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  • 101.
    Engström, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Bertus Warntjes, Marcel, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. SyntheticMR AB, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Tisell, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Multi-Parametric Representation of Voxel-Based Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 11, p. e111688-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to explore the possibilities of multi-parametric representations of voxel-wise quantitative MRI data to objectively discriminate pathological cerebral tissue in patients with brain disorders. For this purpose, we recruited 19 patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) as benchmark samples and 19 age and gender matched healthy subjects as a reference group. The subjects were examined using quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) measuring the tissue structure parameters: relaxation rates, R-1 and R-2, and proton density. The resulting parameter images were normalized to a standard template. Tissue structure in MS patients was assessed by voxel-wise comparisons with the reference group and with correlation to a clinical measure, the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). The results were visualized by conventional geometric representations and also by multi-parametric representations. Data showed that MS patients had lower R-1 and R-2, and higher proton density in periventricular white matter and in wide-spread areas encompassing central and sub-cortical white matter structures. MS-related tissue abnormality was highlighted in posterior white matter whereas EDSS correlation appeared especially in the frontal cortex. The multi-parameter representation highlighted disease-specific features. In conclusion, the proposed method has the potential to visualize both high-probability focal anomalies and diffuse tissue changes. Results from voxel-based statistical analysis, as exemplified in the present work, may guide radiologists where in the image to inspect for signs of disease. Future clinical studies must validate the usability of the method in clinical practice.

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  • 102.
    Engström, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Hallböök, Tove
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Szakacs, Attila
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg. Sweden; Halmstad County Hospital, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Functional magnetic resonance imaging in narcolepsy and the Kleine–Levin syndrome2014In: Frontiers in Neurology, ISSN 1664-2295, E-ISSN 1664-2295, Vol. 5, no 105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work aims at reviewing the present state of the art when it comes to understanding the pathophysiology of narcolepsy and the Kleine–Levin syndrome (KLS) from a neuroimaging point of view. This work also aims at discussing future perspectives of functional neuroimaging in these sleep disorders. We focus on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which is a technique for in vivo measurements of brain activation in neuronal circuitries under healthy and pathological conditions. fMRI has significantly increased the knowledge on the affected neuronal circuitries in narcolepsy and the Kleine–Levin syndrome. It has been shown that narcolepsy is accompanied with disturbances of the emotional and the closely related reward systems. In the Kleine Levin syndrome, fMRI has identified hyperactivation of the thalamus as a potential biomarker that could be used in the diagnostic procedure. The fMRI findings in both narcolepsy and the Kleine–Levin syndrome are in line with previous structural and functional imaging studies. We conclude that fMRI in combination with multi-modal imaging can reveal important details about the pathophysiology in narcolepsy and the Kleine–Levin syndrome. In the future, fMRI possibly gives opportunities for diagnostic support and prediction of treatment response in individual patients.

  • 103.
    Engström, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Jan Bertus Warntje, Marcel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Tisell, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Multi-Parametric Representation of Voxel-Based Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to explore the possibilities of multi-parametric representations of voxel-wise quantitative MRI data to objectively discriminate pathological cerebral tissue in patients with brain disorders. For this purpose, we recruited 19 patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) as benchmark samples and 19 age and gender matched healthy subjects as a reference group. The subjects were examined using quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) measuring the tissue structure parameters: relaxation rates, R and R, and proton density. The resulting parameter images were normalized to a standard template. Tissue structure in MS patients was assessed by voxel-wise comparisons with the reference group and with correlation to a clinical measure, the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). The results were visualized by conventional geometric representations and also by multi-parametric representations. Data showed that MS patients had lower R and R, and higher proton density in periventricular white matter and in wide-spread areas encompassing central and sub-cortical white matter structures. MS-related tissue abnormality was highlighted in posterior white matter whereas EDSS correlation appeared especially in the frontal cortex. The multi-parameter representation highlighted disease-specific features. In conclusion, the proposed method has the potential to visualize both high-probability focal anomalies and diffuse tissue changes. Results from voxel-based statistical analysis, as exemplified in the present work, may guide radiologists where in the image to inspect for signs of disease. Future clinical studies must validate the usability of the method in clinical practice.

  • 104.
    Engström, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Reduced thalamic and pontine connectivity in Kleine–Levin syndrome2014In: Frontiers in Neurology, ISSN 1664-2295, E-ISSN 1664-2295, Vol. 5, no 42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Kleine–Levin syndrome (KLS) is a rare sleep disorder, characterized by exceptionally long sleep episodes. The neuropathology of the syndrome is unknown and treatment is often inadequate. The aim of the study was to improve understanding of the underlying neuropathology, related to cerebral networks, in KLS during sleep episodes. One patient with KLS and congenital nystagmus was investigated by resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging during both asymptomatic and hypersomnic periods. Fourteen healthy subjects were also investigated as control samples. Functional connectivity was assessed from seed regions of interest in the thalamus and the dorsal pons. Thalamic connectivity was normal in the asymptomatic patient whereas the connectivity between the brain stem, including dorsal pons, and the thalamus was diminished during hypersomnia. These results suggest that the patient’s nystagmus and hypersomnia might have their pathological origin in adjacent dorsal pontine regions. This finding provides additional knowledge of the cerebral networks involved in the neuropathology of this disabling disorder. Furthermore, these findings regarding a rare syndrome have broad implications, and results could be of interest to researchers and clinicians in the whole field of sleep medicine.

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  • 105.
    Engström, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Thalamic Activation in the Kleine-Levin Syndrome2014In: Sleep, ISSN 0161-8105, E-ISSN 1550-9109, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 379-386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY OBJECTIVES:

    The objective of this study was to investigate if combined measures of activation in the thalamus and working memory capacity could guide the diagnosis of Kleine-Levin Syndrome (KLS). A second objective was to obtain more insight into the neurobiological causes of KLS.

    DESIGN:

    Matched group and consecutive recruitment.

    SETTING:

    University hospital neurology department and imaging center.

    PATIENTS OR PARTICIPANTS:

    Eighteen patients with KLS diagnosed according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders and 26 healthy controls were included.

    INTERVENTIONS:

    N/A.

    MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS:

    Working memory capacity was assessed by the listening span task. A version of this task (reading span) was presented to the participants during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Activation in the thalamus was measured in a region of interest analysis. A combination of the working memory capacity and the thalamic activation measures resulted in 80% prediction accuracy, 81% sensitivity, and 78% specificity regarding the ability to separate KLS patients from healthy controls. The controls had an inverse relation between working memory capacity and thalamic activation; higher performing participants had lower thalamic activation (r = -0.41). KLS patients showed the opposite relationship; higher performing participants had a tendency to higher thalamic activation (r = -0.35).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    This study shows that functional neuroimaging of the thalamus combined with neuropsychological assessment of working memory function provides a means to guide diagnosis of Kleine-Levin Syndrome. Results in this study also indicate that imaging of brain function and evaluation of cognitive capacity can give insights into the neurobiological mechanisms of Kleine-Levin Syndrome.

  • 106.
    Engström, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Craig, Arthur
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Barrow Neurol Institute, AZ 85013 USA.
    Evidence of conjoint activation of the anterior insular and cingulate cortices during effortful tasks2015In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5161, E-ISSN 1662-5161, Vol. 8, no 1071Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability to perform effortful tasks is a topic that has received considerable interest in the research of higher functions of the human brain. Neuroimaging studies show that the anterior insular and the anterior cingulate cortices are involved in a multitude of cognitive tasks that require mental effort. In this study, we investigated brain responses to effort using cognitive tasks with task-difficulty modulations and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We hypothesized that effortful performance involves modulation of activation in the anterior insular and the anterior cingulate cortices, and that the modulation correlates with individual performance levels. Healthy participants performed tasks probing verbal working memory capacity using the reading span task, and visual perception speed using the inspection time task. In the fMRI analysis, we focused on identifying effort-related brain activation. The results showed that working memory and inspection time performances were directly related. The bilateral anterior insular and anterior cingulate cortices showed significantly increased activation during each task with common portions that were active across both tasks. We observed increased brain activation in the right anterior insula and the anterior cingulate cortex in participants with low working memory performance. In line with the reported results, we suggest that activation in the anterior insular and cingulate cortices is consistent with the neural efficiency hypothesis (Neubauer).

  • 107.
    Engström, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    New hypothesis on pontine-frontal eye field connectivity in Kleine-Levin syndrome2016In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 716-719Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies have indicated involvement of the thalamus and the pons in Kleine-Levin syndrome. In the present study, functional connectivity of the thalamus and the pons was investigated in asymptomatic patients with Kleine-Levin syndrome and healthy controls. Twelve patients and 14 healthy controls were investigated by functional magnetic resonance imaging during rest. Resting state images were analysed using seed regions of interest in the thalamus and the pons. The results showed significantly lower functional connectivity between the pons and the frontal eye field in persons with Kleine-Levin syndrome compared with healthy controls. There were no connectivity differences involving the thalamus. Based on these findings, a relation is proposed between the sleep disorder Kleine-Levin syndrome and cerebral control of eye movements, which in turn is related to visual attention and working memory. This hypothesis has to be tested in future studies of oculomotor control in Kleine-Levin syndrome.

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  • 108.
    Engström, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Latini, Francesco
    Department of Neuroscience, Section of Neurosurgery, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Neuroscience, Section of Neurology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Neuroimaging in the Kleine-Levin Syndrome2018In: Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports, ISSN 1528-4042, E-ISSN 1534-6293, Vol. 18, no 9, article id 58Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose was to review the most recent literature on neuroimaging in the Kleine-Levin syndrome (KLS). We aimed to investigate if frontotemporal and thalamic dysfunction are key KLS signatures, and if recent research indicates other brain networks of interest that elucidate KLS symptomatology and aetiology. In a comprehensive literature search, we found 12 original articles published 2013-2018. Most studies report deviations related to cerebral perfusion, glucose metabolism, or blood-oxygen-level-dependent responses in frontotemporal areas and/or the thalamus. Studies also report dysfunction in the temporoparietal junction and the oculomotor network that also were related to clinical parameters. We discuss these findings based on recent research on thalamocortical networks and brain stem white matter tracts. The hypothesis of frontotemporal and thalamic involvement in KLS was confirmed, and additional findings in the temporoparietal junction and the oculomotor system suggest a broader network involvement, which can be investigated by future high-resolution and multimodal imaging.

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  • 109.
    Eriksson, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Torfinn
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Hoistad, Malin
    Swedish Agency Health Technology Assessment and Assessment, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hultcrantz, Monica
    Swedish Agency Health Technology Assessment and Assessment, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Jacobson, Stella
    Swedish Agency Health Technology Assessment and Assessment, Sweden.
    Mejare, Ingegerd
    Swedish Agency Health Technology Assessment and Assessment, Sweden.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Diagnostic accuracy of postmortem imaging vs autopsy-A systematic review2017In: European Journal of Radiology, ISSN 0720-048X, E-ISSN 1872-7727, Vol. 89, p. 249-269Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Postmortem imaging has been used for more than a century as a complement to medico-legal autopsies. The technique has also emerged as a possible alternative to compensate for the continuous decline in the number of clinical autopsies. To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of postmortem imaging for various types of findings, we performed this systematic literature review. Data sources The literature search was performed in the databases PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library through January 7, 2015. Relevant publications were assessed for risk of bias using the QUADAS tool and were classified as low, moderate or high risk of bias according to pre-defined criteria. Autopsy and/or histopathology were used as reference standard. Findings The search generated 2600 abstracts, of which 340 were assessed as possibly relevant and read in full-text. After further evaluation 71 studies were finally included, of which 49 were assessed as having high risk of bias and 22 as moderate risk of bias. Due to considerable heterogeneity - in populations, techniques, analyses and reporting - of included studies it was impossible to combine data to get a summary estimate of the diagnostic accuracy of the various findings. Individual studies indicate, however, that imaging techniques might be useful for determining organ weights, and that the techniques seem superior to autopsy for detecting gas Conclusions and Implications In general, based on the current scientific literature, it was not possible to determine the diagnostic accuracy of postmortem imaging and its usefulness in conjunction with, or as an alternative to autopsy. To correctly determine the usefulness of postmortem imaging, future studies need improved planning, improved methodological quality and larger materials, preferentially obtained from multi-center studies. (C) 2016 Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  • 110.
    Eriksson, Jonatan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zajac, Jakub
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. University of Calif San Francisco, CA USA.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Left ventricular hemodynamic forces as a marker of mechanical dyssynchrony in heart failure patients with left bundle branch block2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 2971Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Left bundle branch block (LBBB) causes left ventricular (LV) dyssynchrony which is often associated with heart failure. A significant proportion of heart failure patients do not demonstrate clinical improvement despite cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). How LBBB-related effects on LV diastolic function may contribute to those therapeutic failures has not been clarified. We hypothesized that LV hemodynamic forces calculated from 4D flow MRI could serve as a marker of diastolic mechanical dyssynchrony in LBBB hearts. MRI data were acquired in heart failure patients with LBBB or matched patients without LBBB. LV pressure gradients were calculated from the Navier-Stokes equations. Integration of the pressure gradients over the LV volume rendered the hemodynamic forces. The findings demonstrate that the LV filling forces are more orthogonal to the main LV flow direction in heart failure patients with LBBB compared to those without LBBB during early but not late diastole. The greater the conduction abnormality the greater the discordance of LV filling force with the predominant LV flow direction (r(2) = 0.49). Such unique flow-specific measures of mechanical dyssynchrony may serve as an additional tool for considering the risks imposed by conduction abnormalities in heart failure patients and prove to be useful in predicting response to CRT.

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  • 111.
    Eriksson, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Swedish Radiat Safety Author, Sweden; IAEA EL, Monaco.
    Ammala, Kirsi
    Univ Helsinki, Finland.
    Levy, Isabelle
    IAEA EL, Monaco.
    Gastaud, Janine
    IAEA EL, Monaco.
    Lehto, Jukka
    Univ Helsinki, Finland.
    Scholten, Jan
    IAEA EL, Monaco; Univ Kiel, Germany.
    On the use of MnO2 cartridges for the plutonium determination in seawater2019In: Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, ISSN 0265-931X, E-ISSN 1879-1700, Vol. 204, p. 66-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To analyze plutonium (Pu) in open ocean waters can be challenging due to the low seawater concentrations. In this study we compared two techniques for Pu determination, one in-situ MnO2 cartridge system and the more commonly used MnO2 precipitation technique. During the pre-pilot GEOTRACES cruise ANT XXX-1 (2005) we tested MnO2 cartridges for the pre-concentration of Pu from seawater at 19 sampling stations on a transect in the southeastern Atlantic Ocean between Vigo (Spain) and Cape Town (South Africa). Our in-situ sampling setup consisted of one particle cartridge followed by three MnO2 cartridges in a series. Through the system we pumped between 956 and 2700 I of surface seawater with a flow rate between 1.6 and 5.21/min. We found that the adsorption efficiency of a single MnO2 cartridge to adsorb Pu was rather constant and on average a 58 +/- 7%. The adsorption efficiency was also found to be independent of seawater: temperature in the range of 18.3-29.2 degrees C, salinity range 34.2-37.1 parts per thousand, and conductivity in the range of 46.8-58.4 mS/cm. In parallel with the in-situ sampling, discrete surface water samples between 259 and 281 I were taken and Pu was pre-concentrated using the MnO2 precipitation method. We find a good agreement between the Pu concentrations determined with the two different techniques. The in-situ pre-concentration technique requires more radiochemical work in the laboratory but has the advantage that large seawater volumes can be sampled without the necessity for radiochemical processing on-board the ship. The much larger volumes sampled with the in-situ technique compared with the precipitation technique, enables accurate determination of Pu-isotopic ratios with a low relative standard deviation. We have shown in this study that in-situ MnO2 cartridge technique can be used in a reliable way for the determination of dissolved Pu seawater concentration in open ocean waters.

  • 112. Eriksson, O
    et al.
    Backlund, EO
    Lindstam, H
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Lindström, S
    Wårdell, K
    Stereotactic RF-lesioning2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 113.
    Eriksson, Olle
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Statistics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Backlund, EO
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Lindstam, H
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    A method for comparisons between in vitro, in vivo and post mortem appearance of tereotactic RF-lesions in the pig brain.2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 114.
    Falk, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Patient Safety.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis.
    Lagerfelt, Marie
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Woisetschläger, Mischa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Ahlström, Ulla
    Vårdcentralen Kungsgatan Linköping, Sweden Region Östergötland, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Modifierad brittisk modell kortade ledtid till datortomografi av kolon2015In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The British national Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has presented guidelines based on signs and symptoms which should raise a suspicion of colorectal cancer. A slightly modified version of these guidelines, adapted to Swedish conditions, named Swedish NICE (sNICE) criteria, was implemented at eight primary care centres. By following the sNICE criteria, cases with higher degree of suspicion of colorectal cancer were advised for computer tomography (CT) of the colon, whereas cases of low degree of suspicion were advised for the considerably less time and patient demanding CT of the abdomen. For patients with isolated anal symptoms without presence of sNICE criteria, active expectancy for six weeks was recommended, followed by renewed consideration. Results showed that the ratio between CT colon and CT abdomen was reduced from 2.2 to 1.1 after introduction of the sNICE criteria. Also, the proportion of patients undergoing CT colon within two weeks from admittance was increased from 3 to 25 %. We conclude that the sNICE criteria may be a useful supportive tool for the primary care physician.

  • 115.
    Fattibene, Paola
    et al.
    Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy.
    Trompier, Francois
    Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses, France.
    Wieser, Albrecht
    Institute of Radiation Protection, Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany.
    Brai, Maria
    Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Viale Delle Scienze, Palermo, Italy.
    Ciesielski, Bartlomej
    Medical University of Gdansk, Gdańsk, Poland.
    De Angelis, Cinzia
    Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy.
    Della Monaca, Sara
    Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy.
    Garcia, Tristan
    CEA, LIST, Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel, Gif-sur-Yvette, France.
    Gustafsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Biomedical Engineering.
    Hole, Eli Olag
    Department of Physics, University of Oslo (UiO), Oslo, Norway.
    Juniewicz, M.
    Medical University of Gdansk, Gdańsk, Poland.
    Krefft, K.
    Medical University of Gdansk, Gdańsk, Poland.
    Longo, Anna
    Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Palermo, Italy.
    Leveque, Philippe
    Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain, Belgium.
    Lund, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Marrale, Maurizio
    Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Palermo, Italy.
    Michalec, Barbara
    The Henryk Niewodniczański Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kraków, Poland.
    Mierzwinska, Gabriela
    The Henryk Niewodniczański Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kraków, Poland.
    Rao, J. L.
    Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh, India.
    Romanyukha, Alexander A.
    Naval Dosimetry Center, US Navy, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Tuner, Hasan
    Department of Physics, Faculty of Art and Science, Balikesir University, 10145, Cagis, Balıkesir, Turkey.
    EPR dosimetry intercomparison using smart phone touch screen glass2014In: Radiation and Environmental Biophysics, ISSN 0301-634X, E-ISSN 1432-2099, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 311-320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the results of an interlaboratory comparison of retrospective dosimetry using the electron paramagnetic resonance method. The test material used in this exercise was glass coming from the touch screens of smart phones that might be used as fortuitous dosimeters in a large-scale radiological incident. There were 13 participants to whom samples were dispatched, and 11 laboratories reported results. The participants received five calibration samples (0, 0.8, 2, 4, and 10 Gy) and four blindly irradiated samples (0, 0.9, 1.3, and 3.3 Gy). Participants were divided into two groups: for group A (formed by three participants), samples came from a homogeneous batch of glass and were stored in similar setting; for group B (formed by eight participants), samples came from different smart phones and stored in different settings of light and temperature. The calibration curves determined by the participants of group A had a small error and a critical level in the 0.37-0.40-Gy dose range, whereas the curves determined by the participants of group B were more scattered and led to a critical level in the 1.3-3.2-Gy dose range for six participants out of eight. Group A were able to assess the dose within 20 % for the lowest doses (< 1.5 Gy) and within 5 % for the highest doses. For group B, only the highest blind dose could be evaluated in a reliable way because of the high critical values involved. The results from group A are encouraging, whereas the results from group B suggest that the influence of environmental conditions and the intervariability of samples coming from different smart phones need to be further investigated. An alongside conclusion is that the protocol was easily transferred to participants making a network of laboratories in case of a mass casualty event potentially feasible.

  • 116.
    Flejmer, Anna M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Chehrazi, Behnaz
    Department of Physics, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Josefsson, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Toma-Dasu, Iuliana
    Medical Radiation Physics, Stockholm University and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. The Skandion Clinic, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Impact of physiological breathing motion for breast cancer radiotherapy with proton beam scanning: An in silico study2017In: Physica medica (Testo stampato), ISSN 1120-1797, E-ISSN 1724-191X, Vol. 39, p. 88-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the impact of breathing motion on proton breast treatment plans. Twelve patients with CT datasets acquired during breath-hold-at-inhalation (BHI), breath-hold-at-exhalation (BHE) and in free-breathing (FB) were included in the study. Proton plans were designed for the left breast for BHI and subsequently recalculated for BHE or designed for FB and recalculated for the extreme breath-hold phases. The plans were compared from the point of view of their target coverage and doses to organs-at-risk. The median amplitude of breathing motion determined from the positions of the sternum was 4.7 mm (range 0.5-14.6 mm). Breathing motion led to a degradation of the dose coverage of the target (heterogeneity index increased from 4-7% to 8-11%), but the degraded values of the dosimetric parameters of interest fulfilled the clinical criteria for plan acceptance. Exhalation decreased the lung burden [average dose 3.1-4.5 Gy (RBE)], while inhalation increased it [average dose 5.8-6.8 Gy (RBE)]. The individual values depended on the field arrangement. Smaller differences were seen for the heart [average dose 0.1-0.2 Gy (RBE)] and the LAD [1.9-4.6 Gy (RBE)]. Weak correlations were generally found between changes in dosimetric parameters and respiratory motion. The differences between dosimetric parameters for various breathing phases were small and their expected clinical impact is consequently quite small. The results indicated that the dosimetric parameters of the plans corresponding to the extreme breathing phases are little affected by breathing motion, thus suggesting that this motion might have little impact for the chosen beam orientations with scanned proton beams.

  • 117.
    Flejmer, Anna M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Dohlmar, Frida
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Futurum - Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping.
    Stenmarker, Margaretha
    Futurum - Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm versus Pencil Beam Convolution for treatment planning of breast cancer: implications for target coverage and radiation burden of normal tissue2015In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 2841-2848Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The present study aimed to investigate the implications of using the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) for calculation of target coverage and radiation burden of normal tissues. Most model parameters, recommendations and planning guidelines associated with a certain outcome are from the era of pencil beam convolution (PBC) calculations on relatively simple assumptions of energy transport in media. Their relevance for AAA calculations that predict more realistic dose distributions needs to be evaluated. Patients and Methods: Forty patients with left-sided breast cancer receiving 3D conformal radiation therapy were planned using PBC with a standard protocol with 50 Gy in 25 fractions according to existing re-commendations. The plans were subsequently recalculated with the AAA and relevant dose parameters were determined and compared to their PBC equivalents. Results: The majority of the AAA-based plans had a significantly worse coverage of the planning target volume and also a higher maximum dose in hotspots near sensitive structures, suggesting that these criteria could be relaxed for AAA-calculated plans. Furthermore, the AAA predicts higher volumes of the ipsilateral lung will receive doses below 25 Gy and smaller volume doses above 25 Gy. These results indicate that lung tolerance criteria might also have to be relaxed for AAA planning in order to maintain the level of normal tissue toxicity. The AAA also predicts lower doses to the heart, thus indicating that this organ might be more sensitive to radiation than thought from PBC-based calculations. Conclusion: The AAA should be preferred over the PBC algorithm for breast cancer radiotherapy as it gives more realistic dose distributions. Guidelines for plan acceptance might have to be re-evaluated to account for differences in dose predictions in order to maintain the current levels of control and complication rates. The results also suggest an increased radiosensitivity of the heart, thus indicating that a revision of the current models for cardiovascular complications may be needed.

  • 118.
    Flejmer, Anna M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Edvardsson, Anneli
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Dohlmar, Frida
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Josefsson, Dan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Futurum - Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Witt Nyström, Petra
    Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Respiratory gating for proton beam scanning versus photon 3D-CRT for breast cancer radiotherapy2016In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 55, no 5, p. 577-583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Respiratory gating and proton therapy have both been proposed to reduce the cardiopulmonary burden in breast cancer radiotherapy. This study aims to investigate the additional benefit of proton radiotherapy for breast cancer with and without respiratory gating.

    Material and methods Twenty left-sided patients were planned on computed tomography (CT)-datasets acquired during enhanced inspiration gating (EIG) and free-breathing (FB), using photon three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and scanned proton beams. Ten patients received treatment to the whole breast only (WBO) and 10 were treated to the breast and the regional lymph nodes (BRN). Dosimetric parameters characterizing the coverage of target volumes and the cardiopulmonary burden were compared using a paired, two-tailed Student’s t-test.

    Results Protons ensured comparable or better target coverage than photons in all patients during both EIG and FB. The heterogeneity index decreased from 12% with photons to about 5% with protons. The mean dose to the ipsilateral lung was reduced in BRN patients from 12 Gy to 7 Gy (RBE) in EIG and from 14 Gy to 6-7 Gy (RBE) in FB, while for WBO patients all values were about 5-6 Gy (RBE). The mean dose to heart decreased by a factor of four in WBO patients [from 1.1 Gy to 0.3 Gy (RBE) in EIG and from 2.1 Gy to 0.5 Gy (RBE) in FB] and 10 in BRN patients [from 2.1 Gy to 0.2 Gy (RBE) in EIG and from 3.4 Gy to 0.3 Gy (RBE) in FB]. Similarly, the mean and the near maximum dose to left anterior descending artery (LAD) were significantly lower (p<0.05) with protons in comparison with photons.

    Conclusion Proton spot scanning has a high potential to reduce the irradiation of organs at risk and other normal tissues for most patients, beyond what could be achieved with EIG and photon therapy. The largest dose sparing has been seen for BRN patients, both in terms of cardiopulmonary burden and integral dose.

  • 119.
    Flejmer, Anna M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Josefsson, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Futurum - Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping.
    Stenmarker, Margaretha
    Futurum - Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Clinical implications of the ISC technique for breast cancer radiotherapy and comparison with clinical recommendations2014In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 34, no 7, p. 3563-3568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The project studied the implications of using the irregular surface compensator (ISC) technique in comparison to three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for breast cancer treatment. ISC is an electronic compensation algorithm that modulates the fluence across the radiation fields to compensate for irregularly shaped surfaces and deliver a homogeneous dose to a compensation plane. Methods: Ten breast cancer patients (five left- and five right-sided) were planned with both techniques. The planning was done for 50 Gy in 25 fractions with 2 Gy per fraction in all patients. Physical parameters such as doses to the clinical target volume (CTV-T) and the planned target volume (PTV), heterogeneity index and doses to lung and heart were determined and compared for the treatment plans. Results: The ISC technique led to significantly better coverage of the CTV-T and PTV in almost all patients with statistically significant better homogeneity of the dose distribution. The contralateral lung and the heart receive the same doses with both ISC and 3D-CRT plans. However, ISC showed a trend towards decreasing the volumes of the ipsilateral lung irradiated with high doses. Consequently this led to better compliance with the national recommendations for breast radiotherapy. Conclusion: The ISC technique leads to an improvement of the target coverage and the radiation burden of the ipsilateral lung thus allowing better compliance with the national recommendations and increasing the potential for improved quality of life for breast cancer patients. It should therefore be preferred over 3D-CRT for breast cases with difficult dose homogeneity to the PTV or CTV-T.

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  • 120.
    Flejmer, Anna M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Witt Nyström, Petra
    Uppsala University Hospital.
    Dohlmar, Frida
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Josefsson, Dan
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Potential benefit of scanned proton beam versus photons as adjuvant radiation therapy in breast cancer2015In: International Journal of Particle Therapy, ISSN 2331-5180, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 845-855Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using scanned proton beams as adjuvant radiation therapy for breast cancer. Long-term cardiopulmonary complications may worsen the quality of life and reduce the positive contribution of radiation therapy, which has been known to improve long-term control of locoregional disease as well as the long-term survival for these patients.

    Materials and Methods: Ten patients with stage I-III cancer (either after mastectomy or lumpectomy, left- or right-sided) were included in the study. The patients were identified from a larger group where dose heterogeneity in the target and/or hotspots in the normal tissues qualified them for irregular surface compensator planning with photons. The patients underwent planning with 2 scanned proton beam planning techniques, single-field uniform dose and intensity-modulated proton therapy, and the results were compared with those from irregular surface compensator. All volumes of interest were delineated and reviewed by experienced radio-oncologists. The patients were prescribed 50 GyRBE in 25 fractions. Dosimetric parameters of interest were compared with a paired, 2-tailed Student t test.

    Results: The proton plans showed comparable or better target coverage than the original photon plans. There were also large reductions with protons in mean doses to the heart (0.2 versus 1.3 GyRBE), left anterior descending artery (1.4 versus 6.4 GyRBE), and the ipsilateral lung (6.3 versus 7.7 GyRBE). This reduction is important from the point of view of the quality of life of the patients after radiation therapy. No significant differences were found between single-field uniform dose and intensity-modulated proton therapy plans.

    Conclusion: Spot scanning technique with protons may improve target dose homogeneity and further reduce doses to the organs at risk compared with advanced photon techniques. The results from this study indicate a potential for protons as adjuvant radiation therapy in breast cancer and a further step toward the individualization of treatment based on anatomic and comorbidity characteristics.

  • 121.
    Fornander, Lotta
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Norrköping. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nyman, Torbjörn
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Hansson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Brismar, Tom
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Inter-hemispheric plasticity in patients with median nerve injury2016In: Neuroscience Letters, ISSN 0304-3940, E-ISSN 1872-7972, Vol. 628, p. 59-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Peripheral nerve injuries result in reorganization within the contralateral hemisphere. Furthermore, recent animal and human studies have suggested that the plastic changes in response to peripheral nerve injury also include several areas of the ipsilateral hemisphere. The objective of this study was to map the inter-hemispheric plasticity in response to median nerve injury, to investigate normal differences in contra- and ipsilateral activation, and to study the impact of event-related or blocked functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) design on ipsilateral activation. Four patients with median nerve injury at the wrist (injured and epineurally sutured amp;gt;2 years earlier) and ten healthy volunteers were included. 3T fMRI was used to map the hemodynamic response to brain activity during tactile stimulation of the fingers, and a laterality index (LI) was calculated. Stimulation of Digits II-III of the injured hand resulted in a reduction in contralateral activation in the somatosensory area SI. Patients had a lower LI (0.21 +/- 0.15) compared to healthy controls (0.60 +/- 0.26) indicating greater ipsilateral activation of the primary somatosensory cortex. The spatial dispersion of the coordinates for areas SI and SII was larger in the ipsilateral than in the contralateral hemisphere in the healthy controls, and was increased in the contralateral hemisphere of the patients compared to the healthy controls. There was no difference in LI between the event-related and blocked paradigms. In conclusion, patients with median nerve injury have increased ipsilateral SI area activation, and spatially more dispersed contralateral SI activation during tactile stimulation of their injured hand. In normal subjects ipsilateral activation has larger spatial distribution than the contralateral. Previous findings in patients performed with the blocked fMRI paradigm were confirmed. The increase in ipsilateral SI activation may be due to an interhemispheric disinhibition associated with changes in the afferent signal inflow to the contralateral primary somatosensory cortex.

  • 122. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Forsgren, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    The Non-Invasive Liver Biopsy: Determining Hepatic Function in Diffuse and Focal LiverDisease2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The liver is one of the largest organs within the human body and it handles many vital tasks such as nutrient processing, toxin removal, and synthesis of important proteins. The number of people suffering from chronic liver disease is on the rise, likely due to the present ‘western’ lifestyle. As disease develops in the liver there are pathophysiological manifestations within the liver parenchyma that are both common and important to monitor. These manifestations include inflammation, fatty infiltration (steatosis), excessive scar tissue formation (fibrosis and cirrhosis), and iron loading. Importantly, as the disease progresses there is concurrent loss of liver function. Furthermore, postoperative liver function insufficiency is an important concern when planning surgical treatment of the liver, because it is associated with both morbidity and mortality. Liver function can also be hampered due to drug-induced injuries, an important aspect to consider in drug-development.

    Currently, an invasive liver needle biopsy is required to determine the aetiology and to stage or grade the pathophysiological manifestations. There are important limitations with the biopsy, which include, risk of serious complications, mortality, morbidity, inter- and intra-observer variability, sampling error, and sampling variability. Cleary, it would be beneficial to be able investigate the pathophysiological manifestations accurately, non-invasively, and on regional level.

    Current available laboratory liver function blood panels are typically insufficient and often only indicate damage at a late stage. Thus, it would be beneficial to have access to biomarkers that are both sensitive and responds to early changes in liver function in both clinical settings and for the pharmaceutical industry and regulatory agencies.

    The main aim of this thesis was to develop and evaluate methods that can be used for a ‘non-invasive liver biopsy’ using magnetic resonance (MR). We also aimed to develop sensitive methods for measure liver function based on gadoxetate-enhanced MR imaging (MRI).

    The presented work is primarily based on a prospective study on c. 100 patients suffering from chronic liver disease of varying aetiologies recruited due to elevated liver enzyme levels, without clear signs of decompensated cirrhosis. Our results show that the commonly used liver fat cut-off for diagnosing steatosis should be lowered from 5% to 3% when using MR proton-density fat fraction (PDFF). We also show that MR elastography (MRE) is superior in staging fibrosis.

    Finally we presented a framework for quantifying liver function based on gadoxetate-enhanced MRI. The method is based on clinical images and a clinical approved contrast agent (gadoxetate). The framework consists of; state-of the-art image reconstruction and correction methods, a mathematical model, and a precise model parametrization method. The model was developed and validated on healthy subjects. Thereafter the model was found applicable on the chronic liver disease cohort as well as validated using gadoxetate levels in biopsy samples and blood samples. The liver function parameters correlated with clinical markers for liver function and liver fibrosis (used as a surrogate marker for liver function).

    In summary, it should be possible to perform a non-invasive liver biopsy using: MRI-PDFF for liver fat and iron loading, MRE for liver fibrosis and possibly also inflammation, and measure liver function using the presented framework for analysing gadoxetate-enhanced MRI. With the exception of an MREtransducer no additional hardware is required on the MR scanner. The liver function method is likely to be useful both in a clinical setting and in pharmaceutical trials.

    List of papers
    1. Separation of advanced from mild hepatic fibrosis by quantification of the hepatobiliary uptake of Gd-EOB-DTPA
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Separation of advanced from mild hepatic fibrosis by quantification of the hepatobiliary uptake of Gd-EOB-DTPA
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: European Radiology, ISSN 0938-7994, E-ISSN 1432-1084, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 174-181Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    To apply dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI on patients presenting with elevated liver enzymes without clinical signs of hepatic decompensation in order to quantitatively compare the hepatocyte-specific uptake of Gd-EOB-DTPA with histopathological fibrosis stage.

    Methods

    A total of 38 patients were prospectively examined using 1.5-T MRI. Data were acquired from regions of interest in the liver and spleen by using time series of single-breath-hold symmetrically sampled two-point Dixon 3D images (non-enhanced, arterial and venous portal phase; 3, 10, 20 and 30 min) following a bolus injection of Gd-EOB-DTPA (0.025 mmol/kg). The signal intensity (SI) values were reconstructed using a phase-sensitive technique and normalised using multiscale adaptive normalising averaging (MANA). Liver-to-spleen contrast ratios (LSC_N) and the contrast uptake rate (KHep) were calculated. Liver biopsy was performed and classified according to the Batts and Ludwig system.

    Results

    Area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUROC) values of 0.71, 0.80 and 0.78, respectively, were found for KHep, LSC_N10 and LSC_N20 with regard to severe versus mild fibrosis. Significant group differences were found for KHep (borderline), LSC_N10 and LSC_N20.

    Conclusions

    Liver fibrosis stage strongly influences the hepatocyte-specific uptake of Gd-EOB-DTPA. Potentially the normalisation technique and KHep will reduce patient and system bias, yielding a robust approach to non-invasive liver function determination.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer, 2013
    Keywords
    Quantification, Gd-EOB-DTPA, Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, Pharmacokinetics, Liver
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-87242 (URN)10.1007/s00330-012-2583-2 (DOI)000312324500022 ()
    Projects
    NILB
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council|VR/M 2007-2884|Medical Research Council of South-east Sweden|FORSS 12621|Linkoping University, Linkoping University Hospital Research Foundations||County Council of Ostergotland||

    Available from: 2013-01-14 Created: 2013-01-14 Last updated: 2019-06-14
    2. Physiologically Realistic and Validated Mathematical Liver Model Revels Hepatobiliary Transfer Rates for Gd-EOB-DTPA Using Human DCE-MRI Data
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physiologically Realistic and Validated Mathematical Liver Model Revels Hepatobiliary Transfer Rates for Gd-EOB-DTPA Using Human DCE-MRI Data
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    2014 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 0095700-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Diffuse liver disease (DLD), such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NASH) and cirrhosis, is a rapidly growing problem throughout the Westernized world. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), based on uptake of the hepatocyte-specific contrast agent (CA) Gd-EOB-DTPA, is a promising non-invasive approach for diagnosing DLD. However, to fully utilize the potential of such dynamic measurements for clinical or research purposes, more advanced methods for data analysis are required. Methods: A mathematical model that can be used for such data-analysis was developed. Data was obtained from healthy human subjects using a clinical protocol with high spatial resolution. The model is based on ordinary differential equations and goes beyond local diffusion modeling, taking into account the complete system accessible to the CA. Results: The presented model can describe the data accurately, which was confirmed using chi-square statistics. Furthermore, the model is minimal and identifiable, meaning that all parameters were determined with small degree of uncertainty. The model was also validated using independent data. Conclusions: We have developed a novel approach for determining previously undescribed physiological hepatic parameters in humans, associated with CA transport across the liver. The method has a potential for assessing regional liver function in clinical examinations of patients that are suffering of DLD and compromised hepatic function.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Public Library of Science, 2014
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-106962 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0095700 (DOI)000335226500139 ()
    Available from: 2014-06-04 Created: 2014-06-02 Last updated: 2019-06-14
    3. Using a 3% Proton Density Fat Fraction as a Cut-off Value Increases Sensitivity of Detection of Hepatic Steatosis, Based on Results from Histopathology Analysis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using a 3% Proton Density Fat Fraction as a Cut-off Value Increases Sensitivity of Detection of Hepatic Steatosis, Based on Results from Histopathology Analysis
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    2017 (English)In: Gastroenterology, ISSN 0016-5085, E-ISSN 1528-0012, Vol. 153, no 1, p. 53-+Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    It is possible to estimate hepatic triglyceride content by calculating the proton density fat fraction (PDFF), using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (less thansuperscriptgreater than1less than/superscriptgreater thanH-MRS), instead of collecting and analyzing liver biopsies to detect steatosis. However, the current PDFF cut-off value (5%) used to define steatosis by magnetic resonance was derived from studies that did not use histopathology as the reference standard. We performed a prospective study to determine the accuracy of less thansuperscriptgreater than1less than/superscriptgreater thanH-MRS PDFF in measurement of steatosis using histopathology analysis as the standard. We collected clinical, serologic, less thansuperscriptgreater than1less than/superscriptgreater thanH-MRS PDFF, and liver biopsy data from 94 adult patients with increased levels of liver enzymes (6 months or more) referred to the Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at Linköping University Hospital in Sweden from 2007 through 2014. Steatosis was graded using the conventional histopathology method and fat content was quantified in biopsy samples using stereological point counts (SPCs). We correlated less thansuperscriptgreater than1less than/superscriptgreater thanH-MRS PDFF findings with SPCs (r = 0.92; P less than.001). less thansuperscriptgreater than1less than/superscriptgreater thanH-MRS PDFF results correlated with histopathology results (ρ = 0.87; P less than.001), and SPCs correlated with histopathology results (ρ = 0.88; P less than.001). All 25 subjects with PDFF values of 5.0% or more had steatosis based on histopathology findings (100% specificity for PDFF). However, of 69 subjects with PDFF values below 5.0% (negative result), 22 were determined to have steatosis based on histopathology findings (53% sensitivity for PDFF). Reducing the PDFF cut-off value to 3.0% identified patients with steatosis with 100% specificity and 79% sensitivity; a PDFF cut-off value of 2.0% identified patients with steatosis with 94% specificity and 87% sensitivity. These findings might be used to improve non-invasive detection of steatosis.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2017
    National Category
    Gastroenterology and Hepatology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-136544 (URN)10.1053/j.gastro.2017.03.005 (DOI)000403918300022 ()
    Note

    Funding agencies: Swedish Research Council/Medicine and Health [VR/M 2007-2884, VR/M 2012-3199]; Swedish Research Council/Natural and Engineering Sciences [VR/NT 2014-6157]; Swedish Innovation Agency VINNOVA [2013-01314]; Region Ostergotland (ALF)

    Available from: 2017-04-19 Created: 2017-04-19 Last updated: 2019-09-25Bibliographically approved
    4. Model-inferred mechanisms of liver function from magnetic resonance imaging data: Validation and variation across a clinically relevant cohort
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Model-inferred mechanisms of liver function from magnetic resonance imaging data: Validation and variation across a clinically relevant cohort
    Show others...
    2019 (English)In: PloS Computational Biology, ISSN 1553-734X, E-ISSN 1553-7358, Vol. 15, no 6, article id e1007157Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Estimation of liver function is important to monitor progression of chronic liver disease (CLD). A promising method is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) combined with gadoxetate, a liver-specific contrast agent. For this method, we have previously developed a model for an average healthy human. Herein, we extended this model, by combining it with a patient-specific non-linear mixed-effects modeling framework. We validated the model by recruiting 100 patients with CLD of varying severity and etiologies. The model explained all MRI data and adequately predicted both timepoints saved for validation and gadoxetate concentrations in both plasma and biopsies. The validated model provides a new and deeper look into how the mechanisms of liver function vary across a wide variety of liver diseases. The basic mechanisms remain the same, but increasing fibrosis reduces uptake and increases excretion of gadoxetate. These mechanisms are shared across many liver functions and can now be estimated from standard clinical images.

    Author summary

    Being able to accurately and reliably estimate liver function is important when monitoring the progression of patients with liver disease, as well as when identifying drug-induced liver injury during drug development. A promising method for quantifying liver function is to use magnetic resonance imaging combined with gadoxetate. Gadoxetate is a liver-specific contrast agent, which is taken up by the hepatocytes and excreted into the bile. We have previously developed a mechanistic model for gadoxetate dynamics using averaged data from healthy volunteers. In this work, we extended our model with a non-linear mixed-effects modeling framework to give patient-specific estimates of the gadoxetate transport-rates. We validated the model by recruiting 100 patients with liver disease, covering a range of severity and etiologies. All patients underwent an MRI-examination and provided both blood and liver biopsies. Our validated model provides a new and deeper look into how the mechanisms of liver function varies across a wide variety of liver diseases. The basic mechanisms remain the same, but increasing fibrosis reduces uptake and increases excretion of gadoxetate.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    San Francisco, CA, United States: Public Library of Science, 2019
    National Category
    Pharmaceutical Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-159165 (URN)10.1371/journal.pcbi.1007157 (DOI)000474703000068 ()31237870 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85069296906 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [2014-6157, 2007-2884]; Medical Research council of Southeast Sweden [12621]; Vinnova [2013-01314]; Linkoping University, CENIIT [15.09]; Swedish fund for research without animal experiments [Nytank2015]

    Available from: 2019-07-30 Created: 2019-07-30 Last updated: 2019-12-12Bibliographically approved
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    The Non-Invasive Liver Biopsy: Determining Hepatic Function in Diffuse and Focal LiverDisease
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  • 123.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Cedersund, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Physiologically Realistic and Validated Mathematical Liver Model Revels Hepatobiliary Transfer Rates for Gd-EOB-DTPA Using Human DCE-MRI Data2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 0095700-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Diffuse liver disease (DLD), such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NASH) and cirrhosis, is a rapidly growing problem throughout the Westernized world. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), based on uptake of the hepatocyte-specific contrast agent (CA) Gd-EOB-DTPA, is a promising non-invasive approach for diagnosing DLD. However, to fully utilize the potential of such dynamic measurements for clinical or research purposes, more advanced methods for data analysis are required. Methods: A mathematical model that can be used for such data-analysis was developed. Data was obtained from healthy human subjects using a clinical protocol with high spatial resolution. The model is based on ordinary differential equations and goes beyond local diffusion modeling, taking into account the complete system accessible to the CA. Results: The presented model can describe the data accurately, which was confirmed using chi-square statistics. Furthermore, the model is minimal and identifiable, meaning that all parameters were determined with small degree of uncertainty. The model was also validated using independent data. Conclusions: We have developed a novel approach for determining previously undescribed physiological hepatic parameters in humans, associated with CA transport across the liver. The method has a potential for assessing regional liver function in clinical examinations of patients that are suffering of DLD and compromised hepatic function.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 124.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Karlsson, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Cedersund, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Whole Body Mechanistic Minimal Model for Gd-EOB-DTPA Contrast Agent Pharmacokinetics in Evaluation of Diffuse Liver Disease2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Aiming for non-invasive diagnostic tools to decrease the need for biopsy in diffuse liver disease and to quantitatively describe liver function, we applied a mechanistic pharmacokinetic modelling analysis of liver MRI with Gd-EOB-DTPA. This modelling method yields physiologically relevant parameters and was compared to previously developed methods in a patient group with diffuse liver disease. Materials and Methods: Using data from healthy volunteers undergoing liver MRI, an identifiable mechanistic model was developed, based on compartments described by ordinary differential equations and kinetic expressions, and validated with independent data including Gd-EOB-DTPA concentration measurements in blood samples. Patients (n=37) with diffuse liver disease underwent liver biopsy and MRI with Gd-EOB-DTPA. The model was used to derive pharmacokinetic parameters which were then compared with other quantitative estimates in their ability to separate mild from severe liver fibrosis. Results: The estimations produced by the mechanistic model allowed better separation between mild and severe fibrosis than previously described methods for quantifying hepatic Gd-EOB-DTPA uptake. Conclusions: With a mechanistic pharmacokinetic modelling approach, the estimation of liver uptake function and its diagnostic information can be improved compared to current methods.

  • 125.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Karlsson, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ignatova, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Cedersund, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Model-inferred mechanisms of liver function from magnetic resonance imaging data: Validation and variation across a clinically relevant cohort2019In: PloS Computational Biology, ISSN 1553-734X, E-ISSN 1553-7358, Vol. 15, no 6, article id e1007157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Estimation of liver function is important to monitor progression of chronic liver disease (CLD). A promising method is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) combined with gadoxetate, a liver-specific contrast agent. For this method, we have previously developed a model for an average healthy human. Herein, we extended this model, by combining it with a patient-specific non-linear mixed-effects modeling framework. We validated the model by recruiting 100 patients with CLD of varying severity and etiologies. The model explained all MRI data and adequately predicted both timepoints saved for validation and gadoxetate concentrations in both plasma and biopsies. The validated model provides a new and deeper look into how the mechanisms of liver function vary across a wide variety of liver diseases. The basic mechanisms remain the same, but increasing fibrosis reduces uptake and increases excretion of gadoxetate. These mechanisms are shared across many liver functions and can now be estimated from standard clinical images.

    Author summary

    Being able to accurately and reliably estimate liver function is important when monitoring the progression of patients with liver disease, as well as when identifying drug-induced liver injury during drug development. A promising method for quantifying liver function is to use magnetic resonance imaging combined with gadoxetate. Gadoxetate is a liver-specific contrast agent, which is taken up by the hepatocytes and excreted into the bile. We have previously developed a mechanistic model for gadoxetate dynamics using averaged data from healthy volunteers. In this work, we extended our model with a non-linear mixed-effects modeling framework to give patient-specific estimates of the gadoxetate transport-rates. We validated the model by recruiting 100 patients with liver disease, covering a range of severity and etiologies. All patients underwent an MRI-examination and provided both blood and liver biopsies. Our validated model provides a new and deeper look into how the mechanisms of liver function varies across a wide variety of liver diseases. The basic mechanisms remain the same, but increasing fibrosis reduces uptake and increases excretion of gadoxetate.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Model-inferred mechanisms of liver function from magnetic resonance imaging data: Validation and variation across a clinically relevant cohort
  • 126.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Comparing 2D and 3D Magnetic Resonance Elastography Techniques in a Clinical Setting: Initial Experiences2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: It has been shown that liver fibrosis, and even cirrhosis, may be reversible in humans. For this reason there is a great need for the imminent introduction of non-invasive and clinically useful methods in order to monitor fibrosis in patients [1, 2]. A body of evidence points to the fact that MRE is a highly useful candidate towards this end [3]. However, before using such techniques more widely, it is important to verify that comparable physical measures are provided by alternative and clinically relevant MRE approaches. The aim of this pilot study was to compare 2D and 3D MRE, also known as MR Rheology, using a commercially available 2D system, with an acoustic transducer, and 3D MRE research system, with an electromagnetic transducer, with respect to liver stiffness and elasticity in patients with diffuse or suspected diffuse liver disease. Materials and Methods: Seven patients, referred to our hospital for evaluation of elevated serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and/or alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels but without signs of cirrhosis on physical examination, were recruited from a previous study [4], and examined in the course of one day. Fibrosis staging from prior biopsy were gained from [4], see Table 1. The 3D MRE method included an active electromagnetic transducer generating waves at 56 Hz, and a 1.5 T Philips Achieva MR-scanner, with a phased array body coil (Sense TorsoXL, all 16 coil elements), GRE sequence parameters include; FOV = 320x256 mm2, matrix = 80x38, slice thickness = 4 mm, # slices = 9, FA = 15°, TR = 112 ms, TE = 9.21 ms, SENSE = 2. The 2D MRE method included a passive acoustic transducer generating waves at 60 Hz, and a 1.5 T GE 450W MR-scanner, with a phased array body coil (HD8 Torso, all 8 coil elements), GRE sequence parameters include; FOV = 440x440 mm2, matrix = 256x64, slice thickness = 10 mm, # slices = 4, FA = 30°, TR = 50 ms, TE = 21.7 ms, ASSET = 2. The transducers were on both systems placed on the anterior chest wall to the right of xiphoid process (patient in a supine position), the time between each MRE acquisition was dependent on how long it took to transfer the patient between the two MR systems in the hospital (<10 min) A region of interest (ROI) was placed in an appropriate single 10 mm slice acquired using the GE MR-scanner. A corresponding ROI for the Philips system, covering the same anatomical region, was placed over three slices (4 mm thickness each). This yielded a total cranio-caudal coverage of the ROIs equal to 10 mm (on the GE data) and 12 mm (on the Philips data). The mean and standard deviations of the stiffness (GE), elasticity (Philips) and Gabs,Elastic (Philips) were calculated. Gabs,Elastic is the absolute value of the shear modulus, which in principle is equivalent to the viscoelastic property, shear stiffness. In the 3D method the shear waves were obtained by applying the curl operator and using the Voigt rheological model to obtain shear elasticity maps [5, 6]. In the 2D method the GE system provided the stiffness maps. Statistics was performed using Mathematica 9. ROI drawing and quantification of the data from the GE system was performed using Sectra PACS IDS7, and ROI drawing and quantification of the data from the Philips system was performed using a custom software package implemented in ROOT, generously provided by R. Sinkus (Kings College, London, UK). Results: The measured values are presented in Table 1. Both elasticity and Gabs,Elastic correlates well with the stiffness measurement carried out in the GE system (Fig. 1), as was shown by the elasticity and stiffness correlation R2 = 0.96 (P < 0.001) slope = 1.08 (P < 0.001), intercept = 0.61 kPa (P = 0.08), Gabs,Elastic and stiffness correlation R2 = 0.96 (P < 0.001), slope = 0.95 (P< 0.001) intercept = 0.28 kPa (P = 0.43)

  • 127.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Wolfram MathCore AB, Linköping, Sweden.
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Comparing hepatic 2D and 3D magnetic resonance elastography methods in a clinical setting – Initial experiences2015In: European Journal of Radiology Open, E-ISSN 2352-0477, Vol. 2, p. 66-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Continuous monitoring of liver fibrosis progression in patients is not feasible with the current diagnostic golden standard (needle biopsy). Recently, magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has emerged as a promising method for such continuous monitoring. Since there are different MRE methods that could be used in a clinical setting there is a need to investigate whether measurements produced by these MRE methods are comparable. Hence, the purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate whether the measurements of the viscoelastic properties produced by 2D (stiffness) and 3D (elasticity and ‘Gabs,Elastic’) MRE are comparable.

    Materials and methods

    Seven patients with diffuse or suspect diffuse liver disease were examined in the same day with the two MRE methods. 2D MRE was performed using an acoustic passive transducer, with a 1.5 T GE 450 W MR system. 3D MRE was performed using an electromagnetic active transducer, with a 1.5 T Philips Achieva MR system. Finally, mean viscoelastic values were extracted from the same anatomical region for both methods by an experienced radiologist.

    Results

    Stiffness correlated well with the elasticity, R2 = 0.96 (P < 0.001; slope = 1.08, intercept = 0.61 kPa), as well as with ‘Gabs,ElasticR2 = 0.96 (P < 0.001; slope = 0.95, intercept = 0.28 kPa).

    Conclusion

    This pilot study shows that different MRE methods can produce comparable measurements of the viscoelastic properties of the liver. The existence of such comparable measurements is important, both from a clinical as well as a research perspective, since it allows for equipment-independent monitoring of disease progression.

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    fulltext
  • 128.
    Forslin, Y.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Martola, J.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Bergendal, A.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Fredrikson, S.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Kristoffersen Wiberg, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Granberg, T.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Gadolinium Retention in the Brain: An MRI Relaxometry Study of Linear and Macrocyclic Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents in Multiple Sclerosis2019In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, ISSN 0195-6108, E-ISSN 1936-959X, Vol. 40, no 8, p. 1265-1273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Brain gadolinium retention is consistently reported for linear gadolinium-based contrast agents, while the results for macrocyclics are contradictory and potential clinical manifestations remain controversial. Furthermore, most previous studies are based on conventional T1-weighted MR imaging. We therefore aimed to quantitatively investigate longitudinal and transversal relaxation in the brain in relation to previous gadolinium-based contrast agent administration and explore associations with disability in multiple sclerosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighty-five patients with MS and 21 healthy controls underwent longitudinal and transverse relaxation rate (R-1 and R-2) relaxometry. Patients were divided into linear, mixed, and macrocyclic groups based on previous gadolinium-based contrast agent administration. Neuropsychological testing was performed in 53 patients. The dentate nucleus, globus pallidus, caudate nucleus, and thalamus were manually segmented. Repeatability measures were also performed. RESULTS: The relaxometry was robust (2.0% scan-rescan difference) and detected higher R-1 (dentate nucleus, globus pallidus, caudate nucleus, thalamus) and R-2 (globus pallidus, caudate nucleus) in patients receiving linear gadolinium-based contrast agents compared with controls. The number of linear gadolinium-based contrast agent administrations was associated with higher R-1 and R-2 in all regions (except R-2 in the thalamus). No similar differences and associations were found for the macrocyclic group. Higher relaxation was associated with lower information-processing speed (dentate nucleus, thalamus) and verbal fluency (caudate nucleus, thalamus). No associations were found with physical disability or fatigue. CONCLUSIONS: Previous linear, but not macrocyclic, gadolinium-based contrast agent administration is associated with higher relaxation rates in a dose-dependent manner. Higher relaxation in some regions is associated with cognitive impairment but not physical disability or fatigue in MS. The findings should be interpreted with care but encourage studies into gadolinium retention and cognition.

  • 129.
    Fowler, Jack F.
    et al.
    University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI, USA.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Toma-Dasu, Iuliana
    Stockholm University and Karolinska Institutet.
    Optimum overall treatment time in radiation oncology2015Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    John "Jack" Fowler has been a busy radiation biology researcher and teacher. He has written 581 papers over the last 65 plus years. He has also received nearly every honor the medical physics field can bestow. But Jack is not done. He says it is time he wrote a book. Jack's new book, Optimum overall treatment time in radiation oncology, sums up the key concepts relating to optimum fractionation in radiation therapy that have interested him all these years.

  • 130.
    Fowler, Jack F.
    et al.
    University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI, USA.
    Toma-Dasu, Iuliana
    Stockholm University and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Dasu, Alexandru
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Is the α/β ratio for prostate tumours really low and does it vary with the level of risk at diagnosis?2013In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 1009-1011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To answer the questions: Is the α/β ratio (radiosensitivity to size of dose-per-fraction) really low enough to justify using a few large dose fractions instead of the traditional many small doses? Does this parameter vary with prognostic risk factors? Methods and Materials: Three large statistical overviews are critiqued, with results for 5,000, 6,000 and 14,000 patients with prostate carcinoma, respectively. Results: These major analyses agree in finding the average α/β ratio to be less than 2 Gy: 1.55 (95% confidence interval=0.46-4.52), 1.4 (0.9-2.2), and the third analysis 1.7 (1.4-2.2) by ASTRO and 1.6 (1.2-2.2) by Phoenix criteria. All agree that α/β values do not vary significantly with the low, intermediate, high and “all included” risk factors. Conclusion: The high sensitivity to dose-per-fraction is an intrinsic property of prostate carcinomas and this supports the use of hypofractionation to increase the therapeutic gain for these tumours with dose-volume modelling to reduce the risk of late complications in rectum and bladder.

  • 131.
    Fransson, Sven Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Det stora vita huset i Kolmårdsskogen: 100-årigt vittne om Sveriges kamp mot tuberkulosen2019In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 116, no 7Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 132.
    Fransson, Sven Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Editorial Material: The annoying pulmonary nodule on CT2014In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 387-388Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 133.
    Fransson, Sven Göran
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Editorial Material: Tuberculosis: a medical evergreen in ACTA RADIOLOGICA, vol 56, issue 5, pp 515-5162015In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 56, no 5, p. 515-516Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 134.
    Franzén, Stephanie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Pihl, Liselotte
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Khan, Nadeem
    Gustafsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Norrköping/Finspång. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Palm, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Pronounced kidney hypoxia precedes albuminuria in type 1 diabetic mice2016In: American Journal of Physiology - Renal Physiology, ISSN 1931-857X, E-ISSN 1522-1466, Vol. 310, no 9, p. F807-F809Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intrarenal tissue hypoxia has been proposed as a unifying mechanism for the development of chronic kidney disease, including diabetic nephropathy. However, hypoxia has to be present before the onset of kidney disease in order to be the causal mechanism. In order to establish if hypoxia precedes the onset of diabetic nephropathy, we implemented a minimally invasive electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry technique using implanted oxygen sensing probes for repetitive measurements of in vivo kidney tissue oxygen tensions in mice. Kidney cortex oxygen tensions were measured before and up to 15 days after the induction of insulinopenic diabetes in male mice and compared to normoglycemic controls. On day 16, urinary albumin excretions and conscious glomerular filtration rates were determined in order to define the temporal relationship between intrarenal hypoxia and disease development. Diabetic mice developed pronounced intrarenal hypoxia three days after the induction of diabetes, which persisted throughout the study period. On day 16, diabetic mice had glomerular hyperfiltration, but normal urinary albumin excretion. In conclusion, intrarenal tissue hypoxia in diabetes precedes albuminuria thereby being a plausible cause for the onset and progression of diabetic nephropathy.

  • 135.
    Franzén, Stephanie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pihl, Liselotte
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Khan, Nadeem
    Geisel School Med, NH USA.
    Palm, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Gustafsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Biomedical Engineering.
    Repetitive Measurements of Intrarenal Oxygenation In Vivo Using L Band Electron Paramagnetic Resonance2014In: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0065-2598, E-ISSN 2214-8019, Vol. 812, p. 135-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intrarenal oxygenation is heterogeneous with oxygen levels normally being highest in the superficial cortex and lowest in the inner medulla. Reduced intrarenal oxygenation has been implied in the pathology of several kidney diseases. However, there is currently no method available to repetitively monitor regional renal oxygenation using minimally invasive procedures. We therefore evaluated implantable lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc) probes, which display a close correlation between EPR line width and oxygen availability. LiPc probes were implanted in the kidney cortex and medulla in the same mouse and sEPR spectra were acquired using a L band scanner during inhalation of air (21 % oxygen) or a mixture of air and nitrogen (10 % oxygen). In order to separate the signals from the two probes, a 1 G/cm gradient was applied and the signals were derived from 40 consecutive sweeps. Peak-to-peak comparison of the EPR line was used to convert the signal to an approximate oxygen tension in MATLAB. Kidney cortex as well as medullary oxygenation was stable over the 45 day period (cortex 56 +/- 7 mmHg and medulla 43 +/- 6 mmHg). However, 10 % oxygen inhalation significantly reduced oxygenation in both cortex (56 +/- 6 to 34 +/- 2 mmHg n = 15 p less than 0.05) and medulla (42 +/- 5 to 29 +/- 3 mmHg n = 7 p less than 0.05). In conclusion, L band EPR using LiPc probes implanted in discrete intrarenal structures can be used to repetitively monitor regional renal oxygenation. This minimally invasive method is especially well suited for conditions of reduced intrarenal oxygenation since this increases the signal intensity which facilitates the quantification of the EPR signal to absolute oxygenation values.

  • 136.
    Geessink, Oscar G. F.
    et al.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands; Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands; Lab Pathol East Netherlands LabPON, Netherlands.
    Baidoshvili, Alexi
    Lab Pathol East Netherlands LabPON, Netherlands.
    Klaase, Joost M.
    Medisch Spectrum Twente, Netherlands.
    Bejnordi, Babak Ehteshami
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Litjens, Geert J. S.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    van Pelt, Gabi W.
    Leiden Univ, Netherlands.
    Mesker, Wilma E.
    Leiden Univ, Netherlands.
    Nagtegaal, Iris D.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Ciompi, Francesco
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    van der Laak, Jeroen
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology. Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Computer aided quantification of intratumoral stroma yields an independent prognosticator in rectal cancer2019In: Cellular Oncology, ISSN 2211-3428, E-ISSN 2211-3436, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 331-341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PurposeTumor-stroma ratio (TSR) serves as an independent prognostic factor in colorectal cancer and other solid malignancies. The recent introduction of digital pathology in routine tissue diagnostics holds opportunities for automated TSR analysis. We investigated the potential of computer-aided quantification of intratumoral stroma in rectal cancer whole-slide images.MethodsHistological slides from 129 rectal adenocarcinoma patients were analyzed by two experts who selected a suitable stroma hot-spot and visually assessed TSR. A semi-automatic method based on deep learning was trained to segment all relevant tissue types in rectal cancer histology and subsequently applied to the hot-spots provided by the experts. Patients were assigned to a stroma-high or stroma-low group by both TSR methods (visual and automated). This allowed for prognostic comparison between the two methods in terms of disease-specific and disease-free survival times.ResultsWith stroma-low as baseline, automated TSR was found to be prognostic independent of age, gender, pT-stage, lymph node status, tumor grade, and whether adjuvant therapy was given, both for disease-specific survival (hazard ratio=2.48 (95% confidence interval 1.29-4.78)) and for disease-free survival (hazard ratio=2.05 (95% confidence interval 1.11-3.78)). Visually assessed TSR did not serve as an independent prognostic factor in multivariate analysis.ConclusionsThis work shows that TSR is an independent prognosticator in rectal cancer when assessed automatically in user-provided stroma hot-spots. The deep learning-based technology presented here may be a significant aid to pathologists in routine diagnostics.

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  • 137. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Georgiopoulos, Charalampos
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Imaging Studies of Olfaction in Health and Parkinsonism2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Olfactory loss is a common non-motor symptom of Parkinson’s disease (PD), often preceding the cardinal motor symptoms of the disease. The aim of this thesis was to: (a) evaluate whether olfactory examination can increase diagnostic accuracy, and (b) study the structural and functional neural basis of olfactory dysfunction in PD with different applications of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI).

    Paper I was a comparison of the diagnostic accuracy between a simple smell identification test and DaTSCAN Single Photon Emission Computerized Tomography (SPECT), a nuclear medicine tomographic imaging technique that is commonly used in patients with suspected parkinsonism. The results indicate that smell test is inferior to DaTSCAN SPECT, but the combination of these two methods can lead to improved diagnostic accuracy.

    Paper II showed that diffusion MRI could detect discrete microstructural changes in the white matter of brain areas that participate in higher order olfactory neurotransmission, whereas MRI with Magnetization Transfer contrast could not.

    Paper III was a methodological study on how two different acquisition parameters can affect the activation pattern of olfactory brain areas, as observed with functional MRI (fMRI). The results indicate that brief olfactory stimulation and fast sampling rate should be preferred on olfactory fMRI studies.

    Paper IV used olfactory fMRI and resting-state fMRI in order to elucidate potentially altered activation patterns and functional connectivity within olfactory brain areas, between PD patients and healthy controls. Olfactory fMRI showed that olfactory impairment in PD is associated with significantly lower recruitment of the olfactory network. Resting-state fMRI did not detect any significant changes in the functional connectivity within the olfactory network of PD patients.

    In conclusion, the included studies provide evidence of: (a) disease-related structural and functional changes in olfactory brain areas, and (b) beneficial addition of olfactory tests in the clinical work-up of patients with parkinsonism.

    List of papers
    1. The diagnostic value of dopamine transporter imaging and olfactory testing in patients with parkinsonian syndromes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The diagnostic value of dopamine transporter imaging and olfactory testing in patients with parkinsonian syndromes
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Journal of Neurology, ISSN 0340-5354, E-ISSN 1432-1459, Vol. 262, no 9, p. 2154-2163Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of olfactory testing and presynaptic dopamine imaging in diagnosing Parkinsons disease (PD) and atypical parkinsonian syndromes (APS); to evaluate if the combination of these two diagnostic tools can improve their diagnostic value. A prospective investigation of 24 PD patients, 16 APS patients and 15 patients with non-parkinsonian syndromes was performed during an 18-month period. Single photon emission computed tomography with the presynaptic radioligand I-123-FP-CIT (DaTSCAN (R)) and olfactory testing with the Brief 12-item Smell Identification Test (B-SIT) were performed in all patients. DaTSCAN was analysed semi-quantitatively, by calculating two different striatal uptake ratios, and visually according to a predefined ranking scale. B-SIT score was significantly lower for PD patients, but not significantly different between APS and non-parkinsonism. The visual assessment of DaTSCAN had higher sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy compared to olfactory testing. Most PD patients (75 %) had visually predominant dopamine depletion in putamen, while most APS patients (56 %) had visually severe dopamine depletion both in putamen and in caudate nucleus. The combination of DaTSCAN and B-SIT led to a higher rate of correctly classified patients. Olfactory testing can distinguish PD from non-parkinsonism, but not PD from APS or APS from non-parkinsonism. DaTSCAN is more efficient than olfactory testing and can be valuable in differentiating PD from APS. However, combining olfactory testing and DaTSCAN imaging has a higher predictive value than these two methods separately.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2015
    Keywords
    Parkinsons disease; Atypical parkinsonism; Parkinsonian syndromes; Olfaction; I-123-FP-CIT SPECT
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122669 (URN)10.1007/s00415-015-7830-4 (DOI)000363035400018 ()26122543 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Ostergotland County Council (ALF); Swedish Parkinsons Foundation

    Available from: 2015-11-16 Created: 2015-11-13 Last updated: 2019-03-05Bibliographically approved
    2. Olfactory Impairment in Parkinsons Disease Studied with Diffusion Tensor and Magnetization Transfer Imaging
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Olfactory Impairment in Parkinsons Disease Studied with Diffusion Tensor and Magnetization Transfer Imaging
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: Journal of Parkinson's Disease, ISSN 1877-7171, E-ISSN 1877-718X, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 301-311Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Olfactory impairment is an early manifestation of Parkinsons disease (PD). Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) and Magnetization Transfer (MT) are two imaging techniques that allow noninvasive detection of microstructural changes in the cerebral white matter. Objective: To assess white matter alterations associated with olfactory impairment in PD, using a binary imaging approach with DTI and MT. Methods: 22 PD patients and 13 healthy controls were examined with DTI, MT and an odor discrimination test. DTI data were first analyzed with tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) in order to detect differences in fractional anisotropy, mean, radial and axial diffusivity between PD patients and controls. Voxelwise randomized permutation was employed for the MT analysis, after spatial and intensity normalization. Additionally, ROI analysis was performed on both the DTI and MT data, focused on the white matter adjacent to olfactory brain regions. Results: Whole brain voxelwise analysis revealed decreased axial diffusivity in the left uncinate fasciculus and the white matter adjacent to the left olfactory sulcus of PD patients. ROI analysis demonstrated decreased axial diffusivity in the right orbitofrontal cortex, as well as decreased mean diffusivity and axial diffusivity in the white matter of the left entorhinal cortex of PD patients. There were no significant differences regarding fractional anisotropy, radial diffusivity or MT between patients and controls. Conclusions: ROI analysis of DTI could detect microstructural changes in the white matter adjacent to olfactory areas in PD patients, whereas MT imaging could not.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    IOS PRESS, 2017
    Keywords
    Parkinson disease; smell; diffusion tensor imaging; magnetization transfer contrast imaging
    National Category
    Neurology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-138300 (URN)10.3233/JPD-161060 (DOI)000401801600010 ()28482644 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Parkinson Foundation; Linkoping University Hospital Research Fund; ALF Grants from Region Ostergotland

    Available from: 2017-06-13 Created: 2017-06-13 Last updated: 2019-03-05
    3. Olfactory fMRI: Implications of Stimulation Length and Repetition Time
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Olfactory fMRI: Implications of Stimulation Length and Repetition Time
    Show others...
    2018 (English)In: Chemical Senses, ISSN 0379-864X, E-ISSN 1464-3553, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 389-398Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Studying olfaction with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) poses various methodological challenges. This study aimed to investigate the effects of stimulation length and repetition time (TR) on the activation pattern of 4 olfactory brain regions: the anterior and the posterior piriform cortex, the orbitofrontal cortex, and the insula. Twenty-two healthy participants with normal olfaction were examined with fMRI, with 2 stimulation lengths (6 s and 15 s) and 2 TRs (0.901 s and 1.34 s). Data were analyzed using General Linear Model (GLM), Tensorial Independent Component Analysis (TICA), and by plotting the event-related time course of brain activation in the 4 olfactory regions of interest. The statistical analysis of the time courses revealed that short TR was associated with more pronounced signal increase and short stimulation was associated with shorter time to peak signal. Additionally, both long stimulation and short TR were associated with oscillatory time courses, whereas both short stimulation and short TR resulted in more typical time courses. GLM analysis showed that the combination of short stimulation and short TR could result in visually larger activation within these olfactory areas. TICA validated that the tested paradigm was spatially and temporally associated with a functionally connected network that included all 4 olfactory regions. In conclusion, the combination of short stimulation and short TR is associated with higher signal increase and shorter time to peak, making it more amenable to standard GLM-type analyses than long stimulation and long TR, and it should, thus, be preferable for olfactory fMRI.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    OXFORD UNIV PRESS, 2018
    Keywords
    fMRI; olfaction; smell; repetition time
    National Category
    Neurosciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-149862 (URN)10.1093/chemse/bjy025 (DOI)000438293600001 ()29726890 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Parkinson Foundation, Linkoping University Hospital Research Fund; ALF Grants from Region Ostergotland

    Available from: 2018-08-02 Created: 2018-08-02 Last updated: 2019-04-17
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  • 138.
    Georgiopoulos, Charalampos
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Davidsson, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Zachrisson, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dizdar (Dizdar Segrell), Nil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    The diagnostic value of dopamine transporter imaging and olfactory testing in patients with parkinsonian syndromes2015In: Journal of Neurology, ISSN 0340-5354, E-ISSN 1432-1459, Vol. 262, no 9, p. 2154-2163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of olfactory testing and presynaptic dopamine imaging in diagnosing Parkinsons disease (PD) and atypical parkinsonian syndromes (APS); to evaluate if the combination of these two diagnostic tools can improve their diagnostic value. A prospective investigation of 24 PD patients, 16 APS patients and 15 patients with non-parkinsonian syndromes was performed during an 18-month period. Single photon emission computed tomography with the presynaptic radioligand I-123-FP-CIT (DaTSCAN (R)) and olfactory testing with the Brief 12-item Smell Identification Test (B-SIT) were performed in all patients. DaTSCAN was analysed semi-quantitatively, by calculating two different striatal uptake ratios, and visually according to a predefined ranking scale. B-SIT score was significantly lower for PD patients, but not significantly different between APS and non-parkinsonism. The visual assessment of DaTSCAN had higher sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy compared to olfactory testing. Most PD patients (75 %) had visually predominant dopamine depletion in putamen, while most APS patients (56 %) had visually severe dopamine depletion both in putamen and in caudate nucleus. The combination of DaTSCAN and B-SIT led to a higher rate of correctly classified patients. Olfactory testing can distinguish PD from non-parkinsonism, but not PD from APS or APS from non-parkinsonism. DaTSCAN is more efficient than olfactory testing and can be valuable in differentiating PD from APS. However, combining olfactory testing and DaTSCAN imaging has a higher predictive value than these two methods separately.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 139.
    Georgiopoulos, Charalampos
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Davidsson, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Granerus, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Dizdar (Dizdar Segrell), Nil
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Zachrisson, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    DaTSCAN SPECT EVALUATION OF PATIENTS WITH MOVEMENT DISORDERS2011In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NEUROLOGY, Wiley-Blackwell, 2011, Vol. 18 (Suppl. 2), no SI, p. 567-567, article id P2617Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Molecular imaging with DaTSCAN SPECTis widely used as a diagnostic tool in patients with movementdisorders in the form of Parkinson's Disease (PD),Parkinson-plus syndromes and Tremor. In the present studythe potency of DATScan SPECT to detect degeneration inthe basal ganglia in early stages of PD, before the onset ofmedication, is evaluated. In addition the efficacy ofDaTSCAN for differential diagnosis between patients withidiopathic PD and patients with Parkinson-plus syndromesis examined.

    Methodology: Participants: 21 patients with PD in earlystages, before the onset of medication, 20 patients withidiopathic PD and 6 patients with Parkinson-plussyndromes. 15 participants with normal results ofDaTSCAN SPECT and a clinical diagnosis different fromPD or Parkinson-plus were used as control.

    DaTSCAN SPECT: In the present study the quantificationof Striatum Occipital/Occipital and the Xeleris workstation(GE) were used.

    Results: The quantification for patients with idiopathic PD(1.185±0.05687) was significantly lower (p<0.0001) fromthe control (2.369±0.1258) and significantly lower (p<0.05)from that of patients in early stages of PD, before the onsetof medication (1.359±0.05324). There was no significantdifference between the idiopathic PD and Parkinson-plussyndromes (1.103±0.2442).

    Conclusion: DaTSCAN SPECT can detect efficiently earlydegeneration in the basal ganglia before the onset ofmedication is needed. Its efficacy for the differentialdiagnosis between idiopathic PD and Parkinson-plussyndromes is questioned. The combination of imaging andclinical examination is mandatory for a certain diagnosis.

  • 140.
    Georgiopoulos, Charalampos
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Warntjes, Marcel Jan Bertus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). SyntheticMR AB, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Dizdar Segrell, Nil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Zachrisson, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Haller, Sven
    Affidea CDRC Centre Diagnost Radiol Carouge SA, Switzerland; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Olfactory Impairment in Parkinsons Disease Studied with Diffusion Tensor and Magnetization Transfer Imaging2017In: Journal of Parkinson's Disease, ISSN 1877-7171, E-ISSN 1877-718X, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 301-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Olfactory impairment is an early manifestation of Parkinsons disease (PD). Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) and Magnetization Transfer (MT) are two imaging techniques that allow noninvasive detection of microstructural changes in the cerebral white matter. Objective: To assess white matter alterations associated with olfactory impairment in PD, using a binary imaging approach with DTI and MT. Methods: 22 PD patients and 13 healthy controls were examined with DTI, MT and an odor discrimination test. DTI data were first analyzed with tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) in order to detect differences in fractional anisotropy, mean, radial and axial diffusivity between PD patients and controls. Voxelwise randomized permutation was employed for the MT analysis, after spatial and intensity normalization. Additionally, ROI analysis was performed on both the DTI and MT data, focused on the white matter adjacent to olfactory brain regions. Results: Whole brain voxelwise analysis revealed decreased axial diffusivity in the left uncinate fasciculus and the white matter adjacent to the left olfactory sulcus of PD patients. ROI analysis demonstrated decreased axial diffusivity in the right orbitofrontal cortex, as well as decreased mean diffusivity and axial diffusivity in the white matter of the left entorhinal cortex of PD patients. There were no significant differences regarding fractional anisotropy, radial diffusivity or MT between patients and controls. Conclusions: ROI analysis of DTI could detect microstructural changes in the white matter adjacent to olfactory areas in PD patients, whereas MT imaging could not.

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  • 141.
    Georgiopoulos, Charalampos
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Witt, Suzanne
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Haller, Sven
    Ctr Imagerie Rive Droite SA, Switzerland; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Dizdar Segrell, Nil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology in Linköping.
    Zachrisson, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    A study of neural activity and functional connectivity within the olfactory brain network in Parkinsons disease2019In: NeuroImage: Clinical, ISSN 0353-8842, E-ISSN 2213-1582, Vol. 23, article id UNSP 101946Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Olfactory dysfunction is an early manifestation of Parkinsons disease (PD). The present study aimed to illustrate potential differences between PD patients and healthy controls in terms of neural activity and functional connectivity within the olfactory brain network. Twenty PD patients and twenty healthy controls were examined with olfactory fMRI and resting-state fMRI. Data analysis of olfactory fMRI included data-driven tensorial independent component (ICA) and task-driven general linear model (GLM) analyses. Data analysis of resting-state fMRI included probabilistic ICA based on temporal concatenation and functional connectivity analysis within the olfactory network. ICA of olfactory fMRI identified an olfactory network consisting of the posterior piriform cortex, insula, right orbitofrontal cortex and thalamus. Recruitment of this network was less significant for PD patients. GLM analysis revealed significantly lower activity in the insula bilaterally and the right orbitofrontal cortex in PD compared to healthy controls but no significant differences in the olfactory cortex itself. Analysis of resting-state fMRI did not reveal any differences in the functional connectivity within the olfactory, default mode, salience or central executive networks between the two groups. In conclusion, olfactory dysfunction in PD is associated with less significant recruitment of the olfactory brain network. ICA could demonstrate differences in both the olfactory cortex and its main projections, compared to GLM that revealed differences only on the latter. Resting-state fMRI did not reveal any significant differences in functional connectivity within the olfactory, default mode, salience and central executive networks in this cohort.

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  • 142.
    Georgiopoulos, Charalampos
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Witt, Suzanne Tyson
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Haller, Sven
    Affidea CDRC Ctr Diagnost Radiol Carouge SA, Switzerland; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Dizdar Segrell, Nil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Zachrisson, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Olfactory fMRI: Implications of Stimulation Length and Repetition Time2018In: Chemical Senses, ISSN 0379-864X, E-ISSN 1464-3553, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 389-398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studying olfaction with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) poses various methodological challenges. This study aimed to investigate the effects of stimulation length and repetition time (TR) on the activation pattern of 4 olfactory brain regions: the anterior and the posterior piriform cortex, the orbitofrontal cortex, and the insula. Twenty-two healthy participants with normal olfaction were examined with fMRI, with 2 stimulation lengths (6 s and 15 s) and 2 TRs (0.901 s and 1.34 s). Data were analyzed using General Linear Model (GLM), Tensorial Independent Component Analysis (TICA), and by plotting the event-related time course of brain activation in the 4 olfactory regions of interest. The statistical analysis of the time courses revealed that short TR was associated with more pronounced signal increase and short stimulation was associated with shorter time to peak signal. Additionally, both long stimulation and short TR were associated with oscillatory time courses, whereas both short stimulation and short TR resulted in more typical time courses. GLM analysis showed that the combination of short stimulation and short TR could result in visually larger activation within these olfactory areas. TICA validated that the tested paradigm was spatially and temporally associated with a functionally connected network that included all 4 olfactory regions. In conclusion, the combination of short stimulation and short TR is associated with higher signal increase and shorter time to peak, making it more amenable to standard GLM-type analyses than long stimulation and long TR, and it should, thus, be preferable for olfactory fMRI.

  • 143.
    Gerdle, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Bengtsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Sören, B.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Karlsson, Anette
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brandejsky, Vaslav
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Lund, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Decreased muscle concentrations of ATP and PCR in the quadriceps muscle of fibromyalgia patients – A 31P-MRS study2013In: European Journal of Pain, ISSN 1090-3801, E-ISSN 1532-2149, Vol. 17, no 8, p. 1205-1215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND METHODS:

    Fibromyalgia (FMS) has a prevalence of approximately 2% in the population. Central alterations have been described in FMS, but there is not consensus with respect to the role of peripheral factors for the maintenance of FMS. 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) has been used to investigate the metabolism of phosphagens in muscles of FMS patients, but the results in the literature are not in consensus. The aim was to investigate the quantitative content of phosphagens and pH in resting quadriceps muscle of patients with FMS (n = 19) and in healthy controls (Controls; n = 14) using (31) P-MRS. It was also investigated whether the concentrations of these substances correlated with measures of pain and/or physical capacity.

    RESULTS:

    Significantly lower concentrations of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and phosphocreatinine (PCr; 28-29% lower) were found in FMS. No significant group differences existed with respect to inorganic phosphate (Pi), Pi/PCr and pH. The quadriceps muscle fat content was significantly higher in FMS than in Controls [FMS: 9.0 ± 0.5% vs. Controls: 6.6 ± 0.6%; (mean ± standard error); P = 0.005]. FMS had significantly lower hand and leg capacity according to specific physical test, but there were no group differences in body mass index, subjective activity level and in aerobic fitness. In FMS, the specific physical capacity in the leg and the hand correlated positively with the concentrations of ATP and PCr; no significant correlations were found with pain intensities.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Alterations in intramuscular ATP, PCr and fat content in FMS probably reflect a combination of inactivity related to pain and dysfunction of muscle mitochondria.

  • 144.
    Germann, Markus W.
    et al.
    Departments of Biological Sciences, The University of Calgary Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
    Kalisch, Bernd W.
    Medical Biochemistry, The University of Calgary Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Departments of Biological Sciences, The University of Calgary Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
    Vogel, Hans J.
    Departments of Biological Sciences, The University of Calgary Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
    van de Sande, Johan H.
    Medical Biochemistry, The University of Calgary Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
    Perturbation of DNA hairpins containing the EcoRI recognition site by hairpin loops of varying size and composition: physical (NMR and UV) and enzymatic (EcoRI) studies1990In: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 1489-1498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have investigated loop-induced structural perturbation of the stem structure in hairpins d(GAATTCXnGAATTC) (X = A, T and n = 3, 4, 5 and 6) that contain an EcoRI restriction site in close proximity to the hairpin loop. Oligonucleotides containing either a T3 or a A3 loop were not hydrolyzed by the restriction enzyme and also showed only weak binding to EcoRI in the absence of the cofactor Mg2+. In contrast, hairpins with larger loops are hydrolyzed by the enzyme at the scission site next to the loop although the substrate with a A4 loop is significantly more resistant than the oligonucleotide containing a T4 loop. The hairpin structures with 3 loop residues were found to be thermally most stable while larger hairpin loops resulted in structures with lower melting temperatures. The T-loop hairpins are thermally more stable than the hairpins containing the same number of A residues in the loop. As judged from proton NMR spectroscopy and the thermodynamic data, the base pair closest to the hairpin loop did form in all cases studied. The hairpin loops did, however, affect the conformation of the stem structure of the hairpins. From 31P and 1H NMR spectroscopy we conclude that the perturbation of the stem structure is stronger for smaller hairpin loops and that the extent of the perturbation is limited to 2-3 base pairs for hairpins with T3 or A4 loops. Our results demonstrate that hairpin loops modulate the conformation of the stem residues close to the loop and that this in turn reduces the substrate activity for DNA sequence specific proteins.

  • 145. Germann, MW
    et al.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Vogel, HJ
    van de Sande,
    Cleavage of EcoRI at perturbed recognition sites1988Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 146. Germann, MW
    et al.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Vogel, HJ
    van de Sande, JH
    Biochemical and biophysical studies on DNA hairpins containing perturbed EcoRI recognition sites1987Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 147.
    Ghazal, Mohammed
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Westermark, Mathias
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Kaveckyte, Vaiva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Benmakhlouf, Hamza
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    6-MV small field output factors: intra-/intermachine comparison and implementation of TRS-483 using various detectors and several linear accelerators2019In: Medical physics (Lancaster), ISSN 0094-2405, Vol. 46, no 11, p. 5350-5359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose To investigate the applicability of output correction factors reported in TRS-483 on 6-MV small-field detector-reading ratios using four solid-state detectors. Also, to investigate variations in 6-MV small-field output factors (OF) among nominally matched linear accelerators (linacs). Methods The TRS-483 Code of Practice (CoP) introduced and provided output correction factors to be applied to measured detector-reading ratios to obtain OFs for several small-field detectors. Detector readings for 0.5 cm x 0.5 cm to 8 cm x 8 cm fields were measured and normalized to that of 10 cm x 10 cm field giving the detector-reading ratios. Three silicon diodes, IBA PFD, IBA EFD (IBA, Schwarzenbruck, Germany), PTW T60017, and one microdiamond, PTW T60019 (PTW, Freiburg, Germany), were used. Output correction factors from the CoP were applied to measured detector-reading ratios. Measurements were performed on six Clinac and six TrueBeam linacs (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, USA). An investigation of the relationship between the size of small fields and corresponding detector-reading ratio among the linacs was performed by measuring lateral dose profiles for 0.5 cm x 0.5 cm fields to determine the full width half maximum (FWHM). The relationship between the linacs focal spot size and the small-field detector-reading ratio was investigated by measuring 10 cm x 10 cm lateral dose profiles and determining the penumbra width reflecting the focal spot size. Measurement geometry was as follows: gantry angle = 0 degrees, collimator angle = 0 degrees, source-to surface distance (SSD) = 90 cm, and depth in water = 10 cm. Results For a given linac and 0.5 cm x 0.5 cm field, the deviations in detector-reading ratios among the detectors were 9%-15% for the Clinacs and 4%-5% for the TrueBeams. Use of output correction factors reduced these deviations to 6%-12% and 3%-4%, respectively. For field sizes equal to or larger than 0.8 cm x 0.8 cm, the deviations were corrected to 1% using output correction factors for both Clinacs and TrueBeams. For a given detector and 0.5 cm x 0.5 cm field, the deviations in detector-reading ratios among the linacs were 11%-17% for the Clinacs and 5-6% for the TrueBeams. For 1 cm x 1 cm the deviations were 1%-2% for Clinacs and 1% for TrueBeams. For field sizes larger than 1 cm x 1 cm the deviations were within 1% for both Clinacs and TrueBeams. No relationship between FWHMs and detector-reading ratios for 0.5 cm x 0.5 cm was observed. For Clinacs, larger 10 cm x 10 cm penumbra width yielded lower 0.5 cm x 0.5 cm detector-reading ratio indicating an effect of the focal spot size. For TrueBeams, the spread of penumbra widths was lower compared to Clinacs and no similar relationship was observed. Conclusions Output correction factors from the TRS-483 CoP are not sufficient for accurate determination of OF for 0.5 cm x 0.5 cm fields but are applicable for 0.8 cm x 0.8 cm to 8 cm x 8 cm fields. Nominally matched Clinacs and TrueBeams show large differences in detector-reading ratios for fields smaller than 1 cm x 1 cm.

  • 148.
    Giambini, Hugo
    et al.
    Mayo Clin, MN 55905 USA.
    Hatta, Taku
    Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Gorny, Krzysztof R.
    Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Widholm, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Karlsson, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Adkins, Mark C.
    Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Zhao, Chunfeng
    Mayo Clin, MN 55905 USA; Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    An, Kai-Nan
    Mayo Clin, MN 55905 USA; Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    INTRAMUSCULAR FAT INFILTRATION EVALUATED BY MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING PREDICTS THE EXTENSIBILITY OF THE SUPRASPINATUS MUSCLE2018In: Muscle and Nerve, ISSN 0148-639X, E-ISSN 1097-4598, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 129-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Rotator cuff (RC) tears result in muscle atrophy and fat infiltration within the RC muscles. An estimation of muscle quality and deformation, or extensibility, is useful in selecting the most appropriate surgical procedure. We determined if noninvasive quantitative assessment of intramuscular fat using MRI could be used to predict extensibility of the supraspinatus muscle. Methods: Seventeen cadaveric shoulders were imaged to assess intramuscular fat infiltration. Extensibility and histological evaluations were then performed. Results: Quantitative fat infiltration positively correlated with histological findings and presented a positive correlation with muscle extensibility (r=0.69; P=0.002). Extensibility was not significantly different between shoulders graded with a higher fat content versus those with low fat when implementing qualitative methods. Discussion: A noninvasive prediction of whole-muscle extensibility may directly guide pre-operative planning to determine if the torn edge could efficiently cover the original footprint while aiding in postoperative evaluation of RC repair.

  • 149.
    González Sánchez, José Carlos
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Segmentation of bones in medical dual-energy CT volumes using the 3D U-Net convolutional neural network - supplementary data2018Data set
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    Algorithm comparison and DECT comparison
  • 150.
    Gudowska, Irena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Ardenfors, Oscar
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Toma-Dasu, Iuliana
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Radiation burden from secondary doses to patients undergoing radiation therapy with photons and light ions and radiation doses from imaging modalities2014In: Radiation Protection Dosimetry, ISSN 0144-8420, E-ISSN 1742-3406, Vol. 161, no 1-4, p. 357-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ionising radiation is increasingly used for the treatment of cancer, being the source of a considerable fraction of the medical irradiation to patients. With the increasing success rate of cancer treatments and longer life expectancy of the treated patients, the issue of secondary cancer incidence is of growing concern, especially for paediatric patients who may live long after the treatment and be more susceptible to carcinogenesis. Also, additional imaging procedures like CT, kV and MV imaging and PET, alone or in conjunction with radiation therapy, may add to the radiation burden associated with the risk of occurrence of secondary cancers. This work has been based on literature studies and is focussed on the assessment of secondary doses to healthy tissues that are delivered by the use of modern radiation therapy and diagnostic imaging modalities in the clinical environment.

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