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  • 1.
    Apostolopoulou-Kalkavoura, Varvara
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Hu, Shiqian
    Univ Tokyo, Japan.
    Lavoine, Nathalie
    NC State Univ, NC 27695 USA.
    Garg, Mohit
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Linares, Mathieu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Munier, Pierre
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Zozoulenko, Igor
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Shiomi, Junichiro
    Univ Tokyo, Japan.
    Bergstrom, Lennart
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Humidity-Dependent Thermal Boundary Conductance Controls Heat Transport of Super-Insulating Nanofibrillar Foams2021In: Matter, ISSN 2590-2393, E-ISSN 2590-2385, Vol. 4, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose nanomaterial (CNM)-based foams and aerogels with thermal conductivities substantially below the value for air attract significant interest as super-insulating materials in energy-efficient green buildings. However, the moisture dependence of the thermal conductivity of hygroscopic CNM-based materials is poorly understood, and the importance of phonon scattering in nanofibrillar foams remains unexplored. Here, we show that the thermal conductivity perpendicular to the aligned nanofibrils in super-insulating icetemplated nanocellulose foams is lower for thinner fibrils and depends strongly on relative humidity (RH), with the lowest thermal conductivity (14 mW m(-1) K-1) attained at 35% RH. Molecular simulations show that the thermal boundary conductance is reduced by the moisture-uptake-controlled increase of the fibril-fibril separation distance and increased by the replacement of air with water in the foam walls. Controlling the heat transport of hygroscopic super-insulating nanofibrillar foams by moisture uptake and release is of potential interest in packaging and building applications.

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  • 2.
    Li, Youbing
    et al.
    Engineering Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Zhejiang, Ningbo, 315201, China; Qianwan Institute of CNiTECH, Ningbo, 315336, China.
    Zhu, Shuairu
    Zhejiang Institute of Tianjin University, 85 Zhongguan West Road, Ningbo, 315201, Zhejiang, China.
    Le, Jia-Bo
    Key Laboratory of Advanced Fuel Cell and Electrolyzer Technology of Zhejiang Province, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo, 315201, China.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wang, Xue
    Key Laboratory of Advanced Fuel Cell and Electrolyzer Technology of Zhejiang Province, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo, 315201, China.
    Chen, Lu
    Engineering Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Zhejiang, Ningbo, 315201, China; Qianwan Institute of CNiTECH, Ningbo, 315336, China.
    Ding, Haoming
    Engineering Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Zhejiang, Ningbo, 315201, China; Qianwan Institute of CNiTECH, Ningbo, 315336, China.
    Chen, Ke
    Engineering Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Zhejiang, Ningbo, 315201, China; Qianwan Institute of CNiTECH, Ningbo, 315336, China.
    Li, Mian
    Engineering Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Zhejiang, Ningbo, 315201, China; Qianwan Institute of CNiTECH, Ningbo, 315336, China.
    Du, Shiyu
    Engineering Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Zhejiang, Ningbo, 315201, China; Qianwan Institute of CNiTECH, Ningbo, 315336, China.
    Wang, Hui
    Zhejiang Institute of Tianjin University, 85 Zhongguan West Road, Ningbo, 315201, Zhejiang, China.
    Zhang, Runnan
    Zhejiang Institute of Tianjin University, 85 Zhongguan West Road, Ningbo, 315201, Zhejiang, China.
    Persson, Per O. Å.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eklund, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kuang, Yongbo
    Key Laboratory of Advanced Fuel Cell and Electrolyzer Technology of Zhejiang Province, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo, 315201, China; Center of Materials Science and Optoelectronics Engineering, University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19(A) Yuquan Road, Beijing, 100049, China.
    Chai, Zhifang
    Engineering Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Zhejiang, Ningbo, 315201, China; Qianwan Institute of CNiTECH, Ningbo, 315336, China.
    Huang, Qing
    Engineering Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Zhejiang, Ningbo, 315201, China; Qianwan Institute of CNiTECH, Ningbo, 315336, China.
    A-site alloying-guided universal design of noble metal-based MAX phases2024In: Matter, ISSN 2590-2393, E-ISSN 2590-2385, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 523-538Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mn+1AXn (MAX) phases have attracted significant attention due to their structural diversity and potential applications. Designing MAX phases with single-atom-thick A layers featuring 4d/5d-orbital electronic elements is interesting work. Here, we present a comprehensive report on noble metal-based M2(A1-xA′x)C (M = V, Ti, Nb; A = Al, Sn, In, Ga, Ge; A′ = Ru, Rh, Pd, Ir, Pt, Au and combinations thereof; 0 < x ≤ 0.4) phases featuring A sublayers of 4d/5d-orbital electronic elements through an A-site alloying strategy. The chemical composition of MAX phases can be adjusted by selecting different M- and A-site elements, with morphology tailored by distinct C sources. Furthermore, the V2(Sn0.8Pt0.2)C (15.7 wt % Pt) catalyst showed better performance for hydrogen evolution reaction compared to the commercial Pt/C (20 wt % Pt) electrode. This study highlights the prospects of A-site alloying for the design of novel MAX phases with unique properties and promising applications in electrocatalysis and beyond.

    The full text will be freely available from 2025-01-10 14:32
  • 3.
    Liu, Tianjun
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gao, Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Large-scale perovskite light-emitting diodes enabled by quantum-wire arrays: One step closer to commercialization2022In: Matter, ISSN 2590-2393, E-ISSN 2590-2385, Vol. 5, no 8, p. 2428-2430Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Halide perovskite light-emitting diodes (PeLEDs) are enticing candidates for displays and lighting. However, it remains a challenge for devices to upscale to large-area or non-planar structures with high uniformity. Recently, in Nature Photonics, Fan and co-workers developed perovskite quantum-wire arrays templated by porous alumina membranes to achieve highly uniform performance LEDs based on wafer-scale substrates and three-dimensional spherical structures.

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  • 4.
    Luo, Xiyu
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Tsinghua Univ, Peoples R China.
    Xu, Weidong
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Northwestern Polytech Univ, Peoples R China.
    Zheng, Guanhaojie
    Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Tammireddy, Sandhya
    Tech Univ Chemnitz, Germany.
    Wei, Qi
    Hong Kong Polytech Univ, Peoples R China.
    Karlsson, Max
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhang, Zhaojun
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Ji, Kangyu
    Univ Cambridge, England; Univ Cambridge, England.
    Kahmann, Simon
    Univ Cambridge, England; Univ Cambridge, England.
    Yin, Chunyang
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zou, Yatao
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhang, Zeyu
    Beijing Univ Technol, Peoples R China.
    Chen, Huaiyu
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Marcal, Lucas A. B.
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Zhao, Haifeng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ma, Dongxin
    Tsinghua Univ, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Dongdong
    Tsinghua Univ, Peoples R China.
    Lu, Yue
    Beijing Univ Technol, Peoples R China.
    Li, Mingjie
    Hong Kong Polytech Univ, Peoples R China.
    Deibel, Carsten
    Tech Univ Chemnitz, Germany.
    Stranks, Samuel D.
    Univ Cambridge, England; Univ Cambridge, England.
    Duan, Lian
    Tsinghua Univ, Peoples R China.
    Wallentin, Jesper
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Huang, Wei
    Northwestern Polytech Univ, Peoples R China.
    Gao, Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Effects of local compositional heterogeneity in mixed halide perovskites on blue electroluminescence2024In: Matter, ISSN 2590-2393, E-ISSN 2590-2385, Vol. 7, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Compositional heterogeneity is commonly observed in mixed bromide/iodide perovskite photoabsorbers, typically with minimal effects on charge carrier recombination and photovoltaic performance. Consistently, it has so far received very limited attention in bromide/chloride-mixed perovskites, which hold particular significance for blue light -emitting diodes. Here, we uncover that even a minor degree of localized halide heterogeneity leads to severe non -radiative losses in mixed bromide/chloride blue perovskite emitters, presenting a stark contrast to general observations in photovoltaics. We not only provide a visualization of the heterogeneity landscape spanning from micro -to sub-microscale but also identify that this issue mainly arises from the initially formed chloride -rich clusters during perovskite nucleation. Our work sheds light on a long-term neglected factor impeding the advancement of blue light -emitting diodes using mixed halide perovskites and provides a practical strategy to mitigate this issue.

  • 5.
    Malina, Tomas
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hamawandi, Bejan
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Toprak, Muhammet S.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Chen, Lin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Materials design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Björk, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Materials design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhou, Jie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Materials design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Materials design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fadeel, Bengt
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Tuning the transformation and cellular signaling of 2D titanium carbide MXenes using a natural antioxidant2024In: Matter, ISSN 2590-2393, E-ISSN 2590-2385, Vol. 7, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    2D titanium carbide (Ti3C2) MXenes have emerged as promising candidates for biomedical applications. However, the biological properties of these materials are poorly understood. Moreover, MXenes are prone to oxidation under ambient conditions. Here, we show that glutathione (GSH), a natural antioxidant present in millimolar concentrations in the cytosol of most cells, protects MXenes from oxidation in aqueous suspensions while preserving the biocompatibility of the material. Reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) simulations confirm that GSH protects MXenes. Moreover, we provide evidence of the intracellular biotransformation of Ti3C2 MXenes to the rutile form of TiO2, and we show that GSH tunes the transformation process, resulting in the secretion of pro -inflammatory interleukin (IL) -1b through a non -canonical, elastase-dependent pathway. These results are important because they shed new light on the biotransformation of Ti3C2 MXenes and its ramifications for cellular signaling.

  • 6.
    Song, Jiali
    et al.
    Beihang Univ, Peoples R China.
    Li, Yun
    Beihang Univ, Peoples R China.
    Cai, Yunhao
    Beihang Univ, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Rui
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wang, Shijie
    Xi An Jiao Tong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Xin, Jingming
    Xi An Jiao Tong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Han, Lili
    Zhengzhou Univ, Peoples R China.
    Wei, Donghui
    Zhengzhou Univ, Peoples R China.
    Ma, Wei
    Xi An Jiao Tong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Gao, Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sun, Yanming
    Beihang Univ, Peoples R China.
    Solid additive engineering enables high-efficiency and eco-friendly all-polymer solar cells2022In: Matter, ISSN 2590-2393, E-ISSN 2590-2385, Vol. 5, no 11, p. 4047-4059Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Currently, morphology optimization of all-polymer solar cells (all-PSCs) strongly depends on the use of solvent additives, which are usually highly toxic and harmful to the environment and human health. Here, we report a green and volatile solid additive, 2-methoxynaphthalene (2-MN). It was found that the incorporation of 2-MN into a PM6:PY-DT blend can effectively manipulate the aggregations of PM6 and PY-DT during film depositing and thermal annealing processes and results in highly ordered molecular packing and favorable phase-separated morphology. Consequently, a re-cord-high efficiency of 17.32% is achieved for the PM6:PY-DT de-vice. Moreover, 2-MN-processed all-PSCs were fabricated by using non-halogenated solvent. High efficiencies of 17.03% and 16.67% are obtained for all-PSCs fabricated under nitrogen atmosphere and ambient conditions, respectively. Our work shows that the utili-zation of 2-MN as a green and solid additive is a simple and feasible strategy to optimize the morphology and sheds new light on eco-friendly fabrication and application of all-PSCs.

  • 7.
    Su, Wen
    et al.
    Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Yuan, Fanglong
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Perovskite nanocrystal LEDs: Large areas for efficient vivid displays2022In: Matter, ISSN 2590-2393, E-ISSN 2590-2385, Vol. 5, no 8, p. 2450-2452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Large-area perovskite LEDs (PeLEDs) are promising for cost-effective and high-throughput industrial applications. However, growing large-area efficient perovskite light emitters remains a big challenge. In a recent study in Nature Nanotechnology, Lee et al. demonstrated a simple modified bar-coating method for fabricating highly efficient and large-area perovskite nanocrystal-based PeLEDs with external quantum efficiency over 20% for a large pixel area of 900 mm(2).

  • 8.
    Su, Wen
    et al.
    Natl Ctr Nanosci & Technol, Peoples R China.
    Yuan, Fanglong
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Natl Ctr Nanosci & Technol, Peoples R China; Univ Toronto, Canada.
    QD-LEDs: High efficiency and long-term stability toward practical applications2022In: Matter, ISSN 2590-2393, E-ISSN 2590-2385, Vol. 5, no 8, p. 2464-2466Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Quantum dot LEDs (QD-LEDs) are promising for display and lighting applications. However, fabricating stable, efficient green and blue QD-LEDs remains a big challenge. In a recent study in Nature Photonics, Jin et al. developed a general strategy to eliminate charge leakage for the fabrication of efficient QD-LEDs with exceptional long-term stability (T-95 lifetime of 580,000 h for green and 4,400 h for blue).

  • 9.
    Tang, Weidong
    et al.
    Zhejiang Univ, Peoples R China.
    Liu, Tianjun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhang, Muyi
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yuan, Fanglong
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Beijing Normal Univ, Peoples R China.
    Zhou, Ke
    Zhejiang Univ, Peoples R China.
    Lai, Runchen
    Zhejiang Univ, Peoples R China.
    Lian, Yaxiao
    Zhejiang Univ, Peoples R China.
    Xing, Shiyu
    Zhejiang Univ, Peoples R China.
    Xiong, Wentao
    Zhejiang Univ, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Meng
    Zhejiang Univ, Peoples R China.
    Gao, Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhao, Baodan
    Zhejiang Univ, Peoples R China.
    Di, Dawei
    Zhejiang Univ, Peoples R China.
    The roles of metal oxidation states in perovskite semiconductors2023In: Matter, ISSN 2590-2393, E-ISSN 2590-2385, Vol. 6, no 11, p. 3782-3802Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metal halide perovskites are an emerging materials platform for optoelectronic, spintronic, and thermoelectric applications. The field of perovskite materials and devices has progressed rapidly over the past decade. For halide perovskite materials, a range of physical and chemical properties such as crystal structure, bandgap, charge carrier density, and stability that govern the device functionalities are critically determined by the oxidation states of the B-site metal ions. However, such an important mechanistic connection unique to halide perovskites is not well established, limiting the pace of development in this area. In this review, we identify the roles of metal oxidation states in perovskite semiconductors. The redox reactions leading to these states, and their effects on the materials properties, are clarified. Finally, we suggest routes to improving device efficiency and stability from the perspective of oxidation state control.

  • 10.
    Teng, Pengpeng
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Nanjing Univ Aeronaut & Astronaut, Peoples R China; Nanjing Univ Aeronaut & Astronaut, Sweden.
    Reichert, Sebastian
    Tech Univ Chemnitz, Germany.
    Xu, Weidong
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yang, Shih-Chi
    Swiss Fed Labs Mat Sci & Technol, Switzerland.
    Fu, Fan
    Swiss Fed Labs Mat Sci & Technol, Switzerland.
    Zou, Yatao
    Soochow Univ, Peoples R China.
    Yin, Chunyang
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bao, Chunxiong
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Karlsson, Max
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Norrkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Qin, Jiajun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yu, Tao
    Nanjing Univ, Peoples R China.
    Tress, Wolfgang
    Zurich Univ Appl Sci, Switzerland.
    Yang, Ying
    Nanjing Univ Aeronaut & Astronaut, Peoples R China; Nanjing Univ Aeronaut & Astronaut, Sweden.
    Sun, Baoquan
    Soochow Univ, Peoples R China.
    Deibel, Carsten
    Tech Univ Chemnitz, Germany.
    Gao, Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Degradation and self-repairing in perovskite light-emitting diodes2021In: Matter, ISSN 2590-2393, E-ISSN 2590-2385, Vol. 4, no 11, p. 3710-3724Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the most critical challenges in perovskite light-emitting diodes (PeLEDs) lies in poor operational stability. Although field dependent ion migration is believed to play an important role in the operation of perovskite optoelectronic devices, a complete understanding of how it affects the stability of PeLEDs is still missing. Here, we report a unique self-repairing behavior that the electroluminescence of moderately degraded PeLEDs can almost completely restore to their initial performance after resting. We find that the accumulated halides within the hole transport layer undergo back diffusion toward the surface of the perovskite layer during resting, repairing the vacancies and thus resulting in electroluminescence recovery. These findings indicate that one of the dominant degradation pathways in PeLEDs is the generation of halide vacancies at perovskite/hole transport layer interface during operation. We thus further passivate this key interface, which results in a high external quantum efficiency of 22.8% and obviously improved operational stability.

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