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  • 1.
    Amin, Tamer G.
    et al.
    Amer University of Beirut, Lebanon.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Haglund, Jesper
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Editorial Material: Conceptual Metaphor and Embodied Cognition in Science Learning: Introduction to special issue2015In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 37, no 5-6, p. 745-758Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 2.
    Amin, Tamer
    et al.
    Lebanese American University, Beirut, Lebanon.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Haglund, Jesper
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Strömdahl, Helge
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Arrow of time: Metaphorical construals of entropy and the second law of thermodynamics2012In: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 5, no 96, p. 818-848Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Various features of scientific discourse have been characterized in the science education literature, and challenges students face in appropriating these features have been explored. Using the framework of conceptual metaphor, this paper sought to identify explicit and implicit metaphors in pedagogical texts dealing with the concept of entropy and the second law of thermodynamics, an abstract and challenging domain for learners. Three university-level textbooks were analyzed from a conceptual metaphor perspective, and a range of explicit and implicit metaphors were identified. Explicit metaphors identified include entropy as disorder, thermodynamics processes as movements along a path, and energetic exchange as financial transactions among others. Implicit metaphors include application and elaboration of the generic Location Event Structure metaphor, application of the Object Event Structure metaphor, and others. The similarities and differences between explicit and implicit metaphors found in the textbooks are also described. Two key pedagogical implications are discussed: that the selection of explicit instructional metaphors can be guided by consistency with implicit metaphors; and that the range of implicit metaphors found in pedagogical texts implies that a multiple instructional metaphor strategy is warranted. The depth of the phenomenon of conceptual metaphor and its implications for future research are also discussed

  • 3.
    Grothérus, Annika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Formative Scaffolding: how to alter the level and strength of self-efficacy and foster self-regulation in a mathematics test situation2018In: Educational action research, ISSN 0965-0792, E-ISSN 1747-5074Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study is to advocate the use of a participatory action research programme, the Formative Scaffolding Programme (FSP), in mathematics. The FSP’s main structure is presented as well as an implementation of a class intervention, with the aim of exploring the FSP test cycle’s virtues in a social science class in a Swedish upper-secondary school. The motivations for the FSP’s development were to enhance students’ awareness of their mathematical proficiency, alter the level and strength of their self-efficacy, foster self-regulated learning (SRL), reduce and prevent mathematics-related anxiety, and visualise the learning process in mathematics. The primary findings of the study were there was a resemblance between the FSP setting and SRL phases, and that participation in the test cycle altered the level and strength of students’ self-efficacy and fostered self-regulation in a mathematics test situation. The benefits of working in a formative scaffolding manner indicate that it is worth implementing the FSP on a larger scale. The study is an example of how students can engage in transforming classroom practice and be radical agents of change.

  • 4.
    Haglund, Jesper
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Confronting conceptual challenges in thermodynamics by use of self-generated analogies2014In: Science & Education, ISSN 0926-7220, E-ISSN 1573-1901, Vol. 23, no 7, p. 1505-1529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Use of self-generated analogies has been proposed as a method for students to learn about a new subject by reference to what they previously know, in line with a constructivist perspective on learning and a resource perspective on conceptual change. We report on a group exercise on using completion problems in combination with self-generated analogies to make sense of two thermodynamic processes. The participants (N = 8) were preservice physics teacher students at the fourth year of the teacher education program. The students experienced challenges in accounting for the constant entropy in reversible, adiabatic expansion of an ideal gas and the constant temperature in free, adiabatic expansion of an ideal gas. These challenges were found to be grounded in the students’ intuitive understanding of the phenomena. In order to come to terms with the constant entropy in the first process, the students developed idiosyncratic explanations, but these could by properly adjusted given suitable scaffolding. In contrast, the students by themselves managed to make sense of the constant temperature in free expansion, by use of microscopic explanatory models. As a conclusion, self-generated analogies were found to provide a useful approach to identifying challenges to understanding among students, but also for the students to come to terms with these challenges. The results are discussed against a background of different perspectives on the issue of conceptual change in science education.

  • 5.
    Haglund, Jesper
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Inledning2013In: Modeller, analogier och metaforer i naturvetenskapsundervisning / [ed] Fredrik Jeppsson & Jesper Haglund, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, 1, p. 13-38Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Elever kan bara lära sig nya saker genom att bygga på det de redan vet och sina tidigare erfarenheter. Detta är en viktig utgångspunkt i konstruktivismen. Samtidigt är naturvetenskapen ofta abstrakt till sin karaktär. Hur kan vi som lärare skapa miljöer och situationer i naturvetenskapsundervisningen där våra elever ges möjlighet att dra nytta av sina tidigare kunskaper och inne­boende resurser? Ett sätt att åstadkomma detta är att använda sig av modeller, analogier och metaforer i undervisningen.

    I denna antologi presenteras forskning och undervisningsexempel kring hur man kan använda modeller, analogier och metaforer, samt elevers egna representationer i undervisningen i fysik, kemi och biologi.

    Antologin vänder sig främst till blivande och verksamma lärare i ­naturvetenskap med fokus på grundskolans senare år och gymnasiet, samt lärarutbildningen i naturvetenskapliga ämnen och deras didaktik.

  • 6.
    Haglund, Jesper
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Using self-generated analogies in teaching of thermodynamics2012In: Journal of Research in Science Teaching, ISSN 0022-4308, E-ISSN 1098-2736, Vol. 49, no 7, p. 898-921Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using self-generated analogies has been proposed as a method in a constructivist tradition for students to learn about a new subject, by use of what they previously know. We report on a group exercise on using self-generated analogies to make sense of two thermodynamic processes, reversible adiabatic expansion and free adiabatic expansion of an ideal gas. The participants (N = 8) were physics preservice teacher students at the fourth year of the teacher education program. A main finding was that work with self-generated analogies tended to be accompanied by the students assuming ownership for their learning, manifested in terms of actions of choice and control and the use of exploratory talk. Consequently, several self-generated analogies were elaborated and developed to a high-order relational structure. However, we also found that with the use of self-generated analogies in science teaching follows the risks of developing idiosyncratic explanations of the encountered phenomena or getting stuck in overly complex comparisons.

  • 7.
    Haglund, Jesper
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Ahrenberg, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Taking advantage of the "Big Mo": Momentum in everyday english and swedish and in physics teaching2015In: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 345-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Science education research suggests that our everyday intuitions of motion and interaction of physical objects fit well with how physicists use the term “momentum”. Corpus linguistics provides an easily accessible approach to study language in different domains, including everyday language. Analysis of language samples from English text corpora reveals a trend of increasing metaphorical use of “momentum” in non-science domains, and through conceptual metaphor analysis, we show that the use of the word in everyday language, as opposed to for instance “force”, is largely adequate from a physics point of view. In addition, “momentum” has recently been borrowed into Swedish as a metaphor in domains such as sports, politics and finance, with meanings similar to those in physics. As an implication for educational practice, we find support for the suggestion to introduce the term “momentum” to English-speaking pupils at an earlier age than what is typically done in the educational system today, thereby capitalising on their intuitions and experiences of everyday language. For Swedish-speaking pupils, and possibly also relevant to other languages, the parallel between “momentum” and the corresponding physics term in the students’ mother tongue could be made explicit.

  • 8.
    Haglund, Jesper
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Andersson, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Primary school childrens´s ideas of mixing and heat as expressed in a classroom setting2014In: Journal of Baltic Science Education, ISSN 1648-3898, E-ISSN 2538-7138, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 726-739Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates primary school children’s (7-8 year-old, N = 25) ideas of mixing of marbles and of heat, expressed in small-group predict-observe-explain exercises, and drawings representing the children’s own analogies in a classroom setting. The children were typically found to predict that marbles of two different colours would mix when rocked back and forth on a board. This idea of mixing is slightly more advanced than previously reported in the literature. The children’s ideas of heat included reference to warm objects, their own bodies when exercising, and the process of one warm solid object heating another object in direct contact. In addition, through scaffolding, some of the children expressed a substance view of heat. Finally, the potential and challenges in probing children’s ideas through a combination of data collection techniques in a classroom setting are reflected upon

  • 9.
    Haglund, Jesper
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science.
    Andersson, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Young children's analogical reasoning in science domains2012In: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 96, no 4, p. 725-756Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This exploratory study in a classroom setting investigates first graders (age 78 years, N = 25) ability to perform analogical reasoning and create their own analogies for two irreversible natural phenomena: mixing and heat transfer. We found that the children who contributed actively to a full-class discussion were consistently successful at making analogical comparisons between known objects provided by a researcher and that some of the children could come up with their own analogies for the abstract natural phenomena with which they interacted. The use of full-class and small-group settings, shared laboratory experiences of the phenomena and childrens drawings as different kinds of scaffolding was found to be helpful for the childrens analogical reasoning. As an implication for science education, self-generated analogies are put forward as a potential learning tool within a constructivist approach to education.

  • 10.
    Haglund, Jesper
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hedberg, David
    Realgymnasiet, Sweden.
    Schönborn, Konrad
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Students framing of laboratory exercises using infrared cameras2015In: Physical Review Special Topics : Physics Education Research, ISSN 1554-9178, E-ISSN 1554-9178, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 020127-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal science is challenging for students due to its largely imperceptible nature. Handheld infrared cameras offer a pedagogical opportunity for students to see otherwise invisible thermal phenomena. In the present study, a class of upper secondary technology students (N = 30) partook in four IR-camera laboratory activities, designed around the predict-observe-explain approach of White and Gunstone. The activities involved central thermal concepts that focused on heat conduction and dissipative processes such as friction and collisions. Students interactions within each activity were videotaped and the analysis focuses on how a purposefully selected group of three students engaged with the exercises. As the basis for an interpretative study, a "thick" narrative description of the students epistemological and conceptual framing of the exercises and how they took advantage of the disciplinary affordance of IR cameras in the thermal domain is provided. Findings include that the students largely shared their conceptual framing of the four activities, but differed among themselves in their epistemological framing, for instance, in how far they found it relevant to digress from the laboratory instructions when inquiring into thermal phenomena. In conclusion, the study unveils the disciplinary affordances of infrared cameras, in the sense of their use in providing access to knowledge about macroscopic thermal science.

  • 11.
    Haglund, Jesper
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Hedberg, David
    Realgymnasiet, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Schönborn, Konrad J
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Thermal cameras in school laboratory activities2015In: Physics Education, ISSN 0031-9120, E-ISSN 1361-6552, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 424-430, article id 424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal cameras offer real-time visual access to otherwise invisible thermal phenomena, which are conceptually demanding for learners during traditional teaching. We present three studies of students’ conduction of laboratory activities that employ thermal cameras to teach challenging thermal concepts in grades 4, 7 and 10–12. Visualization of heat-related phenomena in combination with predict-observe-explain experiments offers students and teachers a pedagogically powerful means for unveiling abstract yet fundamental physics concepts.

  • 12.
    Haglund, Jesper
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Melander, Emil
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Pendrill, Ann-Marie
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Xie, Charles
    Concord Consortium, MA 01742 USA.
    Schönborn, Konrad
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Infrared cameras in science education2016In: Infrared physics & technology, ISSN 1350-4495, E-ISSN 1879-0275, Vol. 75, p. 150-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 13.
    Haglund, Jesper
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Schönborn, Konrad
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Taking on the Heat—a Narrative Account of How Infrared Cameras Invite Instant Inquiry2016In: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 685-713Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Integration of technology, social learning and scientific models offers pedagogical opportunities for science education. A particularly interesting area is thermal science, where students often struggle with abstract concepts, such as heat. In taking on this conceptual obstacle, we explore how hand-held infrared (IR) visualization technology can strengthen students’ understanding of thermal phenomena. Grounded in the Swedish physics curriculum and part of a broader research programme on educational uses of IR cameras, we have developed laboratory exercises around a thermal storyline, in conjunction with the teaching of a heat-flow model. We report a narrative analysis of how a group of five fourth-graders, facilitated by a researcher, predicts, observes and explains (POE) how the temperatures change when they pour hot water into a ceramic coffee mug and a thin plastic cup. Four chronological episodes are described and analysed as group interaction unfolded. Results revealed that the students engaged cognitively and emotionally with the POE task and, in particular, held a sustained focus on making observations and offering explanations for the scenarios. A compelling finding was the group’s spontaneous generation of multiple "what-ifs" in relation to thermal phenomena, such as blowing on the water surface, or submerging a pencil into the hot water. This was followed by immediate interrogation with the IR camera, a learning event we label instant inquiry. The students’ expressions largely reflected adoption of the heat-flow model. In conclusion, IR cameras could serve as an access point for even very young students to develop complex thermal concepts.

  • 14.
    Haglund, Jesper
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Strömdahl, Helge
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Different Senses of Entropy-Implications for Education2010In: ENTROPY, ISSN 1099-4300, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 490-515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A challenge in the teaching of entropy is that the word has several different senses, which may provide an obstacle for communication. This study identifies five distinct senses of the word entropy, using the Principled Polysemy approach from the field of linguistics. A semantic network is developed of how the senses are related, using text excerpts from dictionaries, text books and text corpora. Educational challenges such as the existence of several formal senses of entropy and the intermediary position of entropy as disorder along the formal/non-formal scale are presented using a two-Dimensional Semiotic/semantic Analysing Schema (2-D SAS).

  • 15.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Begrepsliga metaforer i studenters dialog2013In: Modeller, analogier och metaforer i naturvetenskapsundervisning / [ed] Fredrik Jeppsson & Jesper Haglund, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, 1, p. 155-166Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Elever kan bara lära sig nya saker genom att bygga på det de redan vet och sina tidigare erfarenheter. Detta är en viktig utgångspunkt i konstruktivismen. Samtidigt är naturvetenskapen ofta abstrakt till sin karaktär. Hur kan vi som lärare skapa miljöer och situationer i naturvetenskapsundervisningen där våra elever ges möjlighet att dra nytta av sina tidigare kunskaper och inne­boende resurser? Ett sätt att åstadkomma detta är att använda sig av modeller, analogier och metaforer i undervisningen.

    I denna antologi presenteras forskning och undervisningsexempel kring hur man kan använda modeller, analogier och metaforer, samt elevers egna representationer i undervisningen i fysik, kemi och biologi.

    Antologin vänder sig främst till blivande och verksamma lärare i ­naturvetenskap med fokus på grundskolans senare år och gymnasiet, samt lärarutbildningen i naturvetenskapliga ämnen och deras didaktik.

  • 16.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Conceptual metaphors in learning and teaching entropy: adopting a cognitive semantic approach in science education research2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last 20 years there has been an extensive amount of research on science learning conducted from a “knowledge-in-pieces” or “resources” perspective. One of the main goals of that research has been to identify and characterize available cognitive knowledge resources that can be productive components of scientific understanding. In relation to characterizing available knowledge resources, the research, adopting the resource perspective, has focused on finding out and describing the continuity between the novice/learner and expert in various scientific domains. However, even though there exists an extensive amount of studies with a clear focus on characterizing available cognitive knowledge resources, research with a special focus on the role of language in relation to thermodynamics adopting a resource perspective is limited. In this thesis, on the one hand I describe challenges that can be related to language and, on the other hand, I identify possible available resources in the form of conceptual metaphors. Based on the results from the first two papers included in this thesis I show, among other things, the ambiguity of the physical concept of entropy. Furthermore, the result of paper two also highlights that there is an ambiguity in the words used as source domain words for metaphors that include entropy. For instance, source domain words such as ‘disorder’ in the metaphor ‘entropy is disorder’ turn out not to be as unambiguous as one might first think. In addition, in papers three and four, I highlight how very experienced people construe entropy in both written text and in a problem-solving situation based on textbook analyses and interviews. The included texts for analyses, in paper three, represented university textbooks on introductory physics, chemistry and statistical mechanics. In addition, all the texts covered macroscopic and microscopic accounts (as well as links between the two) of thermodynamics. The results from the text book analyses show that there is a systematic difference between the conceptual metaphors used for macroscopic and microscopic descriptions. In addition, the largest number of conceptual metaphors was identified at the macroscopic level. The problem-solving situation, in paper four, was structured around three thermodynamic problems where two PhD students worked together in pairs while they solved the three tasks. In addition, the problem-solving situation was captured by use of audio and video recordings. From the problem-solving situation I show, among other things, that a single conceptual metaphor was used in a sustained way to ground reasoning and, in addition, a number of conceptual metaphors were coordinated with each other and with other symbolic forms in a coherent way. In sum, the results of this thesis indicate that adopting tools from other disciplines, such as cognitive linguistics, may contribute to the field of science education.

    List of papers
    1. Different Senses of Entropy-Implications for Education
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Different Senses of Entropy-Implications for Education
    2010 (English)In: ENTROPY, ISSN 1099-4300, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 490-515Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A challenge in the teaching of entropy is that the word has several different senses, which may provide an obstacle for communication. This study identifies five distinct senses of the word entropy, using the Principled Polysemy approach from the field of linguistics. A semantic network is developed of how the senses are related, using text excerpts from dictionaries, text books and text corpora. Educational challenges such as the existence of several formal senses of entropy and the intermediary position of entropy as disorder along the formal/non-formal scale are presented using a two-Dimensional Semiotic/semantic Analysing Schema (2-D SAS).

    Keywords
    science education, thermodynamics, entropy, semantics, cognitive linguistics, polysemy
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-54783 (URN)10.3390/e12030490 (DOI)000275934000012 ()
    Available from: 2010-04-09 Created: 2010-04-09 Last updated: 2014-09-25
    2. Exploiting languages in teaching of entropy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploiting languages in teaching of entropy
    2011 (English)In: Journal of Baltic Science Education, ISSN 1648-3898, E-ISSN 2538-7138, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 27-35Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The words disorder, information, freedom and spreading are used as metaphors and analogies in science teaching to capture the scientific qualitative sense of entropy. In addition, the identification of entropy with the everyday conception of heat has been proposed. While physical sciences are regarded as exact disciplines, in which terms have precise definitions, the words being used in the qualitative interpretation of entropy have many senses. This may provide an obstacle to achieving a scientific understanding of entropy. In this study, the metaphors for entropy and seeing entropy as heat were analysed by use of the different entries for the words in a dictionary. The present paper is a contribution to highlighting the importance of making any metaphors and analogies and their benefits and limitations explicit.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Lithuania: Scientific Methodical Center ”Scientia Educologica”, 2011
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-68343 (URN)000289845300004 ()
    Available from: 2011-05-20 Created: 2011-05-20 Last updated: 2017-12-11
    3. Arrow of time: Metaphorical construals of entropy and the second law of thermodynamics
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Arrow of time: Metaphorical construals of entropy and the second law of thermodynamics
    2012 (English)In: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 5, no 96, p. 818-848Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Various features of scientific discourse have been characterized in the science education literature, and challenges students face in appropriating these features have been explored. Using the framework of conceptual metaphor, this paper sought to identify explicit and implicit metaphors in pedagogical texts dealing with the concept of entropy and the second law of thermodynamics, an abstract and challenging domain for learners. Three university-level textbooks were analyzed from a conceptual metaphor perspective, and a range of explicit and implicit metaphors were identified. Explicit metaphors identified include entropy as disorder, thermodynamics processes as movements along a path, and energetic exchange as financial transactions among others. Implicit metaphors include application and elaboration of the generic Location Event Structure metaphor, application of the Object Event Structure metaphor, and others. The similarities and differences between explicit and implicit metaphors found in the textbooks are also described. Two key pedagogical implications are discussed: that the selection of explicit instructional metaphors can be guided by consistency with implicit metaphors; and that the range of implicit metaphors found in pedagogical texts implies that a multiple instructional metaphor strategy is warranted. The depth of the phenomenon of conceptual metaphor and its implications for future research are also discussed

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley & Sons, 2012
    National Category
    Didactics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-79912 (URN)10.1002/sce.21015 (DOI)000307392600005 ()
    Available from: 2012-08-15 Created: 2012-08-15 Last updated: 2017-12-07
    4. Exploring the Use of Conceptual Metaphors in Solving Problems on Entropy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring the Use of Conceptual Metaphors in Solving Problems on Entropy
    2013 (English)In: The Journal of the learning sciences, ISSN 1050-8406, E-ISSN 1532-7809, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 70-120Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A growing body of research has examined the experiential grounding of scientific thought and the role of experiential intuitive knowledge in science learning. Meanwhile, research in cognitive linguistics has identified many conceptual metaphors (CMs), metaphorical mappings between abstract concepts and experiential source domains, implicit in everyday and scientific language. However, the contributions of CMs to scientific understanding and reasoning are still not clear. This study explores the roles that CMs play in scientific problem-solving through a detailed analysis of two physical chemistry PhD students solving problems on entropy. We report evidence in support of three claims: a range of CMs are used in problem-solving enabling flexible, experiential construals of abstract scientific concepts; CMs are coordinated with one another and other resources supporting the alignment of qualitative and quantitative reasoning; use of CMs grounds abstract reasoning in a “narrative” discourse incorporating conceptions of paths, agents, and movement. We conclude that CMs should be added to the set of intuitive resources others have suggested contribute to expertise in science. This proposal is consistent with two assumptions: that cognition is embodiment and that internal cognitive structures and processes interact with semiotic systems. The implications of the findings for learning and instruction are discussed.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Routledge, 2013
    National Category
    Didactics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-79910 (URN)10.1080/10508406.2012.691926 (DOI)000312584600005 ()
    Available from: 2012-08-15 Created: 2012-08-15 Last updated: 2017-12-07
  • 17.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Naturvetenskap och teknik genom estetiska lärprocesser i förskolan2018Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Varför klingar gitarrens strängar olika? Varför känns en sten kallare än trä? Har du funderat på hur du kan förklara naturvetenskapliga och tekniska fenomen på ett lekfullt sätt, så att barnen blir nyfikna och vill veta mer? I den här praktiska metodboken visar författarna hur estetiska ämnen som drama, musik och bild, kan bredda våra möjligheter att förklara och uppleva naturvetenskap och teknik. Teori varvas med praktiska exempel och övningar som integrerar ämnesområdena och lockar till samspel och lek. När kropp och sinne aktiveras i ett sådant tvärvetenskapligt arbetssätt stärks också lärprocessen, vi förstår helt enkelt och minns bättre.

  • 18.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Frejd, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Naturvetenskap och energi2018In: Naturvetenskap och teknik genom estetiska lärprocesser i förskolan, Stockholm: Natur och kultur, 2018, p. 83-97Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science.
    Hagerman, Frans
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Axell, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Frejd, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Sultan, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Estetiska lärprocesser2018In: Naturvetenskap och teknik genom estetiska lärprocesser i förskolan, Stockholm: Natur och kultur, 2018, p. 26-38Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science.
    Hagerman, Frans
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Axell, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Frejd, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Sultan, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    NO och teknik på lekfulla villkor2018In: Naturvetenskap och teknik genom estetiska lärprocesser i förskolan / [ed] Fredrik Jeppsson, Stockholm: Natur och kultur, 2018, p. 15-25Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Haglund, JesperLinköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Modeller, analogier och metaforer i naturvetenskapsundervisning2013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Elever kan bara lära sig nya saker genom att bygga på det de redan vet och sina tidigare erfarenheter. Detta är en viktig utgångspunkt i konstruktivismen. Samtidigt är naturvetenskapen ofta abstrakt till sin karaktär. Hur kan vi som lärare skapa miljöer och situationer i naturvetenskapsundervisningen där våra elever ges möjlighet att dra nytta av sina tidigare kunskaper och inne­boende resurser? Ett sätt att åstadkomma detta är att använda sig av modeller, analogier och metaforer i undervisningen.

    I denna antologi presenteras forskning och undervisningsexempel kring hur man kan använda modeller, analogier och metaforer, samt elevers egna representationer i undervisningen i fysik, kemi och biologi.

    Antologin vänder sig främst till blivande och verksamma lärare i ­naturvetenskap med fokus på grundskolans senare år och gymnasiet, samt lärarutbildningen i naturvetenskapliga ämnen och deras didaktik.

  • 22.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science.
    Haglund, Jesper
    Karlstad universitet, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Sampublicering med studenter: ett sätt att stärka forskningsanknytningen i lärarutbildningen2019In: Högre Utbildning, ISSN 2000-7558, E-ISSN 2000-7558, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 98-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Lärarutbildningen uppmärksammas inte sällan för att dess studenter har svårt att uppnå den nivå av akademiskt skrivande som krävs, inte minst vid examensarbeten. Som kontrast till den beskrivningen vill vi lyfta fram motexempel, där lärarstudenters examensarbeten och andra skrivuppgifter har nått en sådan kvalitet att de genom samförfattande med handledare och andra medförfattare har kunnat omarbetas och publiceras som vetenskapliga artiklar eller i mer lärartillvända forum, i vårt fall inom fysikdidaktik. Samförfattande med lärarstudenter kan på så vis vara ett sätt att stärka forskningsförankringen i lärarutbildningen. Förutsättningarna för att kunna lyckas med detta diskuteras, bland annat utifrån att under lärarutbildningen gradvis låta studenterna inlemmas i en praktikgemenskap av ämnesdidaktisk forskning.

  • 23.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Haglund, Jesper
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Amin, Tamer G.
    Amer University of Beirut, Lebanon.
    Varying Use of Conceptual Metaphors across Levels of Expertise in Thermodynamics2015In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 37, no 5-6, p. 780-805Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many studies have previously focused on how people with different levels of expertise solve physics problems. In early work, focus was on characterising differences between experts and novices and a key finding was the central role that propositionally expressed principles and laws play in expert, but not novice, problem-solving. A more recent line of research has focused on characterising continuity between experts and novices at the level of non-propositional knowledge structures and processes such as image-schemas, imagistic simulation and analogical reasoning. This study contributes to an emerging literature addressing the coordination of both propositional and non-propositional knowledge structures and processes in the development of expertise. Specifically, in this paper, we compare problem-solving across two levels of expertise-undergraduate students of chemistry and Ph.D. students in physical chemistry-identifying differences in how conceptual metaphors (CMs) are used (or not) to coordinate propositional and non-propositional knowledge structures in the context of solving problems on entropy. It is hypothesised that the acquisition of expertise involves learning to coordinate the use of CMs to interpret propositional (linguistic and mathematical) knowledge and apply it to specific problem situations. Moreover, we suggest that with increasing expertise, the use of CMs involves a greater degree of subjective engagement with physical entities and processes. Implications for research on learning and instructional practice are discussed.

  • 24.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Haglund, Jesper
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Amin, Tamer
    Department of Education, Lebanese American University.
    Strömdahl, Helge
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Exploring the Use of Conceptual Metaphors in Solving Problems on Entropy2013In: The Journal of the learning sciences, ISSN 1050-8406, E-ISSN 1532-7809, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 70-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing body of research has examined the experiential grounding of scientific thought and the role of experiential intuitive knowledge in science learning. Meanwhile, research in cognitive linguistics has identified many conceptual metaphors (CMs), metaphorical mappings between abstract concepts and experiential source domains, implicit in everyday and scientific language. However, the contributions of CMs to scientific understanding and reasoning are still not clear. This study explores the roles that CMs play in scientific problem-solving through a detailed analysis of two physical chemistry PhD students solving problems on entropy. We report evidence in support of three claims: a range of CMs are used in problem-solving enabling flexible, experiential construals of abstract scientific concepts; CMs are coordinated with one another and other resources supporting the alignment of qualitative and quantitative reasoning; use of CMs grounds abstract reasoning in a “narrative” discourse incorporating conceptions of paths, agents, and movement. We conclude that CMs should be added to the set of intuitive resources others have suggested contribute to expertise in science. This proposal is consistent with two assumptions: that cognition is embodiment and that internal cognitive structures and processes interact with semiotic systems. The implications of the findings for learning and instruction are discussed.

  • 25.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science.
    Haglund, Jesper
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science.
    Strömdahl, Helge
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Exploiting languages in teaching of entropy2011In: Journal of Baltic Science Education, ISSN 1648-3898, E-ISSN 2538-7138, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 27-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The words disorder, information, freedom and spreading are used as metaphors and analogies in science teaching to capture the scientific qualitative sense of entropy. In addition, the identification of entropy with the everyday conception of heat has been proposed. While physical sciences are regarded as exact disciplines, in which terms have precise definitions, the words being used in the qualitative interpretation of entropy have many senses. This may provide an obstacle to achieving a scientific understanding of entropy. In this study, the metaphors for entropy and seeing entropy as heat were analysed by use of the different entries for the words in a dictionary. The present paper is a contribution to highlighting the importance of making any metaphors and analogies and their benefits and limitations explicit.

  • 26.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Strömdahl, Helge
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    COMPREHENSION OF TEMPERATURE WHEN SOLVING A THERMODYNAMIC TASK2010In: JOURNAL OF BALTIC SCIENCE EDUCATION, ISSN 1648-3898, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 224-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study focus the presence and role of deep qualitative conceptual knowledge of temperature among a group of ten individuals (n=10), academic well-educated and experienced in science, when solving a task about changes in temperature of a given thermodynamic system. The aim is to find out the variation of comprehension of temperature in the task solving process. Data is gathered by interviews based on the thinking aloud method. The interviews were video-recorded and verbatim transcribed. Transcriptions were analysed by using a two dimensional semiotic/semantic analysing schema (acronym 2-D SAS). The results revealed a broad variation in the comprehension of the term temperature in the given context. The three informants who produced correct answers structured the task by identifying the scientifically appropriate referent and sense of the term temperature according to the given context.

  • 27.
    Rengman, Helen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Johansson, Helen
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Den elektriska kretsen - En explorativ studie av svenska elevers uppfattningar angående den elektriska kretsen2010In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 173-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study has developed as a part of an ongoing co-operation between Taiwan, Finland and Sweden with the purpose of examining and comparing the conceptions of students of different ages concerning electric circuits. The purpose of this explorative study is to find out what conceptions Swedish students of different ages have concerning the electric circuit. The study has been accomplished by means of semi-structured interviews. Altogether nine students in the age of eleven, fifteen, seventeen and eighteen have been interviewed. The interviews have been analyzed partly from Kärrqvist’s (1985) models that students have shown regarding electric circuits. The result inter alia demonstrates that three models are to be found among the respondents corresponding to Kärrqvist’s (1985) ideas. In addition, we discovered a new model, which does not correspond to Kärrqvist’s (1985) models or any other known model in the literature. The new model has been named “kopplingsberoende modell” (connection-dependent model). Furthermore we revealed that all the respondents had the idea of a closed circuit where they often used the word wire to describe end explain the electric circuit.

1 - 27 of 27
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