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  • 101.
    Abbasi, Mazhar Ali
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hussain Ibupoto, Zafar
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hussain, Mushtaque
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pozina, Galia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nur, Omer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Decoration of ZnO nanorods with coral reefs like NiO nanostructures by the hydrothermal growth method and their luminescence study2014In: Materials, ISSN 1996-1944, E-ISSN 1996-1944, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 430-440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Composite nanostructures of coral reefs like p-type NiO on n-type ZnO nanorods have been decorate on fluorine-doped tin oxide glass substrates by the hydrothermal growth. Structural characterization was performed by field emission scanning electron microscopy,  high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. This investigation has shown that the adopted synthesis has led to high crystalline quality nanostructures. Morphological study shows that the coral reefs like nanostructures are densely packed on the ZnO nanorods. Cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra for the synthesized composite nanostructures were dominated by a near band gap emission at 380 nm and by a broad interstitial defect related luminescence centered at ~630 nm. Spatially resolved CL images reveal that the luminescence originates mainly from the ZnO nanorods.

  • 102.
    Abbasi, Mazhar Ali
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hussain Ibupoto, Zafar
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Khan, Azam
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nur, Omer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Fabrication of UV photo-detector based on coral reef like p-NiO/n-ZnO nanocomposite structures2013In: Materials letters (General ed.), ISSN 0167-577X, E-ISSN 1873-4979, Vol. 108, p. 149-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this research work, a UV photo-detector is fabricated on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) glass substrate by exploiting the advantageous features of p-n heterojunctions based on p-NiO and n-ZnO composite nanostructures forming a coral-reef like structures. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction results showed uniform morphology and good crystal quality of the synthesised nanostructures respectively. I-V measurements have shown nonlinear and rectifying response of the p-NiO/n-ZnO heterojunction. The proposed photodiode exhibited excellent UV response with acceptable photocurrent generation of about 3.4 mA and the responsivity of 2.27 A/W at -3 biasing voltage.

  • 103.
    Abbasi, Mazhar Ali
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hussain Ibupoto, Zafar
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Khan, Yaqoob
    National Centre for Physics, Islamabad, Pakistan .
    Khan, Azam
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nur, Omer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Iron (III) Ion Sensor Based on the Seedless Grown ZnO Nanorods in 3 Dimensions Using Nickel Foam Substrate2013In: Journal of Sensors, ISSN 1687-725X, E-ISSN 1687-7268, no 382726Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present work, the seedless, highly aligned and vertical ZnO nanorods in 3 dimensions (3D) were grown on the nickel foam substrate. The seedless grown ZnO nanorods were characterised by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The characterised seedless ZnO nanorods in 3D on nickel foam were highly dense, perpendicular to substrate, grown along the (002) crystal plane, and also composed of single crystal. In addition to this, these seedless ZnO nanorods were functionalized with trans-dinitro-dibenzo-18-6 crown ether, a selective iron (III) ion ionophore, along with other components of membrane composition such as polyvinyl chloride (PVC), 2-nitopentylphenyl ether as plasticizer (NPPE), and tetrabutyl ammonium tetraphenylborate (TBATPB) as conductivity increaser. The sensor electrode has shown high linearity with a wide range of detection of iron (III) ion concentrations from 0.005 mM to 100 mM. The low limit of detection of the proposed ion selective electrode was found to be 0.001 mM. The proposed sensor also described high storage stability, selectivity, reproducibility, and repeatability and a quick response time of less than 10 s.

  • 104.
    Abbasi, Mazhar Ali
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hussain, Mushtaque
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Khan, Yaqoob
    Quaid-e-Azam University Campus, Islamabad, Pakistan.
    Khan, Azam
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nur, Omer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Potentiometric Zinc Ion Sensor Based on Honeycomb-Like NiO Nanostructures2012In: Sensors, ISSN 1424-8220, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 12, no 11, p. 15424-15437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study honeycomb-like NiO nanostructures were grown on nickel foam by a simple hydrothermal growth method. The NiO nanostructures were characterized by field emission electron microscopy (FESEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The characterized NiO nanostructures were uniform, dense and polycrystalline in the crystal phase. In addition to this, the NiO nanostructures were used in the development of a zinc ion sensor electrode by functionalization with the highly selective zinc ion ionophore 12-crown-4. The developed zinc ion sensor electrode has shown a good linear potentiometric response for a wide range of zinc ion concentrations, ranging from 0.001 mM to 100 mM, with sensitivity of 36 mV/decade. The detection limit of the present zinc ion sensor was found to be 0.0005 mM and it also displays a fast response time of less than 10 s. The proposed zinc ion sensor electrode has also shown good reproducibility, repeatability, storage stability and selectivity. The zinc ion sensor based on the functionalized NiO nanostructures was also used as indicator electrode in potentiometric titrations and it has demonstrated an acceptable stoichiometric relationship for the determination of zinc ion in unknown samples. The NiO nanostructures-based zinc ion sensor has potential for analysing zinc ion in various industrial, clinical and other real samples.

  • 105.
    Abbasi, Mazhar Ali
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Khan, Yaqoob
    National Centre for Physics, Quaid-e-Azam University Campus, Islamabad, Pakistan .
    Hussain, Sajjad
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nur, Omer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Anions effect on the low temperature growth of ZnO nanostructures2012In: Vacuum, ISSN 0042-207X, E-ISSN 1879-2715, Vol. 86, no 12, p. 1998-2001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Seed mediated aqueous chemical growth (ACG) route was used for the growth of ZnO nanostructures on Si substrate in four different growth mediums. The growth medium has shown to affect the morphology and the size of the different nanostructures. We observed that the medium containing zinc nitrate anions yields the nanorods, in a medium containing zinc acetate anions nano-candles are obtained. While in a medium containing zinc chloride anions ZnO nano-discs were obtained and in a medium containing zinc sulfate anions nano-flakes are achieved. Growth in these different mediums has also shown effect on the optical emission characteristics of the different ZnO nanostructures.

  • 106.
    Abbasi, Muneeb Mehmood
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jabbar, Mohammad Abdul
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Design and Performance Analysis of Low-Noise Amplifier with Band-Pass Filter for 2.4-2.5 GHz2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Low power wireless electronics is becoming more popular due to durability, portability and small dimension. Especially, electronic devices in instruments, scientific and medical (ISM) band is convenient from the spectrum regulations and technology availability point of view. In the communication engineering society, to make a robust transceiver is always a matter of challenges for the better performance.

    However, in this thesis work, a new approach of design and performance analysis of Low-Noise Amplifier with Band-Pass filter is performed at 2.45 GHz under the communication electronics research group of Institute of Science and Technology (ITN). Band-Pass Filtered Low-Noise Amplifier is designed with lumped components and transmission lines. Performances of different designs are compared with respect to noise figure, gain, input and output reflection coefficient. In the design process, a single stage LNA is designed with amplifier, ATF-58143. Maximally flat band-pass (BPF) filters were designed with lumped components and distributed elements. Afterwards, BPF is integrated with the LNA at the front side of LNA to get a compact Band-Pass Filtered Low-Noise Amplifier with good performance.

    Advanced Design System (ADS) tool was used for design and simulation, and each design was tuned to get the optimum value for noise figure, gain and input reflection coefficient. LNA stand-alone gives acceptable value of noise figure and gain but the bandwidth was too wide compared to specification. Band-Pass Filtered Low-Noise Amplifier with lumped components gives also considerable values of noise and gain. But the gain was not so flat and the bandwidth was also wide. Then, Band-Pass Filtered Low-Noise Amplifier was designed with transmission lines where the optimum value of noise figure and gain was found. The gain was almost flat over the whole band, i.e., 2.4-2.5 GHz compared to LNA stand-alone and Band-Pass Filtered Low-Noise Amplifier designed with lumped components. It is observed that deviations of results from schematic to layout level are considerable, i.e., electromagnetic simulation is needed to predict the Band-Pass Filtered Low-Noise Amplifier performance.

    Prototype of LNA, Band-Pass Filtered Low-Noise Amplifier with lumped and transmission lines are made at ITN’s PCB laboratory. Due to unavailability of exact values of Murata components and for some other technical reasons, the measured values of Band-Pass Filtered Low-Noise Amplifier with lumped components and transmission lines are deviated compared to predicted values from simulation.

  • 107.
    Abbasi, Rizwan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A Framework For Interacting With Parameterized and Infinite State Verification Tools2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    We develop a tool to explore the behavior of parameterized systems (i.e., systems consisting of an arbitrary number of identical processes that synchronize using shared variables or global communications) and to ease user interaction with tools that verify them. The tool includes a user friendly GUI that allows the user to describe a parameterized system and to perform guided, interactive or random simulation. This tool empowers the user to plug in several independent verifiers to perform verification. A mockup verifier is developed in order to facilitate the development of the tool and testing the required functionalities. The mockup verifier involves parsing descriptions of the parameterized systems to be analyzed. In order to interact with the verifier, the tool is user friendly and flexible in the sense that the user can plug in a verifier developed in any language as long as it allows to perform a number of basic computations on the parameterized system (such as the set of enabled transitions or the set of successor configurations). In order to plug in a new tool, our tool needs to be able to make use of these operations, for instance using a wrapper written for a verifier particular to a class of parameterized systems. Given these operations, our tool enables the user to carry out various types of simulations like random, interactive or guided simulations. Moreover, our tool can submit verification queries to the underlying verifier and walk the user through the generated counter examples as if it was a simulation session.

  • 108.
    Abbasi, Saad Zeb
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Automatic Test Builder2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In Ericsson, the Automation Team automates test cases that are frequently rerun. This process involves copying data related to a particular Configured Test Case from a database and then pasting it into a java file created to run a test case. In one java file, there can be more than one Configured Test Cases. So information can vary. Then the tester has to add package name, necessary imports, member variables, preamble and post amble methods, help methods and main execution methods. A lot of time and effort are consumed in writing the whole code. The Automation Team came up with a proposal of having a tool that can generate this whole information and the tester just has to add or remove minor changes. This will save time and resources. So the development of tool started and finally a tool named Automatic Test Builder developed in java was created to help automation teams in Ottawa, Kista and Linkoping.

    This document elaborates problem statement, opted approach, tools used in development process, a detailed overview of all development stages of Automatic Test Builder. This document also explains issues what came during the development, evaluation and usability analysis of Automatic Test Builder.

  • 109.
    Abbass, Allan
    et al.
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Bernier, Denise
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Kisely, Steve
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Town, Joel
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Johansson, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Sustained reduction in health care costs after adjunctive treatment of graded intensive short-term dynamic psychotherapy in patients with psychotic disorders2015In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 228, no 3, p. 538-543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the changes in symptom severity and long-term health care cost after intensive short-term dynamic psychotherapy (ISTDP) individually tailored and administered to patients with psychotic disorders undergoing standard psychiatric care. Eleven therapists with different levels of expertise delivered an average of 13 one-hour sessions of graded ISTDP to 38 patients with psychotic disorders. Costs for health care services were compiled for a one-year period prior to the start of ISTDP (baseline) along with four one-year periods after termination. Two validated self-report scales, the Brief Symptom Inventory and the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems, were administered at intake and termination of ISTDP. Results revealed that health care cost reductions were significant for the one-year post-treatment period relative to baseline year, for both physician costs and hospital costs, and the reductions were sustained for the follow-up period of four post-treatment years. Furthermore, at treatment termination self-reported symptoms and interpersonal problems were significantly reduced. These preliminary findings suggest that this brief adjunctive psychotherapy may be beneficial and reduce costs in selected patients with psychotic disorders, and that gains are sustained in long-term follow-up. Future research directions are discussed. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 110.
    Abbass, Allan
    et al.
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Johansson, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rasic, Daniel
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Town, Joel M.
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Johansson, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Long-term healthcare cost reduction with Intensive Short-term Dynamic Psychotherapy in a tertiary psychiatric service2015In: Journal of Psychiatric Research, ISSN 0022-3956, E-ISSN 1879-1379, Vol. 64, p. 114-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate whether a mixed population of patients treated with Intensive Short-term Dynamic Psychotherapy (ISTDP) would exhibit reduced healthcare costs in long-term follow-up. Methods: A quasi-experimental design was employed in which data on pre- and post-treatment healthcare cost were compared for all ISTDP cases treated in a tertiary care service over a nine year period. Observed cost changes were compared with those of a control group of patients referred but never treated. Physician and hospital costs were compared to treatment cost estimates and normal population cost figures. Results: 1082 patients were included; 890 treated cases for a broad range of somatic and psychiatric disorders and 192 controls. The treatment averaged 7.3 sessions and measures of symptoms and interpersonal problems significantly improved. The average cost reduction per treated case was $12,628 over 3 follow-up years: this compared favorably with the estimated treatment cost of $708 per patient. Significant differences were seen between groups for follow-up hospital costs. Conclusions: ISTDP in this setting appears to facilitate reductions in healthcare costs, supporting the notion that brief dynamic psychotherapy provided in a tertiary setting can be beneficial to health care systems overall. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 111.
    Abbatelli, Daniele
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Material flows in the waterjet industry: an environmental perspective2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abrasive Waterjet cutting (AWJ) presents many advantages over competing machining techniques, but several issues are related to the high volume of materials (and in particular of abrasive) used in the process.

    In this study, the environmental impact of the material flows in the abrasive waterjet industry has been analyzed adopting a life cycle perspective in order to individuate which phases place the largest burden on the environment. Moreover, three alternative abrasives (crushed rock, recycled glass and synthetic abrasive) and three disposal practices (in-site recycling, off-site recycling and recycling as construction material) have been also evaluated to estimate the benefits that can be achieved if these could be used in place of garnet abrasives and landfilling.

    The transportation of the abrasive resulted to be the phase that has the largest influence in every case and thus should be reduced as much as possible. For what concerns the alternative options, the usage of recycled glass and the in-site recycling of the abrasive were the two alternatives with the best environmental performances. However, crushed rock could be the best option for what concerns the global warming potential if carbon sequestration due to carbonation of silicate rocks is taken into account. Off-site recycling and recycling as construction material are good options only if the transportation to the recycling site can be reduced. Synthetic abrasive are instead found to have a much larger impact compared to every other alternative examined.

  • 112.
    Abbey, Susan E.
    et al.
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    De Luca, Enza
    University Health Network, University of Toronto, Canada.
    Mauthner, Oliver E.
    University Health Network, University of Toronto, Canada.
    McKeever, Patricia
    Bloorview Research Institute, Bloorview Kids Rehab, Canada.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Queen's University, Belfast, Northern Ireland.
    Poole, Jennifer M.
    Ryerson University, Canada.
    Gewarges, Mena
    University Health Network, University of Toronto, Canada.
    Ross, Heather J.
    University Health Network, University of Toronto, Canada.
    Qualitative interviews versus standardised self-report questionnaires in assessing qualityb of life in heart transplant recipients2011In: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation, ISSN 1053-2498, E-ISSN 1557-3117, Vol. 30, no 8, p. 963-966Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quality of life (QoL) studies in heart transplant recipients (HTRs) using validated, quantitative, self-report questionnaires have reported poor QoL in approximately 20% of patients. This consecutive mixed methods study compared self-report questionnaires, the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short Form Health Survey (MOS SF-36) and the Atkinson Life Satisfaction Scale, with phenomenologically informed audiovisual (AV) qualitative interview data in 27 medically stable HTRs (70% male; age 53 ± 13.77 years; time since transplant 4.06 ± 2.42 years). Self-report questionnaire data reported poor QoL and more distress compared with previous studies and normative population samples; in contrast, 52% of HTRs displayed pervasive distress according to visual methodology. Using qualitative methods to assess QoL yields information that would otherwise remain unobserved by the exclusive use of quantitative QOL questionnaires.

  • 113.
    Abbey-Lee, Robin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Max Planck Inst Ornithol, Germany.
    Araya-Ajoy, Yimen G.
    Norwegian Univ Sci and Technol, Norway.
    Mouchet, Alexia
    Max Planck Inst Ornithol, Germany.
    Moiron, Maria
    Max Planck Inst Ornithol, Germany.
    Stuber, Erica F.
    Univ Nebraska Lincoln, NE USA.
    Kempenaers, Bart
    Max Planck Inst Ornithol, Germany.
    Dingemanse, Niels J.
    Max Planck Inst Ornithol, Germany; Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Germany.
    Does perceived predation risk affect patterns of extra-pair paternity? A field experiment in a passerine bird2018In: Functional Ecology, ISSN 0269-8463, E-ISSN 1365-2435, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 1001-1010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-consumptive predator effects have been shown to influence a wide range of behavioural, life history and morphological traits. Extra-pair reproduction is widespread among socially monogamous birds and may incur predation costs. Consequently, altered rates of extra-pair reproduction are expected in circumstances characterized by increased adult perceived predation risk. In addition, extra-pair reproduction is expected to be most affected for birds with phenotypes that generally increase predation risk (such as more active individuals). In two consecutive years, perceived predation risk was manipulated for great tits Parus major breeding in 12 nest-box plots by broadcasting sounds of their main predator (European sparrowhawk Accipiter nisus; six plots). As a control treatment, sounds of a sympatric, avian non-predator species were broadcast (Eurasian blackbird Turdus merula; six plots). Levels of extra-pair paternity did not differ between plots with different predation risk treatments. Males that moved more in a novel environment (more active or faster exploring) tended to have offspring with fewer partners, but this effect did not vary with predation risk treatment. From an adaptive viewpoint, predation costs associated with extra-pair reproduction may be small and may not outweigh the benefits of extra-pair behaviour. Research on a broader range of taxa with different mating strategies is now needed to confirm the generality of our findings.

  • 114.
    Abbey-Lee, Robin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Max Planck Inst Ornithol, Germany.
    Dingemanse, Niels J.
    Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Germany.
    Adaptive individual variation in phenological responses to perceived predation levels2019In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, article id 1601Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The adaptive evolution of timing of breeding (a component of phenology) in response to environmental change requires individual variation in phenotypic plasticity for selection to act upon. A major question is what processes generate this variation. Here we apply multi-year manipulations of perceived predation levels (PPL) in an avian predator-prey system, identifying phenotypic plasticity in phenology as a key component of alternative behavioral strategies with equal fitness payoffs. We show that under low-PPL, faster (versus slower) exploring birds breed late (versus early); the pattern is reversed under high-PPL, with breeding synchrony decreasing in conjunction. Timing of breeding affects reproductive success, yet behavioral types have equal fitness. The existence of alternative behavioral strategies thus explains variation in phenology and plasticity in reproductive behavior, which has implications for evolution in response to anthropogenic change.

  • 115.
    Abbey-Lee, Robin N.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kreshchenko, Anastasia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fernandez Sala, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petkova, Irina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Løvlie, Hanne
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Effects of monoamine manipulations on the personality and gene expression of three-spined sticklebacks2019Data set
    Abstract [en]

    Among-individual behavioral differences (i.e. animal personality) are commonly observed across taxa, although the underlying, causal mechanisms of such differences are poorly understood. Animal personality has been implicated in correlations with physiological functions as well as affecting fitness-related traits. Variation in many aspects of monoamine systems, such as metabolite levels and gene polymorphisms, has been linked to behavioral variation. Therefore, here we investigated the potential role of monoamines in explaining individual variation in personality, using two common pharmaceuticals that respectively alter the levels of serotonin and dopamine in the brain: fluoxetine and ropinirole. We exposed three- spined sticklebacks, a species that shows animal personality, to either chemical alone or to a combination of the two chemicals, for 18 days. During the experiment, fish were assayed at four time points for the following personality traits: exploration, boldness, aggression and sociability. To quantify brain gene expression on short- and longer-term scales, fish were sampled at two time points. Our results show that monoamine manipulations influence fish behavior. Specifically, fish exposed to either fluoxetine or ropinirole were significantly bolder, and fish exposed to the two chemicals together tended to be bolder than control fish. Our monoamine manipulations did not alter the gene expression of monoamine or stress-associated neurotransmitter genes, but control, untreated fish showed covariation between gene expression and behavior. Specifically, exploration and boldness were predicted by genes in the dopaminergic, serotonergic and stress pathways, and sociability was predicted by genes in the dopaminergic and stress pathways. These results add further support to the links between monoaminergic systems and personality, and show that exposure to monoamines can causally alter animal personality.

  • 116.
    Abbey-Lee, Robin N.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Uhrig, Emily J.
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, 10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Zidar, Josefina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Favati, Anna
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, 10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Almberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dahlblom, Josefin
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala Biomedical Centre BMC, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Winberg, Svante
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala Biomedical Centre BMC, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Løvlie, Hanne
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The influence of rearing on behavior, brain monoamines and gene expression in three-spined sticklebacks2018Data set
    Abstract [en]
    1. The causes of individual variation in behavior are often not well understood, and potential underlying mechanisms include both intrinsic and extrinsic factors, such as early environmental, physiological, and genetic differences.
    2. In an exploratory laboratory study, we raised three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) under 4 different environmental conditions (simulated predator environment, complex environment, variable social environment, and control). We investigated how these manipulations related to behavior, brain physiology and gene expression later in life, with focus on brain dopamine and serotonin levels, turnover rates, and gene expression.
    3. The different rearing environments influenced behavior and gene expression, but did not alter monoamine levels or metabolites. Specifically, compared to control fish, fish exposed to a simulated predator environment tended to be less aggressive, more exploratory, and more neophobic; and fish raised in both complex and variable social environments tended to be less neophobic. Exposure to a simulated predator environment tended to lower expression of dopamine receptor DRD4A, a complex environment increased expression of dopamine receptor DRD1B, while a variable social environment tended to increase serotonin receptor 5-HTR2B and increased serotonin transporter SLC6A4A expression. Despite both behavior and gene expression varying with early environment, there was no evidence that gene expression mediated the relationship between early environment and behavior.
    4. Our results confirm that environmental conditions early in life can affect phenotypic variation. However, the mechanistic pathway of the monoaminergic systems translating early environmental variation into observed behavioral responses was not detected.
  • 117.
    Abbey-Lee, Robin N.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Uhrig, Emily
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zidar, Josefina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Favati, A.
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Almberg, J.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dahlbom, J.
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala Biomedical Centre BMC, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Winberg, S.
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala Biomedical Centre BMC, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Løvlie, Hanne
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The Influence of Rearing on Behavior, Brain Monoamines, and Gene Expression in Three-Spined Sticklebacks2018In: Brain, behavior, and evolution, ISSN 0006-8977, E-ISSN 1421-9743, Vol. 91, no 4, p. 201-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The causes of individual variation in behavior are often not well understood, and potential underlying mechanisms include both intrinsic and extrinsic factors, such as early environmental, physiological, and genetic differences. In an exploratory laboratory study, we raised three-spined sticklebacks <i>(Gasterosteus aculeatus)</i> under 4 different environmental conditions (simulated predator environment, complex environment, variable social environment, and control). We investigated how these manipulations related to behavior, brain physiology, and gene expression later in life, with focus on brain dopamine and serotonin levels, turnover rates, and gene expression. The different rearing environments influenced behavior and gene expression, but did not alter monoamine levels or metabolites. Specifically, compared to control fish, fish exposed to a simulated predator environment tended to be less aggressive, more exploratory, and more neophobic; and fish raised in both complex and variable social environments tended to be less neophobic. Exposure to a simulated predator environment tended to lower expression of dopamine receptor DRD4A, a complex environment increased expression of dopamine receptor DRD1B, while a variable social environment tended to increase serotonin receptor 5-HTR2B and serotonin transporter SLC6A4A expression. Despite both behavior and gene expression varying with early environment, there was no evidence that gene expression mediated the relationship between early environment and behavior. Our results confirm that environmental conditions early in life can affect phenotypic variation. However, the mechanistic pathway of the monoaminergic systems translating early environmental variation into observed behavioral responses was not detected.

  • 118.
    Abbey-Lee, Robin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Uhrig, Emily
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Southern Oregon Univ, OR 97520 USA.
    Garnham, Laura
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lundgren, Kristoffer
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Child, Sarah
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Manchester, England.
    Lovlie, Hanne
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Experimental manipulation of monoamine levels alters personality in crickets2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 16211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Animal personality has been described in a range of species with ecological and evolutionary consequences. Factors shaping and maintaining variation in personality are not fully understood, but monoaminergic systems are consistently linked to personality variation. We experimentally explored how personality was influenced by alterations in two key monoamine systems: dopamine and serotonin. This was done using ropinirole and fluoxetine, two common human pharmaceuticals. Using the Mediterranean field cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus), we focused on the personality traits activity, exploration, and aggression, with confirmed repeatability in our study. Dopamine manipulations explained little variation in the personality traits investigated, while serotonin manipulation reduced both activity and aggression. Due to limited previous research, we created a dose-response curve for ropinirole, ranging from concentrations measured in surface waters to human therapeutic doses. No ropinirole dose level strongly influenced cricket personality, suggesting our results did not come from a dose mismatch. Our results indicate that the serotonergic system explains more variation in personality than manipulations of the dopaminergic system. Additionally, they suggest that monoamine systems differ across taxa, and confirm the importance of the mode of action of pharmaceuticals in determining their effects on behaviour.

  • 119.
    Abbott, Allan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Faculty of Health Science and Medicine, Bond University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.
    Evidence base and future research directions in the management of low back pain2016In: World Journal of Orthopedics, ISSN 2218-5836, E-ISSN 2218-5836, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 156-161Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Low back pain (LBP) is a prevalent and costly condition. Awareness of valid and reliable patient history taking, physical examination and clinical testing is important for diagnostic accuracy. Stratified care which targets treatment to patient subgroups based on key characteristics is reliant upon accurate diagnostics. Models of stratified care that can potentially improve treatment effects include prognostic risk profiling for persistent LBP, likely response to specific treatment based on clinical prediction models or suspected underlying causal mechanisms. The focus of this editorial is to highlight current research status and future directions for LBP diagnostics and stratified care.

  • 120.
    Abbott, Allan
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Physiotherapeutic rehabilitation and lumbar fusion surgery2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last two decades, the economic costs and rates of lumbar fusion surgery for chronic low back pain has risen dramatically in western industrialized countries. Data from the Swedish National Spine Register suggest that 25% of patients experience unimproved pain and up to 40% are not satisfied with the outcome of lumbar fusion surgery. Thus, there is a definite need to optimize the selection and management of patients to improve lumbar fusion outcomes. Aim: To investigate the role of biopsychosocial factors in explaining disability and health related quality of life in chronic low back pain patients before and after lumbar fusion surgery and to evaluate the effectiveness of post-operative rehabilitation regimes. Methods: At total of 107 patients were recruited, aged 18 to 65 years, selected for lumbar fusion due to 12 months of symptomatic back and/or leg pain due to spinal stenosis, degenerative/isthmic spondylolisthesis or degenerative disc disease. Measures of disability, health related quality of life, pain, mental health, fear of movement/(re)injury, self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, pain coping styles, work status, health care use, analgesic use and sickness leave were collected with self-rated questionnaires at baseline (Studies I-IV), 3, 6, 12 months (Study II) and 2-3 years after surgery (Studies II-III). In Studies II-IV, patients were randomised to psychomotor therapy (N=53) or exercise therapy (N=54) implemented during the first 3 post-operative months. Semi-structured interviews were conducted 3-6 months after surgery on 20 patients including 10 from each rehabilitation group to investigate experiences of back problems before and after surgery, post-operative recovery and expectations of rehabilitation analysed in terms of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (Study IV). Results: Approximately 50% of the variability in baseline disability and 40% of the variability in baseline health related quality of life could be explained by psychological variables. In particular, catastrophizing, control over pain, self-efficacy and outcome expectancy had significant mediation roles (Study I). For the short and long term outcome of lumbar fusion surgery, post-operative psychomotor therapy is significantly more effective than exercise therapy with approximately 10-20% better outcome in measures of disability, fear of movement/(re)injury, pain catastrophizing, self-efficacy, outcome expectancy sickness leave, health care utilization and return to work (Study II). A model with good outcome predictive performance which significantly predicts disability, back pain and health related quality of life outcomes 2-3 year after lumbar fusion surgery, was shown to involve pre-operative screening of disability, leg pain intensity, mental health, fear of movement/(re)injury, outcome expectations, catastrophizing, control over pain and the implementation of post-operative psychomotor therapy (Study III). Lumbar fusion patient s experiences of back problems before and after the operation as well as experiences of recovery and outcome expectations correspond well with the content of outcomes measures used in the study suggesting good content validity (Study IV). Conclusion: Psychological factors strongly influence levels of disability and health related quality of life in lumbar fusion candidates as well as predicts post-operative outcomes. Early post-operative rehabilitation focusing on cognition, behaviour and motor control is recommended for improved lumbar fusion outcomes.

  • 121.
    Abbott, Allan
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    The Coping Strategy Questionnaire2010In: Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 1836-9553, E-ISSN 1836-9561, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 63-63Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 122.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Neuro R1:07, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden; Institute of Health and Sport, Bond University, Queensland, Australia.
    Ghasemi-Kafash, Elaheh
    Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Dedering, Åsa
    Department of Physical Therapy, Neuro R1:07, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
    The validity of using an electrocutaneous device for pain assessment in patients with cervical radiculopathy2014In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 500-506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity and preference for assessing pain magnitude with electrocutaneous testing (ECT) compared to the visual analogue scale (VAS) and Borg CR10 scale in men and women with cervical radiculopathy of varying sensory phenotypes. An additional purpose was to investigate ECT sensory and pain thresholds in men and women with cervical radiculopathy of varying sensory phenotypes. This is a cross-sectional study of 34 patients with cervical radiculopathy. Scatterplots and linear regression were used to investigate bivariate relationships between ECT, VAS and Borg CR10 methods of pain magnitude measurement as well as ECT sensory and pain thresholds. The use of the ECT pain magnitude matching paradigm for patients with cervical radiculopathy with normal sensory phenotype shows good linear association with arm pain VAS (R(2) = 0.39), neck pain VAS (R(2) = 0.38), arm pain Borg CR10 scale (R(2) = 0.50) and neck pain Borg CR10 scale (R(2) = 0.49) suggesting acceptable validity of the procedure. For patients with hypoesthesia and hyperesthesia sensory phenotypes, the ECT pain magnitude matching paradigm does not show adequate linear association with rating scale methods rendering the validity of the procedure as doubtful. ECT for sensory and pain threshold investigation, however, provides a method to objectively assess global sensory function in conjunction with sensory receptor specific bedside examination measures.

  • 123.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Physiotherapist, Department for Physiotherapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Halvorsen, Marie
    Physiotherapist, Department for Physiotherapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dedering, Åsa
    Physiotherapist, Department for Physiotherapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Is there a need for cervical collar usage post anterior cervical decompression and fusion?: A randomized control pilot trial2013In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 290-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is a common surgical intervention for radiculopathy resulting from degenerative cervical spine conditions. Post-surgical cervical collar use is believed to reduce post-operative pain, provide the patient with a sense of security during activities of daily living and even reduce rates of non-fusion. This prospective randomized controlled pilot trial investigates trial design feasibility in relation to prospective physical, functional, and quality of life-related outcomes of patients undergoing ACDF with interbody cage, with (n = 17) and without (n = 16) post-operative cervical collar usage. Results show that the sample provides sufficient statistical power to show that the use of a rigid cervical collar during 6 post-operative weeks is associated with significantly lower levels of neck disability index after 6 weeks and significantly lower levels of prospective neck pain. To investigate causal quality of life or fusion rate outcomes, sample size needs to be increased at least fourfold and optimally sixfold when accounting for data loss in prospective follow-up. The study suggests that post-surgical cervical collar usage may help certain patients cope with initial post-operative pain and disability.

  • 124.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Division of Orthopaedics, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm , Sweden.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Department of Orthopaedics, Institute for Clinical Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tyni-Lenné, Raija
    Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Patient’s experience post-lumbar fusion regarding back problems, recovery and expectations in terms of the international classification of functioning, disability and health.2011In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 33, no 15-16, p. 1399-1408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    To describe within the context of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), patient's experiences post-lumber fusion regarding back problems, recovery and expectations of rehabilitation and to contrast with the content of outcome measures and the ICF low back pain (LBP) core sets.

    METHODS:

    The study has a cross-sectional and retrospective design and involves 20 lumbar fusion patients. Using the ICF, qualitative content analysis of semi-structured interviews 3-6 months post-surgery was performed. This was compared with the ICF related content of the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Medical Outcome Study Short Form 36 (SF-36), European Quality of Life Questionnaire (EQ5D) and the ICF LBP core sets.

    RESULTS:

    Patient's experiences were most frequently linked to psychological, sensory, neuromusculoskeletal and movement related body function chapters of the ICF. The most frequently linked categories of activity and participation were mobility, domestic activities, family relationships, work, recreation and leisure. Environmental factors frequently linked were the use of analgesics, walking aids, family support, social security systems, health care systems and labour market employment services.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    This study highlights important ICF related aspects of patient's experiences post-lumber fusion. The use of the comprehensive ICF core sets is recommended in conjunction with ODI, SF-36 and the EQ5D for a broader analysis of patient outcomes post-lumbar fusion.

  • 125.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Bond University, Australia.
    Kjellman, Görel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Multidimensional assessment of pain related disability after surgery for cervical disc disease2013In: APA Conference 2013: New moves, Australian Physiotherapy Association , 2013, p. 2-2Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Questions: Given only 25% of patients, 10 year post-surgery for cervical disc disease report clinically meaningful improvements in functional disability, what are the biopsychosocial factors associated with continued long-term disability? What are the implications for physiotherapy practice?

    Design: Cross-sectional observational study.

    Participants: Ninety patients who had undergone anterior discectomy and fusion (ACDF) surgery 10-13 years prior.

    Outcome Measures: The Neck Disability Index (NDI), ACDF surgery type, surgical fusion status, patient age and Part 1 of the West Haven-Yale multidimensional pain inventory Swedish version (MPI-S) were entered into a statistical model. Part 1 of the MPI-S contains 5 subscales: pain severity, interference, life control, affective distress and support.

    Results: Seventy-three patients answered the questionnaires. Non-linear categorical regression modeling (CATREG) of the selected predictive variables explained 76.1% of the variance in NDI outcomes 10-13 years post ACDF. Of these predictors, MPI-S affective distress subscale (β = 0.635, p = <0.001) and pain severity subscale (β = 0.354, p = <0.001) were significant individual predictors of NDI ratings.

    Conclusion: This is the first study to investigate potential factors associated with prolonged functional disability greater than 10 years post-surgery for cervical disc disease. The results suggest the importance of not only pain severity but also screening affective distress as a potential barrier to physical functioning in patients previously operated for cervical disc disease. Future research on the utility of affect-focused body awareness therapy and pain coping strategies for post-surgical patients with continuing pain and physical disability is indicated.

    Key Practice Points:

    •  The screening of pain severity and affective distress is of importance for patients presenting with continuing physical disability after previous surgery for cervical disc disorders

    •  Affect-focused body awareness therapies and pain coping strategies may be a potential treatment alternative for patients with continuing pain and physical disability.

  • 126.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Bond University, Gold Coast, Australia.
    Möller, Hans
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gerdhem, Paul
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    CONTRAIS: CONservative TReatment for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: a randomised controlled trial protocol2013In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 14, article id 261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Idiopathic scoliosis is a three-dimensional structural deformity of the spine that occurs in children and adolescents. Recent reviews on bracing and exercise treatment have provided some evidence for effect of these interventions. The purpose of this study is to improve the evidence base regarding the effectiveness of conservative treatments for preventing curve progression in idiopathic scoliosis.

    Methods/design:

    Patients: Previously untreated girls and boys with idiopathic scoliosis, 9 to 17 years of age with at least one year of remaining growth and a curve Cobb angle of 25–40 degrees will be included. A total of 135 participants will be randomly allocated in groups of 45 patients each to receive one of the three interventions.Interventions: All three groups will receive a physical activity prescription according to the World Health Organisation recommendations. One group will additionally wear a hyper-corrective night-time brace. One group will additionally perform postural scoliosis-specific exercises.Outcome: Participation in the study will last until the curve has progressed, or until cessation of skeletal growth. Outcome variables will be measured every 6 months. The primary outcome variable, failure of treatment, is defined as progression of the Cobb angle more than 6 degrees, compared to the primary x-ray, seen on two consecutive spinal standing x-rays taken with 6 months interval. Secondary outcome measures include the SRS-22r and EQ5D-Y quality of life questionnaires, the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) short form, and Cobb angle atend of the study.

    Discussion:This trial will evaluate which of the tested conservative treatment approaches that is the most effective for patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Trial registration: NCT01761305

  • 127.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Schröder, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Enthoven, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Effectiveness of implementing a best practice primary healthcare model for low back pain (BetterBack) compared with current routine care in the Swedish context: an internal pilot study informed protocol for an effectiveness-implementation hybrid type 2 trial2018In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 4, article id e019906Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Low back pain (LBP) is a major health problem commonly requiring healthcare. In Sweden, there is a call from healthcare practitioners (HCPs) for the development, implementation and evaluation of a best practice primary healthcare model for LBP.

    Aims (1) To improve and understand the mechanisms underlying changes in HCP confidence, attitudes and beliefs for providing best practice coherent primary healthcare for patients with LBP; (2) to improve and understand the mechanisms underlying illness beliefs, self-care enablement, pain, disability and quality of life in patients with LBP; and (3) to evaluate a multifaceted and sustained implementation strategy and the cost-effectiveness of the BetterBack☺ model of care (MOC) for LBP from the perspective of the Swedish primary healthcare context.

    Methods This study is an effectiveness-implementation hybrid type 2 trial testing the hypothesised superiority of the BetterBack☺ MOC compared with current routine care. The trial involves simultaneous testing of MOC effects at the HCP, patient and implementation process levels. This involves a prospective cohort study investigating implementation at the HCP level and a patient-blinded, pragmatic, cluster, randomised controlled trial with longitudinal follow-up at 3, 6 and 12 months post baseline for effectiveness at the patient level. A parallel process and economic analysis from a healthcare sector perspective will also be performed. Patients will be allocated to routine care (control group) or the BetterBack☺ MOC (intervention group) according to a stepped cluster dogleg structure with two assessments in routine care. Experimental conditions will be compared and causal mediation analysis investigated. Qualitative HCP and patient experiences of the BetterBack☺ MOC will also be investigated.

    Dissemination The findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at national and international conferences. Further national dissemination and implementation in Sweden and associated national quality register data collection are potential future developments of the project.

  • 128.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital; Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Division of Orthopaedics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tyni-Lenné, Raija
    Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Department for Orthopaedics, Institute for Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Early rehabilitation targeting cognition, behaviour and motor function after lumbar fusion: A randomized controlled trial2010In: Spine, ISSN 0362-2436, E-ISSN 1528-1159, Vol. 35, no 8, p. 848-857Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study Design - Open label randomized controlled trial with 3-, 6-, 12-month, and 2- to 3-year follow-up.

    Objective - To investigate the effectiveness of a psychomotor therapy focusing on cognition, behavior, and motor relearning compared with exercise therapy applied during the first 3 months after lumbar fusion.

    Summary of Background Data - Postoperative management after lumbar fusion commonly focuses on analgesic pain control and activities of daily living. After 3 months, exercise therapy is often implemented. No randomized controlled trial has investigated early rehabilitation techniques conducted during the first 3 months after surgery.

    Methods - The study recruited 107 patients, aged 18 to 65 years, selected for lumbar fusion because of 12 months of symptomatic spinal stenosis, spondylosis, degenerative/isthmic spondylolisthesis, or degenerative disc disease. The exercise therapy group received a home program focusing on pain contingent training of back, abdominal, and leg muscle functional strength and endurance, stretching, and cardiovascular fitness. The psychomotor therapy group received a home program and 3 outpatient sessions focusing on modifying maladaptive pain cognitions, behaviors, and motor control. Rated questionnaires investigating functional disability, pain, health-related quality of life, functional self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, fear of movement/(re)injury, and coping were assessed at 3, 6, 12 months, and 2 to 3 years after surgery.

    Results - Follow-up rates were 93% at 12 months and 81% at 2 to 3 years after surgery. Psychomotor therapy improved functional disability, self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, and fear of movement/(re)injury significantly more than exercise therapy at respective follow-up occasions. Similar results occurred for pain coping but group differences were nonsignificant at 2 to 3 years follow-up. Potentially clinical relevant higher reoperation rates occurred after psychomotor therapy but rates were within normal ranges.

    Conclusion - The study shows that postoperative rehabilitation can be safely implemented during the first 3 months after lumbar fusion and should include measures to modify psychological as well as motor functions.

  • 129.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Orthopaedics, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tyni-Lenné, Raija
    Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Department for Orthopaedics, Institute for Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Leg pain and psychological variables predict outcome 2-3 years after lumber fusion surgery2011In: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 20, no 10, p. 1626-1634Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prediction studies testing a thorough range of psychological variables in addition to demographic, work-related and clinical variables are lacking in lumbar fusion surgery research. This prospective cohort study aimed at examining predictions of functional disability, back pain and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) 2-3 years after lumbar fusion by regressing nonlinear relations in a multivariate predictive model of pre-surgical variables. Before and 2-3 years after lumbar fusion surgery, patients completed measures investigating demographics, work-related variables, clinical variables, functional self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, fear of movement/(re)injury, mental health and pain coping. Categorical regression with optimal scaling transformation, elastic net regularization and bootstrapping were used to investigate predictor variables and address predictive model validity. The most parsimonious and stable subset of pre-surgical predictor variables explained 41.6, 36.0 and 25.6% of the variance in functional disability, back pain intensity and HRQOL 2-3 years after lumbar fusion. Pre-surgical control over pain significantly predicted functional disability and HRQOL. Pre-surgical catastrophizing and leg pain intensity significantly predicted functional disability and back pain while the pre-surgical straight leg raise significantly predicted back pain. Post-operative psychomotor therapy also significantly predicted functional disability while pre-surgical outcome expectations significantly predicted HRQOL. For the median dichotomised classification of functional disability, back pain intensity and HRQOL levels 2-3 years post-surgery, the discriminative ability of the prediction models was of good quality. The results demonstrate the importance of pre-surgical psychological factors, leg pain intensity, straight leg raise and post-operative psychomotor therapy in the predictions of functional disability, back pain and HRQOL-related outcomes.

  • 130.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Division of Orthopaedics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tyni-Lenné, Raija
    Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Institute for Clinical Sciences, Department for Orthopaedics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The influence of psychological factors on pre-operative levels of pain intensity, disability and HRQOL in lumbar spinal fusion surgery patients2010In: Physiotherapy, ISSN 0031-9406, E-ISSN 1873-1465, Vol. 96, no 3, p. 213-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES:

    To assess the extent to which perceived pain and psychological factors explain levels of disability and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients scheduled for lumbar fusion surgery, and to test the hypothesis that relationships between pain intensity, mental health, fear of movement/(re)injury, disability and HRQOL are mediated by cognitive beliefs and appraisals.

    DESIGN:

    Cross-sectional, correlation study.

    SETTING:

    Orthopaedic outpatient setting in a tertiary hospital.

    PARTICIPANTS:

    One hundred and seven chronic back pain patients scheduled for lumbar fusion surgery.

    MEASURES:

    Visual analogue scale for pain intensity, Short Form 36 mental health subscale, Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia, Back Beliefs Questionnaire, Self-efficacy Scale, Coping Strategy Questionnaire, Oswestry Disability Index and European Quality of Life Questionnaire.

    RESULTS:

    The group effect of multiple mediators significantly influenced the relationships between pain intensity and mental health, fear of movement/(re)injury, functional disability and HRQOL. Pain catastrophising significantly mediated the relationship between pain intensity and mental health, control over pain significantly mediated the relationship between mental health and functional disability, self-efficacy and pain outcome expectancy significantly mediated the relationship between mental health and HRQOL, and self-efficacy also significantly mediated the relationship between pain intensity, fear of movement/(re)jury and functional disability. The model explained 28, 30, 52 and 42% of the variation in mental health, fear of movement/(re)injury, functional disability and HRQOL, respectively.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    This study highlights the strong influence and mediation roles of psychological factors on pain, mental health, fear of movement/(re)injury, disability and HRQOL in patients scheduled for lumber fusion. Future research should focus on screening as well as pre- and post-operative interventions based on these psychological factors for the potential improvement of lumber fusion surgery outcomes.

    Copyright 2010 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 131.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tynni-Lenne, Raija
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Early physiotherapeutic rehabilitation following lumbar spinal fusion surgery2009In: Oral Presentations: Cervical Spine: The Surgical Treatment of Painful Disorders, Springer, 2009, Vol. 18, Supplement 4, p. S409-S410Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Physiotherapy after lumbar spinal fusion surgery is traditionally focused on physical exercise. Too few studies have investigatedthe efficacy of modern lumbar stabilization exercise regimes. Benefits have been shown for combining traditional physical exercise with a psychosocial intervention. No randomised controlled study has evaluated thecombined biopsychosocial effect of modern lumbar stabilization exercisesand cognitive behavioural intervention compared to traditional physical exercise starting immediately after lumbar spinal fusion.

    Purpose: To investigate the effectiveness of modern physiotherapy(MPT) compared to a traditional physiotherapy (TPT) starting immediately after lumber spinal fusion.

    Study design/setting: Randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Patient sample, inclusion period and follow-up: Patients between 18 and 65 years, selected for lumbar spinal fusion due to at least 12 months of CLBP symptoms caused by spinal stenosis, spondylosis, spondylolisthesis or degenerative disc disease were included in the study between 2005 and 2007. A total of 107 patients were randomly allocated to the MPT group (n = 53) and TPT group (n = 54). The TPT group was prescribed daily home based pain contingent training of traditional physical exercises for back, abdominal and leg muscles. The MPT group was prescribed daily home based training of lumbar stabilization exercises combined with 90 min of cognitive behavioural intervention at 3, 6 and 9 weeks after the operation. The patients outcomes were followed up at 3, 6, 12 months and 2–3 years

    Outcome measures: Oswestry disability index (ODI), pain intensity, HRQOL, kinesiophobia, anxiety/depression, self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, use of coping strategies, work status, sickness leave and health care use.

    Methods: Analysis of mean differences between groups.

    Results: 2–3 year follow-up showed that the MPT group had significantly lower percentage scores in ODI = 18.2 (P = 0.008), kinesiophobia= 30.0 (P = 0.001), catastrophizing = 21.8 (P = 0.006) and higher self-efficacy = 64.6 (P = 0.019) compared to TPT group’s ODI = 28.1, kinesiophobia = 41.9, catastrophizing = 31.3 and self-efficacy = 55.5. The MPT group had significantly more employment, less health care use (P = 0.035) and less long-term sickness leave (P = 0.040).

    Conclusions: This study provides evidence for the benefits of combining lumbar stabilization exercise and cognitive behavioural intervention starting immediately after lumbar fusion.

  • 132.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tynni-Lenné, R
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedlund, R
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The effectiveness of physiotherapeutic rehabilitation and issues of outcome prediction after lumber fusion surgery.2011In: Proceedings of the WCPT Congress, Amsterdam Netherlands. / [ed] Physiotherapy, World Confederation of Physical Therapy , 2011, Vol. 97 (Suppl 1), p. 20-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The primary purpose was to analyse the short and long term effectiveness of physiotherapeutic rehabilitation programs performed during the first 3 month after lumbar fusion surgery. A secondary purpose was to analyse factors predicting long-term disability, back pain and health related quality of life (HRQOL) outcomes after lumbar fusion.

    Relevance: The study provides evidence for the effectiveness of early physiotherapy after lumbar fusion. Furthermore improved knowledge of predictive factors can help physiotherapist in the screening of lumbar fusion candidates and the individualised implementation of pre-surgical and post-surgical interventions.

    Participants: A total of 107 patients were recruited from the Karolinska University Hospital's Orthopaedic Clinic, Stockholm, Sweden. The inclusion criteria were: men and women aged between 18 and 65 years with a >12 month history of back pain and/or sciatica; a primary diagnosis of spinal stenosis, degenerative or isthmic spondylolisthesis or degenerative disc disease; selected for lumbar fusion with or without decompression; competence in the Swedish language. The criteria for exclusion were: previous lumbar fusion, rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis.

    Methods: An open book randomised controlled trial with pre-surgical and post-surgical measures at 3, 6, 12 and 24-36 months was performed to investigate the effectiveness of a psychomotor therapy focusing on cognition, behaviour and motor relearning compared to exercise therapy focusing on strength and conditioning, applied during the first 3 months after lumbar fusion. Randomisation allocated 53 patients to psychomotor therapy and 54 patients to exercise therapy. The Oswestry disability index (ODI) was the primary outcome measure. Secondary measures included the Visual analogue scale for back pain (VAS), European quality of life questionnaire (EQ5D), as well as other clinical, psychological and work related variables.

    Analysis: A total of 78 patients were needed assuming a power = 80%. Patient compliance was analysed and an intention to treat principle applied to data analysis. For statistical comparison between the 2 independent groups, analysis of covariance was used. Categorical regression with optimal scaling transformation, elastic net regularization and bootstrapping were used to investigate pre-surgical predictor variables and address predictive model validity.

    Results: Follow-up rates were 93% at 12 months and 81% at 24-36 months after surgery. Psychomotor therapy improved functional disability, self-efficacy, outcome expectancy and fear of movement/(re)injury significantly more than exercise therapy at respective follow-up occasions. Pre-surgical control over pain significantly predicted functional disability and HRQOL. Pre-surgical catastrophizing and leg pain intensity significantly predicted functional disability and back pain while the pre-surgical lasegue test significantly predicted back pain. The implementation of post-operative psychomotor therapy also significantly predicted functional disability while pre-surgical outcome expectations significantly predicted HRQOL.

    Conclusions: The study shows that post-operative rehabilitation can be safely implemented during the first 3 months after lumbar fusion and should include measures to modify psychological as well as motor functions. The study also demonstrates the importance of pre-surgical psychological factors, leg pain intensity, the lasegue test and post-operative psychomotor therapy in the predictions of functional disability, back pain and HRQOL related outcomes.

    Implications: Physiotherapist should screen patients pain, psychological factors and neuromusculoskeletal system pre-surgically and rehabilitate patients with early psychomotor therapy after lumbar fusion.

  • 133.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tynni-Lenné, Raija
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Early rehabilitation targeting cognition, behaviour and motor function after lumbar fusion: A randomised controlled trial2010In: Abstracts: Oral Presentations, 2010, p. 186-186Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Study Design: Open label randomised controlled trial with 3, 6, 12 month and 2-3 year follow-up.

    Objective. To investigate the effectiveness of a psychomotor therapy focusing on cognition, behaviour and motor relearning compared to exercise therapy applied during the first 3 months after lumbar fusion.

    Methods: The study recruited 107 patients, aged 18 to 65 years, selected for lumbar fusion due to 12 months of symptomatic spinal stenosis, degenerative/isthmic spondylolisthesis or degenerative disc disease. The exercise therapy group received a home program focusing on pain contingent training of back, abdominal and leg muscle functional strength and endurance, stretching and cardiovascular fitness. The psychomotor therapy group received a home program and 3 outpatient sessions focusing on modifying maladaptive pain cognitions, behaviours and motor control. Patient-rated questionnaires investigating functional disability, pain, health related quality of life, functional self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, fear of movement/(re)injury and copingwere assessed at baseline, 3, 6, 12 months and 2-3 years after surgery.

    Results: Follow-up rates were 93% at 12 months and 81% at 2-3 years after surgery. Psychomotor therapy improved functional disability, self-efficacy, outcome expectancy and fear of movement/(re)injury significantly more than exercise therapy at respective follow-up occasions. Similar results occurred for pain coping but group differences were non-significant at 2-3 year follow-up.

    Conclusions: The study shows that post-operative rehabilitation can be effectively implemented during the first 3 months after lumbar fusion and should include measures to modify psychological aswell as motor functions.

  • 134.
    Abbott, Rebecca
    et al.
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60611 USA.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    West, Janne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Elliott, James M.
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60611 USA; Univ Queensland, Australia; Zurich Univ Appl Sci, Switzerland.
    Åslund, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    The qualitative grading of muscle fat infiltration in whiplash using fat and water magnetic resonance imaging2018In: The spine journal, ISSN 1529-9430, E-ISSN 1878-1632, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 717-725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT: The development of muscle fat infiltration (MFI) in the neck muscles is associated with poor functional recovery following whiplash injury. Custom software and time-consuming manual segmentation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is required for quantitative analysis and presents as a barrier for clinical translation. PURPOSE: The purpose of this work was to establish a qualitative MRI measure for MFI and evaluate its ability to differentiate between individuals with severe whiplash-associated disorder (WAD), mild or moderate WAD, and healthy controls. STUDY DESIGN/SETTING: This is a cross-sectional study. PATIENT SAMPLE: Thirty-one subjects with WAD and 31 age-and sex-matched controls were recruited from an ongoing randomized controlled trial. OUTCOME MEASURES: The cervical multifidus was visually identified and segmented into eighths in the axial fat/water images (C4-C7). Muscle fat infiltration was assessed on a visual scale: 0 for no or marginal MFI, 1 for light MFI, and 2 for distinct MFI. The participants with WAD were divided in two groups: mild or moderate and severe based on Neck Disability Index % scores. METHODS: The mean regional MFI was compared between the healthy controls and each of the WAD groups using the Mann-Whitney U test. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analyses were carried out to evaluate the validity of the qualitative method. RESULTS: Twenty (65%) patients had mild or moderate disability and 11 (35%) were considered severe. Inter- and intra-rater reliability was excellent when grading was averaged by level or when frequency of grade II was considered. Statistically significant differences (pamp;lt;.05) in regional MFI were particularly notable between the severe WAD group and healthy controls. The ROC curve, based on detection of distinct MFI, showed an area-under-the curve of 0.768 (95% confidence interval 0.59-0.94) for discrimination of WAD participants. CONCLUSIONS: These preliminary results suggest a qualitative MRI measure for MFI is reliable and valid, and may prove useful toward the classification of WAD in radiology practice. (C) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 135.
    Abbott, T. E. F.
    et al.
    Queen Mary Univ London, England.
    Ahmad, T.
    Queen Mary Univ London, England.
    Phull, M. K.
    Barts Hlth NHS Trust, England.
    Fowler, A. J.
    Guys and St Thomass NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Hewson, R.
    Barts Hlth NHS Trust, England.
    Biccard, B. M.
    Univ Cape Town, South Africa.
    Chew, Michelle
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Gillies, M.
    Univ Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Pearse, R. M.
    Queen Mary Univ London, England.
    The surgical safety checklist and patient outcomes after surgery: a prospective observational cohort study, systematic review and meta-analysis2018In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 120, no 1, p. 146-155Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The surgical safety checklist is widely used to improve the quality of perioperative care. However, clinicians continue to debate the clinical effectiveness of this tool. Methods: Prospective analysis of data from the International Surgical Outcomes Study (ISOS), an international observational study of elective in-patient surgery, accompanied by a systematic review and meta-analysis of published literature. The exposure was surgical safety checklist use. The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality and the secondary outcome was postoperative complications. In the ISOS cohort, a multivariable multi-level generalized linear model was used to test associations. To further contextualise these findings, we included the results from the ISOS cohort in a meta-analysis. Results are reported as odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals. Results: We included 44 814 patients from 497 hospitals in 27 countries in the ISOS analysis. There were 40 245 (89.8%) patients exposed to the checklist, whilst 7508 (16.8%) sustained amp;gt;= 1 postoperative complications and 207 (0.5%) died before hospital discharge. Checklist exposure was associated with reduced mortality [odds ratio (OR) 0.49 (0.32-0.77); Pamp;lt;0.01], but no difference in complication rates [OR 1.02 (0.88-1.19); P = 0.75]. In a systematic review, we screened 3732 records and identified 11 eligible studies of 453 292 patients including the ISOS cohort. Checklist exposure was associated with both reduced postoperative mortality [OR 0.75 (0.62-0.92); Pamp;lt;0.01; I-2 = 87%] and reduced complication rates [OR 0.73 (0.61-0.88); Pamp;lt;0.01; I-2 = 89%). Conclusions: Patients exposed to a surgical safety checklist experience better postoperative outcomes, but this could simply reflect wider quality of care in hospitals where checklist use is routine.

  • 136.
    Abd Al Qahar Al-Kubaisy, Waqar
    et al.
    MARA University of Technology, Sungai Buloh, Malaysia; MARA University of Technology UiTM, Malaysia.
    Jawad Obaid, Kadhim
    MARA University of Technology, Sungai Buloh, Malaysia.
    Aini Mohd Noor, Nor
    MARA University of Technology, Sungai Buloh, Malaysia; MARA University of Technology UiTM, Shah Alam, Selangor, Malaysia.
    Shamsidah Binti Nik Ibrahim, Nik
    MARA University of Technology, Sungai Buloh, Malaysia.
    Albu-Kareem Al-Azawi, Ahmed
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Hepatitis C virus prevalence and genotyping among hepatocellular carcinoma patients in Baghdad2014In: Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention, ISSN 1513-7368, Vol. 15, no 18, p. 7725-7730Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third most common cause for cancer death in the world, now being especially linked to chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. This case-control study consisting of 65 HCC patients and 82 patients with other malignant tumours as controls was conducted to determine the association of HCV markers with HCC. Serum of each participant was obtained for detection of HCV Ab and RNA by DNA enzyme immunoassay (DEIA). Twenty six per cent (26.0%) of HCC patients had positive anti-HCV which was significantly greater than the control group (p=0.001). HCC patients significantly have a risk of exposure to HCV infection almost 3 times than the control group (OR=2.87, 95% C.I=1.1-7). Anti-HCV seropositive rate was significantly (p=0.03) higher among old age HCC patients and increases with age. Males with HCC significantly showed to have more than 9 times risk of exposure to HCV infection (OR=9.375, 95 % CI=1.299-67.647) than females. HCV-RNA seropositive rate was (70.8%) significantly higher among HCC patients compared to (22.2%) the control group (p=0.019). The most prevalent genotype (as a single or mixed pattern of infection) was HCV-1b. This study detected a significantly higher HCV seropositive rate of antibodies and RNA in HCC patients.

  • 137.
    Abdalla, Hana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Diab, Asim
    Department of Neurology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, USA.
    Forslund, Tony
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bakhiet, Moiz
    Department of Medicine, Divisions of lnfectious Diseases, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stendahl, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sundqvist, Tommy
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthases and nitrotyrosine during the course of Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis in ratManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Bacterial meningitis continues to be a major health problem and despite great advances in antimicrobial therapy the fatality rate remains high. There is increasing evidence that leukocyte-endothelial interactions are involved in CNS damage during bacterial meningitis. Once leukocytes have entered the CSF they cause injury by releasing toxic molecules such as nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The induction of iNOS was examined by assessing intracerebral mRNA expression and protein production during the course of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) meningitis in the rat. Induction of iNOS mRNA was detected 12h postinoculation (pi), followed by a gradual reduction. The increased number of intracerebral iN OS expressing cells was detected at 12h pi. followed by further elevation to peak expression at 72h pi. The iNOS positive tissue also bound antibodies specific for nitrotyrosine. The expression of iNOS and NO production, as shown by nitrotyrosine expression, correlated with disease severity, suggesting that activation of iNOS may play an important role in Haemophilus irifluenzae type b meningitis.

  • 138.
    Abdalla, Hana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Forslund, Tony
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Schön, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stendahl, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sundqvist, Tommy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effects of CNI-1493 on human granulocyte functions2006In: Immunobiology, ISSN 0171-2985, E-ISSN 1878-3279, Vol. 211, no 3, p. 191-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During acute bacterial infections such as sepsis and meningitis, activation of inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO) plays a crucial role in both pathogenesis and host defense. We have previously reported that CNI-1493, a macrophage deactivator, reduced mortality in infant rats infected with Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) with associated decrease in the number of granulocytes in the infected tissue. The aim of the present study was to investigate how CNI-1493 affects granulocytes and macrophages in vitro. Murine macrophages (RAW 264.7) pre-incubated with CNI-1493 prior to activation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon gamma (IFNγ) had decreased NO production measured as NO2/NO3 levels and reduction in inducible NO-synthase (iNOS) expression. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was increased in formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP)-stimulated granulocytes following CNI-1493 treatment, whereas F-actin content, motility and chemotaxis were decreased under the same conditions. The effects of CNI-1493 on both NO production in LPS/IFNγ-activated macrophages and ROS production, F-actin content, motility and chemotaxis in granulocytes, may contribute to the reduced inflammatory response and increased survival in Hib-infected animals treated with CNI-1493.

  • 139.
    Abdalla, Hassan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Complex Materials and Devices. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Charge and Energy Transport in Disordered Organic Semiconductors2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Improvement of the performance of organic disordered semiconductors (OSC) is driven by the understanding   of the underlying charge transport mechanisms and systematic exploitation thereof. There exists a multitude of materials and material systems based on polymers and small molecules with promising performance for use in organic light emitting diodes, photovoltaics, organic field-effect transistors and thermoelectrics. However, universal understanding of many classes of these materials has eluded researchers, due to their broad   spectrum of morphologies, molecular structures and electrical properties. Building on the large body of existing models, this thesis deals with charge transport phenomena from the perspective of transport energetics, by studying the interplay between a few but important concepts commonly accepted to play a crucial role in all  OSC materials; energetic disorder, charge carrier hopping and Coulomb interactions. The influence of these concepts on the energetic landscape through which charge carriers move and how this translates to experimentally observed transport phenomena are studied by a combination of experimental work, kinetic Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and empirical and analytical models.

    The universal scaling and collapse of the temperature and electric field dependence of the conductivity of PEDOT:PSS to a single curve is shown to be functionally equivalent to the scaling of the effective temperature, which describes the effect of field heating as a broadening of the charge carrier distribution. From numerical investigation of the energy relaxation, an empirical model is developed that relates the physical meaning   behind both concepts to the heat balance between Joule heating of the carrier distribution via the effective temperature and energy loss to the lattice. For this universal description to be applicable a strongly energy- dependent density of states (DOS) as well as Coulomb interactions and large carrier concentrations are needed.

    Chemical doping is a common way of improving charge transport in OSC and is also beneficial for energy transport, which combined leads to an increased thermoelectric power factor. The ensuing thermoelectric investigations not only showed the potential of these materials for use in thermoelectric generators, but are  also helpful in unraveling charge transport mechanism as they give direct insight into the energetics of a material. Interestingly, doped OSC exhibit the same universal power-law relationship between thermopower and conductivity, independent of material system or doping method, pointing towards a common energy and charge transport mechanism. In this thesis an analytical model is presented, which reproduces said universal power-law behavior and is able to attribute it to Variable Range Hopping (VRH) or a transition between Nearest Neighbour Hopping (NNH) and VRH at higher concentrations. This model builds on an existing three- dimensional hopping formalism that includes the effect of the attractive Coulomb potential of ionized dopants that leads to a broadening of the DOS. Here, this model is extended by including the energy offset between   host and dopant material and is positively tested against MC simulations and a set of thermoelectric measurements covering different material groups and doping mechanisms.

    Organic field effect transistors (OFETs) have become increasingly comparable in electrical mobility to their inorganic (silicon) counterparts. The spatial extent of charge transport in OFETs has been subject to debate since their inception with many experimental, numerical and analytical studies having been undertaken. Here it is shown that the common way of analyzing the dimensionality of charge transport in OFETs may be prone to misinterpretations. Instead, the results in this thesis suggest that charge transport in OFETs is, in fact, quasi- two-dimensional (2D) due to the confinement of the gate field in addition to a morphology-induced preferred in-plane direction of the transport. The inherently large charge carrier concentrations in OFETs in addition to   the quasi-2D confinement leads to increased Coulomb interaction between charge carriers as compared to bulk material, leading to a thermoelectric behavior that deviates from doped organic systems. At very large concentrations interesting charge transport phenomena are observed, including an unexpected simultaneous increase of the concentration dependence and the magnitude of the mobility, the appearance of a negative transconductance, indicating a transition to an insulating Mott-Hubbard phase. The experimental and   numerical results in this thesis relate these phenomena the intricacies of the interplay between Coulomb interactions, energetic disorder and charge carrier hopping.

    List of papers
    1. Effective Temperature and Universal Conductivity Scaling in Organic Semiconductors
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effective Temperature and Universal Conductivity Scaling in Organic Semiconductors
    2015 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, article id 16870Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the scalability of the temperature-and electric field-dependence of the conductivity of disordered organic semiconductors to universal curves by two different but commonly employed methods; by so-called universal scaling and by using the effective temperature concept. Experimentally both scaling methods were found to be equally applicable to the out-of-plane charge transport in PEDOT: PSS thin films of various compositions. Both methods are shown to be equivalent in terms of functional dependence and to have identical limiting behavior. The experimentally observed scaling behavior can be reproduced by a numerical nearest-neighbor hopping model, accounting for the Coulomb interaction, the high charge carrier concentration and the energetic disorder. The underlying physics can be captured in a simple empirical model, describing the effective temperature of the charge carrier distribution as the outcome of a heat balance between Joule heating and (effective) temperature-dependent energy loss to the lattice.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Nature Publishing Group, 2015
    National Category
    Physical Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123329 (URN)10.1038/srep16870 (DOI)000364933800002 ()26581975 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2015-12-14 Created: 2015-12-11 Last updated: 2019-09-26
    2. Impact of doping on the density of states and the mobility in organic semiconductors
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of doping on the density of states and the mobility in organic semiconductors
    2016 (English)In: PHYSICAL REVIEW B, ISSN 2469-9950, Vol. 93, no 23, p. 235203-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We experimentally investigated conductivity and mobility of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) doped with tetrafluorotetracyanoquinodimethane (F(4)TCNQ) for various relative doping concentrations ranging from ultralow (10(-5)) to high (10(-1)) and various active layer thicknesses. Although the measured conductivity monotonously increases with increasing doping concentration, the mobilities decrease, in agreement with previously published work. Additionally, we developed a simple yet quantitative model to rationalize the results on basis of a modification of the density of states (DOS) by the Coulomb potentials of ionized dopants. The DOS was integrated in a three-dimensional (3D) hopping formalism in which parameters such as energetic disorder, intersite distance, energy level difference, and temperature were varied. We compared predictions of our model as well as those of a previously developed model to kinetic Monte Carlo (MC) modeling and found that only the former model accurately reproduces the mobility of MC modeling in a large part of the parameter space. Importantly, both our model and MC simulations are in good agreement with experiments; the crucial ingredient to both is the formation of a deep trap tail in the Gaussian DOS with increasing doping concentration.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    AMER PHYSICAL SOC, 2016
    National Category
    Other Physics Topics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130276 (URN)10.1103/PhysRevB.93.235203 (DOI)000378813800009 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Chinese Scholarship Council (CSC)

    Available from: 2016-08-01 Created: 2016-07-28 Last updated: 2018-08-29
    3. Range and energetics of charge hopping in organic semiconductors
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Range and energetics of charge hopping in organic semiconductors
    2017 (English)In: Physical Review B, ISSN 2469-9950, E-ISSN 2469-9969, Vol. 96, no 24, article id 241202Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The recent upswing in attention for the thermoelectric properties of organic semiconductors (OSCs) adds urgency to the need for a quantitative description of the range and energetics of hopping transport in organic semiconductors under relevant circumstances, i.e., around room temperature (RT). In particular, the degree to which hops beyond the nearest neighbor must be accounted for at RT is still largely unknown. Here, measurements of charge and energy transport in doped OSCs are combined with analytical modeling to reach the univocal conclusion that variable-range hopping is the proper description in a large class of disordered OSC at RT. To obtain quantitative agreement with experiment, one needs to account for the modification of the density of states by ionized dopants. These Coulomb interactions give rise to a deep tail of trap states that is independent of the materials initial energetic disorder. Insertion of this effect into a classical Mott-type variable-range hopping model allows one to give a quantitative description of temperature-dependent conductivity and thermopower measurements on a wide range of disordered OSCs. In particular, the model explains the commonly observed quasiuniversal power-law relation between the Seebeck coefficient and the conductivity.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    AMER PHYSICAL SOC, 2017
    National Category
    Condensed Matter Physics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-144143 (URN)10.1103/PhysRevB.96.241202 (DOI)000418616700001 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Chinese Scholarship Council (CSC); Knut och Alice Wallenberg stiftelse

    Available from: 2018-01-10 Created: 2018-01-10 Last updated: 2018-08-29
    4. Investigation of the dimensionality of charge transport in organic field effect transistors
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Investigation of the dimensionality of charge transport in organic field effect transistors
    2017 (English)In: Physical Review B, ISSN 2469-9950, E-ISSN 2469-9969, Vol. 95, no 8, article id 85301Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Ever since the first experimental investigations of organic field effect transistors (OFETs) the dimensionality of charge transport has alternately been described as two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D). More recently, researchers have turned to an analytical analysis of the temperature-dependent transfer characteristics to classify the dimensionality as either 2D or 3D as well as to determine the disorder of the system, thereby greatly simplifying dimensionality investigations. We applied said analytical analysis to the experimental results of our OFETs comprising molecularly well-defined polymeric layers as the active material as well as to results obtained from kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and found that it was not able to correctly distinguish between 2D and 3D transports or give meaningful values for the disorder and should only be used for quasiquantitative and comparative analysis. We conclude to show that the dimensionality of charge transport in OFETs is a function of the interplay between transistor physics and morphology of the organic material.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    AMER PHYSICAL SOC, 2017
    National Category
    Condensed Matter Physics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-138929 (URN)10.1103/PhysRevB.95.085301 (DOI)000402194500006 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Knut och Alice Wallenbergs stiftelse; Advanced Functional Materials Center at Linkoping University [2009-00971]; VINNOVA [2015-04859]

    Available from: 2017-06-27 Created: 2017-06-27 Last updated: 2018-03-14
  • 140.
    Abdalla, Hassan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Complex Materials and Devices. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fabiano, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kemerink, Martijn
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Complex Materials and Devices. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Investigation of the dimensionality of charge transport in organic field effect transistors2017In: Physical Review B, ISSN 2469-9950, E-ISSN 2469-9969, Vol. 95, no 8, article id 85301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ever since the first experimental investigations of organic field effect transistors (OFETs) the dimensionality of charge transport has alternately been described as two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D). More recently, researchers have turned to an analytical analysis of the temperature-dependent transfer characteristics to classify the dimensionality as either 2D or 3D as well as to determine the disorder of the system, thereby greatly simplifying dimensionality investigations. We applied said analytical analysis to the experimental results of our OFETs comprising molecularly well-defined polymeric layers as the active material as well as to results obtained from kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and found that it was not able to correctly distinguish between 2D and 3D transports or give meaningful values for the disorder and should only be used for quasiquantitative and comparative analysis. We conclude to show that the dimensionality of charge transport in OFETs is a function of the interplay between transistor physics and morphology of the organic material.

  • 141.
    Abdalla, Hassan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Complex Materials and Devices. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    van de Ruit, Kevin
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Kemerink, Martijn
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Complex Materials and Devices. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Effective Temperature and Universal Conductivity Scaling in Organic Semiconductors2015In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, article id 16870Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the scalability of the temperature-and electric field-dependence of the conductivity of disordered organic semiconductors to universal curves by two different but commonly employed methods; by so-called universal scaling and by using the effective temperature concept. Experimentally both scaling methods were found to be equally applicable to the out-of-plane charge transport in PEDOT: PSS thin films of various compositions. Both methods are shown to be equivalent in terms of functional dependence and to have identical limiting behavior. The experimentally observed scaling behavior can be reproduced by a numerical nearest-neighbor hopping model, accounting for the Coulomb interaction, the high charge carrier concentration and the energetic disorder. The underlying physics can be captured in a simple empirical model, describing the effective temperature of the charge carrier distribution as the outcome of a heat balance between Joule heating and (effective) temperature-dependent energy loss to the lattice.

  • 142.
    Abdalla, Hassan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Complex Materials and Devices. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zuo, Guangzheng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Complex Materials and Devices. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kemerink, Martijn
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Complex Materials and Devices. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Range and energetics of charge hopping in organic semiconductors2017In: Physical Review B, ISSN 2469-9950, E-ISSN 2469-9969, Vol. 96, no 24, article id 241202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent upswing in attention for the thermoelectric properties of organic semiconductors (OSCs) adds urgency to the need for a quantitative description of the range and energetics of hopping transport in organic semiconductors under relevant circumstances, i.e., around room temperature (RT). In particular, the degree to which hops beyond the nearest neighbor must be accounted for at RT is still largely unknown. Here, measurements of charge and energy transport in doped OSCs are combined with analytical modeling to reach the univocal conclusion that variable-range hopping is the proper description in a large class of disordered OSC at RT. To obtain quantitative agreement with experiment, one needs to account for the modification of the density of states by ionized dopants. These Coulomb interactions give rise to a deep tail of trap states that is independent of the materials initial energetic disorder. Insertion of this effect into a classical Mott-type variable-range hopping model allows one to give a quantitative description of temperature-dependent conductivity and thermopower measurements on a wide range of disordered OSCs. In particular, the model explains the commonly observed quasiuniversal power-law relation between the Seebeck coefficient and the conductivity.

  • 143.
    Abdalla, Maie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Landerholm, Kalle
    Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Andersson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Risk of Rectal Cancer After Colectomy for Patients With Ulcerative Colitis: A National Cohort Study2017In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, ISSN 1542-3565, E-ISSN 1542-7714, Vol. 15, no 7, p. 1055-1060, article id e2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND amp; AIMS: Patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) have an increased risk of rectal cancer, therefore reconstruction with an ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) generally is preferred to an ileorectal anastomosis (IRA) after subtotal colectomy. Similarly, completion proctectomy is recommended for patients with ileostomy and a diverted rectum, although this approach has been questioned because anti-inflammatory agents might reduce cancer risk. We performed a national cohort study in Sweden to assess the risk of rectal cancer in patients with UC who have an IRA, IPAA, or diverted rectum after subtotal colectomy.

    METHODS: We collected data from the Swedish National Patient Register for a cohort of 5886 patients with UC who underwent subtotal colectomy with an IRA, IPAA, or diverted rectum from 1964 through 2010. Patients who developed rectal cancer were identified from the Swedish National Cancer Register. The risk of rectal cancer was compared between this cohort and the general population by standardized incidence ratio analysis.

    RESULTS: Rectal cancer occurred in 20 of 1112 patients (1.8%) who received IRA, 1 of 1796 patients (0.06%) who received an IPAA, and 25 of 4358 patients (0.6%) with a diverted rectum. Standardized incidence ratios for rectal cancer were 8.7 in patients with an IRA, 0.4 in patients with an IPAA, and 3.8 in patients with a diverted rectum. Risk factors for rectal cancer were primary sclerosing cholangitis in patients with an IRA (hazard ratio, 6.12), and colonic severe dysplasia or cancer before subtotal colectomy in patients with a diverted rectum (hazard ratio, 3.67).

    CONCLUSIONS: In an analysis of the Swedish National Patient Register, we found that the risk for rectal cancer after colectomy in patients with UC is low, in relative and absolute terms, after reconstruction with an IPAA. An IRA and diverted rectum are associated with an increased risk of rectal cancer, compared with the general population, but the absolute risk is low. Patients and their health care providers should consider these findings in making decisions to leave the rectum intact, perform completion proctectomy, or reconstruct the colon with an IRA or IPAA.

  • 144.
    Abdalla, Maie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of General Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Norblad, Rickard
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Olsson, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Landerholm, Kalle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Surgery, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Andersson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping.
    Söderholm, Johan D.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Surgery, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Anorectal Function After Ileo-Rectal Anastomosis Is Better than Pelvic Pouch in Selected Ulcerative Colitis Patients2019In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, ISSN 0163-2116, E-ISSN 1573-2568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: With a lifelong perspective, 12% of ulcerative colitis patients will need a colectomy. Further reconstruction via ileo-rectal anastomosis or pouch can be affected by patients' perspective of their quality of life after surgery.

    AIM: To assess the function and quality of life after restorative procedures with either ileo-rectal anastomosis or ileal pouch-anal anastomosis in relation to the inflammatory activity on endoscopy and in biopsies.

    METHOD: A total of 143 UC patients operated with subtotal colectomy and ileo-rectal anastomosis or pouches between 1992 and 2006 at Linköping University Hospital were invited to participate. Those who completed the validated questionnaires (Öresland score, SF-36, Short Health Scale) were offered an endoscopic evaluation including multiple biopsies. Associations between anorectal function and quality of life with type of restorative procedure and severity of endoscopic and histopathologic grading of inflammation were evaluated.

    RESULTS: Some 77 (53.9%) eligible patients completed questionnaires, of these 68 (88.3%) underwent endoscopic evaluation after a median follow-up of 12.5 (range 3.5-19.4) years after restorative procedure. Patients with ileo-rectal anastomosis reported better overall Öresland score: median = 3 (IQR 2-5) for ileo-rectal anastomosis (n = 38) and 10 (IQR 5-15) for pouch patients (n = 39) (p < 0.001). Anorectal function (Öresland score) and endoscopic findings (Baron-Ginsberg score) were positively correlated in pouch patients (tau: 0.28, p = 0.006).

    CONCLUSION: Patients operated with ileo-rectal anastomosis reported better continence compared to pouches. Minor differences were noted regarding the quality of life. Ileo-rectal anastomosis is a valid option for properly selected ulcerative colitis patients if strict postoperative endoscopic surveillance is carried out.

  • 145.
    Abdallah, Nancy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Mathematics and Applied Mathematics.
    Hansson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Mathematics and Applied Mathematics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Axel
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Mathematics and Applied Mathematics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Topology of posets with special partial matchings2019In: Advances in Mathematics, ISSN 0001-8708, E-ISSN 1090-2082, Vol. 348, p. 255-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Special partial matchings (SPMs) are a generalisation of Brentis special matchings. Let a pircon be a poset in which every non-trivial principal order ideal is finite and admits an SPM. Thus pircons generalise Mariettis zircons. We prove that every open interval in a pircon is a PL ball or a PL sphere. It is then demonstrated that Bruhat orders on certain twisted identities and quasiparabolic W-sets constitute pircons. Together, these results extend a result of Can, Cherniaysky, and Twelbeck, prove a conjecture of Hultman, and confirm a claim of Rains and Vazirani.

  • 146.
    Abdallah, Nancy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Mathematics and Applied Mathematics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Axel
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Mathematics and Applied Mathematics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Combinatorial invariance of Kazhdan-Lusztig-Vogan polynomials for fixed point free involutions2018In: Journal of Algebraic Combinatorics, ISSN 0925-9899, E-ISSN 1572-9192, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 543-560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When acts on the flag variety of , the orbits are in bijection with fixed point free involutions in the symmetric group . In this case, the associated Kazhdan-Lusztig-Vogan polynomials can be indexed by pairs of fixed point free involutions , where denotes the Bruhat order on . We prove that these polynomials are combinatorial invariants in the sense that if is a poset isomorphism of upper intervals in the Bruhat order on fixed point free involutions, then for all v amp;gt;= u.

  • 147.
    Abdelfattah, Ahmed
    et al.
    Univ Mediterranea Reggio Calabria, Italy.
    Malacrinò, Antonino
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wisniewski, Michael
    USDA ARS, WV 25430 USA.
    Cacciola, Santa O.
    Univ Catania, Italy.
    Schena, Leonardo
    Univ Mediterranea Reggio Calabria, Italy.
    Metabarcoding: A powerful tool to investigate microbial communities and shape future plant protection strategies2018In: Biological control (Print), ISSN 1049-9644, E-ISSN 1090-2112, Vol. 120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microorganisms are the main drivers shaping the functioning and equilibrium of all ecosystems, contributing to nutrient cycling, primary production, litter decomposition, and multi-trophic interactions. Knowledge about the microbial assemblies in specific ecological niches is integral to understanding the assemblages interact and function the function, and becomes essential when the microbiota intersects with human activities, such as protecting crops against pests and diseases. Metabarcoding has proven to be a valuable tool and has been widely used for characterizing the microbial diversity of different environments and has been utilized in many research endeavors. Here we summarize the current status of metabarcoding technologies, the advantages and challenges in utilizing this technique, and how this pioneer approach is being applied to studying plant diseases and pests, with a focus on plant protection and biological control. Current and future developments in this technology will foster a more comprehensive understanding of microbial ecology, and the development of new, innovative pest control strategies.

  • 148.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Validation of the burn intervention score in a National Burn Centre2018In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, no 5, p. 1159-1166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Linköping burn score has been used for two decades to calculate the cost to the hospital of each burned patient. Our aim was to validate the Burn Score in a dedicated Burn Centre by analysing the associations with burn-specific factors: percentage of total body surface area burned (TBSA%), cause of injury, patients referred from other (non-specialist) centres, and survival, to find out which of these factors resulted in higher scores. Our second aim was to analyse the variation in scores of each category of care (surveillance, respiration, circulation, wound care, mobilisation, laboratory tests, infusions, and operation).

    We made a retrospective analysis of all burned patients admitted during the period 2000–15. Multivariable regression models were used to analyse predictive factors for an increased daily burn score, the cumulative burn score (the sum of the daily burn scores for each patient) and the total burn score (total sum of burn scores for the whole group throughout the study period) in addition to sub-analysis of the different categories of care that make up the burn score.

    We retrieved 22 301 daily recordings for inpatients. Mobilisation and care of the wound accounted for more than half of the total burn score during the study. Increased TBSA% and age over 45 years were associated with increased cumulative (model R2 0.43, p < 0.001) and daily (model R2 0.61, p < 0.001) burn scores. Patients who died had higher daily burn scores, while the cumulative burn score decreased with shorter duration of hospital stay (p < 0.001).

    To our knowledge this is the first long term analysis and validation of a system for scoring burn interventions in patients with burns that explores its association with the factors important for outcome. Calculations of costs are based on the score, and it provides an indicator of the nurses’ workload. It also gives important information about the different dimensions of the care provided from thorough investigation of the scores for each category.

  • 149.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Division of overall duration of stay into operative stay and postoperative stay improves the overall estimate as a measure of quality of outcome in burn care.2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 3, article id e0174579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients and Methods: Surgically managed burn patients admitted between 2010-14 were included. Operative stay was defined as the time from admission until the last operation, postoperative stay as the time from the last operation until discharge. The difference in variation was analysed with F-test. A retrospective review of medical records was done to explore reasons for extended postoperative stay. Multivariable regression was used to assess factors associated with operative stay and postoperative stay.less thanbr /greater thanResults: Operative stay/TBSA% showed less variation than total duration/TBSA% (F test = 2.38, pless than0.01). The size of the burn, and the number of operations, were the independent factors that influenced operative stay (R2 0.65). Except for the size of the burn other factors were associated with duration of postoperative stay: wound related, psychological and other medical causes, advanced medical support, and accommodation arrangements before discharge, of which the two last were the most important with an increase of (mean) 12 and 17 days (pless than0.001, R2 0.51).less thanbr /greater thanConclusion: Adjusted operative stay showed less variation than total hospital stay and thus can be considered a more accurate outcome measure for surgically managed burns. The size of burn and number of operations are the factors affecting this outcome measure.

  • 150.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. a Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Improvement in mortality at a National Burn Centre since 2000: Was it the result of increased resources?2017In: Medicine (Baltimore, Md.), ISSN 0025-7974, E-ISSN 1536-5964, Vol. 96, no 25, article id e6727Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract The aim of this study was to find out whether the charging costs (calculated using interventional burn score) increased as mortality decreased. During the last 2 decades, mortality has declined significantly in the Linköping Burn Centre. The burn score that we use has been validated as a measure of workload and is used to calculate the charging costs of each burned patient. We compared the charging costs and mortality in 2 time periods (2000–2007 and 2008–2015). A total of 1363 admissions were included. We investigated the change in the burn score, as a surrogate for total costs per patient. Multivariable regression was used to analyze risk-adjusted mortality and burn score. The median total body surface area % (TBSA%) was 6.5% (10–90 centile 1.0–31.0), age 33 years (1.3–72.2), duration of stay/ TBSA% was 1.4 days (0.3–5.3), and 960 (70%) were males. Crude mortality declined from 7.5% in 2000–2007 to 3.4% in 2008–2015, whereas the cumulative burn score was not increased (P=.08). Regression analysis showed that risk-adjusted mortality decreased (odds ratio 0.42, P=.02), whereas the adjusted burn score did not change (P=.14, model R2 0.86). Mortality decreased but there was no increase in the daily use of resources as measured by the interventional burn score. The data suggest that the improvements in quality obtained have been achieved within present routines for care of patients (multidisciplinary/ orientated to patients’ safety).

    Abbreviation: TBSA% = total body surface area %.

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