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  • 1.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    A Gentle Introduction to the Comparison Between Null Hypothesis Testing and Bayesian Analysis: Reanalysis of Two Randomized Controlled Trials2018Ingår i: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 20, nr 10, artikel-id e10873Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The debate on the use and misuse of P values has risen and fallen throughout their almost century-long existence in scientific discovery. Over the past few years, the debate has again received front-page attention, particularly through the public reminder by the American Statistical Association on how P values should be used and interpreted. At the core of the issue lies a fault in the way that scientific evidence is dichotomized and research is subsequently reported, and this fault is exacerbated by researchers giving license to statistical models to do scientific inference. This paper highlights a different approach to handling the evidence collected during a randomized controlled trial, one that does not dichotomize, but rather reports the evidence collected. Through the use of a coin flipping experiment and reanalysis of real-world data, the traditional approach of testing null hypothesis significance is contrasted with a Bayesian approach. This paper is meant to be understood by those who rely on statistical models to draw conclusions from data, but are not statisticians and may therefore not be able to grasp the debate that is primarily led by statisticians.

  • 2.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Databas och informationsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Bayesian Optimisation of Gated Bayesian Networks for Algorithmic Trading2015Ingår i: / [ed] John Mark Agosta, Rommel Novaes Carvalho, CEUR-WS.org , 2015, Vol. 1565, s. 2-11Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Gated Bayesian networks (GBNs) are an extension of Bayesian networks that aim to model systems that have distinct phases. In this paper, we aim to use GBNs to output buy and sell decisions for use in algorithmic trading systems. These systems may have several parameters that require tuning, and assessing the performance of these systems as a function of their parameters cannot be expressed in closed form, and thus requires simulation. Bayesian optimisation has grown in popularity as a means of global optimisation of parameters where the objective function may be costly or a black box. We show how algorithmic trading using GBNs, supported by Bayesian optimisation, can lower risk towards invested capital, while at the same time generating similar or better rewards, compared to the benchmark investment strategy buy-and-hold.

  • 3.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Feasibility of a Fully Automated Multiple Session Alcohol Intervention to University Students, Using Different Modes of Electronic Delivery: The TOPHAT 1 Study2013Ingår i: Journal of Software Engineering and Applications, ISSN 1945-3116, E-ISSN 1945-3124, nr 6, s. 14-26Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In recent years more and more electronic health behaviour interventions have been developed in order to reach individuals with an unhealthy behaviour such as risky drinking. This is especially relevant in university students who are among those who most frequently are risky drinkers. This study explored the acceptability and feasibility, in an unselected group of university students, of a fully automated multiple session alcohol intervention offering different modes of delivery such as email, SMS and Android.

    Material and Methods: A total of 11,283 students at Linköping University in Sweden were invited to perform a single session alcohol intervention and among those accepting this (4916 students) a total of 24.7% accepted to further participate in the extended multiple intervention lasting 3 - 6 weeks. The students could choose mode of delivery, total length of the intervention (between 3 - 6 weeks) and number of messages per week (3, 5, or 7 per week). A follow-up questionnaire was applied after the intervention to which 82.7% responded.

    Results: most students wanted to receive the messages by email with the shortest intervention length (3 weeks) and as few messages as possible per week (3 messages). However, no major difference was seen regarding satisfaction with the length and frequency of the intervention despite chosen length and frequency. Most students also expressed satisfaction with the content of the messages and would recommend the intervention to a fellow student in need of reducing drinking.

    Discussion and Conclusion: Based upon feedback from the students, a multiple push-based intervention appears to be feasible to offer additional help for those who have interest after a single session alcohol intervention. In a forthcoming study we will further explore the optimal mode of delivery and length of intervention and number of messages per week.

  • 4.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Databas och informationsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Gated Bayesian Networks2017Doktorsavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Bayesian networks have grown to become a dominant type of model within the domain of probabilistic graphical models. Not only do they empower users with a graphical means for describing the relationships among random variables, but they also allow for (potentially) fewer parameters to estimate, and enable more efficient inference. The random variables and the relationships among them decide the structure of the directed acyclic graph that represents the Bayesian network. It is the stasis over time of these two components that we question in this thesis.

    By introducing a new type of probabilistic graphical model, which we call gated Bayesian networks, we allow for the variables that we include in our model, and the relationships among them, to change overtime. We introduce algorithms that can learn gated Bayesian networks that use different variables at different times, required due to the process which we are modelling going through distinct phases. We evaluate the efficacy of these algorithms within the domain of algorithmic trading, showing how the learnt gated Bayesian networks can improve upon a passive approach to trading. We also introduce algorithms that detect changes in the relationships among the random variables, allowing us to create a model that consists of several Bayesian networks, thereby revealing changes and the structure by which these changes occur. The resulting models can be used to detect the currently most appropriate Bayesian network, and we show their use in real-world examples from both the domain of sports analytics and finance.

  • 5.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Databas och informationsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Regime Aware Learning2016Ingår i: Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Probabilistic Graphical Models, JMLR , 2016, Vol. 52, s. 1-12Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose a regime aware learning algorithm to learn a sequence of Bayesian networks (BNs) that model a system that undergoes regime changes. The last BN in the sequence represents the system’s current regime, and should be used for BN inference. To explore the feasibility of the algorithm, we create baseline tests against learning a singe BN, and show that our proposed algorithm outperforms the single BN approach. We also apply the learning algorithm on real world data from the financial domain, where it is evident that the algorithm is able to produce BNs that have adapted to the regime changes during the most recent global financial crisis of 2007-08.

  • 6.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Databas och informationsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Regimes in baseball players' career data2017Ingår i: Data mining and knowledge discovery, ISSN 1384-5810, E-ISSN 1573-756X, Vol. 31, nr 6, s. 1580-1621Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we investigate how we can use gated Bayesian networks, a type of probabilistic graphical model, to represent regimes in baseball players’ career data. We find that baseball players do indeed go through different regimes throughout their career, where each regime can be associated with a certain level of performance. We show that some of the transitions between regimes happen in conjunction with major events in the players’ career, such as being traded or injured, but that some transitions cannot be explained by such events. The resulting model is a tool for managers and coaches that can be used to identify where transitions have occurred, as well as an online monitoring tool to detect which regime the player currently is in.

  • 7.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Databas och informationsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken .
    Feasibility and user perception of a fully automated push-based multiple-session alcohol intervention for university students: randomized controlled trial.2014Ingår i: JMIR mhealth and uhealth, E-ISSN 2291-5222, Vol. 2, nr 2, s. e30-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In recent years, many electronic health behavior interventions have been developed in order to reach individuals with unhealthy behaviors, such as risky drinking. This is especially relevant for university students, many of whom are risky drinkers.

    OBJECTIVE: This study explored the acceptability and feasibility in a nontreatment-seeking group of university students (including both risk and nonrisk drinkers), of a fully automated, push-based, multiple-session, alcohol intervention, comparing two modes of delivery by randomizing participants to receive the intervention either by SMS text messaging (short message service, SMS) or by email.

    METHODS: A total of 5499 students at Luleå University in northern Sweden were invited to participate in a single-session alcohol assessment and feedback intervention; 28.04% (1542/5499) students completed this part of the study. In total, 29.44% (454/1542) of those participating in the single-session intervention accepted to participate further in the extended multiple-session intervention lasting for 4 weeks. The students were randomized to receive the intervention messages via SMS or email. A follow-up questionnaire was sent immediately after the intervention and 52.9% (240/454) responded.

    RESULTS: No difference was seen regarding satisfaction with the length and frequency of the intervention, regardless of the mode of delivery. Approximately 15% in both the SMS (19/136) and email groups (15/104) would have preferred the other mode of delivery. On the other hand, more students in the SMS group (46/229, 20.1%) stopped participating in the intervention during the 4-week period compared with the email group (10/193, 5.2%). Most students in both groups expressed satisfaction with the content of the messages and would recommend the intervention to a fellow student in need of reducing drinking. A striking difference was seen regarding when a message was read; 88.2% (120/136) of the SMS group read the messages within 1 hour in contrast to 45.2% (47/104) in the email group. In addition, 83.1% (113/136) in the SMS group stated that they read all or almost all the messages, compared with only 63.5% (66/104) in the email group.

    CONCLUSIONS: Based on the feedback from the students, an extended, multiple-session, push-based intervention seems to be a feasible option for students interested in additional support after a single-session alcohol intervention. SMS as a mode of delivery seems to have some advantages over email regarding when a message is read and the proportion of messages read. However, more students in the SMS group stopped the intervention than in the email group. Based on these promising findings, further studies comparing the effectiveness of single-session interventions with extended multiple-session interventions delivered separately or in combination are warranted.

  • 8.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Databas och informationsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Peña, Jose M.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Databas och informationsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Gated Bayesian Networks2013Ingår i: TWELFTH SCANDINAVIAN CONFERENCE ON ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE (SCAI 2013), Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2013, s. 35-44Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces a new probabilistic graphical model called gated Bayesian network (GBN). This model evolved from the need to represent real world processes that include several distinct phases. In essence a GBN is a model that combines several Bayesian networks (BN) in such a manner that they may be active or inactive during queries to the model. We use objects called gates to combine BNs, and to activate and deactivate them when predefined logical statements are satisfied. These statements are based on combinations of posterior probabilities of the variables in the BNs. Although GBN is a new formalism there are features of GBNs that are similar to other formalisms and research, including influence diagrams, context-specific independence and structural adaptation.

  • 9.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Databas och informationsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Peña, Jose M.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Databas och informationsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Gated Bayesian Networks for Algorithmic Trading2016Ingår i: International Journal of Approximate Reasoning, ISSN 0888-613X, E-ISSN 1873-4731, Vol. 69, s. 58-80Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Gated Bayesian networks (GBNs) are a recently introduced extension of Bayesian networks that aims to model dynamical systems consisting of several distinct phases. In this paper, we present an algorithm for semi-automatic learning of GBNs. We use the algorithm to learn GBNs that output buy and sell decisions for use in algorithmic trading systems. We show how using the learnt GBNs can substantially lower risks towards invested capital, while at the same time generating similar or better rewards, compared to the benchmark investment strategy buy-and-hold.

  • 10.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Databas och informationsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Peña, Jose M.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Databas och informationsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Learning Gated Bayesian Networks for Algorithmic Trading2014Ingår i: Probabilistic Graphical Models: 7th European Workshop, PGM 2014, Utrecht, The Netherlands, September 17-19, 2014. Proceedings / [ed] Linda C. van der Gaag and Ad J. Feelders, Springer, 2014, s. 49-64Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Gated Bayesian networks (GBNs) are a recently introduced extension of Bayesian networks that aims to model dynamical systems consisting of several distinct phases. In this paper, we present an algo- rithm for semi-automatic learning of GBNs. We use the algorithm to learn GBNs that output buy and sell decisions for use in algorithmic trading systems. We show how using the learnt GBNs can substantially lower risks towards invested capital, while at the same time generating similar or better rewards, compared to the benchmark investment strat- egy buy-and-hold. 

  • 11.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Databas och informationsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Peña, Jose M.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Statistik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Modelling regimes with Bayesian network mixtures2017Ingår i: Proceedings of the 30th Annual Workshop of the Swedish Artificial Intelligence Society SAIS 2017, May 15–16, 2017, Karlskrona, Sweden / [ed] Niklas Lavesson, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2017, Vol. 137, s. 20-29, artikel-id 002Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Bayesian networks (BNs) are advantageous when representing single independence models, however they do not allow us to model changes among the relationships of the random variables over time. Due to such regime changes, it may be necessary to use different BNs at different times in order to have an appropriate model over the random variables. In this paper we propose two extensions to the traditional hidden Markov model, allowing us to represent both the different regimes using different BNs, and potential driving forces behind the regime changes, by modelling potential dependence between state transitions and some observable variables. We show how expectation maximisation can be used to learn the parameters of the proposed model, and run both synthetic and real-world experiments to show the model’s potential.

  • 12.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Databas och informationsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    White, Ian R.
    Cambridge Institute Public Heatlh, England.
    McCambridge, Jim
    University of York, England.
    Online Alcohol Assessment and Feedback for Hazardous and Harmful Drinkers: Findings From the AMADEUS-2 Randomized Controlled Trial of Routine Practice in Swedish Universities2015Ingår i: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 17, nr 7, s. e170-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous research on the effectiveness of online alcohol interventions for college students has shown mixed results. Small benefits have been found in some studies and because online interventions are inexpensive and possible to implement on a large scale, there is a need for further study. Objective: This study evaluated the effectiveness of national provision of a brief online alcohol intervention for students in Sweden. Methods: Risky drinkers at 9 colleges and universities in Sweden were invited by mail and identified using a single screening question. These students (N=1605) gave consent and were randomized into a 2-arm parallel group randomized controlled trial consisting of immediate or delayed access to a fully automated online assessment and intervention with personalized feedback. Results: After 2 months, there was no strong evidence of effectiveness with no statistically significant differences in the planned analyses, although there were some indication of possible benefit in sensitivity analyses suggesting an intervention effect of a 10% reduction (95% CI -30% to 10%) in total weekly alcohol consumption. Also, differences in effect sizes between universities were seen with participants from a major university (n=365) reducing their weekly alcohol consumption by 14% (95% CI -23% to -4%). However, lower recruitment than planned and differential attrition in the intervention and control group (49% vs 68%) complicated interpretation of the outcome data. Conclusions: Any effects of current national provision are likely to be small and further research and development work is

  • 13.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Akutkliniken. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken .
    McCambridge, Jim
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, United Kingdom.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Interaktiva och kognitiva system. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Arbetslivsinriktad rehabilitering. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Utvärdering och hälsoekonomi.
    Effectiveness of a proactive mail-based alcohol Internet intervention for university students: dismantling the assessment and feedback components in a randomized controlled trial2012Ingår i: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 14, nr 5Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: University students in Sweden routinely receive proactive mail-based alcohol Internet interventions sent from student health services. This intervention provides personalized normative feedback on alcohol consumption with suggestions on how to decrease drinking. Earlier feasibility trials by our group and others have examined effectiveness in simple parallel-groups designs.Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of electronic screening and brief intervention, using a randomized controlled trial design that takes account of baseline assessment reactivity (and other possible effects of the research process) due to the similarity between the intervention and assessment content. The design of the study allowed for exploration of the magnitude of the assessment effects per se.Methods: This trial used a dismantling design and randomly assigned 5227 students to 3 groups: (1) routine practice assessment and feedback, (2) assessment-only without feedback, and (3) neither assessment nor feedback. At baseline all participants were blinded to study participation, with no contact being made with group 3. We approached students 2 months later to participate in a cross-sectional alcohol survey. All interventions were fully automated and did not have any human involvement. All data used in the analysis were based on self-assessment using questionnaires. The participants were unaware that they were participating in a trial and thus were also blinded to which group they were randomly assigned.Results: Overall, 44.69% (n = 2336) of those targeted for study completed follow-up. Attrition was similar in groups 1 (697/1742, 40.01%) and 2 (737/1742, 42.31% retained) and lower in group 3 (902/1743, 51.75% retained). Intention-to-treat analyses among all participants regardless of their baseline drinking status revealed no differences between groups in all alcohol parameters at the 2-month follow-up. Per-protocol analyses of groups 1 and 2 among those who accepted the email intervention (36.2% of the students who were offered the intervention in group 1 and 37.3% of the students in group2 ) and who were risky drinkers at baseline (60.7% follow-up rate in group 1 and 63.5% in group 2) suggested possible small beneficial effects on weekly consumption attributable to feedback.Conclusions: This approach to outcome evaluation is highly conservative, and small benefits may follow the actual uptake of feedback intervention in students who are risky drinkers, the precise target group.Trial Registration: International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN): 24735383; http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN24735383 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6Awq7gjXG)

  • 14.
    McCambridge, Jim
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK, England.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Databas och informationsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    White, Ian R.
    Institute Public Heatlh, England .
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Akutkliniken. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken .
    Alcohol assessment and feedback by e-mail for university student hazardous and harmful drinkers: study protocol for the AMADEUS-2 randomised controlled trial2013Ingår i: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 13, nr 949Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Alcohol is responsible for a large and growing proportion of the global burden of disease, as well as being the cause of social problems. Brief interventions are one component of comprehensive policy measures necessary to reduce these harms. Brief interventions increasingly take advantage of the Internet to reach large numbers of high risk groups such as students. The research literature on the efficacy and effectiveness of online interventions is developing rapidly. Although many studies show benefits in the form of reduced consumption, other intervention studies show no effects, for reasons that are unclear. Sweden became the first country in the world to implement a national system in which all university students are offered a brief online intervention via an e-mail. Methods/Design: This randomized controlled trial (RCT) aims to evaluate the effectiveness of this national system comprising a brief online intervention among university students who are hazardous and harmful drinkers. This study employs a conventional RCT design in which screening to determine eligibility precedes random allocation to immediate or delayed access to online intervention. The online intervention evaluated comprises three main components; assessment, normative feedback and advice on reducing drinking. Screening is confined to a single question in order to minimise assessment reactivity and to prevent contamination. Outcomes will be evaluated after 2 months, with total weekly alcohol consumption being the primary outcome measure. Invitations to participate are provided by e-mail to approximately 55,000 students in 9 Swedish universities. Discussion: This RCT evaluates routine service provision in Swedish universities via a delay in offer of intervention to the control group. It evaluates effects in the key population for whom this intervention has been designed. Study findings will inform the further development of the national service provision.

  • 15.
    McCambridge, Jim
    et al.
    London School Hyg and Trop Med, England .
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Databas och informationsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    White, Ian R.
    Institute Public Heatlh, England .
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för hälso- och sjukvårdsanalys. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Akutkliniken. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken .
    Alcohol assessment and feedback by email for university students: main findings from a randomised controlled trial2013Ingår i: British Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0007-1250, E-ISSN 1472-1465, Vol. 203, nr 5, s. 334-340Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanBrief interventions can be efficacious in changing alcohol consumption and increasingly take advantage of the internet to reach high-risk populations such as students. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanAims less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanTo evaluate the effectiveness of a brief online intervention, controlling for the possible effects of the research process. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethod less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanA three-arm parallel groups design was used to explore the magnitude of the feedback and assessment component effects. The three groups were: alcohol assessment and feedback (group 1); alcohol assessment only without feedback (group 2); and no contact, and thus neither assessment nor feedback (group 3). Outcomes were evaluated after 3 months via an invitation to participate in a brief cross-sectional lifestyle survey. The study was undertaken in two universities randomising the email addresses of all 14 910 students (the AMADEUS-1 study, trial registration: ISRCTN28328154). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanOverall, 52% (n=7809) of students completed follow-up, with small differences in attrition between the three groups. For each of the two primary outcomes, there was one statistically significant difference between groups, with group 1 having 3.7% fewer risky drinkers at follow-up than group 3 (P=0.006) and group 2 scoring 0.16 points lower than group 3 on the three alcohol consumption questions from the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT-C) (P = 0.039). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThis study provides some evidence of population-level benefit attained through intervening with individual students.

  • 16.
    McCambridge, Jim
    et al.
    London School Hyg and Tropical Medicine, England .
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Akutkliniken.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Interaktiva och kognitiva system. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Utvärdering och hälsoekonomi.
    Alcohol email assessment and feedback study dismantling effectiveness for university students (AMADEUS-1): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial2012Ingår i: TRIALS, ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 13, nr 49Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Alcohol causes huge problems for population health and for society, which require interventions with individuals as well as populations to prevent and reduce harms. Brief interventions can be effective and increasingly take advantage of the internet to reach high-risk groups such as students. The research literature on the effectiveness of online interventions is developing rapidly and is confronted by methodological challenges common to other areas of e-health including attrition and assessment reactivity and in the design of control conditions. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods/design: The study aim is to evaluate the effectiveness of a brief online intervention, employing a randomized controlled trial (RCT) design that takes account of baseline assessment reactivity, and other possible effects of the research process. Outcomes will be evaluated after 3 months both among student populations as a whole including for a randomized no contact control group and among those who are risky drinkers randomized to brief assessment and feedback (routine practice) or to brief assessment only. A three-arm parallel groups trial will also allow exploration of the magnitude of the feedback and assessment component effects. The trial will be undertaken simultaneously in 2 universities randomizing approximately 15,300 students who will all be blinded to trial participation. All participants will be offered routine practice intervention at the end of the study. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanDiscussion: This trial informs the development of routine service delivery in Swedish universities and more broadly contributes a new approach to the study of the effectiveness of online interventions in student populations, with relevance to behaviors other than alcohol consumption. The use of blinding and deception in this study raise ethical issues that warrant further attention.

  • 17.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Andersson, E Kristin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Linderoth, Catharina
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Leijon, Matti E.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Centrum för verksamhetsstöd och utveckling, Verksamhetsutveckling vård och hälsa.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    A Text Message-Based Intervention Targeting Alcohol Consumption Among University Students: User Satisfaction and Acceptability Study.2018Ingår i: JMIR Human Factors, E-ISSN 2292-9495, Vol. 5, nr 3, artikel-id e23Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Heavy consumption of alcohol among university students is a global problem, with excessive drinking being the social norm. Students can be a difficult target group to reach, and only a minority seek alcohol-related support. It is important to develop interventions that can reach university students in a way that does not further stretch the resources of the health services. Text messaging (short message service, SMS)-based interventions can enable continuous, real-time, cost-effective, brief support in a real-world setting, but there is a limited amount of evidence for effective interventions on alcohol consumption among young people based on text messaging. To address this, a text messaging-based alcohol consumption intervention, the Amadeus 3 intervention, was developed.

    OBJECTIVE: This study explored self-reported changes in drinking habits in an intervention group and a control group. Additionally, user satisfaction among the intervention group and the experience of being allocated to a control group were explored.

    METHODS: Students allocated to the intervention group (n=460) were asked about their drinking habits and offered the opportunity to give their opinion on the structure and content of the intervention. Students in the control group (n=436) were asked about their drinking habits and their experience in being allocated to the control group. Participants received an email containing an electronic link to a short questionnaire. Descriptive analyses of the distribution of the responses to the 12 questions for the intervention group and 5 questions for the control group were performed.

    RESULTS: The response rate for the user feedback questionnaire of the intervention group was 38% (176/460) and of the control group was 30% (129/436). The variation in the content of the text messages from facts to motivational and practical advice was appreciated by 77% (135/176) participants, and 55% (97/176) found the number of messages per week to be adequate. Overall, 81% (142/176) participants stated that they had read all or nearly all the messages, and 52% (91/176) participants stated that they were drinking less, and increased awareness regarding negative consequences was expressed as the main reason for reduced alcohol consumption. Among the participants in the control group, 40% (52/129) stated that it did not matter that they had to wait for access to the intervention. Regarding actions taken while waiting for access, 48% (62/129) participants claimed that they continued to drink as before, whereas 35% (45/129) tried to reduce their consumption without any support.

    CONCLUSIONS: Although the main randomized controlled trial was not able to detect a statistically significant effect of the intervention, most participants in this qualitative follow-up study stated that participation in the study helped them reflect upon their consumption, leading to altered drinking habits and reduced alcohol consumption.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number ISRCTN95054707; http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN95054707 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/705putNZT).

  • 18.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Databas och informationsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    White, Ian R.
    Cambridge Institute Public Heatlh, England.
    Mccambridge, James
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. University of York, England.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken.
    Effectiveness of Short Message Service Text-Based Smoking Cessation Intervention Among University Students A Randomized Clinical Trial2016Ingår i: JAMA Internal Medicine, ISSN 2168-6106, E-ISSN 2168-6114, Vol. 176, nr 3, s. 321-328Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    IMPORTANCE Smoking is globally the most important preventable cause of ill health and death. Mobile telephone interventions and, in particular, short message service (SMS) text messaging, have the potential to overcome access barriers to traditional health services, not least among young people. OBJECTIVE To determine the effectiveness of a text-based smoking cessation intervention among young people. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A single-blind, 2-arm, randomized clinical trial (Nicotine Exit [NEXit]) was conducted from October 23, 2014, to April 17, 2015; data analysis was performed from April 23, 2014, to May 22, 2015. Participants included daily or weekly smokers willing to set a quit date within 1 month of enrollment. The study used email to invite all college and university students throughout Sweden to participate. INTERVENTIONS The NEXit core program is initiated with a 1- to 4-week motivational phase during which participants can choose to set a stop date. The intervention group then received 157 text messages based on components of effective smoking cessation interventions for 12 weeks. The control group received 1 text every 2 weeks thanking them for participating in the study, with delayed access to the intervention. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary outcomes were self-reported prolonged abstinence (not having smoked >5 cigarettes over the past 8 weeks) and 4-week point prevalence of complete smoking cessation shortly after the completion of the intervention (approximately 4 months after the quit date). RESULTS A total of 1590 participants, mainly between 21 and 30 years of age, were randomized into the study; 827 (573 [69.3%] women) were allocated to the intervention group and 763 (522 [68.4%] women) were included in the control group. Primary outcome data were available for 783 (94.7%) of the intervention group and 719 (94.2%) of the control group. At baseline, participants were smoking a median (range) of 63 (1-238) and 70 (2-280) cigarettes per week, respectively. Eight-week prolonged abstinence was reported by 203 participants (25.9%) in the intervention group and 105 (14.6%) in the control group; 4-week point prevalence of complete cessation was reported by 161 (20.6%) and 102 (14.2%) participants, respectively, a mean (SD) of 3.9 (0.37) months after the quit date. The adjusted odds ratios (95% CIs) for these findings were 2.05 (1.57-2.67) and 1.56 (1.19-2.05), respectively. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE With the limitation of assessing only the short-term effect of the intervention, the effects observed in this trial are comparable with those for traditional smoking cessation interventions. The simple NEXit intervention has the potential to improve the uptake of effective smoking cessation interventions.

  • 19.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Databas och informationsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    White, Ian R.
    Cambridge Institute of Public Health.
    McCambridge, Jim
    University of York.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken .
    SMS-based smoking cessation intervention among university students: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial (NEXit trial)2015Ingår i: Trials, ISSN 1745-6215, E-ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 16, artikel-id 140Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Most smoking efforts targeting young people have so far been focused on prevention of initiation, whereas smoking cessation interventions have largely been targeted towards adult populations. Thus, there is limited evidence for effective smoking cessation interventions in young people, even though many young people want to quit smoking. Mobile communication technology has the potential to reach large numbers of young people and recent text-based smoking cessation interventions using phones have shown promising results. Methods/design: The study aims to evaluate a newly developed text-based smoking cessation intervention for students in colleges and universities in Sweden. The design is a randomised controlled trial (RCT) with a delayed/waiting list intervention control condition. The trial will be performed simultaneously in all colleges and universities served by 25 student health care centres in Sweden. Outcomes will be evaluated after 4 months, with 2 cessation primary outcomes and 4 secondary outcomes. After outcome evaluation the control group will be given access to the intervention. Discussion: The study will examine the effectiveness of a stand-alone SMS text-based intervention. The intervention starts with a motivational phase in which the participants are given an opportunity to set a quit date within 4 weeks of randomisation. This first phase and the subsequent core intervention phase of 12 weeks are totally automated in order to easily integrate the intervention into the daily routines of student and other health care settings. As well as providing data for the effectiveness of the intervention, the study will also provide data for methodological analyses addressing a number issues commonly challenging in Internet-based RCTs. For example, an extensive follow-up strategy will be used in order to evaluate the use of repeated attempts in the analysis, and in particular to explore the validity of a possible missing not at random assumption that the odds ratio between the primary outcome and response is the same at every attempt.

  • 20.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Databas och informationsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Mccambridge, James
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. University of York, England.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken.
    User satisfaction with the structure and content of the NEXit intervention, a text messaging-based smoking cessation programme2016Ingår i: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 16, artikel-id 1179Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Smoking is still the leading cause of preventable ill health and death. There is a limited amount of evidence for effective smoking cessation interventions among young people. To address this, a text messaging-based smoking cessation programme, the NEXit intervention, was developed. Short-term effectiveness, measured immediately after the 12-week intervention revealed that 26% of smokers in the intervention group had prolonged abstinence compared with 15% in the control group. The present study was performed to explore the users experiences of the structure and content of the intervention in order to further develop the intervention. Methods: Students participating in the main NEXit randomized controlled trial were invited to grade their experiences of the structure and content of the intervention after having completed follow-up. The participants received an e-mail with an electronic link to a short questionnaire. Descriptive analysis of the distribution of the responses to the questionnaire was performed. Free-text comments to 14 questions were analysed. Results: The response rate for the user feedback questionnaire was 35% (n = 289/827) and 428 free-text comments were collected. The first motivational phase of the intervention was appreciated by 55% (158/289) of the participants. Most participants wanted to quit smoking immediately and only 124/289 (43%) agreed to have to decide a quit-date in the future. Most participants 199/289 (69%) found the content of the messages in the core programme to be very good or good, and the variability between content types was appreciated by 78% (224/289). Only 34% (97/289) of the participants thought that all or nearly all messages were valuable, and some mentioned that it was not really the content that mattered, but that the messages served as a reminder about the decision to quit smoking. Conclusions: The programme was largely perceived satisfactory in most aspects concerning structure and content by young people and most participants stated that they would recommend it to a friend who wants to quit smoking. The motivational phase might be worth shortening and the number of messages around the quit date itself reduced. Shorter messages seemed to be more acceptable.

  • 21.
    Pena, Jose M
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Statistik och maskininlärning. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Databas och informationsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Causal effect identification in acyclic directed mixed graphs and gated models2017Ingår i: International Journal of Approximate Reasoning, ISSN 0888-613X, E-ISSN 1873-4731, Vol. 90, s. 56-75Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We introduce a new family of graphical models that consists of graphs with possibly directed, undirected and bidirected edges but without directed cycles. We show that these models are suitable for representing causal models with additive error terms. We provide a set of sufficient graphical criteria for the identification of arbitrary causal effects when the new models contain directed and undirected edges but no bidirected edge. We also provide a necessary and sufficient graphical criterion for the identification of the causal effect of a single variable on the rest of the variables. Moreover, we develop an exact algorithm for learning the new models from observational and interventional data via answer set programming. Finally, we introduce gated models for causal effect identification, a new family of graphical models that exploits context specific independences to identify additional causal effects. (C) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 22.
    Thomas, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Databas och informationsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Linderoth, Catharina
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Short message service (SMS)-based intervention targeting alcohol consumption among university students: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial2017Ingår i: Trials, ISSN 1745-6215, E-ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 18, artikel-id 156Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Despite significant health risks, heavy drinking of alcohol among university students is a widespread problem; excessive drinking is part of the social norm. A growing number of studies indicate that short message service (SMS)-based interventions are cost-effective, accessible, require limited effort by users, and can enable continuous, real-time, brief support in real-world settings. Although there is emerging evidence for the effect of SMS-based interventions in reducing alcohol consumption, more research is needed. This study aims to test the effectiveness of a newly developed SMS-based intervention targeting excessive alcohol consumption among university and college students in Sweden. Methods: The study is a two-arm randomized controlled trial with an intervention (SMS programme) and a control (treatment as usual) group. Outcome measures will be investigated at baseline and at 3-month follow up. The primary outcome is total weekly alcohol consumption. Secondary outcomes are frequency of heavy episodic drinking, highest estimated blood alcohol concentration and number of negative consequences due to excessive drinking. Discussion: This study contributes knowledge on the effect of automatized SMS support to reduce excessive drinking among students compared with existing support such as Student Health Centres.

  • 23.
    Thomas, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Linderoth, Catharina
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    mHealth smoking cessation intervention among high-school pupils (NEXit Junior): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial2018Ingår i: Trials, ISSN 1745-6215, E-ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 19, artikel-id 648Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundMobile health (mHealth) interventions, using text messages to support high-school pupils to quit smoking, could be a novel and cost-effective approach. However, more research is needed, specifically to investigate long-term effectiveness. The study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a newly developed mHealth intervention targeting smoking cessation among high-school pupils.MethodsThe study is a two-arm, randomized controlled trial with an intervention group (mHealth intervention) and a control group (treatment as usual: national smoking cessation help line). Outcome measures will be investigated at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12months follow-up. Primary outcome measures will be: prolonged abstinence and 4-week point prevalence of smoking abstinence. Secondary outcome measures will be: 7-day point prevalence of smoking abstinence; mean number of quit attempts since taking part in the study; number of uses of other smoking cessation services since first invitation to the study and number of cigarettes smoked weekly if still smoking.DiscussionHigh schools in Sweden are bound by law to offer a smoke-free environment. However, little effort has been made to offer support to pupils who wish to quit smoking; rather the emphasis is on prevention of uptake. The study will examine the effectiveness of a stand-alone mHealth intervention targeting smokers among high-school pupils.Trial registrationThe trial was not retrospectively registered and has been registered at ISRCTN with the unique identification number ISRCTN15396225. The trial was registered on 13 October 2017.

  • 24.
    Thomas, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Linderoth, Catharina
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Databas och informationsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Text Message-Based Intervention Targeting Alcohol Consumption Among University Students: Findings From a Formative Development Study2016Ingår i: JMIR mhealth and uhealth, E-ISSN 2291-5222, Vol. 4, nr 4, artikel-id e119Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Drinking of alcohol among university students is a global phenomenon; heavy episodic drinking is accepted despite several potential negative consequences. There is emerging evidence that short message service (SMS) text messaging interventions are effective to promote behavior change among students. However, it is still unclear how effectiveness can be optimized through intervention design or how user interest and adherence can be maximized. Objective: The objective of this study was to develop an SMS text message-based intervention targeting alcohol drinking among university students using formative research. Methods: A formative research design was used including an iterative revision process based on input from end users and experts. Data were collected via seven focus groups with students and a panel evaluation involving students (n= 15) and experts (n= 5). Student participants were recruited from five universities in Sweden. A semistructured interview guide was used in the focus groups and included questions on alcohol culture, message content, and intervention format. The panel evaluation asked participants to rate to what degree preliminary messages were understandable, usable, and had a good tone on a scale from 1 (very low degree) to 4 (very high degree). Participants could also write their own comments for each message. Qualitative data were analyzed using qualitative descriptive analysis. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The SMS text messages and the intervention format were revised continuously in parallel with data collection. A behavior change technique (BCT) analysis was conducted on the final version of the program. Results: Overall, students were positive toward the SMS text message intervention. Messages that were neutral, motivated, clear, and tangible engaged students. Students expressed that they preferred short, concise messages and confirmed that a 6-week intervention was an appropriate duration. However, there was limited consensus regarding SMS text message frequency, personalization of messages, and timing. Overall, messages scored high on understanding (mean 3.86, SD 0.43), usability (mean 3.70, SD 0.61), and tone (mean 3.78, SD 0.53). Participants added comments to 67 of 70 messages, including suggestions for change in wording, order of messages, and feedback on why a message was unclear or needed major revision. Comments also included positive feedback that confirmed the value of the messages. Twenty-three BCTs aimed at addressing self-regulatory skills, for example, were identified in the final program. Conclusions: The formative research design was valuable and resulted in significant changes to the intervention. All the original SMS text messages were changed and new messages were added. Overall, the findings showed that students were positive toward receiving support through SMS text message and that neutral, motivated, clear, and tangible messages promoted engagement. However, limited consensus was found on the timing, frequency, and tailoring of messages.

  • 25.
    Thomas, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Linderoth, Catharina
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Effectiveness of a Text Messaging-Based Intervention Targeting Alcohol Consumption Among University Students: Randomized Controlled Trial2018Ingår i: JMIR mhealth and uhealth, E-ISSN 2291-5222, Vol. 6, nr 6, artikel-id e146Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Excessive drinking among university students is a global challenge, leading to significant health risks. However, heavy drinking among students is widely accepted and socially normalized. Mobile phone interventions have attempted to reach students who engage in excessive drinking. A growing number of studies suggest that text message-based interventions could potentially reach many students and, if effective, such an intervention might help reduce heavy drinking in the student community. Objective: The objective of this study was to test the effectiveness of a behavior change theory-based 6-week text message intervention among university students. Methods: This study was a two-arm, randomized controlled trial with an intervention group receiving a 6-week text message intervention and a control group that was referred to treatment as usual at the local student health care center. Outcome measures were collected at baseline and at 3 months after the initial invitation to participate in the intervention. The primary outcome was total weekly alcohol consumption. Secondary outcomes were frequency of heavy episodic drinking, highest estimated blood alcohol concentration, and number of negative consequences attributable to excessive drinking. Results: A total of 896 students were randomized to either the intervention or control group. The primary outcome analysis included 92.0% of the participants in the intervention group and 90.1% of the control group. At follow-up, total weekly alcohol consumption decreased in both groups, but no significant between-group difference was seen. Data on the secondary outcomes included 49.1% of the participants in the intervention group and 41.3% of the control group. No significant between-group difference was seen for any of the secondary outcomes. Conclusions: The present study was under-powered, which could partly explain the lack of significance. However, the intervention, although theory-based, needs to be re-assessed and refined to better support the target group. Apart from establishing which content forms an effective intervention, the optimal length of an alcohol intervention targeting students also needs to be addressed in future studies.

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