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  • 101.
    Cardin, Velia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. University College London, Division of Psychology and Language Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ferraz De Oliveira, Rita
    London South Bank University, School of Applied Science.
    Andin, Josefine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Beese, Lilli
    University College London, Deafness Cognition and Language Research Centre.
    Woll, Bencie
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. University College London, Division of Psychology and Language Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    A working memory role for superior temporal cortex in deaf individuals independently of linguistic content2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of sign languages have been used to test traditional cognitive models of working memory (WM) that distinguish between verbal and visuospatial WM (e.g. Baddeley, 2003), without considering that sign languages operate in the visuospatial domain. Previous studies have shown that WM mental representations and processes are largely similar for signed and spoken languages (e.g. Rönnberg et al., 2004). However, it is not clear to what extent visual WM processes aid and support sign language WM.

    Here we characterise the neural substrates supporting sign language and visual WM, and the mechanisms that subserve differential processing for signers and for deaf individuals. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment with three groups of participants: deaf native signers, hearing native signers and hearing non-signers. Participants performed a 2-back WM task and a control task on two sets of stimuli: signs from British Sign Language or non-sense objects. Stimuli were composed of point-lights to control for differences in visual features.

    Our results show activation in a fronto-parietal network for WM processing in all groups, independently of stimulus type, in agreement with previous literature. We also replicate previous findings in deaf signers showing a stronger right posterior superior temporal cortex (STC) activation for visuospatial processing, and stronger bilateral STC activation for sign language stimuli.

    Group comparisons further reveal stronger activations in STC for WM in deaf signers, but not for the groups of hearing individuals. This activation is independent of the linguistic content of the stimuli, being observed in both WM conditions: signs and objects. These results suggest a cognitive role for STC in deaf signers, beyond sign language processing.

  • 102.
    Cardin, Velia
    et al.
    University College London, Division of Psychology and Language Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Ferraz de Oliveira, Rita
    London South Bank University, School of Applied Science.
    Su, Merina
    London South Bank University, Institute of Child Health.
    Andin, Josefine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Beese, Lilli
    University College London, Deafness Cognition and Language Research Centre.
    Woll, Bencie
    University College London, Division of Psychology and Language Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Does the superior temporal cortex have a role in cognitive control as a consequence of cross-modal reorganization?2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 103.
    Cardin, Velia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. University College London, Division of Psychology and Language Sciences.
    Smittenaar, Rebecca C.
    University College London, Experimental Psychology.
    Orfanidou, Eleni
    University of Crete, Greece.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Capek, Cheryl M.
    University of Manchester, School of Psychological Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Woll, Bencie
    University College London, Division of Psychology and Language Sciences.
    Differential activity in Heschl's gyrus between deaf and hearing individuals is due to auditory deprivation rather than language modality2016In: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, Vol. 124, p. 96-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sensory cortices undergo crossmodal reorganisation as a consequence of sensory deprivation. Congenital deafness in humans represents a particular case with respect to other types of sensory deprivation, because cortical reorganisation is not only a consequence of auditory deprivation, but also of language-driven mechanisms. Visual crossmodal plasticity has been found in secondary auditory cortices of deaf individuals, but it is still unclear if reorganisation also takes place in primary auditory areas, and how this relates to language modality and auditory deprivation.

    Here, we dissociated the effects of language modality and auditory deprivation on crossmodal plasticity in Heschl's gyrus as a whole, and in cytoarchitectonic region Te1.0 (likely to contain the core auditory cortex). Using fMRI, we measured the BOLD response to viewing sign language in congenitally or early deaf individuals with and without sign language knowledge, and in hearing controls.

    Results show that differences between hearing and deaf individuals are due to a reduction in activation caused by visual stimulation in the hearing group, which is more significant in Te1.0 than in Heschl's gyrus as a whole. Furthermore, differences between deaf and hearing groups are due to auditory deprivation, and there is no evidence that the modality of language used by deaf individuals contributes to crossmodal plasticity in Heschl's gyrus.

  • 104.
    Carlsson, Rickard
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Heene, Moritz
    Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Germany.
    Innes-Ker, Åse
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Lakensël, Daniel
    Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Schimmack, Ulrich
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Schönbrodt, Felix D
    Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Germany.
    Van Assen, Marcel
    Tilburg University and Utrecht University.
    Weinstein, Yana
    University of Massachusetts, Lowell, USA.
    Inaugural Editorial of Meta-Psychology2017In: Meta-Psychology, ISSN 2003-2714, Vol. 1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 105.
    Carney, Daniel P. J.
    et al.
    London South Bank University, UK.
    Henry, Lucy A.
    London South Bank University, UK.
    Messer, David J.
    The Open University, Milton Keynes, UK.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Brown, Janice H.
    London South Bank University, UK.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Using developmental trajectories to examine verbal and visuospatial short-term memory development in children and adolescents with Williams and Down syndromes2013In: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 34, no 10, p. 3421-3432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Williams (WS) and Down (DS) syndromes have been associated with specifically compromised short-term memory (STM) subsystems. Individuals with WS have shown impairments in visuospatial STM, while individuals with DS have often shown problems with the recall of verbal material. However, studies have not usually compared the development of STM skills in these domains, in these populations. The present study employed a cross-sectional developmental trajectories approach, plotting verbal and visuospatial STM performance against more general cognitive and chronological development, to investigate how the domain-specific skills of individuals with WS and DS may change as development progresses, as well as whether the difference between STM skill domains increases, in either group, as development progresses. Typically developing children, of broadly similar cognitive ability to the clinical groups, were also included. Planned between- and within-group comparisons were carried out. Individuals with WS and DS both showed the domain-specific STM weaknesses in overall performance that were expected based on the respective cognitive profiles. However, skills in both groups developed, according to general cognitive development, at similar rates to those of the TD group. In addition, no significant developmental divergence between STM domains was observed in either clinical group according to mental age or chronological age, although the general pattern of findings indicated that the influence of the latter variable across STM domains, particularly in WS, might merit further investigation.

  • 106.
    Cederborg, A-C
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden .
    Hultman, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fälth-Magnusson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Living with children who have coeliac disease: a parental perspective2012In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 484-489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background This study explores how a childs coeliac disease (CD) influences the daily life of families because such knowledge can enhance the understanding of how to support family adjustment to a gluten-free diet (GFD). Methods We used an interpretative phenomenological approach, interviewing 20 parents of 14 children diagnosed with CD about their individual thoughts and beliefs. Results Once parents know, especially when their children are young, they seem to have the capacity to rapidly adapt to GFD, mainly because they notice how quickly their children recover. Parents may have problems controlling how staff at daycare and at school complies with their information about a GFD. Conclusions To ensure that children with CD are given a GFD at daycare and school, it is necessary for municipalities to educate staff about the disease and to give them the prerequisites for serving a GFD. There is also a need of early identification of children who may have CD. When parents express their worries, not just at the hospital but also at the well-baby clinic and primary care units, supporting treatment could prevent children from suffering from inappropriate food.

  • 107.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    La Rooy, D
    Scottish Institute Policing Research.
    Lamb , M E
    University of Cambridge.
    Repetition of contaminating question types when children and youths with intellectual disabilities are interviewed2009In: JOURNAL OF INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY RESEARCH, ISSN 0964-2633 , Vol. 53, p. 440-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examined the effects of repeating questions in interviews investigating the possible sexual abuse of children and youths who had a variety of intellectual disabilities. We predicted that the repetition of option-posing and suggestive questions would lead the suspected victims to change their responses, making it difficult to understand what actually happened. Inconsistency can be a key factor when assessing the reliability of witnesses.

    Case files and transcripts of investigative interviews with 33 children and youths who had a variety of intellectual disabilities were obtained from prosecutors in Sweden. The interviews involved 25 females and 9 males whose chronological ages were between 5.4 and 23.7 years when interviewed (M = 13.2 years).

    Six per cent of the questions were repeated at least once. The repetition of focused questions raised doubts about the reports because the interviewees changed their answers 40% of the time.

    Regardless of the witnesses abilities, it is important to obtain reports that are as accurate and complete as possible in investigative interviews. Because this was a field study, we did not know which responses were accurate, but repetitions of potentially contaminating questions frequently led the interviewees to contradict their earlier answers. This means that the interviewers behaviour diminished the usefulness of the witnesses testimony.

  • 108.
    Chundu, Srikanth
    et al.
    University of Southampton, UK.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya K. C.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stephens, Dafydd
    Cardiff University, UK .
    Kumar, Neeraj
    Bihar Sharif, Nalanda, Bihar, India .
    Parental reported benefits and shortcomings of cochlear implantation: Pilot study findings from Southeast Asia2013In: Cochlear Implants International, ISSN 1467-0100, E-ISSN 1754-7628, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 22-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The aim of the study was to understand the reported benefits and shortcomings by parents of children with cochlear implants and who contribute towards the cost of the implant. Method Thirty parents of children with cochlear implants from a hearing impaired school in Southeast Asia completed open-ended questionnaires and the data were analysed using content analysis. Results A wide range of benefits and shortcomings were reported. However, it is notable that the single most reported shortcoming was related to cost. Discussion The results suggest that, even though, in general, the reports about benefits and shortcomings were similar to previous results from western countries, the emphasis given to various aspects of shortcomings was different. In particular, it appears that parentally reported outcomes could be related to many factors including the hearing healthcare system with the costs involved for the implanted individuals and their families. These findings help us understand the parental perspectives of the success of cochlear implantation and will be useful during parental counselling sessions.

  • 109.
    Clark, Charlotte
    et al.
    Queen Mary University of London, UK.
    Sörqvist, Patrik
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    3 year update on research on effects of noise on health and behaviour2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 110.
    Classon, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Correction: Early ERR signature of hearing impairment in visual rhyme judgment2013In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 4, p. 897-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 111.
    Classon, Elisabet
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Representing sounds and spellings: Phonological decline and compensatory working memory in acquired hearing impairment2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis examined phonological processing in adults with postlingually acquired moderate-to-severe hearing impairment (HI) and whether explicit working memory processing of phonology and individual working memory capacity (WMC) can compensate for degraded phonological representations in this group (papers I-III). A second aim was to provide reference data for a test of WMC, the reading span test, and to examine the relation between reading span test performance and speech recognition in noise in a larger sample of 50-89 year olds with HI (paper IV). Non-auditory tasks of phonological processing, episodic long-term memory and WMC were used in papers I-III, and both behavioral and electrophysiological measures were collected. Results showed that phonological processing was impaired in the group with HI but that WMC and explicit working memory processing of phonology could be employed to compensate for degraded phonological representations. However, this compensation may come at the cost of interfering with episodic memory encoding. An  electrophysiological marker of HI in text-based rhyme judgments was found. Paper IV presented reference data for reading span test performance in two versions of the test in individuals with HI, and results suggesting that WMC may be differentially predictive of speech recognition in noise in different age groups of older adults with HI. The clinical implications of the present results concerns the double disadvantage of individuals with lower WMC and HI. A structured assessment of WMC in rehabilitative settings would help to identify these individuals and tailor treatment to their needs. The reading span test is suggested as a suitable future candidate for clinical WMC assessment.

    List of papers
    1. Early ERP signature of hearing impairment in visual rhyme judgment
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Early ERP signature of hearing impairment in visual rhyme judgment
    2013 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 4, no 241Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Postlingually acquired hearing impairment (HI) is associated with changes in the representation of sound in semantic long-term memory. An indication of this is the lower performance on visual rhyme judgment tasks in conditions where phonological and orthographic cues mismatch, requiring high reliance on phonological representations. In this study, event-related potentials (ERPs) were used for the first time to investigate the neural correlates of phonological processing in visual rhyme judgments in participants with acquired HI and normal hearing (NH). Rhyme task word pairs rhymed or not and had matching or mismatching orthography. In addition, the inter-stimulus interval (ISI) was manipulated to be either long (800 ms) or short (50 ms). Long ISIs allow for engagement of explicit, top-down processes, while short ISIs limit the involvement of such mechanisms. We hypothesized lower behavioral performance and N400 and N2 deviations in HI in the mismatching rhyme judgment conditions, particularly in short ISI. However, the results showed a different pattern. As expected, behavioral performance in the mismatch conditions was lower in HI than in NH in short ISI, but ERPs did not differ across groups. In contrast, HI performed on a par with NH in long ISI. Further, HI, but not NH, showed an amplified N2-like response in the non-rhyming, orthographically mismatching condition in long ISI. This was also the rhyme condition in which participants in both groups benefited the most from the possibility to engage top-down processes afforded with the longer ISI. Taken together, these results indicate an early ERP signature of HI in this challenging phonological task, likely reflecting use of a compensatory strategy. This strategy is suggested to involve increased reliance on explicit mechanisms such as articulatory recoding and grapheme-to-phoneme conversion.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Switzerland: Frontiers Research Foundation, 2013
    Keywords
    event-related potentials, hearing impairment, phonology, visual rhyme judgment, inter-stimulus interval, N2, N400, FP
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-92284 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00241 (DOI)000330942000001 ()
    Available from: 2013-05-08 Created: 2013-05-08 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    2. Working memory capacity compensates for hearing related phonological processing deficit
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Working memory capacity compensates for hearing related phonological processing deficit
    2013 (English)In: Journal of Communication Disorders, ISSN 0021-9924, E-ISSN 1873-7994, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 17-29Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Acquired hearing impairment is associated with gradually declining phonological representations. According to the Ease of Language Understanding (ELU) model, poorly defined representations lead to mismatch in phonologically challenging tasks. To resolve the mismatch, reliance on working memory capacity (WMC) increases. This study investigated whether WMC modulated performance in a phonological task in individuals with hearing impairment. A visual rhyme judgment task with congruous or incongruous orthography, followed by an incidental episodic recognition memory task, was used. In participants with hearing impairment, WMC modulated both rhyme judgment performance and recognition memory in the orthographically similar non-rhyming condition; those with high WMC performed exceptionally well in the judgment task, but later recognized few of the words. For participants with hearing impairment and low WMC the pattern was reversed; they performed poorly in the judgment task but later recognized a surprisingly large proportion of the words. Results indicate that good WMC can compensate for the negative impact of auditory deprivation on phonological processing abilities by allowing for efficient use of phonological processing skills. They also suggest that individuals with hearing impairment and low WMC may use a non-phonological approach to written words, which can have the beneficial side effect of improving memory encoding. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanLearning outcomes: Readers will be able to: (1) describe cognitive processes involved in rhyme judgment, (2) explain how acquired hearing impairment affects phonological processing and (3) discuss how reading strategies at encoding impact memory performance.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    ELSEVIER, 2013
    Keywords
    Hearing impairment, Phonology, Working memory capacity, Episodic recognition
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-74276 (URN)10.1016/j.jcomdis.2012.10.001 (DOI)000314140200002 ()
    Available from: 2012-01-23 Created: 2012-01-23 Last updated: 2017-12-08
    3. Verbal fluency in adults with postlingually acquired hearing impairment
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Verbal fluency in adults with postlingually acquired hearing impairment
    2013 (English)In: Speech, Language and Hearing, ISSN 2050-571X, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 88-100Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined verbal retrieval in participants with acquired moderate-to-severe sensorineural hearing impairment (M age = 63, M education level = 13 years) compared to participants with normal hearing thresholds (M age = 62, M education level = 14 years) using the letter and category fluency tasks. Analyses of number of words produced, clustering, and switching, were conducted. There was no significant difference between the groups in category fluency performance. In letter fluency, however, the participants with hearing impairment produced significantly fewer words than the normal hearing participants and their production was characterized by fewer switches. Regression analyses were conducted to examine the relationship between demographic, auditory, and cognitive variables and letter fluency performance in the two groups. Phonological skills and auditory acuity predicted letter fluency output only in participants with hearing impairment and a hearing-related link between phonological skills, working memory capacity, and letter fluency switching was found.

    Keywords
    Hearing impairment, Letter fluency, Category fluency, Clustering, Switching, Phonology, Working memory capacity
    National Category
    Other Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-99778 (URN)10.1179/205057113X13781290153457 (DOI)
    Available from: 2013-10-21 Created: 2013-10-21 Last updated: 2017-11-06Bibliographically approved
    4. Reading span performance in 339 Swedish 50-89 year old individuals with hearing impairment: Effects of test version and age, and relation to speech recognition in noise
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reading span performance in 339 Swedish 50-89 year old individuals with hearing impairment: Effects of test version and age, and relation to speech recognition in noise
    Show others...
    2013 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish reading span test (Rönnberg, Lyxell, Arlinger, & Kinnefors, 1989) is often used to assess working memory capacity (WMC) in the field of cognitive hearing science. The test has proven useful as a predictor of speech recognition in noise in adverse conditions. It has been used in a wide range of experimental studies and has been translated to several languages. The purpose of this paper was to provide reference data for the Swedish reading span test (Rönnberg et al., 1989) in a large sample of adults with hearing impairment aged 50-89 years that are representative of patients seeking rehabilitation at audiological clinics. Data from finished and ongoing projects were collated and reanalyzed for this purpose. The original full version and a shortened version of the test were compared, in terms of percentage correct. In addition, performance on the full version was compared across two different age-cohorts, 50-69 year olds and 70-89 year olds. Frequency distributions and percentile scores are reported, as well as relations with demographic variables, and speech recognition in noise. Results showed that reading span performance was related to age, but not sex, with lower scores in older participants. Pure tone hearing thresholds accounted for a small but significant amount of the variance such that higher reading span scores were related to better hearing. The frequency distributions of scores did not differ across the two versions of the test, but the long version seemed to be more sensitive to age. Performance in both versions was significantly correlated with speech recognition in noise. Regression analyses however showed that reading span explained additional variance in speech in noise recognition, after the effects of age and pure tone hearing thresholds were accounted for, only in the 50-69 year olds. These findings are discussed in relation to  age-related differences in the ability to recruit cognitive resources in the service of speech communication.

    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-99780 (URN)
    Available from: 2013-10-21 Created: 2013-10-21 Last updated: 2017-11-06Bibliographically approved
  • 112.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Löfkvist, Ulrika
    Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Linköping University, Sweden/Department of Speech and Language Pathology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Verbal fluency in adults with postlingually acquired hearing impairment2013In: Speech, Language and Hearing, ISSN 2050-571X, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 88-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined verbal retrieval in participants with acquired moderate-to-severe sensorineural hearing impairment (M age = 63, M education level = 13 years) compared to participants with normal hearing thresholds (M age = 62, M education level = 14 years) using the letter and category fluency tasks. Analyses of number of words produced, clustering, and switching, were conducted. There was no significant difference between the groups in category fluency performance. In letter fluency, however, the participants with hearing impairment produced significantly fewer words than the normal hearing participants and their production was characterized by fewer switches. Regression analyses were conducted to examine the relationship between demographic, auditory, and cognitive variables and letter fluency performance in the two groups. Phonological skills and auditory acuity predicted letter fluency output only in participants with hearing impairment and a hearing-related link between phonological skills, working memory capacity, and letter fluency switching was found.

  • 113.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Löfkvist, Ulrika
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Verbal fluency in adults with postlingually acquired hearing impairment2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 114.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ng, Hoi Ning Elaine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kilman, Lisa
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Reading span performance in 339 Swedish 50-89 year old individuals with hearing impairment: Effects of test version and age, and relation to speech recognition in noise2013Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish reading span test (Rönnberg, Lyxell, Arlinger, & Kinnefors, 1989) is often used to assess working memory capacity (WMC) in the field of cognitive hearing science. The test has proven useful as a predictor of speech recognition in noise in adverse conditions. It has been used in a wide range of experimental studies and has been translated to several languages. The purpose of this paper was to provide reference data for the Swedish reading span test (Rönnberg et al., 1989) in a large sample of adults with hearing impairment aged 50-89 years that are representative of patients seeking rehabilitation at audiological clinics. Data from finished and ongoing projects were collated and reanalyzed for this purpose. The original full version and a shortened version of the test were compared, in terms of percentage correct. In addition, performance on the full version was compared across two different age-cohorts, 50-69 year olds and 70-89 year olds. Frequency distributions and percentile scores are reported, as well as relations with demographic variables, and speech recognition in noise. Results showed that reading span performance was related to age, but not sex, with lower scores in older participants. Pure tone hearing thresholds accounted for a small but significant amount of the variance such that higher reading span scores were related to better hearing. The frequency distributions of scores did not differ across the two versions of the test, but the long version seemed to be more sensitive to age. Performance in both versions was significantly correlated with speech recognition in noise. Regression analyses however showed that reading span explained additional variance in speech in noise recognition, after the effects of age and pure tone hearing thresholds were accounted for, only in the 50-69 year olds. These findings are discussed in relation to  age-related differences in the ability to recruit cognitive resources in the service of speech communication.

  • 115.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Early ERP signature of hearing impairment in visual rhyme judgment2013In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 4, no 241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Postlingually acquired hearing impairment (HI) is associated with changes in the representation of sound in semantic long-term memory. An indication of this is the lower performance on visual rhyme judgment tasks in conditions where phonological and orthographic cues mismatch, requiring high reliance on phonological representations. In this study, event-related potentials (ERPs) were used for the first time to investigate the neural correlates of phonological processing in visual rhyme judgments in participants with acquired HI and normal hearing (NH). Rhyme task word pairs rhymed or not and had matching or mismatching orthography. In addition, the inter-stimulus interval (ISI) was manipulated to be either long (800 ms) or short (50 ms). Long ISIs allow for engagement of explicit, top-down processes, while short ISIs limit the involvement of such mechanisms. We hypothesized lower behavioral performance and N400 and N2 deviations in HI in the mismatching rhyme judgment conditions, particularly in short ISI. However, the results showed a different pattern. As expected, behavioral performance in the mismatch conditions was lower in HI than in NH in short ISI, but ERPs did not differ across groups. In contrast, HI performed on a par with NH in long ISI. Further, HI, but not NH, showed an amplified N2-like response in the non-rhyming, orthographically mismatching condition in long ISI. This was also the rhyme condition in which participants in both groups benefited the most from the possibility to engage top-down processes afforded with the longer ISI. Taken together, these results indicate an early ERP signature of HI in this challenging phonological task, likely reflecting use of a compensatory strategy. This strategy is suggested to involve increased reliance on explicit mechanisms such as articulatory recoding and grapheme-to-phoneme conversion.

  • 116.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Lunds universitet, Psykologiska institutionen.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Electrophysiological indices of hearing related phonological processing deficit2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 117.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Lunds universitet, Psykologiska institutionen.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Electrophysiological indices of hearing related phonological processing deficit2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 118.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    On the role of working memory in hearing related phonological processing deficit2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 119.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Working memory capacity compensates for hearing related phonological processing deficit2013In: Journal of Communication Disorders, ISSN 0021-9924, E-ISSN 1873-7994, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 17-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acquired hearing impairment is associated with gradually declining phonological representations. According to the Ease of Language Understanding (ELU) model, poorly defined representations lead to mismatch in phonologically challenging tasks. To resolve the mismatch, reliance on working memory capacity (WMC) increases. This study investigated whether WMC modulated performance in a phonological task in individuals with hearing impairment. A visual rhyme judgment task with congruous or incongruous orthography, followed by an incidental episodic recognition memory task, was used. In participants with hearing impairment, WMC modulated both rhyme judgment performance and recognition memory in the orthographically similar non-rhyming condition; those with high WMC performed exceptionally well in the judgment task, but later recognized few of the words. For participants with hearing impairment and low WMC the pattern was reversed; they performed poorly in the judgment task but later recognized a surprisingly large proportion of the words. Results indicate that good WMC can compensate for the negative impact of auditory deprivation on phonological processing abilities by allowing for efficient use of phonological processing skills. They also suggest that individuals with hearing impairment and low WMC may use a non-phonological approach to written words, which can have the beneficial side effect of improving memory encoding. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanLearning outcomes: Readers will be able to: (1) describe cognitive processes involved in rhyme judgment, (2) explain how acquired hearing impairment affects phonological processing and (3) discuss how reading strategies at encoding impact memory performance.

  • 120.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Lunds universitet, Psykologiska institutionen.
    Hearing impairment, linguistic prcessing and access to verbal long-term memory: In search of behavioral and electrophysiological indices2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 121.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hearing impairment, linguistic processing and access to verbal long-term memory: An ERP-study.2009In: The HEAD Graduate School Second Summer Workshop, Båsenberga, Sweden. June 15-16 2009., 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 122.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Lunds universitet, Psykologiska institutionen.
    Hearing impariment, linguistic processing and access to verbal long-term memory:  an ERP-study2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 123.
    Classon, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Working memory compensates for hearing related phonological processing deficit2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acquired hearing impairment is associated with gradually declining phonological representations. According to the Ease of Language Understanding (ELU) model, poorly defined representations lead to mismatch in phonologically challenging tasks. To resolve the mismatch, reliance on working memory capacity (WMC) increases. This study investigated whether WMC modulated performance in a phonological task in individuals with hearing impairment. A visual rhyme judgment task with congruous or incongruous orthography, followed by an incidental episodic recognition memory task, was used. In participants with hearing impairment, WMC modulated both rhyme judgment performance and recognition memory in the orthographically similar non-rhyming condition; those with high WMC performed exceptionally well in the judgment task, but later recognized few of the words. For participants with hearing impairment and low WMC the pattern was reversed; they performed poorly in the judgment task but later recognized a surprisingly large proportion of the words. Results indicate that good WMC can compensate for the negative impact of auditory deprivation on phonological processing abilities by allowing for efficient use of phonological processing skills. They also suggest that individuals with hearing impairment and low WMC may use a non-phonological approach to written words, which can have the beneficial side effect of improving memory encoding.

    LEARNING OUTCOMES:

    Readers will be able to: (1) describe cognitive processes involved in rhyme judgment, (2) explain how acquired hearing impairment affects phonological processing and (3) discuss how reading strategies at encoding impact memory performance.

  • 124.
    Classon, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Johansson, M
    Hearing impairment, Linguistic processing and access to verbal long-term memory:: In search of electrophysiological indices2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 125.
    Conrad, Isabell
    et al.
    Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Germany.
    Kleinstaeuber, Maria
    University of Marburg, Germany.
    Jasper, Kristine
    Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Germany.
    Hiller, Wolfgang
    Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Germany.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Weise, Cornelia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. University of Marburg, Germany.
    The Changeability and Predictive Value of Dysfunctional Cognitions in Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Chronic Tinnitus2015In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 239-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Multidimensional tinnitus models describe dysfunctional cognitions as a complicating factor in the process of tinnitus habituation. However, this concept has rarely been investigated in previous research. Purpose The present study investigated the effects of two cognitive-behavioral treatments on dysfunctional tinnitus-related cognitions in patients with chronic tinnitus. Furthermore, dysfunctional cognitions were examined as possible predictors of the therapeutic effect on tinnitus distress. Method A total of 128 patients with chronic tinnitus were randomly assigned to either an Internet-delivered guided self-help treatment (Internet-based cognitive-behavioral therapy, ICBT), a conventional face-to-face group therapy (cognitive-behavioral group therapy, GCBT), or an active control group in the form of a web-based discussion forum (DF). To assess tinnitus-related dysfunctional thoughts, the Tinnitus Cognitions Scale (T-Cog) was used at pre- and post-assessment, as well as at the 6- and 12-month follow-up. Results Multivariate ANOVAs with post hoc tests revealed significant and comparable reductions of dysfunctional tinnitus-related cognitions for both treatments (GCBT and ICBT), which remained stable over a 6- and 12-month period. Negative correlations were found between the catastrophic subscale of the T-Cog and therapy outcome for ICBT, but not for GCBT. This means a higher degree of catastrophic thinking at baseline was associated with lower benefit from ICBT directly after the treatment. Hierarchical regression analysis confirmed catastrophizing as a predictor of poorer therapy outcome regarding emotional tinnitus distress in ICBT. No associations were detected in the follow-up assessments. Conclusion Both forms of CBT are successful in reducing dysfunctional tinnitus-related cognitions. Catastrophizing significantly predicted a less favorable outcome regarding emotional tinnitus distress in ICBT. Clinical implications of these results are described. Dysfunctional cognitions could be targeted more intensively in therapy and in future research on tinnitus.

  • 126.
    Conrad, Isabell
    et al.
    Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Germany.
    Kleinstaeuber, Maria
    University of Marburg, Germany.
    Jasper, Kristine
    Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Germany.
    Hiller, Wolfgang
    Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Germany.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Weise, Cornelia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. University of Marburg, Germany.
    The Role of Dysfunctional Cognitions in Patients With Chronic Tinnitus2015In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 36, no 5, p. E279-E289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The present study investigates the role of dysfunctional cognitions in patients with chronic tinnitus. To explore different dimensions of tinnitus-related thoughts, a 22-item self-report measure, the Tinnitus Cognitions Scale (T-Cog), is presented. Furthermore, dysfunctional cognitions are examined as a possible mediator of the relation between tinnitus distress and depression. Design: The present study analyzes the cross-sectional data of 373 patients with chronic tinnitus. Parallel analysis and principal axis factoring are used to identify the factor structure of the T-Cog. Assumed mediating effects are tested using the asymptotic and resampling procedure. Results: Factor analysis reveals two factors interpreted as tinnitus-related catastrophic thinking and tinnitus-related avoidance cognitions. Internal consistency is sufficient with a Cronbachs of 0.88 for the total scale and 0.74 and 0.87 for the subscales. The authors find high associations between the T-Cog and other measures of tinnitus distress, depression, anxiety, and tinnitus acceptance, indicating convergent validity. With the exception of neuroticism, low correlations with personality factors are found, indicating discriminant validity. Patients with moderate or severe tinnitus distress report significantly higher scores of dysfunctional cognitions than patients with mild tinnitus distress. Tinnitus-related catastrophic thinking and tinnitus-related avoidance cognitions partially mediate the relation between tinnitus distress and depression. Conclusions: Dysfunctional cognitions can play an important role in the degree of tinnitus distress. Catastrophic and avoidant thoughts contribute to the explanation of depression among tinnitus patients. The T-Cog is a reliable and valid questionnaire for the assessment of different dimensions of cognitions. Its use could provide information for identifying tinnitus patients who are particularly suitable for cognitive-behavioral therapy.

  • 127.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    Community-based Football – A safe health intervention?2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 128.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Learning effects of a final collaborative exam2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 129.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Prognostic rule generation controlling for treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 130.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Backe, Stefan
    Karlstad University, Sweden Skövde University, Sweden .
    Ekberg, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Janson, Staffan
    Karlstad University, Sweden .
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Health and Developmental Care, Centre for Public Health.
    Is "Football for All" Safe for All? Cross-Sectional Study of Disparities as Determinants of 1-Year Injury Prevalence in Youth Football Programs2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Football (soccer) is endorsed as a health-promoting physical activity worldwide. When football programs are introduced as part of general health promotion programs, equal access and limitation of pre-participation disparities with regard to injury risk are important. The aim of this study was to explore if disparity with regard to parents educational level, player body mass index (BMI), and self-reported health are determinants of football injury in community-based football programs, separately or in interaction with age or gender. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethodology/Principal Findings: Four community football clubs with 1230 youth players agreed to participate in the cross-sectional study during the 2006 season. The study constructs (parents educational level, player BMI, and self-reported health) were operationalized into questionnaire items. The 1-year prevalence of football injury was defined as the primary outcome measure. Data were collected via a postal survey and analyzed using a series of hierarchical statistical computations investigating associations with the primary outcome measure and interactions between the study variables. The survey was returned by 827 (67.2%) youth players. The 1-year injury prevalence increased with age. For youths with parents with higher formal education, boys reported more injuries and girls reported fewer injuries than expected; for youths with lower educated parents there was a tendency towards the opposite pattern. Youths reporting injuries had higher standardized BMI compared with youths not reporting injuries. Children not reporting full health were slightly overrepresented among those reporting injuries and underrepresented for those reporting no injury. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: Pre-participation disparities in terms of parents educational level, through interaction with gender, BMI, and self-reported general health are associated with increased injury risk in community-based youth football. When introduced as a general health promotion, football associations should adjust community-based youth programs to accommodate children and adolescents with increased pre-participation injury risk.

  • 131.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Jan
    VTI, Linköping, Sweden.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The applied value of collaborative memory research in aging – Some critical comments2013In: Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition, ISSN 2211-3681, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 122-123Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The article by Blumen, Rajaram, and Henkel (2013) raises some very interesting research topics. Using the aging population as the prime example, they also provide general recommendations for future research in the area of collaborative memory; ‘it's time to become more applied’, and we appreciate such a suggestion.

    The article spans many subfields and for obvious reasons, it is not possible to consider every potential issue in this field in one single article. In addition, there are several issues that could be either extended or added. We will in this commentary focus on issues we consider important for the understanding of the current literature, and we will add some from our own research.

  • 132.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Emilsson, Magnus
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Jan
    VTI, Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Linköping, Sweden.
    Does retrieval strategy disruption cause general and specific collaborative inhibition?2011In: Memory, ISSN 0965-8211, E-ISSN 1464-0686, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 140-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the experiment on collaborative memory was to investigate if the collaborative inhibition is due to collaborating pair's disruption of each others' retrieval strategies (the retrieval strategy disruption hypothesis, RSD). The participants' (N=36) task was to recall a list of 60 words individually and collaboratively. Retrieval strategies were manipulated by presenting word lists organised either by categories or by country of origin and adoption of retrieval strategies were examined by the adjusted ratio of clustering score. Half of the dyads received word lists organised by the same strategy and half of the dyads received word lists organised by different strategies. The results revealed a main effect of collaboration, i.e., collaborative recalled items were significantly fewer than the sum of the non-redundant individually recalled items. Both conditions (same strategies vs different strategies) suffered to the same extent from collaboration, which did not support the RSD hypothesis. However, focusing on words recalled individually but not collaboratively, dyads with different strategies, as predicted by the RSD, forgot more items during collaboration than did dyads with the same strategy. Additional results suggest that collaborative forgetting is mainly manifested by forgetting of non-overlapping items (as measured by individual recalls).

  • 133.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Jacobsson, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health.
    Overcoming the organization-practice barrier in sports injury prevention: A nonhierarchical organizational model2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 25, no 4, p. e414-e422Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The organization of sports at the national level has seldom been included in scientific discussions of sports injury prevention. The aim of this study was to develop a model for organization of sports that supports prevention of overuse injuries. The quality function deployment technique was applied in seminars over a two-season period to develop a national organizational structure for athletics in Sweden that facilitates prevention of overuse injuries. Three central features of the resulting model for organization of sports at the national level are (a) diminishment of the organizational hierarchy: participatory safety policy design is introduced through annual meetings where actors from different sectors of the sporting community discuss training, injury prevention, and sports safety policy; (b) introduction of a safety surveillance system: a ubiquitous system for routine collection of injury and illness data; and (c) an open forum for discussion of safety issues: maintenance of a safety forum for participants from different sectors of the sport. A nonhierarchical model for organization of sports at the national level - facilitated by modern information technology - adapted for the prevention of overuse injuries has been developed. Further research is warranted to evaluate the new organizational model in prospective effectiveness studies.

  • 134.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johnsrude, Ingrid
    ent of Psychology and Centre for Neuroscience Studies, Queen's University, Kingston Ontario, Canada.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Individual differences in working memory capacity modulate frontal cortical activity while listening to speech in noise2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 135.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johnsrude, Ingrid
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Working Memory Processing for Sign and Speech in Broca's area2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 136.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Signoret, Carine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Dahl, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Effects of cognitive load on neurophysiological activity among persons with tinnitus2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 137.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Skagerstrand, Åsa
    Örebro University Hospital, Audiological Research Center.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Thunberg, Per
    Örebro University, Department of Medical Physics.
    Sörqvist, Patrik
    University of Gävle, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering.
    Lundin, Margareta
    Örebro University Hospital, Audiological Research Center.
    Johnsrude, Ingrid
    University of Western Ontario, School of Communication Sciences and Disorders.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University Hospital, Audiological Research Center.
    Cognitive training and effects on speech-in noise performance in normal hearing and hearing impaired individuals2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cognitive training might have potential to improve speech understanding under adverse listening conditions. Here, we have examined the effects of a 5-week computer-based cognitive training program on speech-in-noise-performance, in normal hearing (NH) participants and in participants with mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss (HI).

    Two groups, matched on gender and age (45-65 years), of 20 participants each (HI and NH respectively) are recruited. Participants perform four test-sessions; inclusion (t0), five weeks (t1), ten weeks (t2) and six months (t3). Training is performed either between t0 and t1, or between t1 and t2 (using a cross-over design), using the computer-based Cogmed training program, approximately 30-40 minutes per day, five days per week, during five weeks. At each session participants are tested in three different ways: (a) cognitive testing (KIPS, SICSPAN, TRT); (b) auditory performance (pure tone-audiometry (air- and bone-conduction) and speech audiometry (HINT, Swedish SPIN-test (SNR +4dB))); (c) cortical activation (MR sessions where participants performed a speech-in-noise task using Hagerman-sentences with steady-state speech-spectrum noise (SSN) and with two competing talkers). MR imaging is performed on a Philips Achieva 1.5 Tesla scanner using a sparse imaging technique in which stimuli are presented during the silent period between successive scans. Participants listen to auditory stimuli under eight different conditions: clear speech, SSN or two competing talkers (each at 90%, 50% and 0% intelligibility), and silent rest. Pre- and post-training, hearing disability is assessed by the Speech-Spatial-Qualities-Questionnaire.

    The study is on-going and behavioral results as well as results from fMRI will be presented.

  • 138.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Rheumatology in Östergötland.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Prognostic rule generation controlling for treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 139.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Factors related to fatigue in women and men with early rheumatoid arthritis (the Swedish TIRA study)2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 140.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zetterqvist, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundh, Lars-Gunnar
    Department of Psychology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden..
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Functions of Nonsuicidal Self-Injury: Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analyses in a Large Community Sample of Adolescents2015In: Psychological Assessment, ISSN 1040-3590, E-ISSN 1939-134X, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 302-313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Given that nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is prevalent in adolescents, structured assessment is an essential tool to guide treatment interventions. The Functional Assessment of Self-Mutilation (FASM) is a self-report scale that assesses frequency, methods, and functions of NSSI. FASM was administered to 3,097 Swedish adolescents in a community sample. With the aim of examining the underlying factor structure of the functions of FASM in this sample, the adolescents with NSSI who completed all function items (n = 836) were randomly divided into 2 subsamples for cross-validation purposes. An exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was followed by a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) using the mean and variance adjusted weighted least squares (WLSMV) estimator in the Mplus statistical modeling program. The results of the EFA suggested a 3-factor model (social influence, automatic functions, and nonconformist peer identification), which was supported by a good fit in the CFA. Factors differentiated between social/interpersonal and automatic/intrapersonal functions. Based on learning theory and the specific concepts of negative and positive reinforcement, the nonconformist peer identification factor was then split into 2 factors (peer identification and avoiding demands). The resulting 4-factor model showed an excellent fit. Dividing social functions into separate factors (social influence, peer identification, and avoiding demands) can be helpful in clinical practice, where the assessment of NSSI functions is an important tool with direct implications for treatment.

  • 141.
    Dalal, Koustuv
    et al.
    University of Örebro, Sweden .
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health.
    Interactions between microfinance programmes and non-economic empowerment of women associated with intimate partner violence in Bangladesh: a cross-sectional study2013In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 3, no 12, p. 2941-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study aims to examine the associations between microfinance programme membership and intimate partner violence (IPV) in different socioeconomic strata of a nationally representative sample of women in Bangladesh. Methods: The cross-sectional study was based on a nationally representative interview survey of 11 178 ever-married women of reproductive age (15-49 years). A total of 4465 women who answered the IPV-related questions were analysed separately using chi(2) tests and Cramers V as a measure of effect size to identify the differences in proportions of exposure to IPV with regard to microfinance programme membership, and demographic variables and interactions between microfinance programme membership and factors related to non-economic empowerment were considered. Results: Only 39% of women were members of microfinance programmes. The prevalence of a history of IPV was 48% for moderate physical violence, 16% for severe physical violence and 16% for sexual violence. For women with secondary or higher education, and women at the two wealthiest levels of the wealth index, microfinance programme membership increased the exposure to IPV two and three times, respectively. The least educated and poorest groups showed no change in exposure to IPV associated with microfinance programmes. The educated women who were more equal with their spouses in their family relationships by participating in decision-making increased their exposure to IPV by membership in microfinance programmes. Conclusions: Microfinance plans are associated with an increased exposure to IPV among educated and empowered women in Bangladesh. Microfinance firms should consider providing information about the associations between microfinance and IPV to the women belonging to the risk groups.

  • 142.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Facing the Illusion Piece by Piece: Face Recognition for Persons with Learning Disability2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The general purpose of this thesis was to investigate face recognition for persons with or without learning disability. Three specific research questions were investigated:

    1. How does familiarity of faces interact with familiarity of environments in pictures for persons with learning disability?

    2. Which, if any, of the 2 theoretical approaches to memory conjunction errors, the binding approach and the dual-processing approach, can explain performance for both persons with and without learning disability?

    3. How does working memory relate to performance in memory conjunction error studies?

    The results of the 4 papers included in this thesis provided answers to the questions:

    1. A person by environment interaction was found and was explained by an absent, present or implausible association between the person and the environment in the picture. These semantic relations determined performance and a “lazy” semantic strategy was suggested.

    2. Different group by recognition type interaction patterns, and specifically different amounts of conjunction errors, were found for different degrees of task difficulty. These patterns could neither be explained by the dual processing approach nor the binding approach. Hence, a new frame of interpretation which included working memory was suggested.

    3. High working memory capacity was associated with 2 effects: firstly, recognition of more facial features and, secondly, recognition of more facial configurations. At high working memory demands, participants relied on the first effect to a higher degree, at the expense of the other.

    It was also found that, in a task with low working memory demands, the performance for persons with learning disability was similar to the performance of age-matched controls with higher working memory demands in the task. This indicates that learning disability, at least in this type of recognition task, can be “simulated” by higher working memory demands in a population without learning disability. This finding is discussed in relation to witness psychology and the use of photographs as cognitive assistance.

    List of papers
    1. What am I doing in Timbuktu: Person–environment picture recognition for persons with intellectual disability
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>What am I doing in Timbuktu: Person–environment picture recognition for persons with intellectual disability
    2006 (English)In: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, ISSN 0964-2633, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 127-138Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background The aim of this study was to examine the effects of familiarity of depicted persons and environments in recognition of photographs for pupils with different degrees of intellectual disability (ID).

    Method Forty-five pupils with ID participated.

    Results An interaction effect between the two variables, person and environment, was found in addition to main effects for both the variables. Pictures of the test person himself or herself in familiar environments were easier to recognize than in unfamiliar environments, whereas the opposite was found for pictures of other familiar persons. No interaction effects of degree of ID were found.

    Conclusions The interaction pattern is explained in terms of absent, present or implausible semantic associations between the person and the environmental context. The results are discussed in relation to augmentative and alternative communication with photographs.

    Keywords
    environment recognition, familiarity, intellectual disability, person recognition, picture recognition
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13745 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2788.2005.00766.x (DOI)
    Note
    The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com: Henrik Danielsson, Jerker Rönnberg and Jan Andersson, What am I doing in Timbuktu: Person–environment picture recognition for persons with intellectual disability, 2006, Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, (50), 2, 127-138. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2788.2005.00766.x Copyright: Blackwell Publishing Ltd http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/ Available from: 2009-01-13 Created: 2008-12-19 Last updated: 2009-02-17Bibliographically approved
    2. The face you recognize may not be the one you saw: Memory conjunction errors in individuals with or without learning disability
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The face you recognize may not be the one you saw: Memory conjunction errors in individuals with or without learning disability
    Show others...
    2006 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 177-186Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Memory conjunction errors, that is, when a combination of two previously presented stimuli is erroneously recognized as previously having been seen, were investigated in a face recognition task with drawings and photographs in 23 individuals with learning disability, and 18 chronologically age-matched controls without learning disability. Compared to the controls, individuals with learning disability committed significantly more conjunction errors, feature errors (one old and one new component), but had lower correct recognition, when the results were adjusted for different guessing levels. A dual-processing approach gained more support than a binding approach. However, neither of the approaches could explain all of the results. The results of the learning disability group were only partly related to non-verbal intelligence.

    Keywords
    Face recognition, memory conjunction errors, learning disability
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13746 (URN)10.1111/j.1467-9450.2006.00505.x (DOI)
    Note
    The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com: Henrik Danielsson, Jerker Rönnberg, Anna Levén, Jan Andersson, Karin Andersson and Björn Lyxell, The face you recognize may not be the one you saw: Memory conjunction errors in individuals with or without learning disability, 2006, Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, (47), 3, 177-186. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9450.2006.00505.x Copyright: Blackwell Publishing Ltd http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/ Available from: 2009-01-13 Created: 2008-12-17 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    3. Verbal overshadowing and memory conjunction errors in persons with learning disability
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Verbal overshadowing and memory conjunction errors in persons with learning disability
    2006 (English)Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13747 (URN)
    Available from: 2006-01-16 Created: 2006-01-16
    4. Memory conjunction errors and working memory capacity in persons with learning disability
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Memory conjunction errors and working memory capacity in persons with learning disability
    Show others...
    2006 (English)Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13748 (URN)
    Available from: 2006-01-16 Created: 2006-01-16
  • 143.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Jan
    VTI.
    The more you remember the more you decide: Collaborative memory in adolescents with intellectual disability and their assistants2011In: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 470-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to investigate collaborative memory in adolescents withintellectual disabilities when collaborating with an assistant, and also the extent to whichdecisiveness is related to individual memory performance.Nineteen students with intellectual disabilities (mean age = 18.5, SD = 0.9) eachcollaborated with a teaching assistant (mean age 40.3, SD = 12.1) familiar from everydaywork in school. Pictures were presented individually. Recognition was performed in twoparts, first individually and thereafter collaboratively. The design involved 2 settings, onenatural (with equal encoding time) and another with equal individual memoryperformance (assistants had shorter encoding time than the students). Results showedcollaborative inhibition in this previously uninvestigated collaboration setting withadolescents with intellectual disabilities and their assistants. The assistants bothperformed higher and decided more than the students with intellectual disabilities inthe natural setting, but not in the equated performance setting. Inhibition was larger in theequated setting. The assistants’ decisiveness was moderately correlated with individualmemory performance. Implications for everyday life are discussed.

  • 144.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Emilsson, Magnus
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Jan
    VTI.
    Opposites accord: Effects of individual performance variations on collaborative memory performance2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborative memory is traditionally assessed among persons with presumed equal memory capability, which is not always true in ecological settings. We have investigated collaborative memory performances both when a difference in memory performance within the pair is provoked and when it is not. This was manipulated by different encoding times in a within participant design. 20 pairs were presented with a word list for later recall. The word list was firstly recalled individually and afterwards collaboratively for both memory difference conditions. Nominal recall (the sum of the individual nonredundant performances) and collaborative recall was calculated. An interaction between type of recall and difference in memory performance was found, where collaborative recall at same memory performance was especially impaired by net negative effects of collaboration. These results are discussed in relation to item analysis of which words were recalled.

  • 145.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Henry, L A
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nilsson, L-G
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Selective problems in executive function in adults with ID: the Betula database in JOURNAL OF APPLIED RESEARCH IN INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES, vol 23, issue 5, pp 438-4382010In: JOURNAL OF APPLIED RESEARCH IN INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES, Blackwell Publishing Ltd , 2010, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 438-438Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 146.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Henry, Lucy
    City University of London, England.
    Messer, David
    Open University, England.
    Carney, Daniel P. J.
    London S Bank University, England.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Developmental delays in phonological recoding among children and adolescents with Down syndrome and Williams syndrome2016In: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 55, p. 64-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined the development of phonological recoding in short-term memory (STM) span tasks among two clinical groups with contrasting STM and language profiles: those with Down syndrome (DS) and Williams syndrome (WS). Phonological recoding was assessed by comparing: (1) performance on phonologically similar and dissimilar items (phonological similarity effects, PSE); and (2) items with short and long names (word length effects, WLE). Participant groups included children and adolescents with DS (n = 29), WS (n = 25) and typical development (n = 51), all with average mental ages around 6 years. The group with WS, contrary to predictions based on their relatively strong verbal STM and language abilities, showed no evidence for phonological recoding. Those in the group with DS, with weaker verbal STM and language abilities, showed positive evidence for phonological recoding (PSE), but to a lesser degree than the typical group (who showed PSE and WLE). These findings provide new information about the memory systems of these groups of children and adolescents, and suggest that STM processes involving phonological recoding do not fit with the usual expectations of the abilities of children and adolescents with WS and DS. (c) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 147.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Henry, Lucy
    London South Bank University, London, UK.
    Messer, David
    Open University, London, UK.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Executive Functions in Children with Intellectual Disabilities2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Executive functions have been assessed in children with intellectual disabilities (ID) in relatively few previous studies. Most have reported that children with ID perform on a par with mental age-matched controls, but there is at least one report of even greater impairment. However, no previous research has used a broad range of executive measures, systematically varying in terms of verbal and visuospatial demands. In the present study, tests of 5 different sub components of executive functions were included: updating, shifting, fluency, problem solving and inhibition. Each component was assessed with one verbal and one nonverbal test. Preliminary results from 17 children with ID, mental age- (MA) and chronological age-matched (CA) comparison groups revealed different levels of impairment on different tests. The performance for the ID group ranged from CA-appropriate, to below MA level. These results emphasize the importance of using a wide range of tests of executive function to better understand the extent of the difficulties in children with ID.

  • 148.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Henry, Lucy
    London South Bank University, London, UK.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lars-Göran
    Stockholm Brain Institute, Stockholm.
    Executive functions in individuals with intellectual disability2010In: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 1299-1304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to investigate executive functions in adults with intellectual disability, and compare them to a closely matched control group longitudinally for 5 years. In the Betula database, a group of adults with intellectual disability (ID, n = 46) was defined from measures of verbal and non-verbal IQ. A control group, with two people for every person with intellectual disability (n = 92), was chosen by matching on the following criterion in order of priority: IQ higher than 85, age, sex, sample, level of education, and years of education. Three types of tasks of executive functions were included on two occasions, with 5 years between testing sessions: The Tower of Hanoi, executively loaded dual task versions of word recall, and verbal fluency. Adults with ID showed significant impairments on verbal fluency and on the executively loaded dual task word recall task (at encoding but not at recall). There were no group differences on the Tower of Hanoi. No significant differences between the two test occasions were found. The results are interpreted in terms of individuals with ID having problems with speed of accessing lexical items and difficulties with working memory-related executive control at encoding, which includes shifting between tasks. There are, however, not necessarily problems with inhibition. The dual task results additionally imply that the adults with intellectual disability were more sensitive to strategy interruptions at encoding, but that dividing attention at recall did not have such detrimental effects.

  • 149.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Indiana Univ, IN 47405 USA.
    Humes, Larry E.
    Indiana Univ, IN 47405 USA.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Different Associations between Auditory Function and Cognition Depending on Type of Auditory Function and Type of Cognition2019In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 1210-1219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Previous studies strongly suggest that declines in auditory threshold can lead to impaired cognition. The aim of this study was to expand that picture by investigating how the relationships between age, auditory function, and cognitive function vary with the types of auditory and cognitive function considered. Design: Three auditory constructs (threshold, temporal-order identification, and gap detection) were modeled to have an effect on four cognitive constructs (episodic long-term memory, semantic long-term memory, working memory, and cognitive processing speed) together with age that could have an effect on both cognitive and auditory constructs. The model was evaluated with structural equation modeling of the data from 213 adults ranging in age from 18 to 86 years. Results: The model provided good a fit to the data. Regarding the auditory measures, temporal-order identification had the strongest effect on the cognitive functions, followed by weaker indirect effects for gap detection and nonsignificant effects for threshold. Regarding the cognitive measures, the association with audition was strongest for semantic long-term memory and working memory but weaker for episodic long-term memory and cognitive speed. Age had a very strong effect on threshold and cognitive speed, a moderate effect on temporal-order identification, episodic long-term memory, and working memory, a weak effect on gap detection, and nonsignificant, close to zero effect on semantic long-term memory. Conclusions: The result shows that auditory temporal-order function has the strongest effect on cognition, which has implications both for which auditory concepts to include in cognitive hearing science experiments and for practitioners. The fact that the total effect of age was different for different aspects of cognition and partly mediated via auditory concepts is also discussed.

  • 150.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Kathleen, Pichora-Fuller
    University of Toronto, Department of Psychology.
    Dupuis, Kate
    Baycrest Health Sciences, Rotman Research Institute.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Modeling the effect of early ageing and hearing loss on cognition and participation in social leisure activities2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There are well-known age-related declines in hearing, cognition and social participation. Furthermore, previous studies have shown that hearing loss is associated with both cognitive decline and increased risk for social isolation and that engagement in social leisure activities is related to cognitive decline. However, it is unclear how the three concepts and age relate to each other. In the current study, behavioral measures of hearing and memory were examined in relation to self-reported participation in social leisure activities. Data from two different samples were analyzed with structural equation modeling. The first consisted of 297 adults from Umeå, Sweden, who participated in the Betula longitudinal study. The second consisted of 273 older adults who volunteered for lab-based research on aging in Toronto, Canada. Structural equation modeling yielded two models with similar statistical properties for both samples. The first model suggests that age contributes to both hearing and memory performance, hearing contributes to memory performance, and memory (but not hearing) contributes to participation in social leisure activities. The second model also suggests that age contributes to hearing and memory performance and that hearing contributes to memory performance, but that age also contributes to participation in social leisure activities, which in turn contributes to memory performance. The models were confirmed in both samples, indicating robustness in the findings, especially since the samples differed on background variables such as years of education and marital status. Few participants in both samples were candidates for hearing aids, but most of those who were candidates used them. This suggests that even early stages of hearing loss can increase demands on cognitive processing that may deter participation in social leisure activities.

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