance, timing, and temperature dependence of the phenology of the invasive legume Lupinus polyphyllus varies with latitude. L. polyphyllus is one of the most frequent invasive species in Europe, and the gained information may help to make management more effective by adjustments to latitude and phenology.

    Methods:

    We quantified variation in phenology across a >2000 km latitudinal gradient from Central to Northern Europe. We sampled data of flowering and fruiting of L. polyphyllus using >1600 digital photos of inflorescences from 220 individual plants observed weekly at 22 locations. We calculated the accumulated growing degree days for each observation date at each site from the temperature data of the meteorological stations, which are listed in the metadata of the dataset.

  • 22.
    Ludewig, Kristin
    et al.
    Universität Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany.
    Klinger, Yves P.
    Justus Liebig University Giessen, Giessen, Germany.
    Donath, Tobias W.
    Kiel University, Kiel, Germany.
    Bärmann, Lukas
    University of Trier, Trier, Germany.
    Eichberg, Carsten
    University of Trier, Trier, Germany.
    Thomsen, Jacob Gadegaad
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Görzen, Eugen
    Kiel University, Kiel, Germany.
    Hansen, Wiebke
    Justus Liebig University Giessen, Giessen, Germany.
    Hasselquist, Eliza M.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) Umeå, Umea, Sweden.
    Helminger, Thierry
    National Museum of Natural History Luxembourg, Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
    Kaiskog, Frida
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Emma
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Kirchner, Torsten
    Wildland-Stiftung Bayern, Oberelsbach, Germany.
    Knudsen, Carola
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Lenzewski, Nikola
    Universität Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany.
    Lindmo, Sigrid
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
    Milberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pruchniewicz, Daniel
    Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Wrocław, Poland.
    Richter, Elisabeth
    Biosphärenreservat Rhön, Oberelsbach, Germany.
    Sandner, Tobias M.
    Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg, Germany.
    Sarneel, Judith M.
    Umea University, Umea, Sweden.
    Schmiede, Ralf
    Myotis Büro für Landschaftsökologie, Halle (Saale), Germany.
    Schneider, Simone
    National Museum of Natural History Luxembourg, Luxembourg, Luxembourg Naturschutzsyndikat SICONA, Olm, Luxembourg.
    Schwarz, Kathrin
    Kiel University, Kiel, Germany.
    Tjäder, Åsa
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Tokarska-Guzik, Barbara
    University of Silesia in Katowice, Katowice, Poland.
    Walczak, Claudia
    Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
    Weber, Odile
    National Museum of Natural History Luxembourg, Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
    Żołnierz, Ludwik
    Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Wrocław, Poland.
    Eckstein, Rolf Lutz
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Phenology and morphology of the invasive legume Lupinus polyphyllus along a latitudinal gradient in Europe2022In: NeoBiota, ISSN 1619-0033, E-ISSN 1314-2488, Vol. 78, p. 185-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plant phenology, i. e. the timing of life cycle events, is related to individual fitness and species distribution ranges. Temperature is one of the most important drivers of plant phenology together with day length. The adaptation of their phenology may be important for the success of invasive plant species. The present study aims at understanding how the performance and the phenology of the invasive legume Lupinus polyphyllus vary with latitude. We sampled data across a >2000 km latitudinal gradient from Central to Northern Europe. We quantified variation in phenology of flowering and fruiting of L. polyphyllus using >1600 digital photos of inflorescences from 220 individual plants observed weekly at 22 sites. The day of the year at which different phenological phases were reached, increased 1.3–1.8 days per degree latitude, whereas the growing degree days (gdd) required for these phenological phases decreased 5–16 gdd per degree latitude. However, this difference disappeared, when the day length of each day included in the calculation of gdd was considered. The day of the year of the earliest and the latest climatic zone to reach any of the three studied phenological phases differed by 23–30 days and temperature requirements to reach these stages differed between 62 and 236 gdd. Probably, the invasion of this species will further increase in the northern part of Europe over the next decades due to climate warming. For invasive species control, our results suggest that in countries with a large latitudinal extent, the mowing date should shift by ca. one week per 500 km at sites with similar elevations.

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  • 23.
    Löfqvist, Zandra
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology.
    Local and regional factors correlating with long term population change in Gentianella campestris2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The decrease of semi-natural grasslands in Europe during the last decade has made several previously common species rare or declining in numbers. One of these species is the endangered field gentian Gentianella campestris, which has been proposed as an important indicator species for semi-natural grasslands. Previous studies have highlighted the importance of consistent management and shown how local conditions affect the species. Less is known about how the population is affected by isolation and changes in the surrounding landscape, both of which are potential consequences of habitat loss.This study utilized long term citizen science data on the population changes to explore if local and regional factors, such as connectivity could explain the rapid decline and local extinctions that the field gentian population in Östergötland, Sweden, has experienced since the beginning of the 1990’s. Generalized linear models showed that the declining field gentian population can partly be explained by changes in the surrounding landscape which has led to decreased connectivity of semi-natural grasslands. The study also indicate that there is a need for future management plans to consider the surrounding landscape on a distance of 1-3 km from field gentian localities as this scale seems to be the most important.

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  • 24.
    Milberg, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bergman, Karl-Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Glimskar, Anders
    SLU, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Sigrid
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tälle, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Site factors are more important than management for indicator species in semi-natural grasslands in southern Sweden2020In: Plant Ecology, ISSN 1385-0237, E-ISSN 1573-5052, Vol. 221, no 7, p. 577-594Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Management of semi-natural grasslands is essential to retain the characteristic diversity of flora and fauna found in these habitats. To maintain, restore or recreate favourable conditions for grassland species, knowledge regarding how they occur in relation to grazing intensity and soil nutrient availability is crucial. We focused on grassland plant species, i.e., species selected to indicate high natural values in semi-natural grasslands. Environmental monitoring data collected at 366 grassland sites in southern Sweden between 2006 and 2010 were used to relate the occurrence of indicator species to factors describing geographic location, local site conditions related to nutrients and moisture, and management. Site productivity, soil moisture and cover of trees and shrubs were the main structuring factors, while other factors related to management had a lesser effect (grass sward height, amount of litter, type of grazer). Not surprisingly, these patterns were also reflected in species-wise analyses of the 25 most commonly occurring indicator species, with almost all species negatively related to site productivity and most also to soil moisture. Furthermore, many species were negatively affected by increasing sward height and litter. In contrast, species-wise responses varied among species in relation to increasing cover of trees and shrubs. In comparison to cattle grazing, sheep grazing was detrimental to six species and beneficial to none, while horse grazing was detrimental to no species and beneficial to four species. When evaluating species traits, taller plant species were favoured when site productivity, grass sward height and the amount of grass litter were high. There were no strong patterns related to the flowering time, leaf arrangement, or nutrient and light requirements of species. These results highlight the importance of nutrient-poor and dry sites, e.g., when selecting sites for conservation, and the importance of the type of management executed.

  • 25.
    Mitchell, DW
    et al.
    Walton Cottage, Upper Hartfield, Sussex, UK.
    Kylin, Henrik
    University of Lund, Sweden.
    Some tunisian myxomycetes1984In: Bulletin of the British Mycological Society, ISSN 0007-1528, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 64-65Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Pequeno, Belen
    et al.
    Spanish Natl Res Council, Spain.
    Castano, Cristina
    Spanish Natl Res Council, Spain.
    Alvarez-Rodriguez, Manuel
    Spanish Natl Res Council, Spain.
    Boveda, Paula
    Spanish Natl Res Council, Spain.
    de la Blanca, Maria Gemma Millan
    Univ Cuenca, Ecuador.
    Toledano-Diaz, Adolfo
    Spanish Natl Res Council, Spain.
    Galarza, Diego Andres
    Univ Cuenca, Ecuador.
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Martinez-Madrid, Belen
    Univ Complutense Madrid UCM, Spain.
    Santiago-Moreno, Julian
    Spanish Natl Res Council, Spain.
    Variation of existence and location of aquaporin 3 in relation to cryoresistance of ram spermatozoa2023In: Frontiers in Veterinary Science, E-ISSN 2297-1769, Vol. 10, article id 1167832Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction and objectiveOsmotic changes during the process of freeze-thawing involve changes in the location of aquaporins (AQPs) in membrane domains of spermatozoa. Some AQPs, like aquaporin 3 (AQP3), are linked to sperm cryotolerance in the porcine species. Conspicuous individual variability exists between rams and their ejaculates, which may be classified as displaying good freezability (GFE) or poor freezability (PFE), depending on several endogenous and environmental factors. The present work aimed to examine whether differences in freezability could even involve changes in location and expression of AQP3 in ram spermatozoa. MethodsThirty ejaculates from 10 rams (three of each) were evaluated and subsequently classified as GFE (n = 13) or PFE (n = 17) through a principal component analysis (PCA) and k-means cluster analysis. Spermatozoa were examined for the presence, abundance and distribution of AQP3 by western blot and immunocytochemistry, employing a commercial rabbit polyclonal antibody (AQP3 - ab125219). Results and discussionAlthough AQP3 was found in the sperm acrosome, midpiece, principal and end piece of the tail in both fresh and after frozen-thawed samples, its highest immunolabeling was found in the mid- and principal piece. In the GFE group, the expression of AQP3 in the mid- and principal piece was greater (P < 0.05) in frozen-thawed samples than in fresh specimens while such differences were not detected in the PFE group. Sperm cryotolerance relates to changes in AQP3 expression and thus AQP3 could be used as a biomarker for cryotolerance. ConclusionA greater capacity of AQP3 localization in mid- and principal piece of the spermatozoa could be linked to an increase the osmo-adaptative capacity of ejaculates with better capacity to withstand freeze-thawing processes.

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  • 27.
    Selçuk, Aslan
    et al.
    Uppsala, Sweden.
    Forsberg, Nils
    Trondheim, Norway.
    Hagenblad, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Leino, Matti W.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Julita, Sweden.
    Molecular Genotyping of HistoricalBarley Landraces Reveals Novel CandidateRegions for Local Adaption2015In: Crop science, ISSN 0011-183X, E-ISSN 1435-0653, Vol. 55, no 6, p. 2766-2776Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Barley landraces from Northern Europe formgenetically distinct latitudinal groups, suggestingthat adaption plays an important role inthe geographical distribution of genetic diversity.Here, we investigate how Northern Europeanbarley landraces relate to landraces fromother parts of Europe and whether candidategenes for climate adaption can be identified.For this purpose, 27 barley landraces, availableas century-old seed specimens, were genotypedwith a 384 single nucleotide polymorphism(SNP) assay. Landraces from the Nordiccountries formed a genetically distinct grouprelative to landraces from Central and SouthernEurope. Polymorphic positions in the floweringtime genes HvCO1, HvFT1, Ppd-H1, and VRN1-H1 were genotyped. The previously known alleledistribution of Ppd-H1 with the responsive allelepresent in the South and the nonresponsiveallele in the North was confirmed. The otherthree genes were more variable in Central andSouthern Europe compared to the North andneither of the flowering time genes showedany geographically correlated variation withinthe Nordic countries. Allelic frequencies fromthe 384 SNP set were correlated with climaticvariables. This allowed us to identify five SNPsputatively associated with length of growth season,and two SNPs putatively associated withprecipitation. The results show how historicalcrop specimens can be used to study howgenetic variation has been geographically distributedand the genetics of adaption.

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  • 28.
    Stavrinidou, Eleni
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gabrielsson, Roger
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gomez, Eliot
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nilsson, Ove
    Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden..
    Simon, Daniel T.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Electronic plants2015In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 1, no 10, p. 1-8, article id e1501136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The roots, stems, leaves, and vascular circuitry of higher plants are responsible for conveying the chemical signals that regulate growth and functions. From a certain perspective, these features are analogous to the contacts, interconnections, devices, and wires of discrete and integrated electronic circuits. Although many attempts have been made to augment plant function with electroactive materials, plants’ “circuitry” has never been directlymerged with electronics. We report analog and digital organic electronic circuits and devices manufactured in living plants. The four key components of a circuit have been achieved using the xylem, leaves, veins, and signals of the plant as the template and integral part of the circuit elements and functions. With integrated and distributed electronics in plants, one can envisage a range of applications including precision recording and regulation of physiology, energy harvesting from photosynthesis, and alternatives to genetic modification for plant optimization.

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  • 29.
    Varli, Sakin Vural
    et al.
    Balikesir Univ, Turkey.
    Tuven, Aylin
    Balikesir Univ, Turkey.
    Surgut, Hakan
    Balikesir Univ, Turkey.
    Jansson, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Determination of Polyphaga Species Distributed in Different Biotopes in Cataldag Karsiyaka Sub-District Directorate (Balikesir) by Pitfall Trap Method2021In: KSU TARIM VE DOGA DERGISI-KSU JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURE AND NATURE, ISSN 2619-9149, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 401-413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main purpose of the study was to determine the species belonging to Oder Coleoptera living in 9 different biotopes in the coniferous and broadleaf forest areas (Pinus pinea, P. brutia, P. nigra, Abies sp., Fagus orientalis, Carpinus sp., Quercus sp. ve Alnus sp.) of CataldagKarsiyaka Chief in the Susurluk district of Balikesir Province. In this study, 32 species of 26 genera were identified under the Curculionidae, Tenebrionidae, Buprestidae, Lucanidae, Scarabaeidae and Staphylinidae families for 268 individuals using pitfall trap method on April and November in between 2017 and 2018. Overall, 19 species identified were reported for the first time for the local fauna of Balikesir province. Identified Curculionidae, Tenebrionidae, Buprestidae, Lucanidae, Scarabaeidae and Staphylinidae families, C. carbonaria, Chalcophora detrita, Trachypteris picta decostigma, Perotis chlorana), two ( Dorcus parallelipipedus, Lucanus cervus), one (Protaetia cuprea) and one ( Gyrohypnus angustatus) saproxylic species, respectively. Furthermore, Dorcus parallelipipedus was included only in the IUCN European Red List, while Lucanus cervus was also included in the Mediterranean basin Red List.

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