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  • 1.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Barn. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    The Coordination of Talk and Touch in Adults Directives to Children: Touch and Social Control2015Inngår i: Research on Language and Social Interaction, ISSN 0835-1813, E-ISSN 1532-7973, Vol. 48, nr 2, s. 152-175Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Adults sometimes accompany the directives they issue to children about their actions and movements with bodily contact (for example, shoving, guiding, or pushing). This article explores the interactional uses and meanings of such combinations of spoken directive and bodily contact that involves touch in data from families and primary educational settings in Sweden. The focus is on how the timing and coordination of haptics (communicative acts of touch), speech, and contextual factors produce communicative meanings. Findings reveal how touch and talk are synchronized to achieve the childs compliance to directives. Laminated (that is, multimodal) directives combine concurrent use of imperatives with adults own haptic acts, signaling and enforcing the onset and/or trajectory of the required movement. They constitute the prevalent pattern of use, as compared to the use of control touch without accompanying verbalization. Haptic control formats are usually responsive to the child recipients noncompliant responses. The data are in Swedish with English translation.

  • 2.
    Cekaite, Asta
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Barn. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Holm Kvist, Malva
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Barn. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Correction: The Comforting Touch: Tactile Intimacy and Talk in Managing Childrens Distress (vol 50, pg 109, 2017)2017Inngår i: Research on Language and Social Interaction, ISSN 0835-1813, E-ISSN 1532-7973, Vol. 50, nr 3, s. 326-326Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 3.
    Cekaite, Asta
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Barn. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Holm Kvist, Malva
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Barn. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    The Comforting Touch: Tactile Intimacy and Talk in Managing Childrens Distress2017Inngår i: Research on Language and Social Interaction, ISSN 0835-1813, E-ISSN 1532-7973, Vol. 50, nr 2, s. 109-127Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examines young childrens distress management in situ, focusing on situations of crying and caregivers embodiedhapticsoothing responses in preschools in Sweden. The adults responses to crying involve embraces, stroking, and patting. Haptic soothing is managed by calibrating the bodily proximity and postural orientations between the participants, including hapticembracing or face-to-faceformations that are coordinated with particular forms of talk. Haptic formations configure specific affordances for embodied participation by actualizing the availability of tactile, aural, and visual modalities. The interactional organization of soothing in an embracing formation involves: an initiation/invitation and response, submergence of two bodies into a close haptic contact, and coordinated withdrawal from haptic contact. The embracing formation temporarily suspends the requirements for the distressed person to act like a responsive listener and speaker. The caregiver uses the face-to-face formation to reestablish conditions for the childs interactional co-presence. Data are in Swedish and English translation.

  • 4.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Barn. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Overlap in Bilingual Play: Some Implications of Code-Switching for Overlap Resolution2001Inngår i: Research on Language and Social Interaction, ISSN 0835-1813, E-ISSN 1532-7973, Vol. 34, nr 4, s. 421-451Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines children's procedures for dealing with simultaneous bilingual speech as it anses in multiparty play episodes. Sequential analyses of more than 10 hr of videorecorded recess activities at an English school in Sweden revealed that children use an array of methods to minimize the overlapping passage. Erceptions to tins may be found in exchanges that are demonstrably competitive with regard to turn taking, in which participants' actions strive to gain exclusive rights to the floor, often resulting in stretched overlaps. Moreover, the sequential location of bilingual overlap onset proved relevant for its resolution: Whereas in onset paticipants would use different methods to deal with simultaneity, resulting in various outcomes of overlap negotiation, instances of overlapping turn baginnings occasioned by multiple self-selection were always resolved the same way, with the speaker diverging from the language of previous turns(s) keeping the floor. It is therefore suggested that the linguistic contrast arising with the code-switch may enhance second speakers' chances to acquire the floor and that the effectiveness of this "turn security device" is strongly dependent on its sequential placement.

  • 5.
    Evaldsson, Ann-Carita
    Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tematisk utbildning och forskning.
    Shifting moral stances: Morality and gender in same-sex and cross-sex game interaction2004Inngår i: Research on Language and Social Interaction, ISSN 0835-1813, E-ISSN 1532-7973, Vol. 37, nr 3, s. 331-363Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, I explore same-sex and cross-sex game interaction in foursquare, looking in particular at how the production of moral actions is adjusted in relation to the diverse configuration of players. The game was played among preadolescent girls (and boys) with low-income and ethnically mixed backgrounds (Syrian, Kurdish, Chilean) in an elementary school setting in Sweden. In the analysis, I demonstrate that the girls who had acquired physical skills in throwing engaged in extended disputes about game outcomes to justify the status of moves and hold one another accountable. The same girls downplayed their skills and mitigated fouls in interaction with less skilled girls. In cross-sex games, the girls reorganized their participation to playfully challenge the boys' (physical) domination. The girls shifted behaviors as the configuration of players changed across game contexts to realize multiple, contradictory, and shifting (moral) stances (ranging from a "morality of rights," to a "morality of responsibility" and a "morality of play"). Overall, the findings challenge a unitary (and separate) view of feminine morality and suggest that research on gender and morality should be grounded in detailed analyses of interactions across (game) contexts.

  • 6.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för moderna språk.
    Bodily quoting in dance correction2010Inngår i: Research on Language and Social Interaction, ISSN 0835-1813, E-ISSN 1532-7973, Vol. 43, nr 4, s. 401-426Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Building on research into reported speech and enactments, this study explores a new aspect of  quoting by looking at how dance teachers ascribe body movements to students. Whether words or movements are quoted depends on the activity the participants are engaged in and what they aim to accomplish. Within corrective teaching sequences at dance classes bodily quotes serve to contrast incorrect performance with the correct one and display features such as decomposition, highlighting, and exaggeration. They afford simultaneous production of demonstration and description. The paper argues that a quote can only be understood as such within the local context and, even in the case of bodily quoting, with adequate ascription. Quoting other bodies is an inherently multimodal achievement, where vocal as well as bodily resources are implemented to construct a coherent course of action. The study is based on video-recorded data in three languages, Swedish, Estonian and English.

  • 7.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för moderna språk.
    Marking boundaries between activities: The particle nii in Estonian2010Inngår i: Research on Language and Social Interaction, ISSN 0835-1813, E-ISSN 1532-7973, Vol. 43, nr 2, s. 157-182Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies a practice of marking transitions to a next activity in Estonian interaction. The particle nii is implemented at boundaries between activities or phases of activities, showing that a pragmatic particle need not be implemented only in regard to verbal matters, such as topic or turn sequence. Nii marks the prior activity or its phase as being closed down and the next one as imminent. Sequences of verbal and non-verbal actions in audio and video recordings disclose the multimodal nature of the boundaries marked by nii. Boundary marking entails a number of interactional capacities, including summoning, claiming authority, setting the agenda, making salient transitions within an individual course of action, marking the expectedness of the sequencing of activities, and changing opportunities for participation.

  • 8.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för kultur och kommunikation, Avdelningen för språk och litteratur. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Sequence Initiation or Self-Talk? Commenting on the Surroundings While Mucking out a Sheep Stable2018Inngår i: Research on Language and Social Interaction, ISSN 0835-1813, E-ISSN 1532-7973, Vol. 51, nr 3, s. 313-328Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates comments on the physical surroundings while a group of people are shoveling dung in a sheep stable. In this setting, where the auditory space is mostly open for talk, some comments launch a conversational sequence, while others are treated as self-talk. The article discusses how the speakers body posture, speech volume, and gaze, as well as the nature of the referent, contribute to attracting a response. Comments treated as self-talk are typically uttered with low volume, while the speaker is bending forwards with his or her gaze toward the ground. Comments that launch a sequence and achieve a focused interaction are instead spoken out loud, with the speakers body oriented toward the other participants, and deploy the recipients current attention focus. Furthermore, the timing of the comment just before an upcoming activity junction from shoveling to a brief rest increases the chances of a conversational sequence being developed. The data are in Estonian with an English translation.

  • 9.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för kultur och kommunikation, Avdelningen för språk och kultur. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Department of Modern Languages , Uppsala University , Sweden .
    The interdependence of bodily demonstrations and clausal syntax2013Inngår i: Research on Language and Social Interaction, ISSN 0835-1813, E-ISSN 1532-7973, Vol. 46, nr 1, s. 1-21Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Units in interaction are emergent real-time phenomena that can be accomplished by the coordinated deployment of language and the body. Focusing mostly on data from dance classes, this study looks at how incomplete syntax projects a continuation realized by the body, and systematically accounts for clausal syntax that can incorporate an embodied demonstration. It is argued that the classic list of types of turn-constructional units by Sacks et al. (1974) needs to be expanded with a syntactic-bodily one, and that the syntax of embodied demonstrations has to be included in the grammatical description of language.

  • 10.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för kultur och kommunikation, Avdelningen för språk och litteratur. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    What Does Embodied Interaction Tell Us About Grammar?2018Inngår i: Research on Language and Social Interaction, ISSN 0835-1813, E-ISSN 1532-7973, Vol. 51, nr 1Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article navigates the findings of conversation analysis, interactional linguistics, and related multimodal studies to summarize what we know about the grammar-body interface. It shows how grammar is fitted to sequences and trajectories of embodied activities, as well as deployed interchangeably with bodily displays, resulting in truly multimodal patterns that emerge in real time. These findings problematize both the paradigmatic and syntagmatic structures documented in verbal-only linguistics. They call for a reconceptualization of grammar as an assembly of routinized methods for the organization of vocal conduct, capable of incorporating aspects of participants bodily behavior. Data are in Estonian, French, German, Italian, Japanese and Swedish.

  • 11.
    Laanesoo, Kirsi
    et al.
    Institute of Estonian and General Linguistics, University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för kultur och kommunikation, Avdelningen för språk och kultur. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Noticing Breaches with Nonpolar Interrogatives: Estonian Kes (“Who”) Ascribing Responsibility for Problematic Conduct2017Inngår i: Research on Language and Social Interaction, ISSN 0835-1813, E-ISSN 1532-7973, Vol. 50, nr 3, s. 286-306Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article targets action formation in multimodal sequences. It shows how nonpolar interrogatives in Estonian are used for noticing breaches in others’ embodied conduct, focusing on kes (“who”)-interrogatives. In contrast to information questions with kes, a “noticing of a breach” does not seek an informative answer, which would be an identification of the grammatical actor of the action depicted in the interrogative. The actor is instead the addressee of the turn, often called by name, and thus clear to everyone present. These “rhetorical” kes-interrogatives formulate a just-observed conduct as problematic, and attribute responsibility for it. Since they call for either a remedy of the (embodied) conduct or a contesting of the blame as the next action, noticing breaches marginally qualify as directive actions. At the same time, they do not explicitly provide any guidelines for the future. The study argues that to determine function in language, it is necessary to study grammatical structures in their temporally emerging and embodied activity contexts. The data are Estonian with English translation.

  • 12.
    Linell, Per
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för kultur och kommunikation.
    Adelswärd, Viveka
    Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för teknik och naturvetenskap, Kommunikations- och transportsystem.
    Sachs, Lisbeth
    Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema.
    Bredmar, Margareta
    Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Avdelningen för sociologi (SOC).
    Lindstedt, U
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Commun Studies, SE-58183 Linkoping, Sweden Jonkoping Univ, Univ Coll Hlth Sci, Jonkoping, Sweden.
    Expert talk in medical contexts: Explicit and implicit orientation to risks2002Inngår i: Research on Language and Social Interaction, ISSN 0835-1813, E-ISSN 1532-7973, Vol. 35, nr 2, s. 195-218Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In medical contexts, parties often have reasons to focus on risks: risks of developing diseases or of having children with congenital diseases, risks involved in taking drugs or in using a particular type of therapy, and so forth. In such risk-implicative contexts, doctors and nurses deal with the risk topics sometimes directly, at other times quite indirectly. In this article, we discuss results from studying 5 different health care contexts, We discuss contextual factors that might account for some of the considerable differences in risk talk. Our claim is that the different explicit versus implicit orientations are linked to where and how the different health care experts position themselves vis-A-vis scientific risk formulations and everyday risk perceptions, Our data on the implicit orientations to risk cast doubt on theories of discourse that would hold that all relevant understandings in discourse are made verbally manifest.

  • 13.
    Persson, Rasmus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för kultur och kommunikation, Avdelningen för språk och litteratur. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. University of York, UK.
    Fill-in-the-blank questions in interaction: Incomplete utterancesas a resource for doing inquiries2017Inngår i: Research on Language and Social Interaction, ISSN 0835-1813, E-ISSN 1532-7973, Vol. 50, nr 3, s. 227-248Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on the use of syntactically incomplete utterances in talk-in-interaction as a resource for doing two sorts of inquiries: seeking information and initiating repair. The element inquired about is made relevant next, and typically given by the addressee, in the form of a completion fitted to the incomplete utterance. Using a vernacular term, the practice could be referred to as “asking a fill-in-the-blank question,” where syntactic structure is distributed across question and answer. It is shown how transition-relevance places can be set up in the absence of syntactic completion and how fill-in-the-blank questions thereby differ from other types of collaborative productions. The particular import and usefulness of incomplete utterances is demonstrated relative to other resources. The phenomenon shows that syntactic completion and turn completion need not coincide and illustrates how questions can constrain the form of answers through projection. Data are in French with English translation.

  • 14.
    Szczepek Reed, Beatrice
    et al.
    Department of Education, University of York, United Kingdom.
    Persson, Rasmus
    Centre for Languages and Literature, Lund University, Sweden.
    How Speakers of Different Languages Extend Their Turns: Word Linking and Glottalization in French and German2016Inngår i: Research on Language and Social Interaction, ISSN 0835-1813, E-ISSN 1532-7973, Vol. 49, nr 2, s. 128-147Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    A speaker who issues a confirming turn starting with particles like yes, oui, ja, and so on, may mean to extend it and provide further material. This study shows that French and German speakers employ the same phonetic contrast to indicate the nature of that turn continuation. In spite of the typological difference between the German use of glottalization and the French use of linking phenomena for word boundaries involving word-initial vowels, speakers of both languages exploit this contrast systematically in their design of multiunit turns. Initial confirmations are joined directly to subsequent vowel-fronted turn components when speakers respond with an internally cohesive multiunit confirming turn. The components are separated by glottalization when responses involve multiple actions or departures from a trajectory projected by the turn-initial confirmation. This is further evidence that sound patterns shape interaction and are not solely determined by language-specific phonologies. Data are in French and German with English translation.

  • 15.
    Weatherall, Ann
    et al.
    Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för kultur och kommunikation, Avdelningen för språk och kultur. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    When Claims of Understanding Are Less Than Affiliative2016Inngår i: Research on Language and Social Interaction, ISSN 0835-1813, E-ISSN 1532-7973, Vol. 49, nr 3, s. 167-182Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Conversation analysis has established that the smooth progression of interaction and the accomplishment of action rest on joint understanding, which is implicitly built by a next turn of talk. In this article we examine explicit claims to intersubjective understanding from a range of settings from the institutional to the mundane. Our target expressions have the general form; I + understand + YOU + PSYCHOLOGICAL FORMULATION such as I understand your concern and I see that this is frustrating you. We propose these expressions do pro forma affiliationthat is, they make a show of affiliating, even if in fact there is no affiliation. By explicitly claiming and demonstrating an understanding of the other speakers subjectivity, our target expression orients to misalignment between the parties, makes a show of other-attentiveness and bridges a shift that advances a speakers interactional agenda. Our contribution is to show the strategic function of a previously undocumented pro-social grammatical-conversational structure. Data are in English, and in Estonian and Swedish with English translation.

  • 16.
    Wiggins, Sally
    Department of Social Sciences, Loughborough University, UK.
    Talking with your mouth full: Gustatory ‘mmm’s and the embodiment of pleasure2002Inngår i: Research on Language and Social Interaction, ISSN 0835-1813, E-ISSN 1532-7973, Vol. 35, nr 3, s. 311-336Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the expression of gustatory pleasure as an interactional and discursive construction. Psychological studies of food and eating typically focus on the individual consumer, with bodily experiences conceptualized as internal and private events. It is argued that this approach underestimates the role of discourse and the interactional nature of food consumption. The expression of pleasure is examined here as a constructed and evaluative activity, using conversational examples from family and adult group mealtimes. The "gustatory mmm" expression is used as a focus for this analysis. Intonation and sequential features of mmm are seen as essential to the construction of pleasure as an immediate and spontaneous, but descriptively vague experience. The gustatory mmm also expresses a particularly embodied sense of pleasure. This study therefore contributes to research on 3 levels. First, it extends work on eating practices to incorporate the interactional, conversational domain. Second, it engages with the debate surrounding embodiment and discursive psychology, and extends work in the latter domain to more naturalistic materials. Third, it contributes to the growing body of conversation analytic work on mmms and response tokens.

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