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  • 1.
    Drotz, Erik
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Kvalitetsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Poksinska, Bozena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Kvalitetsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Swartling, Dag
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Projekt, innovationer och entreprenörskap. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Lean in healthcare from the employee perspective2012Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Several studies may be found on how Lean production is implemented in healthcare. Most articles include single case studies and are often published in medical journals. There is however a different tradition on how research is performed in medical and management sciences. The medical studies describe the state before and after an intervention or improvement program, but rarely pay attention to the implementation process and consider such important issues such as leadership, management processes and employee's role. There is a need for more management studies on Lean healthcare that focus not only on outcomes, but also on the context and factors that influence outcomes.

    The purpose of the article is to contribute to the knowledge on how Lean production influences the daily work and routines of healthcare staff.

    1. What does it mean to employees to work in a Lean healthcare unit?
    2. How does a Lean implementation affect the role and responsibilities of the employees?

    Methodology/Approach:

    The data described in this paper comes from three case studies performed in healthcare organizations: two district care centres and one hospital unit. The data was collected through interviews, both with managers and employees, observations and document studies. The case organizations were described as successful Lean organizations and had worked with Lean for at least three years.

    Findings

    The implementation of Lean production often implies increased responsibility of employees for management of daily activities and increased participation in the improvement work. The influence of Lean on the daily work is however to great extent a matter of how the implementation is managed. In one case, Lean had been implemented by discrete projects, mainly conducted by the manager group with little effort on empowering the employees, increasing two-way communication and involvement in improvement work. Therefore, the role of the employees did not change much in conjunction with the Lean implementation. On the contrary, at another case the managers put a lot effort on coaching, developing and empowering the employees, and the improvement work had become an important working task for all employees. This led to a substantial improvement in the social climate, since the former barriers between different professions were weakened and the teamwork had increased.

    The conclusion is that there are great potential benefits with a Lean implementation for the employees, but this can only be realized if the implementation is managed with a focus on the development of employees and a more open social structure. An important method to facilitate this is improvement groups with employees from different professions and functions within the organization that has an explicit ownership of the improvements, from idea to realization.  

    Originality/Value of paper:

    Lean Healthcare is relatively a new phenomenon and more research work is needed to determine the full range of implications of the concept. The paper increases the understanding of what Lean production actually means to the healthcare staff. This knowledge is vital for the success and sustainability of Lean improvement programs in healthcare. The paper is also an inspiring source for both researchers and healthcare professional who are interested in the application of lean production in healthcare.

  • 2.
    Granfors Wellemets, U.
    et al.
    The Swedish Institute of Production Engineering Research, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Lundin, R.
    The Swedish Institute of Production Engineering Research, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Swartling, Dag
    The Swedish Institute of Production Engineering Research, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Technology driven change fail or suceed - Case studies of 24 Swedish companies1999Ingår i: Proceedings of QERGO, International Conference on TQM and Human Factors, 1999Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to highlight the differences between technology driven change projects that fail and those who succeed. The main differences are the motivation among the employees and the companies ability to build knowledge and to a lesser extent management involvement.

  • 3.
    Olausson, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Projekt, innovationer och entreprenörskap. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Projekt, innovationer och entreprenörskap. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Swartling, Dag
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Projekt, innovationer och entreprenörskap. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Bridging R&D and Manufacturing in High Tech Product Development: Comparing the Effects of Different Sourcing Strategies2006Ingår i: the RD Management Conference in Windermere, England, July 5-7: The challenges and opportunities of RD management : new directions for research, 2006Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Regardless of whether manufacturing is conducted in-house or by external suppliers, it is necessary for the R&D department to have a basic understanding of manufacturing when developing high-tech products. This paper suggests that manufacturing is an important contributor in the development of absorptive capacity at the R&D department. Starting from a distinction between integrated and separated sourcing strategies, the paper shows how the selected sourcing strategy influences the possibilities for R&D-manufacturing interaction. The case study findings illustrate that a company that outsource manufacturing to external suppliers (separated sourcing strategy) primarily has to rely on formalized means for interaction, whereas there is a greater variety in the interaction process at a company that conducts manufacturing in-house (integrated sourcing strategy). The paper concludes by discussing how absorptive capacity is dependent on the geographical distance and organizational bonds between R&D and manufacturing, and on the management of interaction on an operational level.

  • 4.
    Olausson, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Projekt, innovationer och entreprenörskap. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Swartling, Dag
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Projekt, innovationer och entreprenörskap. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Continuous learning in production processes: a comparative case study2005Ingår i: Proceedings of the 8th International QMOD conference 2005, 2005, s. 305-316Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Seven companies were studied with the purpose to discuss learning in production with regard to actual potential and course of action to realize the potential. The study shows that companies that focus on learning in production can reach significant improvements despite low input of resources with a payback time of often less than a year.

  • 5.
    Poksinska, Bozena
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Kvalitetsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Swartling, Dag
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Building capability for Employee-Driven Innovation2011Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Employee-Driven Innovation (EDI) is a companywide approach where ideas are generated and implemented by a single employee or by the joint efforts of two or more employees who have not been deliberately assigned to carry out innovative work. This paper aims to contribute to knowledge about the underlying mechanisms necessary for building EDI capability in an organisation. Two types of organisational structures supporting EDI were identified: participation through suggesting improvements, and participation through teams. The key managerial approaches for enabling EDI are: creating motivation, empowerment and autonomy; collaboration and teamwork; open climate and communication; management support; and organisational learning.

  • 6.
    Poksinska, Bozena
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Kvalitetsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Swartling, Dag
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Kvalitetsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    From Successful to Sustainable Lean Production: The Case of a Lean Prize Award Winner2018Ingår i: Total Quality Management and Business Excellence, ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 29, nr 9-10, s. 996-1011Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Many improvement programmes often fail to sustain over an extended period of time. Previous research suggests that a similar set of factors influence the success and sustainability of an improvement programme. The purpose of this paper is to make a distinction between the success and sustainability of improvement programmes, and to identify mechanisms that specifically contribute to the sustainability. In this paper, we study a sustainable improvement programme from the perspective of complexity theories that stress the importance of studying change as a dynamic process of interacting elements and events unfolding in time. We conducted a longitudinal, in-depth case study of a Swedish Lean Prize Award Winner where a Lean improvement programme was studied over 9 years. An improvement programme is successful if goals are achieved and the targeted problems are resolved. Furthermore, the first-order sustainability means the ability to sustain results and the second-order sustainability means the ability to keep an improvement programme alive. The lessons identified from complexity theories, such as destabilising the organisation, ensuring novelty and constant flow of change or self-organisation at the team level, are examples of mechanisms important to achieve the sustainability of the improvement programme.

  • 7.
    Poksinska, Bozena
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Kvalitetsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Swartling, Dag
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Projekt, innovationer och entreprenörskap. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Drotz, Erik
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Kvalitetsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    The Daily Round of Lean Leaders - a Go to Gemba Study2012Ingår i: Proceedings of the 15th QMOD-ICQSS conference / [ed] Su Mi Dahlgaard-Park, 2012Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to contribute to a better understanding of managerial practices and leadership in Lean organisations. The results presented in this paper are based on five case studies. The manager’s role changed radically with the implementation of Lean production. The focus in managerial tasks changed from managing processes to developing and coaching people. Supporting structures were developed to empower employees and give them more responsibility for the daily management activities. These supporting structures included visual control, goal deployment, short daily meetings, two-way communication flow, and a system of continuous improvement. Many leadership behaviours exhibited by Lean managers can be classified as transformational leadership behaviours. However, the need for transformational leadership behaviours was smaller, if the supporting management structure was strong. Our final conclusion is that the more successful case is a leader supported by the system than a system supported by leader.

  • 8.
    Poksinska, Bozena
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Kvalitetsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Swartling, Dag
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Projekt, innovationer och entreprenörskap. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Drotz, Erik
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Kvalitetsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    The Daily Round of Lean Leaders - a Go to Gemba Study2012Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to contribute to a better understanding of managerial practices and leadership in Lean organisations. The results presented in this paper are based on five case studies. The manager’s role changed radically with the implementation of Lean production. The focus in managerial tasks changed from managing processes to developing and coaching people. Supporting structures were developed to empower employees and give them more responsibility for the daily management activities. These supporting structures included visual control, goal deployment, short daily meetings, two-way communication flow, and a system of continuous improvement. Many leadership behaviours exhibited by Lean managers can be classified as transformational leadership behaviours. However, the need for transformational leadership behaviours was smaller, if the supporting management structure was strong. Our final conclusion is that the more successful case is a leader supported by the system than a system supported by leader.

  • 9.
    Poksinska, Bozena
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Kvalitetsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Swartling, Dag
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Kvalitetsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Drotz, Erik
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Kvalitetsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    The daily work of Lean leaders – lessons from manufacturing and healthcare2013Ingår i: Total Quality Management and Business Excellence, ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 24, nr 7-8, s. 886-898Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to contribute to a better understanding of managerial practices and leadership in Lean organisations. The results presented here are based on five case studies. The manager's role changed radically with the implementation of Lean production. The focus in managerial tasks changed from managing processes to developing and coaching people. Supporting structures were developed to empower employees and give them more responsibility for daily management activities. These supporting structures included visual control, goal deployment, short daily meetings, two-way communication flow, and a system of continuous improvement. Many leadership behaviours exhibited by Lean managers can be classified as transformational leadership behaviours. However, the need for transformational leadership behaviours was smaller, if the supporting management structure was strong.

  • 10.
    Swartling, Dag
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Projekt, innovationer och entreprenörskap. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Bringing it back home - A study in insourcing cases in 7 Swedish companiesManuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Outsourcing has increased rapidly in volume and scope during the last 10 years (Bedford, 1996 and Bailey et al., 1998). There is a risk that new concept that has worked well in one business may not be successful when transplanted elsewhere (Cox, 1996) and massive outsourcing has in some cases has failed to achieve anticipated savings (Berggren & Bengtsson, 2004). This has led to that the outsourcing trend has weakened and there are several examples of companies that are insourcing. An activity, once outsourced is not so easily insourced again since the structures and conditions surrounding the activity has changed (Wasner, 1999). Because of this the description and analysis of insourcing cases is an interesting area to study. There is however very limited number of papers that build theoretical framework regarding insourcing so the theoretical base will be outsourcing theory.

  • 11.
    Swartling, Dag
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Projekt, innovationer och entreprenörskap. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Improvement Group Development and Their use of Quality Tools - an Empirical Study2006Ingår i: 6th International CINet conference, "Continuous Innovatin - (Ways of) Making Things Happen", 2006Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been argued that continuous improvement is an introduction of different quality tools. In this empirical study the use of tools is very limited but the results are anyhow fairly OK. The results of different improvement groups vary substantially and the reason for this variation is mostly difference in knowledge and skill among the groups.

  • 12.
    Swartling, Dag
    Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan. Linköpings universitet, Ekonomiska institutionen.
    Insourcing av produktion: Erfarenheter från sex företag2005Ingår i: Alternativ till outsourcing / [ed] Lars Bengtsson, Christian Berggren, Johnny Lind, Malmö: Liber , 2005, 1, s. 100-113Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [sv]

    Företag som outsourcar är inte mer lönsamma. Istället är det företag som satsar på produktionsutveckling som har haft bäst ekonomisk utveckling de senaste åren. Det finns alternativ till outsourcing!Debatten om outsouring och utflyttning av industriproduktion handlar inte om protektionism och allmän globaliseringsfientlighet. Forskningen visar att det finns en outnyttjad utvecklingspotential i svensk till verkningsindustri som på långa vägar inte är tillvaratagen."Outsourcing har blivit en patentmedicin för att lösa alla tillverkningsproblem ett företag har i sin verksamhet. I verkligheten är svaret oftast inte så enkelt. Det är därför av stort värde att författarna har skapat en mera nyanserad helhetsbild av begreppet så att såväl yrkesverksamma som studenter kan få en bra överblick över området. Det är vår förhoppning att dessa insikter leder till en fortsatt kraftfull produktionsutveckling i Sverige." Johan Ancker, Teknikföretagen"Svensk industri har goda förutsättningar att konkurrera globalt. Den kommer under överskådlig tid att utgöra grunden för våra arbeten och vår välfärd. En industri utan produktion kommer knappast att kunna möta framtidens hårda kon kurrens och inte heller ge den tillväxt vi behöver. Vi måste fokusera på långsiktiga strategier som alternativ till den ensidiga kostnadsjakten som kvartalskapitalismen driver på. Då kan också en framtida industriell produktion i Sverige säkras." Göran Johnsson, ordförande Metall"Varför lägga ut tillverkning på någon annan om du själv kan tjäna pen gar på den? På Scania betraktar vi produktionen av komponenter som hyt ter, motorer, växellådor och axlar som en kärnverksamhet. Genom att ta till vara fördelarna med närheten till vår egen produktutveckling och dessutom jobba med ständiga produktivitetsförbättringar har vi lyckat s åstadkomma ett så högt förädlingsvärde inom vår egen produktion att den bidrar till bolagets goda lönsamhet. Så visst finns det alternativ till outsourcing!' Leif Östling, Scania

  • 13.
    Swartling, Dag
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Projekt, innovationer och entreprenörskap. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Learning and Production Improvements2007Licentiatavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall purpose of the thesis is to explore the role of learning in production improvement work.

    The research questions are:

    How does learning in production relate to investments in new machinery for existing processes and new processes?

    How is learning in production related to using production improvement methods?

    The answer to the first question is that regardless if the investment is in machinery for existing processes or new processes, learning plays an important role, both in the specification phase and in the production phase. In the specification/purchasing phase learning will lead to a better ability to specify the process equipment and to evaluate different supplier proposals. In the production phase learning can positively affect both the availability and the pace of the production process.

    The findings concerning the second question is that to be able to use improvement methods they have to be learned, and by using the methods you learn. The methods facilitate learning. It is possible to learn and improve without methods but it is not possible to use improvement methods without learning them. The ability (and willingness) to learn is more fundamental than improvement methods. Therefore production improvement projects depend more on learning ability than on improvement methods.

    When improving a production system investment in equipment and improvement methods are important. But there is a common decisive factor for both investments in equipment and improvement methods and that is the ability to learn.

    Delarbeten
    1. Technology driven change fail or suceed - Case studies of 24 Swedish companies
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Technology driven change fail or suceed - Case studies of 24 Swedish companies
    1999 (Engelska)Ingår i: Proceedings of QERGO, International Conference on TQM and Human Factors, 1999Konferensbidrag, Publicerat paper (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to highlight the differences between technology driven change projects that fail and those who succeed. The main differences are the motivation among the employees and the companies ability to build knowledge and to a lesser extent management involvement.

    Nyckelord
    change, production, robot investments
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Teknik och teknologier
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-102265 (URN)
    Konferens
    The International Conference on TQM and Human Factors QERGO´99, Linköping, Sweden, June 15-17, 1999
    Tillgänglig från: 2013-12-04 Skapad: 2013-12-04 Senast uppdaterad: 2013-12-04
    2. Bringing it back home - A study in insourcing cases in 7 Swedish companies
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Bringing it back home - A study in insourcing cases in 7 Swedish companies
    (Engelska)Manuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Outsourcing has increased rapidly in volume and scope during the last 10 years (Bedford, 1996 and Bailey et al., 1998). There is a risk that new concept that has worked well in one business may not be successful when transplanted elsewhere (Cox, 1996) and massive outsourcing has in some cases has failed to achieve anticipated savings (Berggren & Bengtsson, 2004). This has led to that the outsourcing trend has weakened and there are several examples of companies that are insourcing. An activity, once outsourced is not so easily insourced again since the structures and conditions surrounding the activity has changed (Wasner, 1999). Because of this the description and analysis of insourcing cases is an interesting area to study. There is however very limited number of papers that build theoretical framework regarding insourcing so the theoretical base will be outsourcing theory.

    Nationell ämneskategori
    Teknik och teknologier
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-102268 (URN)
    Tillgänglig från: 2013-12-04 Skapad: 2013-12-04 Senast uppdaterad: 2013-12-04
    3. Continuous learning in production processes: a comparative case study
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Continuous learning in production processes: a comparative case study
    2005 (Engelska)Ingår i: Proceedings of the 8th International QMOD conference 2005, 2005, s. 305-316Konferensbidrag, Publicerat paper (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Seven companies were studied with the purpose to discuss learning in production with regard to actual potential and course of action to realize the potential. The study shows that companies that focus on learning in production can reach significant improvements despite low input of resources with a payback time of often less than a year.

    Nationell ämneskategori
    Ekonomi och näringsliv
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14225 (URN)
    Konferens
    The 8th International QMOD Conference 29, June-01, July, Palermo, Italy
    Tillgänglig från: 2007-02-26 Skapad: 2007-02-26 Senast uppdaterad: 2013-12-04
    4. Improvement Group Development and Their use of Quality Tools - an Empirical Study
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Improvement Group Development and Their use of Quality Tools - an Empirical Study
    2006 (Engelska)Ingår i: 6th International CINet conference, "Continuous Innovatin - (Ways of) Making Things Happen", 2006Konferensbidrag, Publicerat paper (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been argued that continuous improvement is an introduction of different quality tools. In this empirical study the use of tools is very limited but the results are anyhow fairly OK. The results of different improvement groups vary substantially and the reason for this variation is mostly difference in knowledge and skill among the groups.

    Nyckelord
    continuos improvement, effective groups, quality tools
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Samhällsvetenskap
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-37014 (URN)33402 (Lokalt ID)90-77360-05-0 (ISBN)33402 (Arkivnummer)33402 (OAI)
    Konferens
    7th International CINet conference, "CI and Sustainability - Designing the road ahead" 8-12 September 2006, Lucca, Italy
    Tillgänglig från: 2009-10-10 Skapad: 2009-10-10 Senast uppdaterad: 2013-12-04
  • 14.
    Swartling, Dag
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Projekt, innovationer och entreprenörskap. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Missing link between change approaches?2010Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 15.
    Swartling, Dag
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Kvalitetsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Towards Sustainable Improvement Systems2013Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [sv]

    Förbättringar i allmänhet och uthålliga förbättringar i synnerhet är problematiska områden. Andelen misslyckanden är hög, siffror kring 70 procent nämns ofta, men varför är det svårt att uppnå långsiktigt uthålliga förbättringar och förbättringssystem? Syftet med denna avhandling är att bidra till förståelse av processen för att skapa långsiktigt uthålliga förbättringssystem. Forskningsfrågorna är:

    • Vilken är processen för att skapa ett uthålligt förbättringssystem?
    • Vilka mekanismer påverkar uthålligheten hos förbättringssystem?
    • Hur påverkar de olika mekanismerna förbättringssystemens uthållighet?

    Denna avhandling går bortom att söka efter kritiska framgångsfaktorer för långsiktigt uthålliga förbättringssystem utan identifierar och undersöker mekanismer. Eftersom mekanismer verkar i ett specifikt system är de definitionsmässigt kontextuella vilket kritiska framgångsfaktorer inte är.

    Metoden som använts för att uppfylla syftet är en serie fallstudier. Totalt 13 fall har studerats genom intervjuer, deltagande i möten, arbete i organisationen och skuggning.

    Avhandlingen visar att det finns stora skillnader mellan hur olika organisationer uppnår långsiktigt uthålliga förbättringssystem, trots detta var det möjligt att bygga en generell modell, denna består av tre faser och tre tillstånd. Faserna är initiering överföring uthållighet. Varje fas har ett speciellt tillstånd som behöver uppnås innan nästa fas kan börja. Det första tillståndet är att de anställda ser förbättringarna som positiva för dem. Det andra tillståndet är att de anställda har förändrat sitt tankesätt och beteende. Det tredje tillståndet är ett uthålligt förbättringssystem.

    Delarbeten
    1. Two views on Lean production: Alternative interpretations of the Toyota production system
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Two views on Lean production: Alternative interpretations of the Toyota production system
    (Engelska)Manuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Lean has attracted a lot of attention, both in academia and in practice. However, there are many views about what Lean production actually is. One view focuses solely on using various tools to reduce waste, while an alternative view also focuses on changing an organization’s culture and developing employees. These two divergent views on Lean production represent the starting point of this paper, the purpose of which is to discuss the two different views and exemplify their practical implications. Four case studies were conducted and the results show that in practice there are two types of Lean: the more technical focused Scientific Management Lean (SM-Lean) and the more social-focused Human Lean (H-Lean). The primary difference between the two types is how they view employee development.

    Nyckelord
    Lean production, employee development, Lean culture, sustainable improvements
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Teknik och teknologier
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-100159 (URN)
    Tillgänglig från: 2013-10-30 Skapad: 2013-10-30 Senast uppdaterad: 2013-10-30Bibliografiskt granskad
    2. Continuous improvement put into practice: Alternative approaches to get a successful quality program
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Continuous improvement put into practice: Alternative approaches to get a successful quality program
    2009 (Engelska)Ingår i: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 3, nr 3, s. 337-351Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the existing body of knowledge about what distinguishes effective continuous improvement (CI) approaches and to explain some of the mechanisms which create a successful quality program.

    Design/methodology/approach – The empirical data were collected from interviews with employees at several levels in seven companies. The companies were deliberately selected to represent different types of resource consumption and outcome from a quality program.

    Findings – The implementation approaches of the studied companies were classified according to four different categories: parallel, integrated, coordinated and project approaches. Companies that adopt a project approach tend to fail to achieve anything more than minor improvements, while companies that take parallel and coordinated approaches realise significant improvements but use more resources than companies that utilise an integrated approach.

    Practical implications – This paper illustrates and explains why the project approach ought to be avoided. The paper also highlights the benefits of an integrated approach that is focused on learning.

    Originality/value – This paper contributes to theory and practice by providing an empirically-based explanation for the outcome of alternative implementations of CI in practice.

    Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
    Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2009
    Nyckelord
    Continuous improvement, Efficiency of quality program, Implementation approach, Quality programs
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Teknik och teknologier
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-100160 (URN)10.1108/17566691111182870 (DOI)
    Tillgänglig från: 2013-10-30 Skapad: 2013-10-30 Senast uppdaterad: 2017-12-06Bibliografiskt granskad
    3. Management Initiation of Continuous Improvement from a Motivational Perspective
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Management Initiation of Continuous Improvement from a Motivational Perspective
    2013 (Engelska)Ingår i: Journal of Applied Economics and Business Research, ISSN 1927-033X, E-ISSN 1927-033X, Vol. 3, nr 2, s. 81-94Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Many continuous improvement (CI) initiatives fail since management is unsuccessful in motivating the employees to actively participate in CI activities. In such cases CI often is run by managers and the power of wide participation is lost. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mechanisms behind motivating employees to participate in CI work. The paper is based on findings from three different cases of highly successful CI organizations within different areas. The findings are that the mechanisms behind motivation for CI can be divided into respect for people and improvement system organization. Within respect for people, there need to be meaningfulness and trust, employees need to be seen as individuals, be given problem based training and education, and be given increased authority and responsibility. Within the organization of the improvement system, crucial areas are: Communication; visualization; and cross-functional, cross-professional improvement work. The paper not only shows which areas are important but explains why they are important from a motivation-theory perspective.

    Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
    Journal of Applied Economics and Business Research, 2013
    Nyckelord
    Motivation, Continuous improvement, Lean production
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Teknik och teknologier
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-100162 (URN)
    Tillgänglig från: 2013-10-30 Skapad: 2013-10-30 Senast uppdaterad: 2017-12-06Bibliografiskt granskad
    4. From Successful to Sustainable Lean Production: The Case of a Lean Prize Award Winner
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>From Successful to Sustainable Lean Production: The Case of a Lean Prize Award Winner
    2018 (Engelska)Ingår i: Total Quality Management and Business Excellence, ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 29, nr 9-10, s. 996-1011Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Many improvement programmes often fail to sustain over an extended period of time. Previous research suggests that a similar set of factors influence the success and sustainability of an improvement programme. The purpose of this paper is to make a distinction between the success and sustainability of improvement programmes, and to identify mechanisms that specifically contribute to the sustainability. In this paper, we study a sustainable improvement programme from the perspective of complexity theories that stress the importance of studying change as a dynamic process of interacting elements and events unfolding in time. We conducted a longitudinal, in-depth case study of a Swedish Lean Prize Award Winner where a Lean improvement programme was studied over 9 years. An improvement programme is successful if goals are achieved and the targeted problems are resolved. Furthermore, the first-order sustainability means the ability to sustain results and the second-order sustainability means the ability to keep an improvement programme alive. The lessons identified from complexity theories, such as destabilising the organisation, ensuring novelty and constant flow of change or self-organisation at the team level, are examples of mechanisms important to achieve the sustainability of the improvement programme.

    Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
    Taylor & Francis, 2018
    Nyckelord
    Lean production, Improvement program, sustainability
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Teknik och teknologier
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-100163 (URN)10.1080/14783363.2018.1486539 (DOI)000442759900003 ()
    Forskningsfinansiär
    VINNOVA, 2008-01958
    Anmärkning

    The previous status of this publication was Manuscript.

    Tillgänglig från: 2013-10-30 Skapad: 2013-10-30 Senast uppdaterad: 2018-09-13Bibliografiskt granskad
    5. Changing the Thinking and Behaviour of an individual: When Implementing Lean Production
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Changing the Thinking and Behaviour of an individual: When Implementing Lean Production
    2013 (Engelska)Manuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper consists of an introduction, and a theoretical framework treating different areas where forces can be formed. At the end of the theoretical framework a conceptual model mapping the different sources where forces can originate is presented. This is followed by a methodological part where methodological aspects are discussed. Succeeding the methodological part is the empirical part where the empirical data is presented thematically based on the conceptual model. At the end of the paper are the conclusions and managerial implications.

    Nationell ämneskategori
    Teknik och teknologier
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-100164 (URN)
    Tillgänglig från: 2013-10-30 Skapad: 2013-10-30 Senast uppdaterad: 2015-01-19Bibliografiskt granskad
    6. The daily work of Lean leaders – lessons from manufacturing and healthcare
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>The daily work of Lean leaders – lessons from manufacturing and healthcare
    2013 (Engelska)Ingår i: Total Quality Management and Business Excellence, ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 24, nr 7-8, s. 886-898Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to contribute to a better understanding of managerial practices and leadership in Lean organisations. The results presented here are based on five case studies. The manager's role changed radically with the implementation of Lean production. The focus in managerial tasks changed from managing processes to developing and coaching people. Supporting structures were developed to empower employees and give them more responsibility for daily management activities. These supporting structures included visual control, goal deployment, short daily meetings, two-way communication flow, and a system of continuous improvement. Many leadership behaviours exhibited by Lean managers can be classified as transformational leadership behaviours. However, the need for transformational leadership behaviours was smaller, if the supporting management structure was strong.

    Nyckelord
    Lean leadership, Lean production, transformational leadership, managerial tasks
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Teknik och teknologier
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-94169 (URN)10.1080/14783363.2013.791098 (DOI)000321238300011 ()
    Tillgänglig från: 2013-06-17 Skapad: 2013-06-17 Senast uppdaterad: 2017-12-06Bibliografiskt granskad
  • 16.
    Swartling, Dag
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Kvalitetsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Two views on Lean production: Alternative interpretations of the Toyota production systemManuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Lean has attracted a lot of attention, both in academia and in practice. However, there are many views about what Lean production actually is. One view focuses solely on using various tools to reduce waste, while an alternative view also focuses on changing an organization’s culture and developing employees. These two divergent views on Lean production represent the starting point of this paper, the purpose of which is to discuss the two different views and exemplify their practical implications. Four case studies were conducted and the results show that in practice there are two types of Lean: the more technical focused Scientific Management Lean (SM-Lean) and the more social-focused Human Lean (H-Lean). The primary difference between the two types is how they view employee development.

  • 17.
    Swartling, Dag
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Kvalitetsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Olausson, Daniel
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Projekt, innovationer och entreprenörskap. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Continuous improvement put into practice: Alternative approaches to get a successful quality program2009Ingår i: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 3, nr 3, s. 337-351Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the existing body of knowledge about what distinguishes effective continuous improvement (CI) approaches and to explain some of the mechanisms which create a successful quality program.

    Design/methodology/approach – The empirical data were collected from interviews with employees at several levels in seven companies. The companies were deliberately selected to represent different types of resource consumption and outcome from a quality program.

    Findings – The implementation approaches of the studied companies were classified according to four different categories: parallel, integrated, coordinated and project approaches. Companies that adopt a project approach tend to fail to achieve anything more than minor improvements, while companies that take parallel and coordinated approaches realise significant improvements but use more resources than companies that utilise an integrated approach.

    Practical implications – This paper illustrates and explains why the project approach ought to be avoided. The paper also highlights the benefits of an integrated approach that is focused on learning.

    Originality/value – This paper contributes to theory and practice by providing an empirically-based explanation for the outcome of alternative implementations of CI in practice.

  • 18.
    Swartling, Dag
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Projekt, innovationer och entreprenörskap. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Olausson, Daniel
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Projekt, innovationer och entreprenörskap. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Improvemts vs resources consumption: on the impact of continuous improvement approach2010Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 19.
    Swartling, Dag
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Kvalitetsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Poksinska, Bozena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Kvalitetsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Changing the Thinking and Behaviour of an individual: When Implementing Lean Production2013Manuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper consists of an introduction, and a theoretical framework treating different areas where forces can be formed. At the end of the theoretical framework a conceptual model mapping the different sources where forces can originate is presented. This is followed by a methodological part where methodological aspects are discussed. Succeeding the methodological part is the empirical part where the empirical data is presented thematically based on the conceptual model. At the end of the paper are the conclusions and managerial implications.

  • 20.
    Swartling, Dag
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Kvalitetsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Poksinska, Bozena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Kvalitetsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Management Initiation of Continuous Improvement from a Motivational Perspective2013Ingår i: Journal of Applied Economics and Business Research, ISSN 1927-033X, E-ISSN 1927-033X, Vol. 3, nr 2, s. 81-94Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Many continuous improvement (CI) initiatives fail since management is unsuccessful in motivating the employees to actively participate in CI activities. In such cases CI often is run by managers and the power of wide participation is lost. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mechanisms behind motivating employees to participate in CI work. The paper is based on findings from three different cases of highly successful CI organizations within different areas. The findings are that the mechanisms behind motivation for CI can be divided into respect for people and improvement system organization. Within respect for people, there need to be meaningfulness and trust, employees need to be seen as individuals, be given problem based training and education, and be given increased authority and responsibility. Within the organization of the improvement system, crucial areas are: Communication; visualization; and cross-functional, cross-professional improvement work. The paper not only shows which areas are important but explains why they are important from a motivation-theory perspective.

1 - 20 av 20
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