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  • 101.
    Nilsson, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Bokström, Pernilla
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Gårdman, Caroline
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Rutberg, Hans
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Patient Security.
    Strukturerad journalgranskning av alla dödsfall under ett år vid en allmänkirurgisk klinik2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 102.
    Nilsson, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Bokström, Pernilla
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Gårdman, Caroline
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Rutberg, Hans
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Patient Security.
    Systematic review of adverse events in a surgical ward2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 103.
    Nilsson, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Borendal Wodlin, Ninnie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Risk factors for postoperative complications after fast-track abdominal hysterectomy2012In: Australian and New Zealand journal of obstetrics and gynaecology, ISSN 0004-8666, E-ISSN 1479-828X, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 113-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Fast-track regimen has been shown to reduce postoperative complications in gastrointestinal surgery. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanAims: We investigated the incidence and type of postoperative complications and associated risk factors after benign abdominal hysterectomy undertaken in a fast-track program. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: A prospective longitudinal cohort study. In five Swedish hospitals, a cohort of 162 women, ASA 1-2, undergoing abdominal hysterectomy in a fast-track program was prospectively studied. Surgery was performed under spinal or general anaesthesia. The fast-track concept was standardised with discharge criteria and a restricted intravenous fluid regimen. Complications were systematically registered during the five-week follow-up period. Risk factors for complications were analysed using multiple logistic regression models. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Forty-one (25.3%) developed postoperative complications, mainly infection and wound healing complications. The majority of the complications developed after discharge and were treated in the outpatient clinics. Four women (2.5%) were readmitted to hospital. Substantial risk factors for postoperative complications were obesity (OR 8.83), prior laparotomy (OR 2.92) and relative increase in body weight on the first postoperative day (OR 1.52). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: Minor infection and wound healing complications seem to be common in healthy women undergoing abdominal hysterectomy in a fast-track program. Obesity is an important risk factor also in fast-track abdominal hysterectomy. A modest increase in postoperative relative weight gain during the first postoperative day seemed to increase the risk of postoperative complications. This factor merits further study. Randomised studies are necessary to determine the impact of fast-track program and perioperative fluid regimens on postoperative complications.

  • 104.
    Nilsson, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Goscinski, T.
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kalman, S.
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Johansson, Anders
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Combined photoplethysmographic monitoring of respiration rate and pulse: A comparison between different measurement sites in spontaneously breathing subjects2007In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 51, no 9, p. 1250-1257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The non-invasive photoplethysmographic (PPG) signal reflects blood flow and volume in a tissue. The PPG signal shows variation synchronous with heartbeat (PPGc), as used in pulse oximetry, and variations synchronous with breathing (PPGr). PPGr has been used for non-invasive monitoring of respiration with promising results. Our aim was to investigate PPG signals recorded from different skin sites in order to find suitable locations for parallel monitoring of variations synchronous with heartbeat and breathing. Methods: PPG sensors were applied to the forearm, finger, forehead, wrist and shoulder on 48 awake healthy volunteers. From these sites, seven PPG signals were simultaneously recorded during normal spontaneous breathing over 10 min. Capnometry served as respiration and electrocardiogram (ECG) as pulse reference signals. PPG signals were compared with respect to power spectral content and squared coherence. Results: Forearm PPG measurement showed significantly higher power within the respiratory region of the power spectrum [median (quartile range) 42 (26)%], but significantly lower power within the cardiac region [9 (10)%] compared with the other skin sites. PPG finger measurement showed the opposite, in transmission mode, the power within the respiratory region was significantly lower [4 (10)%] and within the cardiac region significantly higher [45 (25)%] than the other sites. PPGc coherence values were generally high [>0.96 (0.08)], and PPGr coherence values lower [0.83 (0.35)-0.94 (0.17)]. Conclusion: Combined PPG respiration and pulse monitoring is possible, but there are significant differences between the respiratory and cardiac components of the PPG signal at different sites. © 2007 Acta Anaesthesiol Scand.

  • 105.
    Nilsson, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Goscinski, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindberg, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kalman, Sigga
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Age and gender do not influence the ability to detect respiration by photoplethysmography2006In: Journal of clinical monitoring and computing, ISSN 1387-1307, E-ISSN 1573-2614, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 431-436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective  The non-invasive technique photopl- ethysmography (PPG) can detect changes in blood volume and perfusion in a tissue. Respiration causes variations in the peripheral circulation, making it possible to monitor breaths using an optical sensor attached to the skin. The respiratory-synchronous part of the PPG signal (PPGr) has been used to monitor respiration during anaesthesia, and in postoperative and neonatal care. Studies addressing possible differences in PPGr signal characteristics depending on gender or age are lacking.

    Methods  We studied three groups of 16 healthy subjects each during normal breathing; young males, old males and young females, and calculated the concordance between PPGr, derived from a reflection mode PPG sensor on the forearm, and a reference CO2 signal. The concordance was quantified by using a squared coherence analysis. Time delay between the two signals was calculated. In this process, we compared three different methods for calculating time delay.

    Results  Coherence values ≥0.92 were seen for all three groups without any significant differences depending on age or gender (p = 0.67). Comparison between the three different methods for calculating time delay showed a correlation r = 0.93.

    Conclusions  These results demonstrate clinically important information implying the possibility to register qualitative PPGr signals for respiration monitoring, regardless of age and gender.

  • 106.
    Nilsson, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre.
    Goscinski, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindenberger, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Johansson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Respiratory variations in the photoplethysmographic waveform: acute hypovolaemia during spontaneous breathing is not detected2010In: Physiological Measurement, ISSN 0967-3334, E-ISSN 1361-6579, Vol. 31, no 7, p. 953-962Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies using photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals from pulse oximeters have shown potential to assess hypovolaemia during spontaneous breathing. This signal is heavily filtered and reports are based on respiratory variations in the small pulse synchronous variation of PPG. There are stronger respiratory variations such as respiratory synchronous variation (PPGr) in the baseline of the unfiltered PPG signal. We hypothesized that PPGr would increase during hypovolaemia during spontaneous breathing. Hemodynamic and respiratory data were recorded together with PPG infrared signals from the finger, ear and forearm from 12 healthy male volunteers, at rest and during hypovolaemia created by the application of a lower body negative pressure (LBNP) of 15, 30 and 60 cmH(2)O. Hemodynamic and respiratory values changed significantly. From rest to the LBNP of 60 cmH(2)O systolic blood pressure fell from median (IQR) 116 (16) to 101 (23) mmHg, the heart rate increased from 58 (16) to 73 (16) beats min(-1), and the respiratory rate increased from 9.5 (2.0) to 11.5 (4.0) breaths min(-1). The amplitude of PPGr did not change significantly at any measurement site. The strongest effect was seen at the ear, where the LBNP of 60 cmH(2)O gave an amplitude increase from 1.0 (0.0) to 1.31 (2.24) AU. PPG baseline respiratory variations cannot be used for detecting hypovolaemia in spontaneously breathing subjects.

  • 107.
    Nilsson, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kalman, Sigga
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Macrocirculation is not the sole determinant of respiratory induced variations in the reflection mode photoplethysmographic signal2003In: Physiological Measurement, ISSN 0967-3334, E-ISSN 1361-6579, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 925-937Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Photoplethysmography (PPG) is a non-invasive optical technique sensitive to variations in blood volume and perfusion in the tissue. Reflection mode PPG may have clinical advantages over transmission mode PPG. To improve clinical usefulness and further development of the reflection mode PPG, studies on factors that modify the signal are warranted. We studied the coherence between the respiratory induced intensity variations (RIIV) of the PPG signal and respiratory synchronous pressure variations in central venous pressure (CVP), peripheral venous pressure (PVP) and arterial blood pressure (ABP) during positive pressure ventilation on 12 patients under anaesthesia and on 12 patients with spontaneous breathing. During positive pressure ventilation the coherence between all signals was high. Inspiration was followed first by an increase in CVP, then by increases in ABP and PVP and lastly by RIIV indicating less back-scattered light. In spontaneously breathing patients the coherence was high, but the phases between the signals were changed. During inspiration, ABP decreased slightly before CVP, followed by a decrease in RIIV and PVP. The phase relation between RIIV and respiratory induced variation in macrocirculation changed with ventilatory mode, but not in a uniform way, indicating the influence of mechanisms other than macrocirculation involved in generating the RIIV signal.

  • 108.
    Nilsson, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kalman, Sigga
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Monitoring of respiratory rate in postoperative care using a new photoplethysmographic technique2000In: Journal of clinical monitoring and computing, ISSN 1387-1307, E-ISSN 1573-2614, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 309-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective.Photoplethysmography (PPG) is a non-invasive optical technique that measures variations in skin blood volume and perfusion. The PPG signal contains components that are synchronous with respiratory and cardiacrhythms. We undertook this study to evaluate PPG for monitoring patients' respiratory rate in the postoperative care unit, using a new prototype device. We compared it with the established technique, transthoracic impedance (TTI).

    Methods.PPG signals from 16 patients(ASA classes 1–2, mean age 43 years) who were recovering from general anaesthesia after routine operations were recorded continuously for 60minutes/patient. The respiratory synchronous part of the PPG signal was extracted by using a band pass filter. Detection of breaths in the filtered PPG signals was done both visually and by using an automated algorithm. In both procedures, the detected breaths were compared with the breaths detected in the TTI reference.

    Results.A total of 10.661 breaths were recorded, and the mean ± SD respiratory rate was 12.3 ± 3.5breaths/minute. When compared with TTI, the rates of false positive and false negative breaths detected by PPG (visual procedure) were 4.6 ±4.5% and 5.8 ± 6.5%, respectively. When using the algorithm for breath detection from PPG, the rates of false positive andfalse negative breaths were 11.1 ± 9.7% and 3.7 ±3.8%, respectively, when compared to TTI. Lower respiratory rates increased the occurrence of false-positive breaths that were detected by the PPG using visual identification (p< 0.05). The same tendency was seen with the automated PPG procedure (p< 0.10).

    Conclusions.Our results indicate that PPG has the potential to be useful for monitoring respiratory rate in the postoperative period.

  • 109.
    Nilsson, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kalman, Sigga
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Respiration can be monitored by photoplethysmography with high sensitivity and specificity regardless of anaesthesia and ventilatory mode2005In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 49, no 8, p. 1157-1162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:  Photoplethysmography (PPG) is a non-invasive optical technique used, for instance, in pulse oximetry. Beside the pulse synchronous component, PPG has a respiratory synchronous variation (PPGr). Efforts have been made to utilize this component for indirect monitoring of respiratory rate and volume. Assessment of the clinical usefulness as well as of the physiological background of PPGr is required. We evaluated if anaesthesia and positive-pressure ventilation would affect PPGr.

    Methods:  We recorded reflection mode PPGr, at the forearm, and the respiratory synchronous changes in central venous pressure (CVP), peripheral venous pressure (PVP) and arterial blood pressure (ABP) in 12 patients. Recordings for each patient were made on three occasions: awake with spontaneous breathing; anaesthetized with spontaneous breathing; and anaesthetized with positive-pressure ventilation. We analyzed the sensitivity, specificity, coherence and time relationship between the signals.

    Results:  PPGr sensitivity for breath detection was [mean (SD)] >86(21)% and specificity >96(12)%. Respiratory detection in the macrocirculation (CVP, PVP and ABP) showed a sensitivity >83(29)% and specificity >93(12)%. The coherence between signals was high (0.75–0.99). The three measurement situations did not significantly influence sensitivity, specificity or time shifts between the PPGr, PVP, ABP, and the reference CVP signal despite changes in physiological data between measurements.

    Conclusion:  A respiratory synchronous variation in PPG and all invasive pressure signals was detected. The reflection mode PPGr signal seemed to be a constant phenomenon related to respiration regardless of whether or not the subject was awake, anaesthetized or ventilated, which increases its clinical usefulness in respiratory monitoring.

  • 110.
    Nilsson, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kalman, Sigga
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Respiratory variations in the reflection mode photoplethysmographic signal: relationships to peripheral venous pressure2003In: Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, ISSN 0140-0118, E-ISSN 1741-0444, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 249-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Photoplethysmography (PPG) is a non-invasive optical way of measuring variations in blood volume and perfusion in the tissue, used in pulse oximetry for instance. Respiratory-induced intensity variations (RIIVs) in the PPG signal exist, but the physiological background is not fully understood. Respiration causes variations in the blood volume in the peripheral vascular bed. It was hypothesised that the filling of peripheral veins is one of the important factors involved. In 16 healthy subjects, the respiratory synchronous variations from a PPG reflection mode signal and the peripheral venous pressure (PVP) were recorded. Variations of tidal volume, respiratory rate and contribution from abdominal and thoracic muscles gave significant and similar amplitude changes in both RIIV and the respiratory variation of PVP (p<0.01). The highest amplitudes of both signals were found at the largest tidal volume, lowest respiratory rate and during mainly thoracic breathing, respectively. The coherence between PVP and RIIV signals was high, the median (quartile range) being 0.78 (0.42). Phase analysis showed that RIIV was usually leading PVP, but variations between subjects were large. Although respiratory-induced variations in PVP and PPG showed a close correlation in amplitude variation, a causal relationship between the signals could not be demonstrated.

  • 111.
    Nilsson, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre.
    Juhlin, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Krook, H.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Rutberg, H.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Patient Security.
    Strukturerad journalgranskning kan öka patientsäkerheten2009In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 106, no 35, p. 2125-2128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 112.
    Nilsson, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre.
    Lindberget, O
    Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Vrinnevi Hospital, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Gupta, Anil
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Vegfors, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Implementing a pre-operative checklist to increase patient safety: a 1-year follow-up of personnel attitudes.2010In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 176-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The operating room is a complex work environment with a high potential for adverse events. Protocols for perioperative verification processes have increasingly been recommended by professional organizations during the last few years. We assessed personnel attitudes to a pre-operative checklist ('time out') immediately before start of the operative procedure. METHODS: 'Time out' was implemented in December 2007 as an additional safety barrier in two Swedish hospitals. One year later, in order to assess how the checklist was perceived, a questionnaire was sent by e-mail to 704 persons in the operating departments, including surgeons, anesthesiologists, operation and anesthetic nurses and nurse assistants. In order to identify differences in response between professions, each alternative in the questionnaire was assigned a numerical value. RESULTS: The questionnaire was answered by 331 (47%) persons and 93% responded that 'time out' contributes to increased patient safety. Eighty-six percent thought that 'time out' gave an opportunity to identify and solve problems. Confirmation of patient identity, correct procedure, correct side and checking of allergies or contagious diseases were considered 'very important' by 78-84% of the responders. Attitudes to checking of patient positioning, allergies and review of potential critical moments were positive but differed significantly between the professions. Attitudes to a similar checklist at the end of surgery were positive and 72-99% agreed to the different elements. CONCLUSION: Staff attitudes toward a surgical checklist were mostly positive 1 year after their introduction in two large hospitals in central Sweden.

  • 113.
    Nilsson, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Lindenberger, Marcus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Hahn, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    The effect of positive end-expiratory pressure and tripled tidal volume on pleth variability index during hypovolaemia in conscious subjects A volunteer study2013In: European Journal of Anaesthesiology, ISSN 0265-0215, E-ISSN 1365-2346, Vol. 30, no 11, p. 671-677Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUNDThe pulse oximeter measurement pleth variability index (PVI) can detect hypovolaemia during positive pressure ventilation.OBJECTIVESWe studied whether PVI can detect a hypovolaemic state in spontaneously breathing humans and whether better discrimination is obtained by modifying the breathing patterns.DESIGNExperimental study.SETTINGClinical physiology department in a university hospital.PARTICIPANTSFourteen healthy volunteers aged between 18 and 27 (mean 21) years.INTERVENTIONSA hypovolaemic state was induced by lower body negative pressure (LBNP) of 40mmHg (LBNP40) and 15mmHg (LBNP15). Data were collected in four separate series with normal breathing and application of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) 5cmH(2)O, with and without tripling of the tidal volume.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURESPVI (meanstandard deviation), heart rate, arterial blood pressure and cardiac index (CI).RESULTSCardiac index decreased from 2.4 to 1.7 and 2.1 lmin(-1)m(-2) at LBNP40 and LBNP15, respectively (Pandlt;0.001). The mean PVI for the four breathing modes increased with the degree of LBNP, from 23.55.9% at baseline to 27.9 +/- 9.3% at LBNP40, and to 25.2 +/- 6.9% at LBNP15 (Pandlt;0.01). The greatest increase in PVI, to 31.7 +/- 12.3%, was recorded for the PEEP and tripled tidal volume breathing mode when hypovolaemia was induced by LBNP40. However, there was considerable overlap between the LBNP levels.CONCLUSIONThe PVI increased significantly for higher LBNP, but overlap was common regardless of breathing mode. The PVI can be used to indicate a hypovolaemic state during spontaneous breathing in groups but not in individuals.TRIAL REGISTRATIONClinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT01456559

  • 114.
    Nilsson, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Pihl, A.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Tågsjö, M
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Adverse events are common on the intensive care unit: results from a structured record review2012In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 56, no 8, p. 959-965Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Intensive care is advanced and highly technical, and it is essential that, despite this, patient care remains safe and of high quality. Adverse events (AEs) are supposed to be reported to internal quality control systems by health-care providers, but many are never reported. Patients on the intensive care unit (ICU) are at special risk for AEs. Our aim was to identify the incidence and characteristics of AEs in patients who died on the ICUduring a 2-year period.

    METHODS:

    A structured record review according to the Global Trigger Tool (GTT) was used to review charts from patients cared for at the ICU of a middle-sized Swedish hospital during 2007 and 2008 and who died during or immediately after ICU care. All identified AEs were scored according to severity and preventability.

    RESULTS:

    We reviewed 128 records, and 41 different AEs were identified in 25 patients (19.5%). Health care-associated infections, hypoglycaemia, pressure sores and procedural complications were the most common harmful events. Twenty two (54%) of the AEs were classified as being avoidable. Two of the 41AEs were reported as complications according to the Swedish Intensive Care Registry, and one AE had been reported in the internal AE-reporting system.

    CONCLUSION:

    Almost one fifth of the patients who died on the ICU were subjected to harmful events. GTT has the advantage of identifying more patient injuries caused by AEs than the traditional AE-reporting systems used on many ICUs.

  • 115.
    Nilsson, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Rutberg, Hans
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Patient Security.
    Färgensten, Urban
    Strukturerad journalgranskning för att identifiera och mäta förekomst av skador i vården enligt metoden Global Trigger Tool2008Report (Other academic)
  • 116.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bäckman, Carl
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Work and Environmental Science.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Simonsson, Eva
    Ryhov Hospital.
    Nordlund, Peter
    Ryhov Hospital.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Social integration: an important factor for health-related quality of life after critical illness2011In: INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, ISSN 0342-4642, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 831-838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To examine to what extent availability of social integration affects health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in former intensive care unit (ICU) patients and how it relates to corresponding findings in a general reference group. Controlled, multicenter, prospective, explorative study. HRQoL data (SF-36) were collected from three combined medical and surgical ICUs in the south-east of Sweden. Social integration was assessed by the Availability of Social Integration (AVSI) instrument (seven questions related to the social interaction of the patient). As reference group, a random sample (n = 6,093) of people from the uptake area of the hospitals was used. Social integration (AVSI), HRQoL (SF-36), and comorbidity were examined also in the reference group. None. The level of social integration significantly affected HRQoL for the former ICU patients, whereas no such effect was seen for the general reference group. For the ICU patients, social integration affected HRQoL to a larger extent than age, sex, and the ICU-related factors examined, but to a lower extent than the pre-existing diseases. For a comprehensive assessment of HRQoL in former ICU patients, it is mandatory to include the effect of social integration.

  • 117.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Nordlund, Anders
    TFS Trial Form Support AB, Lund.
    Nordlund, Peter
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Simonsson, Eva
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bäckman, Carl
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Vrinnevi Hospital, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Pre-existing disease: the most important factor for health related quality of life long-term after critical illness: a prospective, longitudinal, multicentre trial2010In: Critical Care, ISSN 1364-8535, E-ISSN 1466-609X, Vol. 14, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    The aim of the present multicenter study was to assess long term (36 months) health related quality of life in patients after critical illness, compare ICU survivors health related quality of life to that of the general population and examine the impact of pre-existing disease and factors related to ICU care on health related quality of life.

    Methods

    Prospective, longitudinal, multicentre trial in three combined medical and surgical intensive care units of one university and two general hospitals in Sweden. By mailed questionnaires, health related quality of life was assessed at 6, 12, 24 and 36 months after the stay in ICU by EQ-5D and SF-36, and information of pre-existing disease was collected at the 6 months measure. ICU related factors were obtained from the local ICU database. Comorbidity and health related quality of life (EQ-5D; SF-36) was examined in the reference group. Among the 5306 patients admitted, 1663 were considered eligible (>24 hrs in the intensive care unit, and age ≥ 18 yrs, and alive 6 months after discharge). At the 6 month measure 980 (59%) patients answered the questionnaire. Of these 739 (75%) also answered at 12 month, 595 (61%) at 24 month, and 478 (47%) answered at the 36 month measure. As reference group, a random sample (n = 6093) of people from the uptake area of the hospitals were used in which concurrent disease was assessed and adjusted for.

    Results

    Only small improvements were recorded in health related quality of life up to 36 months after ICU admission. The majority of the reduction in health related quality of life after care in the ICU was related to the health related quality of life effects of pre-existing diseases. No significant effect on the long-term health related quality of life by any of the ICU-related factors was discernible.

    Conclusions

    A large proportion of the reduction in the health related quality of life after being in the ICU is attributable to pre-existing disease. The importance of the effect of pre-existing disease is further supported by the small, long term increment in the health related quality of life after treatment in the ICU. The reliability of the conclusions is supported by the size of the study populations and the long follow-up period.

     

  • 118.
    Oscarsson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Juhas, M.
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Sjolander, A.
    Sjölander, A., Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    The effect of propofol on actin, ERK-1/2 and GABAA receptor content in neurones2007In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 51, no 9, p. 1184-1189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Interaction with the ?-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABA AR) complex is recognized as an important component of the mechanism of many anaesthetic agents, including propofol. The aims of this study were to investigate the effect of propofol on GABAAR, to determine whether exposure of neurones to propofol influences the localization of GABA AR within the cell and to look for cytoskeletal changes that may be connected with activation, such as the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Methods: Primary cortical cell cultures from rat, with and without pre-incubation with the GABAAR antagonist bicuculline, were exposed to propofol. The cells were lysed and separated into membrane and cytosolic fractions. Immunoblot analyses of filamentous actin (F-actin), the GABA A ß2-subunit receptor and extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 (ERK-1/2) were performed. Results: Propofol triggers an increase in GABAAR, actin content and ERK-1/2 phosphorylation in the cytosolic fraction. In the membrane fraction, there is a decrease in GABAA ß2-subunit content and an increase in both actin content and ERK-1/2 phosphorylation. The GABAAR antagonist bicuculline blocks the propofol-induced changes in F-actin, ERK and GABA A ß2-subunit content, and ERK-1/2 phosphorylation. Conclusion: We believe that propofol triggers a dose-dependent internalization of the GABAA ß2-subunit. The increase in internal GABAA ß2-subunit content exhibits a close relationship to actin polymerization and to an increase in ERK-1/2 activation. Actin contributes to the internalization sequestering of the GABAA ß2-subunit. © 2007 Acta Anaesthesiol Scand.

  • 119.
    Oscarsson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Massoumi, R.
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Sjolander, A.
    Sjölander, A., Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Reorganization of actin in neurons after propofol exposure2001In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 45, no 10, p. 1215-1220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: It has previously been shown that propofol in clinically relevant concentrations induces a calcium-dependent conformational change in the cytoskeleton. The aim of this study was to further clarify the effect of propofol on the actin cytoskeleton and to determine if this conformational change is mediated by the interaction between the GABAA-receptor and propofol. Methods: Primary cultured cortical neurons from newborn rats were treated with propofol 3 µg·ml-1 in a time-response titration, with and without preincubation with the GABAA-receptor antagonist, bicuculline. Actin-protein content was detected by Western blot analysis and the cellular content of F-actin measured by a spectrophotometric technique. Results: Propofol triggers a relatively slow statistically significant increase in the intracellular F-actin content, maximum after 20-min incubation (160%±16.3) (mean±SEM) P

  • 120.
    Oscarsson, Anna
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Oster, Susanne
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Platelet function assessed by whole-blood aggregometry in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery2011In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF ANAESTHESIOLOGY, ISSN 0265-0215, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 363-369Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The risk/benefit of continuing low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) for secondary prevention in the perioperative period is still debated. The primary aim of this study was to determine the effect of acetylsalicylic acid compared with placebo on platelet function in the perioperative period. Methods This is a subgroup analysis of a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled multicentre study. High-risk patients undergoing major non-cardiac surgery were randomised to 75 mg acetylsalicylic acid or placebo 7 days preoperatively, until the third postoperative day. In 36 patients, platelet function in response to arachidonic acid was assessed by whole-blood impedance aggregometry using a multiplate analyser 1 h before surgery, directly after surgery and 48 h postoperatively. Results The platelet function was significantly reduced in patients treated with acetylsalicylic acid compared with placebo in the preoperative period [200 aggregation units (AU) min (interquartile range [IQR] 133-261 AU min(-1)) vs. 860 AU min (IQR 800-1010 AU min), P andlt; 0.001] as well as postoperatively [198 AU min (IQR 138-270 AU min) vs. 605 AU min (IQR 434-836 AU min), Pandlt;0.001]. The platelet response was significantly reduced postoperatively compared with preoperatively in patients receiving placebo [860 AU min (IQR 800-1010 AU min) vs. 605 AU min (IQR 434-861 AU min), P=0.0009]. No significant differences were found between pre- and postoperative platelet function in patients on acetylsalicylic acid [200 AU min (IQR 133-261 AU min) vs. 198 AU min (133-270 AU min), P=0.21]. Conclusion Multiplate whole-blood impedance aggregometry demonstrates acetylsalicylic affect in preoperative as well as postoperative samples derived from patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery.

  • 121.
    Oscarsson Tibblin, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Perioperative myocardial damage and cardiac outcome in patients-at-risk undergoing non-cardiac surgery2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite increasingly sophisticated perioperative management, cardiovascular complications continue to be major challenges for the clinician. As a growing number of elderly patients with known coronary artery disease (CAD) or with risk factors for CAD are undergoing non-cardiac surgery, cardiovascular complications will remain a significant clinical problem in the future.

    The overall objective of this thesis was to study the incidence of myocardial damage and perioperative adverse cardiac events, to determine predictors of poor outcome and to assess the effect of a medical intervention in patients at risk undergoing non-cardiac surgery.

    The studies in this thesis were conducted on a total of 952 patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery. Studies I and IV were multicenter studies; whereas the patients included in studies II and III underwent non-cardiac surgery at Linkoping University Hospital, Sweden.

    The correlation between postoperative myocardial damage and short- and long-term outcome were studied in 546 patients, aged 70 years or older undergoing non-cardiac surgery of at least 30 minutes duration. This study showed a close correlation between postoperative myocardial damage and poor short- as well as long-term outcome. Elevated Troponin T was a strong independent predictor of mortality within one year of surgery. In 186 patients with ASA physical status classification III or IV undergoing non-elective surgery, the incidence of myocardial damage was 33%. In this study preoperative myocardial damage was an independent predictor of major adverse cardiac events in the postoperative period. In 69 patients with ASA physical status classification III & IV undergoing acute hip surgery, we found a close correlation between elevated NT-proBNP value prior to surgery and cardiac complications in the postoperative period. To study the effect of acetylsalicylic acid on postoperative myocardial damage and cardiovascular events, 220 patients at risk were randomized to receive 75 mg of acetylsalicylic acid or placebo 7 days prior to surgery until the third postoperative day. This study showed that treatment with acetylsalicylic acid resulted in an 8% (95% CI 1-15%) absolute risk reduction of having a postoperative major adverse cardiac event. No statistically significant differences of bleeding complications were seen between the groups.

    In conclusion, this thesis contributes to the understanding of the clinical relevance of elevated cardiac markers (with or without clinical or ECG signs of myocardial damage) in patients undergoing elective or emergency surgery. Moreover, we have identified predictors of poor outcome in the perioperative period that could be used as tools for identifying patients at risk. Finally, we have shown that continuing acetylsalicylic acid in the perioperative period reduced the risk of major adverse cardiac events within 30 days of surgery.

    List of papers
    1. Troponin T-values provide long-term prognosis in elderly patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Troponin T-values provide long-term prognosis in elderly patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery.
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    2004 (English)In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 48, no 9, p. 1071-9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of elevated postoperative Troponin T (TnT) levels in an elderly population undergoing non-cardiac surgery. METHODS: Five hundred and forty-six consecutive patients aged 70 years or older undergoing non-cardiac surgery of >30-min duration were enrolled in this prospective, observational study. A postoperative TnT measurement was obtained on the 5th to 7th postoperative day. Troponin T values greater than 0.02 ng ml(-1) were considered positive. Patients were followed over a 1-year period, and mortality and non-fatal cardiac events (acute myocardial infarction and coronary interventions) were recorded. RESULTS: Troponin T concentrations greater than 0.02 ng ml(-1) were detected in 53 of the study subjects (9.7%). Eleven per cent of the patients with elevated TnT had electrocardiographic or clinical signs of myocardial ischemia. One year after surgery, 17 (32%) of the patients with abnormal TnT concentrations had died. In a multivariate Cox regression analysis adjusting for baseline and perioperative data, a TnT value >0.02 ng ml(-1) was an independent correlate of the mortality adjusted hazard ratio (HR): 14.9 (95% CI 3.7-60.3). Other independent predictors of death were tachycardia (HR, 14.9 95% CI 3.45-64.8), ASA 4 (HR, 8.1 95% CI 1.3-50.0), reoperation (HR, 6.4 95% CI 1.1-36.9), and use of diuretics (HR, 4.2 95% CI 1.3-13.8). CONCLUSION: We conclude that elevated TnT levels in the postoperative period confer a 15-fold increase in mortality during the first year after surgery. Our findings also provide evidence that silent myocardial ischemia is common in an elderly population. Routine perioperative surveillance for TnT might therefore be of use in detecting patients at an increased risk of mortality during the first postoperative year.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-20245 (URN)10.1111/j.1399-6576.2004.00463.x (DOI)15352951 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2009-08-31 Created: 2009-08-31 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Predictors of cardiac events in high-risk patients undergoing emergency surgery
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predictors of cardiac events in high-risk patients undergoing emergency surgery
    Show others...
    2009 (English)In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 53, no 8, p. 986-994Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of myocardial damage and left ventricular myocardial dysfunction and their influence on outcome in high-risk patients undergoing non-elective surgery.

    Methods: In this prospective observational study, 211 patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists classification III or IV undergoing emergent or urgent surgery were included. Troponin I (TnI) was measured pre-operatively, 12 and 48 h post-operatively. Pre-operative N-terminal fragment of B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), as a marker for left ventricular systolic dysfunction, was analyzed. The diagnostic thresholds were set to TnI andgt; 0.06 mu g/l and NT-proBNP andgt; 1800 pg/ml, respectively. Post-operative major adverse cardiac events (MACE), 30-day and 3-months mortality were recorded.

    Results: Elevated TnI levels were detected in 33% of the patients post-operatively. A TnI elevation increased the risk of MACE (35% vs. 3% in patients with normal TnI levels, P andlt; 0.001) and 30-day mortality (23% vs. 7%, P=0.003). Increased concentrations of NT-proBNP were seen in 59% of the patients. Elevated NT-proBNP was an independent predictor of myocardial damage post-operatively, odds ratio, 6.2 [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.1-18.0] and resulted in an increased risk of MACE (21% vs. 2.5% in patients with NT-proBNP andlt; 1800 pg/ml, P andlt; 0.001).

    Conclusion: Myocardial damage is common in a high-risk population undergoing unscheduled surgery. These results suggest a close correlation between myocardial damage in the post-operative period and increased concentration of NT-proBNP before surgery. The combinations of TnI and NT-proBNP are reliable markers for monitoring patients at risk in the peri-operative period as well as useful tools in our risk assessment pre-operatively in emergency surgery.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell, 2009
    National Category
    Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-20010 (URN)10.1111/j.1399-6576.2009.01971.x (DOI)000268789300002 ()19388892 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2009-08-24 Created: 2009-08-24 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    3. N-terminal fragment of pro-B-type natriuretic peptide is a predictor of cardiac events in high-risk patients undergoing acute hip fracture surgery
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>N-terminal fragment of pro-B-type natriuretic peptide is a predictor of cardiac events in high-risk patients undergoing acute hip fracture surgery
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    2009 (English)In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, ISSN 0007-0912, Vol. 103, no 2, p. 206-212Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this investigation was to assess the incidence of elevated N-terminal fragment of pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and its relation to outcome defined as perioperative adverse cardiac events and all-cause mortality in high-risk patients undergoing non-elective surgery for hip fracture. A cohort of patients with hip fractures were extracted from a prospective observational study of high-risk patients (ASA class III or IV) undergoing emergency surgery. NT-proBNP and troponin I were measured before operation. An NT-proBNP greater than= 3984 ng litre(-1) was set as the cut-off level for significance. Perioperative adverse cardiac events and 30 day and 3 month mortality were recorded. Sixty-nine subjects were included. Thirty-four subjects (49%) had an NT-proBNP greater than= 3984 ng litre(-1) before surgery. Thirty-four subjects (49%) had a perioperative adverse cardiac event. Of these, 22 subjects (65%) had NT-proBNP above the diagnostic threshold compared with 12 subjects (34%) who had an NT-proBNP below the diagnostic threshold (P=0.01). Preoperative NT-proBNP greater than= 3984 ng litre(-1) [odds ratio (OR) 3.0; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0-8.9] and congestive heart failure (OR 3.0; 95% CI 1.0-9.0) were independent predictors of perioperative adverse cardiac events. A total of eight subjects (12%) died within 30 days after operation. There is a high incidence of elevated NT-proBNP in subjects undergoing non-elective hip fracture surgery. Preoperative NT-proBNP is a valuable predictor of cardiac complications in the perioperative period.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Oxford University Press, 2009
    Keywords
    complications; morbidity; heart; myocardial function; surgery; non-cardiac; surgery; orthopaedic
    National Category
    Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-20147 (URN)10.1093/bja/aep139 (DOI)000268107800009 ()19525507 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2009-09-01 Created: 2009-08-31 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    4. To continue or discontinue aspirin in the perioperative period: a randomized, controlled clinical trial
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>To continue or discontinue aspirin in the perioperative period: a randomized, controlled clinical trial
    Show others...
    2010 (English)In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 104, no 3, p. 305-312Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) are a common cause of deathafter non-cardiac surgery. Despite evidence for the benefitof aspirin for secondary prevention, it is often discontinuedin the perioperative period due to the risk of bleeding.

    Methods: We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlledtrial in order to compare the effect of low-dose aspirin withthat of placebo on myocardial damage, cardiovascular, and bleedingcomplications in high-risk patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery.Aspirin (75 mg) or placebo was given 7 days before surgery andcontinued until the third postoperative day. Patients were followedup for 30 days after surgery.

    Results: A total of 220 patients were enrolled, 109 patients receivedaspirin and 111 received placebo. Four patients (3.7%) in theaspirin group and 10 patients (9.0%) in the placebo group hadelevated troponin T levels in the postoperative period (P=0.10).Twelve patients (5.4%) had an MACE during the first 30 postoperativedays. Two of these patients (1.8%) were in the aspirin groupand 10 patients (9.0%) were in the placebo group (P=0.02). Treatmentwith aspirin resulted in a 7.2% absolute risk reduction [95%confidence interval (CI), 1.3–13%] for postoperative MACE.The relative risk reduction was 80% (95% CI, 9.2–95%).Numbers needed to treat were 14 (95% CI, 7.6–78). No significantdifferences in bleeding complications were seen between thetwo groups.

    Conclusions: In high-risk patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery, perioperativeaspirin reduced the risk of MACE without increasing bleedingcomplications. However, the study was not powered to evaluatebleeding complications.

     

    Keywords
    analgesics non-opioid, aspirin; complications, haemorrhage; heart, ischaemia; surgery, non-cardiac
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-20759 (URN)10.1093/bja/aeq003 (DOI)000274485900006 ()
    Note
    This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in British Journal of Anaesthesia following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version: Anna Oscarsson Tibblin, Anil Gupta, Mats Fredrikson, Johannes Järhult, Matti Nyström, Eva Pettersson, Bijan Darvish, Helena Krook, Eva Swahn and Christina Eintrei, To continue or discontinue aspirin in the perioperative period: a randomized, controlled clinical trial, 2010, British Journal of Anaesthesia, (104), 3, 305-312. is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/bja/aeq003 Copyright: Oxford University Press http://www.oxfordjournals.org/ Available from: 2009-09-18 Created: 2009-09-18 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
  • 122.
    Oscarsson Tibblin, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Perioperative myocardial damage and cardiac outcome in patients-at-risk undergoing non-cardiac surgery2010In: ACTA ANAESTHESIOLOGICA SCANDINAVICA, ISSN 0001-5172, Vol. 54, no 5, p. 656-657Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 123.
    Oscarsson Tibblin, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Anskär, S
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engdahl, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fagerström, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Blomqvist, Per
    Anestesikliniken, Ryhov.
    Fredriksson, M
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Troponin T-values provide long-term prognosis in elderly patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery.2004In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 48, no 9, p. 1071-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of elevated postoperative Troponin T (TnT) levels in an elderly population undergoing non-cardiac surgery. METHODS: Five hundred and forty-six consecutive patients aged 70 years or older undergoing non-cardiac surgery of >30-min duration were enrolled in this prospective, observational study. A postoperative TnT measurement was obtained on the 5th to 7th postoperative day. Troponin T values greater than 0.02 ng ml(-1) were considered positive. Patients were followed over a 1-year period, and mortality and non-fatal cardiac events (acute myocardial infarction and coronary interventions) were recorded. RESULTS: Troponin T concentrations greater than 0.02 ng ml(-1) were detected in 53 of the study subjects (9.7%). Eleven per cent of the patients with elevated TnT had electrocardiographic or clinical signs of myocardial ischemia. One year after surgery, 17 (32%) of the patients with abnormal TnT concentrations had died. In a multivariate Cox regression analysis adjusting for baseline and perioperative data, a TnT value >0.02 ng ml(-1) was an independent correlate of the mortality adjusted hazard ratio (HR): 14.9 (95% CI 3.7-60.3). Other independent predictors of death were tachycardia (HR, 14.9 95% CI 3.45-64.8), ASA 4 (HR, 8.1 95% CI 1.3-50.0), reoperation (HR, 6.4 95% CI 1.1-36.9), and use of diuretics (HR, 4.2 95% CI 1.3-13.8). CONCLUSION: We conclude that elevated TnT levels in the postoperative period confer a 15-fold increase in mortality during the first year after surgery. Our findings also provide evidence that silent myocardial ischemia is common in an elderly population. Routine perioperative surveillance for TnT might therefore be of use in detecting patients at an increased risk of mortality during the first postoperative year.

  • 124.
    Oscarsson Tibblin, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sorliden, M.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Anskär, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    N-terminal fragment of pro-B-type natriuretic peptide is a predictor of cardiac events in high-risk patients undergoing acute hip fracture surgery2009In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, ISSN 0007-0912, Vol. 103, no 2, p. 206-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this investigation was to assess the incidence of elevated N-terminal fragment of pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and its relation to outcome defined as perioperative adverse cardiac events and all-cause mortality in high-risk patients undergoing non-elective surgery for hip fracture. A cohort of patients with hip fractures were extracted from a prospective observational study of high-risk patients (ASA class III or IV) undergoing emergency surgery. NT-proBNP and troponin I were measured before operation. An NT-proBNP greater than= 3984 ng litre(-1) was set as the cut-off level for significance. Perioperative adverse cardiac events and 30 day and 3 month mortality were recorded. Sixty-nine subjects were included. Thirty-four subjects (49%) had an NT-proBNP greater than= 3984 ng litre(-1) before surgery. Thirty-four subjects (49%) had a perioperative adverse cardiac event. Of these, 22 subjects (65%) had NT-proBNP above the diagnostic threshold compared with 12 subjects (34%) who had an NT-proBNP below the diagnostic threshold (P=0.01). Preoperative NT-proBNP greater than= 3984 ng litre(-1) [odds ratio (OR) 3.0; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0-8.9] and congestive heart failure (OR 3.0; 95% CI 1.0-9.0) were independent predictors of perioperative adverse cardiac events. A total of eight subjects (12%) died within 30 days after operation. There is a high incidence of elevated NT-proBNP in subjects undergoing non-elective hip fracture surgery. Preoperative NT-proBNP is a valuable predictor of cardiac complications in the perioperative period.

  • 125.
    Oscarsson Tibblin, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sorliden, M
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Anskär, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gupta, Anil
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Predictors of cardiac events in high-risk patients undergoing emergency surgery2009In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 53, no 8, p. 986-994Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of myocardial damage and left ventricular myocardial dysfunction and their influence on outcome in high-risk patients undergoing non-elective surgery.

    Methods: In this prospective observational study, 211 patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists classification III or IV undergoing emergent or urgent surgery were included. Troponin I (TnI) was measured pre-operatively, 12 and 48 h post-operatively. Pre-operative N-terminal fragment of B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), as a marker for left ventricular systolic dysfunction, was analyzed. The diagnostic thresholds were set to TnI andgt; 0.06 mu g/l and NT-proBNP andgt; 1800 pg/ml, respectively. Post-operative major adverse cardiac events (MACE), 30-day and 3-months mortality were recorded.

    Results: Elevated TnI levels were detected in 33% of the patients post-operatively. A TnI elevation increased the risk of MACE (35% vs. 3% in patients with normal TnI levels, P andlt; 0.001) and 30-day mortality (23% vs. 7%, P=0.003). Increased concentrations of NT-proBNP were seen in 59% of the patients. Elevated NT-proBNP was an independent predictor of myocardial damage post-operatively, odds ratio, 6.2 [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.1-18.0] and resulted in an increased risk of MACE (21% vs. 2.5% in patients with NT-proBNP andlt; 1800 pg/ml, P andlt; 0.001).

    Conclusion: Myocardial damage is common in a high-risk population undergoing unscheduled surgery. These results suggest a close correlation between myocardial damage in the post-operative period and increased concentration of NT-proBNP before surgery. The combinations of TnI and NT-proBNP are reliable markers for monitoring patients at risk in the peri-operative period as well as useful tools in our risk assessment pre-operatively in emergency surgery.

  • 126.
    Oscarsson Tibblin, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Gupta, Anil
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Järhult, Johannes
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Matti
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Pettersson, Eva
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Darvish, Bijan
    Department of Anaesthesia & Intensive Care University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Krook, Helena
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    To continue or discontinue aspirin in the perioperative period: a randomized, controlled clinical trial2010In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 104, no 3, p. 305-312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) are a common cause of deathafter non-cardiac surgery. Despite evidence for the benefitof aspirin for secondary prevention, it is often discontinuedin the perioperative period due to the risk of bleeding.

    Methods: We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlledtrial in order to compare the effect of low-dose aspirin withthat of placebo on myocardial damage, cardiovascular, and bleedingcomplications in high-risk patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery.Aspirin (75 mg) or placebo was given 7 days before surgery andcontinued until the third postoperative day. Patients were followedup for 30 days after surgery.

    Results: A total of 220 patients were enrolled, 109 patients receivedaspirin and 111 received placebo. Four patients (3.7%) in theaspirin group and 10 patients (9.0%) in the placebo group hadelevated troponin T levels in the postoperative period (P=0.10).Twelve patients (5.4%) had an MACE during the first 30 postoperativedays. Two of these patients (1.8%) were in the aspirin groupand 10 patients (9.0%) were in the placebo group (P=0.02). Treatmentwith aspirin resulted in a 7.2% absolute risk reduction [95%confidence interval (CI), 1.3–13%] for postoperative MACE.The relative risk reduction was 80% (95% CI, 9.2–95%).Numbers needed to treat were 14 (95% CI, 7.6–78). No significantdifferences in bleeding complications were seen between thetwo groups.

    Conclusions: In high-risk patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery, perioperativeaspirin reduced the risk of MACE without increasing bleedingcomplications. However, the study was not powered to evaluatebleeding complications.

     

  • 127.
    Perniola, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Gupta, Anil
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Crafoord, Kristina
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Darvish, Bijan
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Magnuson, Anders
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Axelsson , Kjell
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Intraabdominal local anaesthetics for postoperative pain relief following abdominal hysterectomy: a randomized, double-blind, dose-finding study2009In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF ANAESTHESIOLOGY, ISSN 0265-0215 , Vol. 26, no 5, p. 421-429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and objective Local anaesthetics administered intraabdominally have been found to reduce analgesic requirements postoperatively after hysterectomy. This study was designed to assess the optimal dose of local anaesthetics for best pain relief.

    Methods Sixty patients undergoing abdominal hysterectomy were randomly divided into three groups to receive 10 ml h(-1) infusion of levobupivacaine intraabdominally postoperatively for 48 h in a double-blind manner: group L, 7.5 mg h(-1); group M, 12.5 mg h(-1) and group H, 17.5 mg h(-1). Pain intensity was measured using the numeric rating scale, ketobemidone consumption over 48 h was measured with a patient-controlled analgesia pump, recovery parameters, expiratory muscle strength, time to home readiness, plasma concentration of levobupivacaine and health-related quality of life were all measured at defined time points postoperatively.

    Results No differences were found between the active groups in pain intensity, recovery parameters or health-related quality of life. Pain intensity was maximal during 04 h and during coughing. Expiratory muscle strength decreased significantly during 0-4 h in all active groups, with no differences between the groups. Plasma concentration of levobupivacaine was below known toxic concentrations in humans, and no patient had symptoms of local anaesthetic toxicity. Health-related quality of life showed improved scores at 3 months after the operation compared with preoperative values, but no differences between the groups were found in any of the parameters.

    Conclusion Satisfactory analgesia can be achieved with low doses of levobupivacaine administered intraabdominally, except during the early postoperative period. No advantages were seen in this study when higher doses of levobupivacaine were administered as a continuous infusion for postoperative pain relief.

  • 128.
    Proczkowska-Björklund, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Child related background factors affecting compliance with induction of anaesthesia.2004In: Pediatric Anaesthesia, ISSN 1155-5645, E-ISSN 1460-9592, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 225-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Factors such as age, sex, behaviour problems, fears, earlier traumatic hospital events and reactions to vaccination were assessed together with behaviour observed before premedication in order to evaluate their importance in predicting response to the anaesthetic process. The anaesthetic process was divided into four endpoints; compliance when given premedication, sedation, compliance during needle insertion or when an anaesthetic mask was put in place and behaviour when put to sleep.

    METHODS: A total of 102 children who were undergoing day-stay surgery and overnight stay surgery were video-filmed during premedication and anaesthetic induction. Before premedication the children and parents answered questionnaires about behaviour [Preschool Behaviour Check List (PBCL)] and fears [Fears Survey Schedule for Children-Revised (FSSC-R)]. The films were analysed to assess behaviour before and after premedication and during induction of anaesthesia. A semistructured interview was conducted with the parents during the time the children were asleep. '

    RESULTS: There was a significantly higher odds ratio for noncompliant behaviour during premedication if the child placed itself in the parent's lap or near the parent or had previously experienced traumatic hospital events. The odds ratio for not being sedated by premedication was higher if compliance was low when premedication was given or the child had experienced a traumatic hospital event in the past. A high odds ratio for noncompliant behaviour during venous access or placement of an anaesthetic mask was seen if the child was not sedated or the child had had a negative reaction when vaccinated. The odds ratio for falling asleep in an anxious or upset state was higher if the child had shown noncompliant behaviour during premedication, had not been sedated or had shown noncompliant behaviour during venous access or facemask placement.

    CONCLUSIONS: The overall most important factor that predicts noncompliant behaviour and a distressed state in the child during the anaesthetic process was the experience of earlier traumatic hospital events including negative reaction to vaccination. All elements of the process are important in determining what will happen and all steps will influence how the child reacts when put to sleep.

  • 129.
    Protic, Alen
    et al.
    University Hospital Rijeka.
    Turina, Dean
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Matanic, Dubravka
    University Hospital Rijeka.
    Spanjol, Josip
    University Hospital Rijeka.
    Zuvic-Butorac, Marta
    University Rijeka.
    Sustic, Alan
    University Hospital Rijeka.
    Effect of preoperative feeding on gastric emptying following spinal anesthesia: a randomized controlled trial2010In: WIENER KLINISCHE WOCHENSCHRIFT, ISSN 0043-5325, Vol. 122, no 1-2, p. 50-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Preoperative fasting is associated with various untoward postoperative health problems. Previous studies have stressed the advantages of preoperative feeding with a carbohydrate-rich drink 2 hours before surgery; this protocol does not increase the risk of gastric-content aspiration but reduces the level of anxiety and thirstiness during the perioperative period. Spinal anesthesia with the local anesthetic bupivacaine can decrease gastric emptying in the early postoperative period. However, the effect of spinal anesthesia on the gastric emptying rate following preoperative feeding is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of preoperative feeding with a clear carbohydrate-rich drink on gastric emptying early after orthopedic surgery under spinal anesthesia. METHODS: A total of 110 patients scheduled for semi-elective orthopedic surgery under spinal anesthesia were included in a randomized controlled trial. Patients were randomly assigned to two groups: group 1 (56 patients) received a standardized 200 ml of clear carbohydrate-enriched drink orally 2 hours before surgery; group 2 (54 patients) acted as a control group with no preoperative feeding. Gastric emptying was evaluated with a paracetamol test at five time points: 15 min, 30 min, 60 min, 90 min and 120 min after administration of paracetamol. RESULTS: No significant differences were observed between the two groups in paracetamol plasma concentrations or area under the curve during the early postoperative period. CONCLUSION: In patients undergoing spinal anesthesia, preoperative feeding 2 hours before surgery had no influence on the gastric emptying rate, indicating that preoperative feeding does not increase the risk of gastric-content aspiration and can be given safely.

  • 130.
    Reini, Kirsi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiothoracic Anaesthesia and Intensive care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Oscarsson Tibblin, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    The prognostic value of the Modified Early Warning Score in critically ill patients: a prospective, observational study2012In: European Journal of Anaesthesiology, ISSN 0265-0215, E-ISSN 1365-2346, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 152-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context The Modified Early Warning Score is a validated assessment tool for detecting risk of deterioration in patients at risk on medical and surgical wards. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanObjective To assess the prognostic ability of the Modified Early Warning Score in predicting outcome after critical care. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanDesign A prospective observational study. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanSetting A tertiary care general ICU. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanPatients Five hundred and eighteen patients aged at least 16 years admitted to the ICU at Linkoping University Hospital were included. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanIntervention The Modified Early Warning Score was documented on arrival at the ICU and every hour for as long as the patient was breathing spontaneously, until discharge from the ICU. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMain outcome measures The primary endpoint was mortality in the ICU. Secondary endpoints were 30-day mortality, length of stay and readmission to the ICU. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults Patients with a Modified Early Warning Score of at least six had significantly higher mortality in the ICU than those with a Modified Early Warning Score andlt;6 (24 vs. 3.4%, Pandlt; 0.001). A Modified Early Warning Score of at least six was an independent predictor of mortality in the ICU [odds ratio (OR) 5.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.4-20.6]. The prognostic ability of the Modified Early Warning Score on admission to the ICU [area under the curve (AUC) 0.80, 95% CI 0.72-0.88] approached those of the Simplified Acute Physiology Score III (AUC 0.89, 95% CI 0.83-0.94) and the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score on admission (AUC 0.91, 95% CI 0.86-0.97). A Modified Early Warning Score of at least six on admission was also an independent predictor of 30-day mortality (OR 4.3, 95% CI 2.3-8.1) and length of stay in the ICU (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.4-3.8). In contrast, the Modified Early Warning Score on discharge from the ICU did not predict the need for readmission. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion This study shows that the Modified Early Warning Score is a useful predictor of mortality in the ICU, 30-day mortality and length of stay in the ICU.

  • 131.
    Rodhe, Peter
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Hahn, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Wennberg, Bernt
    University of Gothenburg.
    Lindahl, Christina
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Sjostrand, Fredrik
    Karolinska Institute.
    Modelling of peripheral fluid accumulation after a crystalloid bolus in female volunteers - a mathematical study2010In: COMPUTATIONAL AND MATHEMATICAL METHODS IN MEDICINE, ISSN 1748-670X, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 341-351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To simultaneously model plasma dilution and urinary output in female volunteers. Methods. Ten healthy female non-pregnant volunteers, aged 21-39 years (mean 29), with a bodyweight of 58-67kg (mean 62.5kg) participated. No oral fluid or food was allowed between midnight and completion of the experiment. The protocol included an infusion of acetated Ringers solution, 25ml/kg over 30min. Blood samples (4ml) were taken every 5min during the first 120min, and thereafter the sampling rate was every 10min until the end of the experiment at 240min. A standard bladder catheter connected to a drip counter to monitor urine excretion continuously was used. The data were analysed by empirical calculations as well as by a mathematical model. Results. Maximum urinary output rate was found to be 19 (13-31) ml/min. The subjects were likely to accumulate three times as much of the infused fluid peripherally as centrally; 1/=2.7 (2.0-5.7). Elimination efficacy, Eeff, was 24 (5-35), and the basal elimination kb was 1.11 (0.28-2.90). The total time delay Ttot of urinary output was estimated as 17 (11-31) min. Conclusion. The experimental results showed a large variability in spite of a homogenous volunteer group. It was possible to compute the infusion amount, plasma dilution and simultaneous urinary output for each consecutive time point and thereby the empirical peripheral fluid accumulation. The variability between individuals may be explained by differences in tissue and hormonal responses to fluid boluses, which needs to be further explored.

  • 132.
    Rousseau, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vascular effects of hyperoxaemia and its mechanisms in man2005Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Most cells in the human body cannot survive without oxygen. The regulation of oxygen delivery to meet demands of tissues remains contentious. The study of supranormallevels of oxygen (hyperoxia/hyperoxaemia) may contribute to the understanding, as mechanisms that are active during normoxia and hypoxia (oxygen deficit) can be assumed to be at least similar, and compensatory mechanisms are kept to a minimum. Hyperoxaemic conditions are often seen clinically, but their effects in the human body are not fully known.

    Hyperoxaemia causes vasoconstriction and reduction in heart rate and cardiac output. These effects are thought to be mediated through the endothelium as a result of either increased release, or activity, of vasoconstrictors such as serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT)), or reduced activity of vasodilators such as prostaglandin E2 and nitric oxide (NO)). 5-HT and NO have been thought to have a central role.

    To investigate both its effects and the underlying mechanisms we set up a human non-invasive normobaric hyperoxaemic model. We studied the effects of hyperoxaemia by measuring: peripheral blood flow by venous occlusion plethysmography; skin blood flow by laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDI); cardiovascular assessments by echocardiography; and oxygen consumption (VO2) by an open circuit exchange system, CPX.

    Plasma concentrations of 5-HT and ß-thromboglobulin (ß-TG) were measured to investigate the role of 5-HT during hyperoxaemia. To test the NO-hypothesis we achieved endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilatation, using acetylcholine (ACh), and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) iontophoresis, respectively.

    Mean calf blood flow decreased linearly to as much as -20% during oxygen breathing. Heart rate and cardiac output decreased, systemic vascular resistance increased, and blood pressure remained unchanged. Hyperoxaemia lessened vasodilatation in the skin induced by current (iontophoresis) and an anaesthetic agent (EMLA®-cream). There was no significant increase in concentrations of either 5-HT or ß-TG during hyperoxia, compared with air. Endothelium-dependent vasodilatation (ACh) was significantly reduced by breathing 100% oxygen. Vitamin C taken orally abolished the effects of oxygen. Hyperoxia did not affect endothelium-independent vasodilatation (SNP).

    Hyperoxia affected most parts of the cardiovascular system in man, including perfusion in the skin. Probably the first and most pronounced effect was peripheral vasoconstriction, which could be seen within minutes. Heart rate and cardiac output decreased, possibly secondary to the vasoconstriction, so as to keep the blood pressure constant. There was no evidence that 5-HT had an important role in hyperoxia-mediated responses. On the contrary, the most likely hypothesis is that hyperoxic vasoconstriction is mediated by inhibition of synthesis of NO by free oxygen radicals inside the endothelial cells.

    List of papers
    1. Acute hyperoxaemia-induced effects on regional blood flow, oxygen consumption and central circulation in man
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acute hyperoxaemia-induced effects on regional blood flow, oxygen consumption and central circulation in man
    2005 (English)In: Acta Physiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6772, E-ISSN 1365-201X, Vol. 183, no 3, p. 231-240Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:  Despite numerous in vitro and animal studies, circulatory effects and mechanisms responsible for the vasoconstriction seen during hyperoxaemia are yet to be ascertained. The present study set out to: (i) set up a non-invasive human model for the study of hyperoxia-induced cardiovascular effects, (ii) describe the dynamics of this effect and (iii) determine whether hyperoxaemia also, by vasoconstriction alters oxygen consumption (O2).

    Methods:  The study comprised four experiments (A, B, C and D) on healthy volunteers examined before, during and after 100% oxygen breathing. A: Blood flow (mL min−1·100 mL−1 tissue), venous occlusion plethysmography was assessed (n = 12). B: Blood flow was recorded with increasing transcutaneous oxygen tension (PtcO2) levels (dose–response) (n = 8). C: Heart rate (HR), stroke volume, cardiac output (CO) and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) was assessed using echocardiography (n = 8). D: O2 was measured using an open circuit technique when breathing an air-O2 mix (fraction of inhaled oxygen: FiO2 = 0.58) (n = 8).

    Results:  Calf blood flow decreased 30% during O2 breathing. The decrease in calf blood flow was found to be oxygen dose dependent. A similar magnitude, as for the peripheral circulation, of the effect on central parameters (HR/CO and SVR) and in the time relationship was noted. Hyperoxia did not change O2. An average of 207 (93) mL O2 per subject was washed in during the experiments.

    Conclusion:  This model appears suitable for the investigation of O2-related effects on the central and peripheral circulation in man. Our findings, based on a more comprehensive (central/peripheral circulation examination) evaluation than earlier made, suggest significant circulatory effects of hyperoxia. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the underlying mechanisms.

    Keywords
    blood flow, consumption, hyperoxaemia, hyperoxia, oxygen, vasoconstriction
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-24768 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-201X.2005.01405.x (DOI)7029 (Local ID)7029 (Archive number)7029 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Hyperoxia decreases cutaneous blood flow in high-perfusion areas
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hyperoxia decreases cutaneous blood flow in high-perfusion areas
    2007 (English)In: Microvascular Research, ISSN 0026-2862, E-ISSN 1095-9319, Vol. 74, no 1, p. 15-22Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanism by which hyperoxia decreases blood flow is still not understood. Hyperoxemia-induced vasoconstriction is known to occur in many organs, including brain and retina, skeletal muscle, and myocardium. Whether this also occurs in skin is unknown.

    This study was conducted in healthy volunteers exposed intermittently to 100% oxygen (FIO2 1.0). Perfusion of forearm skin was measured by laser Doppler imaging (LDI). In series 1, it was measured in 7 subjects before, during, and after 15 min of oxygen breathing. In series 2, flow was measured, also during air and O2 breathing, after perfusion was raised by (a) sympathetic blockade (induced by a topically applied local anesthetic) (n = 9) and by (b) current-induced vasodilation (n = 8).

    In normal unperturbed skin, there was no significant change with hyperoxia. When basal perfusion was raised by topical anesthesia or by current, there was also no change in mean perfusion overall with hyperoxia. However, areas with the highest perfusion (upper decile) showed a significant perfusion decrement with hyperoxia (− 30% and − 20%, respectively; p < 0.001).

    Vasoconstriction with hyperoxia has been demonstrated in human skin. The fact that it is observed only when flow is increased above basal levels and then only in high-flow vessels suggests that cutaneous blood flow control is primarily regulated by variables other than oxygen.

    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-39470 (URN)10.1016/j.mvr.2007.02.001 (DOI)48745 (Local ID)48745 (Archive number)48745 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    3. Hyperoxaemia does not change concentrations of serotonin and beta‐thromboglobulin in blood of healthy humans
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hyperoxaemia does not change concentrations of serotonin and beta‐thromboglobulin in blood of healthy humans
    2004 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 64, no 2, p. 81-85Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The mechanisms of oxygen‐induced effects on blood vessels (vasoconstriction in hyperoxaemia and vasodilatation during hypoxaemia) are uncertain. Many investigators have suggested that the vasoconstriction seen during hyperoxia/hyperoxaemia is mediated through the endothelium as a result of either increased release or activity of vasoconstrictors (oxygen radicals, endothelin, norepinephrine, angiotensin II, or serotonin (5‐HT)), or reduced activity of vasodilators (prostaglandin E2 and nitric oxide). Serotonin has been assumed to have a central role.

    Methods: Eight healthy volunteers were exposed to FiO2 of 1.0 for 20 min and serum concentrations of serotonin and activated platelets were measured (indicated by concentrations of β‐thromboglobulin (β‐TG)).

    Results. During hyperoxaemia in humans, serum concentrations of serotonin and β‐TG remained unchanged.

    Conclusion: If serotonin is involved in oxygen‐induced vasoconstriction, the mechanism is more likely to be either a potentiating effect of serotonin on other vasoconstrictors or increased activity of serotonin on its receptor.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-24029 (URN)10.1080/00365510410004137 (DOI)3584 (Local ID)3584 (Archive number)3584 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    4. Hyperoxia inhibits production of endothelial nitric oxide in humans
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hyperoxia inhibits production of endothelial nitric oxide in humans
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Hypceoxia causes vasoconstriction in most tissues, but the mechanisms have yet to be elucidated. One hypothesis is that hyperoxia affects the production of free oxygen radicals (ROS), which reduce the concentration of the vasorelaxing agent nitric oxide (NO). It is not clear whether ROS reduce the synthesis of NO or inactivate NO that is already present. We investigated the effects of breathing 100% oxygen on NO-mediated vasodilation. Iontophoresis was used to deliver acetylcholine (ACh) (which stimulates endothelium-dependent production of NO) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) (a NO-donor) through the skin of healthy volunteers (n=9). The blood flow in the skin was measured with a laser Doppler perfusion imager and dose-response curves were plotted. The drug dose at which 50% of the total perfusion increase was reached was calculated (ED50). The ED50 was significantly higher (right-shifted curve) while breathing oxygen compared with breathing air, when ACh was given by iontophoresis (95% CI 0.26 to 2.2). When ACh iontophoresis was preceded by oral intake of vitamin C (2.5 g daily for 3 days), this effect was abolished. Hyperoxla had no effect on vasodilation after iontophoresis with SNP. These results favour the hypothesis that hyperoxic vasoconstriction is mediated through inhibition of synthesis of NO by free oxygen radicals inside the endothelial cells.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-83825 (URN)
    Available from: 2012-10-02 Created: 2012-10-02 Last updated: 2012-10-03Bibliographically approved
  • 133.
    Rousseau, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Abdiu, Avni
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hyperoxaemia does not change concentrations of serotonin and beta‐thromboglobulin in blood of healthy humans2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 64, no 2, p. 81-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The mechanisms of oxygen‐induced effects on blood vessels (vasoconstriction in hyperoxaemia and vasodilatation during hypoxaemia) are uncertain. Many investigators have suggested that the vasoconstriction seen during hyperoxia/hyperoxaemia is mediated through the endothelium as a result of either increased release or activity of vasoconstrictors (oxygen radicals, endothelin, norepinephrine, angiotensin II, or serotonin (5‐HT)), or reduced activity of vasodilators (prostaglandin E2 and nitric oxide). Serotonin has been assumed to have a central role.

    Methods: Eight healthy volunteers were exposed to FiO2 of 1.0 for 20 min and serum concentrations of serotonin and activated platelets were measured (indicated by concentrations of β‐thromboglobulin (β‐TG)).

    Results. During hyperoxaemia in humans, serum concentrations of serotonin and β‐TG remained unchanged.

    Conclusion: If serotonin is involved in oxygen‐induced vasoconstriction, the mechanism is more likely to be either a potentiating effect of serotonin on other vasoconstrictors or increased activity of serotonin on its receptor.

  • 134.
    Rousseau, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Janerot-Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Acute hyperoxaemia-induced effects on regional blood flow, oxygen consumption and central circulation in man2005In: Acta Physiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6772, E-ISSN 1365-201X, Vol. 183, no 3, p. 231-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:  Despite numerous in vitro and animal studies, circulatory effects and mechanisms responsible for the vasoconstriction seen during hyperoxaemia are yet to be ascertained. The present study set out to: (i) set up a non-invasive human model for the study of hyperoxia-induced cardiovascular effects, (ii) describe the dynamics of this effect and (iii) determine whether hyperoxaemia also, by vasoconstriction alters oxygen consumption (O2).

    Methods:  The study comprised four experiments (A, B, C and D) on healthy volunteers examined before, during and after 100% oxygen breathing. A: Blood flow (mL min−1·100 mL−1 tissue), venous occlusion plethysmography was assessed (n = 12). B: Blood flow was recorded with increasing transcutaneous oxygen tension (PtcO2) levels (dose–response) (n = 8). C: Heart rate (HR), stroke volume, cardiac output (CO) and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) was assessed using echocardiography (n = 8). D: O2 was measured using an open circuit technique when breathing an air-O2 mix (fraction of inhaled oxygen: FiO2 = 0.58) (n = 8).

    Results:  Calf blood flow decreased 30% during O2 breathing. The decrease in calf blood flow was found to be oxygen dose dependent. A similar magnitude, as for the peripheral circulation, of the effect on central parameters (HR/CO and SVR) and in the time relationship was noted. Hyperoxia did not change O2. An average of 207 (93) mL O2 per subject was washed in during the experiments.

    Conclusion:  This model appears suitable for the investigation of O2-related effects on the central and peripheral circulation in man. Our findings, based on a more comprehensive (central/peripheral circulation examination) evaluation than earlier made, suggest significant circulatory effects of hyperoxia. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the underlying mechanisms.

  • 135.
    Rousseau, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Steinwall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Woodson, RD
    Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hyperoxia decreases cutaneous blood flow in high-perfusion areas2007In: Microvascular Research, ISSN 0026-2862, E-ISSN 1095-9319, Vol. 74, no 1, p. 15-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanism by which hyperoxia decreases blood flow is still not understood. Hyperoxemia-induced vasoconstriction is known to occur in many organs, including brain and retina, skeletal muscle, and myocardium. Whether this also occurs in skin is unknown.

    This study was conducted in healthy volunteers exposed intermittently to 100% oxygen (FIO2 1.0). Perfusion of forearm skin was measured by laser Doppler imaging (LDI). In series 1, it was measured in 7 subjects before, during, and after 15 min of oxygen breathing. In series 2, flow was measured, also during air and O2 breathing, after perfusion was raised by (a) sympathetic blockade (induced by a topically applied local anesthetic) (n = 9) and by (b) current-induced vasodilation (n = 8).

    In normal unperturbed skin, there was no significant change with hyperoxia. When basal perfusion was raised by topical anesthesia or by current, there was also no change in mean perfusion overall with hyperoxia. However, areas with the highest perfusion (upper decile) showed a significant perfusion decrement with hyperoxia (− 30% and − 20%, respectively; p < 0.001).

    Vasoconstriction with hyperoxia has been demonstrated in human skin. The fact that it is observed only when flow is increased above basal levels and then only in high-flow vessels suggests that cutaneous blood flow control is primarily regulated by variables other than oxygen.

  • 136.
    Rousseau, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Henricson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Prostaglandins and Radical Oxygen Species Are Involved in Microvascular Effects of Hyperoxia2010In: JOURNAL OF VASCULAR RESEARCH, ISSN 1018-1172, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 441-450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hyperoxia causes vasoconstriction in most tissues, by mechanisms that are not fully understood. We investigated microvascular effects of breathing 100% oxygen in healthy volunteers, using iontophoresis to deliver acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Aspirin and vitamin C were used to test for involvement of prostaglandins and radical oxygen species. Forearm skin perfusion was measured using laser Doppler perfusion imaging. Results were analysed using dose-response modelling. The response to ACh was reduced by 30% during oxygen breathing compared to air breathing [0.98 (0.81-1.15) PU vs. 1.45 (1.30-1.60) PU, p andlt; 0.001]. ED50 values were unchanged [2.25 (1.84-2.75) vs. 2.21 (1.79-2.74), not significant]. Aspirin pre-treatment abolished the difference in response between oxygen breathing and air breathing [maximum: 1.03 (0.90-1.16) vs. 0.89 (0.77-1.01), not significant; ED50: 1.83 (1.46-2.30) vs. 1.95 (1.65-2.30), not significant]. ACh-mediated vasodilatation during 100% oxygen breathing was partially restored after pre-treatment with vitamin C. Breathing 100% oxygen did not change the microvascular response to SNP [1.45 (1.28-1.62) vs. 1.40 (1.26-1.53), not significant]. These results favour the hypothesis that hyperoxic vasoconstriction is mediated by inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. Radical oxygen species may be involved as vitamin C, independently of aspirin, partially restored ACh-mediated vasodilatation during hyperoxia.

  • 137.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Effects of burns and vasoactive drugs on human skin: Clinical and Experimental studies using microdialysis2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients who require critical care, including those with burns, are affected by a systemic inflammatory reaction, which at times has consequences such as multiple organ dysfunction and failure. It has become increasingly evident that other factors important in the development of organ dysfunction are disturbances at the tissue level, in the microcirculation. Such disturbances activate cascade systems including stress hormones, all of which have local effects on organ function.

    Despite this knowledge, monitoring and treatment in critical illness today relies mainly on central haemodynamics and blood sampling.

    Microdialysis is a minimally invasive technique that enables us to study the chemical composition and changes in biochemistry in the extracellular, extravascular space in living tissues. Most of our current experience is from animal models, but the technique has also been used in humans and has become routine in many neurosurgical intensive care units to monitor brain biochemistry after severe injury. In skin, this experience is limited. During the first half of this thesis we studied the injured and uninjured skin of severely burned patients. The results show that there are severe local metabolic disturbances in both injured and uninjured skin. Most interesting is a sustained tissue acidosis, which is not detectable in systemic (blood) sampling. We also recorded considerable alterations in the glucose homeostasis locally in the skin, suggesting a cellular or mitochondrial dysfunction. In parallel, we noted increased tissue glycerol concentrations, which indicated appreciable traumainduced lipolysis.

    We also examined serotonin kinetics in the same group of patients, as serotonin has been claimed to be a key mediator of the vasoplegia and permeability disturbances found in patients with burns. We have shown, for the first time in humans to our knowledge, that concentrations of serotonin in skin are increased tenfold, whereas blood and urine concentrations are just above normal. The findings support the need for local monitoring of substances with rapid local reabsorption, or degradation, or both. The results also indicate that serotonin may be important for the systemic response that characterises burn injuries.

    In the second half of the thesis we evaluated the effects of microdosing in skin on metabolism and blood flow of vasoactive, mainly stress-response-related, drugs by the microdialysis system. The objectives were to isolate the local effects of the drugs to enable a better understanding of the complex relation between metabolic effects and effects induced by changes in local blood flow. In the first of these two studies we showed that by giving noradrenaline and nitroglycerine into the skin of healthy subjects we induced anticipated changes in skin metabolism and blood flow. The results suggest that the model may be used to examine vascular and metabolic effects induced locally by vasoactive compounds. Data from the last study indicate that conventional pharmacodynamic models (Emax) for time and dose response modelling may be successfully used to measure the vascular and metabolic response in this microdosing model.

    We conclude that the microdialysis technique can be successfully used to monitor skin metabolism and iso late a mediator (serotonin) of the local skin response in burned patients. It was also feasible to develop a vascular model in skin based on microdialysis to deliver vasoactive substances locally to the skin of healthy volunteers. This model provided a framework in which the metabolic effects of hypoperfusion and reperfusion in skin tissues could be examined further.

    List of papers
    1. Microdialysis shows metabolic effects in skin during fluid resuscitation in burn-injured patients
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Microdialysis shows metabolic effects in skin during fluid resuscitation in burn-injured patients
    2006 (English)In: Critical Care, ISSN 1364-8535, E-ISSN 1466-609X, Vol. 10, no 6, p. Art.no: R172-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Established fluid treatment formulas for burn injuries have been challenged as studies have shown the presence of tissue hypoxia during standard resuscitation. Such findings suggest monitoring at the tissue level. This study was performed in patients with major burn injuries to evaluate the microdialysis technique for the continuous assessment of skin metabolic changes during fluid resuscitation and up to four days postburn. Methods: We conducted an experimental study in patients with a burn injury, as represented by percentage of total body surface area burned (TBSA), of more than 25% in a university eight-bed burns intensive care unit serving about 3.5 million inhabitants. Six patients with a median TBSA percentage of 59% (range 33.5% to 90%) and nine healthy controls were examined by intracutaneous MD, in which recordings of glucose, pyruvate, lactate, glycerol, and urea were performed. Results: Blood glucose concentration peaked on day two at 9.8 mmol/l (6.8 to 14.0) (median and range) and gradually declined on days three and four, whereas skin glucose in MD continued to increase throughout the study period with maximum values on day four, 8.7 mmol/l (4.9 to 11.0). Controls had significantly lower skin glucose values compared with burn patients, 3.1 mmol/l (1.5 to 4.6) (p < 0.001). Lactate from burn patients was significantly higher than controls in both injured and uninjured skin (MD), 4.6 mmol/l (1.3 to 8.9) and 3.8 mmol/l (1.6 to 7.5), respectively (p < 0.01). The skin lactate/pyruvate ratio (MD) was significantly increased in burn patients on all days (p < 0.001). Skin glycerol (MD) was significantly increased at days three and four in burn patients compared with controls (p < 0.01). Conclusion: Despite a strategy that fulfilled conventional goals for resuscitation, there were increased lactate/pyruvate ratios, indicative of local acidosis. A corresponding finding was not recorded systemically. We conclude that MD is a promising tool for depicting local metabolic processes that are not fully appreciated when examined systemically. Because the local response in glucose, lactate, and pyruvate metabolism seems to differ from that recorded systemically, this technique may offer a new method of monitoring organs. © 2006 Samuelsson et al., licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London, UK: BioMed Central, 2006
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-37628 (URN)10.1186/cc5124 (DOI)000247718500020 ()17166287 (PubMedID)36806 (Local ID)36806 (Archive number)36806 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Serotonin kinetics in patients with burn injuries: A comparison between the local and systemic responses measured by microdialysis-A pilot study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Serotonin kinetics in patients with burn injuries: A comparison between the local and systemic responses measured by microdialysis-A pilot study
    2008 (English)In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 617-622Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To investigate serotonin (5HT) locally in burned and uninjured skin (intracutaneous) by microdialysis, and simultaneously record urinary and blood values in the same subjects. For comparison, serotonin values were also measured in skin of healthy controls. Design and setting: An experimental study in burned patients with of more than 25% TBSA (total burn surface area) % in an 8-bed tertiary burns unit, serving about 3.5 million persons. Patients and methods: Six subjects with a median TBSA% of 59% (range 33.5-90), and five healthy controls were examined by intracutaneous microdialysis of the skin. Results: 5HT was increased in burned patients, compared with controls. This increase was tenfold in skin and was noted both in uninjured and burned skin. The highest values were recorded on day 1 (median 16.1 nmol in uninjured and 9.5 nmol in burned skin) and day 2 (15.6 nmol in uninjured and 13.4 nmol in burned skin). A rapid reduction was noted on day 3 (4.9 nmol in uninjured and 3.8 nmol in burned skin). The corresponding value for control subjects was 1.3 nmol. The 5HT in blood was twice normal on day 2, and gradually reduced on days 3 and 4 (3189, 3035 and 2573 nmol, respectively). Urinary 5HT concentrations were increased only on day 2 at 1755 nmol and thereafter returned to the normal range on days 3 and 4 (1248 and 1344 nmol, respectively). Conclusions: We showed that microdialysis may be used in the critical care of burns, and local skin serotonin concentrations examined continuously for several days. The findings of significantly raised tissue serotonin concentrations, compared to that in blood and urine, suggests that serotonin may be important in local vascular control and formation of oedema. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-43419 (URN)10.1016/j.burns.2007.08.003 (DOI)73800 (Local ID)73800 (Archive number)73800 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    3. Implications for critical care of a new in vivo human vascular microdosing technique for giving noradrenaline and nitroglycerine by microdialysis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Implications for critical care of a new in vivo human vascular microdosing technique for giving noradrenaline and nitroglycerine by microdialysis
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Skin has a large dynamic capacity for alterations in blood flow, and is therefore often used for recruitment of blood during states of hypoperfusion. Little is known, however, about the metabolic consequences seen in skin secondary to hyporperfusion, particularly when the effects of vasoactive drugs are involved. The aims of this study were: to develop an in vivo, human microdosing model based on microdialysis in skin; and to investigate the effects on blood flow and metabolism of administering noradrenaline and nitroglycerine locally.

    Method: Nine healthy volunteers each had two or three microdialysis catheters placed intradermally in the volar surface of the lower arm. After a stabilisation period, the catheters were perfused with buffers containing noradrenaline 0.5 or 5 μg/ml for 60 minutes, and after a second period of equilibrium of 60 minutes, all catheters were perfused with buffer containing nitroglycerine (0.5mg/ml). Changes in the blood flow in the skin were measured by laser Doppler imaging urea and ethanol clearance. Simultaneous changes in tissue glucose, lactate, and pyruvate concentrations were recorded.

    Results: Perfusing skin with noradrenaline and nitroglycerine induced appreciable changes in all variables studied, depending on time and dose. The changes in glucose and lactate concentrations correlated with the change in blood flow assessed by either laser Doppler imaging or urea clearance. The changes in glucose and lactate that were induced by vasoconstriction (noradrenaline) continued until vasodilatation was induced by nitroglycerine.

    Conclusion: Noradrenaline given by microdialysis in healthy volunteers induced reproducible and dose-dependent hypoperfusion and ischaemia with simultaneous metabolic consequences. Among these, we particularly note that: tissue glucose concentrations responded rapidly to hypoperfusion but remained considerably higher than zero, which suggests an energy-dependent deficiency in cellular uptake; and vasoconstriction remained after cessation of the noradrenaline perfusion, implicating vasospasm and a lack of autoregulatory (recovery) capacity in skin. These findings are particularly interesting from the critical care perspective, where noradrenaline is used extensively for circulatory support. The metabolic consequences may be underestimated and our results suggest that further investigations are warranted.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-59517 (URN)
    Available from: 2010-09-17 Created: 2010-09-17 Last updated: 2010-09-17Bibliographically approved
    4. A human vascular model based on microdialysis for the assessment of the vasoconstrictive dose-response effects of noradrenaline and vasopressin in skin: in JOURNAL OF VASCULAR RESEARCH, vol 48, pp 320-320
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A human vascular model based on microdialysis for the assessment of the vasoconstrictive dose-response effects of noradrenaline and vasopressin in skin: in JOURNAL OF VASCULAR RESEARCH, vol 48, pp 320-320
    Show others...
    2011 (English)In: JOURNAL OF VASCULAR RESEARCH, Karger , 2011, p. 320-320Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microdialysis is a well-established technique for continuous sampling of small, water-soluble molecules within the extracellular fluid space in vivo. It also allows the use of microdoses of drugs, and the simultaneous evaluation of their related effects at the site of action. The present study was an experimental, randomized microdose trial to develop a human vascular model of dose response. We aimed to evaluate a microdialysis dosing method using urea clearance as a marker of druginduced changes in dermal blood flow and metabolism (glucose and lactate) in 12 healthy volunteers. We found that asymptomatic vasoconstriction can be detected by continuous microdialysis measurements of urea clearance in dermal tissue. More importantly, dose-effect relations using the Emax model could be constructed using the corresponding data on drug doses and both the urea clearance-based flow estimates and the changes in concentrations of tissue metabolites. This in vivo human experimental skin model offers an interesting tool with which both the dose-response effects on blood flow and concentrations of tissue metabolites of potent vasoactive substances can be evaluated.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Karger, 2011
    Keywords
    Microdialysis; Urea; Skin; Noradrenalin; Vasopressin; micro dose; dose-response; pharmacodynamics; human; vasoconstriction
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-59518 (URN)000294760800317 ()
    Available from: 2010-09-17 Created: 2010-09-17 Last updated: 2012-03-21Bibliographically approved
  • 138.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Abdiu, Avni
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Wackenfors, Angelica
    Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery Linköpings Universitet.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Serotonin kinetics in patients with burn injuries: A comparison between the local and systemic responses measured by microdialysis-A pilot study2008In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 617-622Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To investigate serotonin (5HT) locally in burned and uninjured skin (intracutaneous) by microdialysis, and simultaneously record urinary and blood values in the same subjects. For comparison, serotonin values were also measured in skin of healthy controls. Design and setting: An experimental study in burned patients with of more than 25% TBSA (total burn surface area) % in an 8-bed tertiary burns unit, serving about 3.5 million persons. Patients and methods: Six subjects with a median TBSA% of 59% (range 33.5-90), and five healthy controls were examined by intracutaneous microdialysis of the skin. Results: 5HT was increased in burned patients, compared with controls. This increase was tenfold in skin and was noted both in uninjured and burned skin. The highest values were recorded on day 1 (median 16.1 nmol in uninjured and 9.5 nmol in burned skin) and day 2 (15.6 nmol in uninjured and 13.4 nmol in burned skin). A rapid reduction was noted on day 3 (4.9 nmol in uninjured and 3.8 nmol in burned skin). The corresponding value for control subjects was 1.3 nmol. The 5HT in blood was twice normal on day 2, and gradually reduced on days 3 and 4 (3189, 3035 and 2573 nmol, respectively). Urinary 5HT concentrations were increased only on day 2 at 1755 nmol and thereafter returned to the normal range on days 3 and 4 (1248 and 1344 nmol, respectively). Conclusions: We showed that microdialysis may be used in the critical care of burns, and local skin serotonin concentrations examined continuously for several days. The findings of significantly raised tissue serotonin concentrations, compared to that in blood and urine, suggests that serotonin may be important in local vascular control and formation of oedema. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI.

  • 139.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Beatrice
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Implications for critical care of a new in vivo human vascular microdosing technique for giving noradrenaline and nitroglycerine by microdialysisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Skin has a large dynamic capacity for alterations in blood flow, and is therefore often used for recruitment of blood during states of hypoperfusion. Little is known, however, about the metabolic consequences seen in skin secondary to hyporperfusion, particularly when the effects of vasoactive drugs are involved. The aims of this study were: to develop an in vivo, human microdosing model based on microdialysis in skin; and to investigate the effects on blood flow and metabolism of administering noradrenaline and nitroglycerine locally.

    Method: Nine healthy volunteers each had two or three microdialysis catheters placed intradermally in the volar surface of the lower arm. After a stabilisation period, the catheters were perfused with buffers containing noradrenaline 0.5 or 5 μg/ml for 60 minutes, and after a second period of equilibrium of 60 minutes, all catheters were perfused with buffer containing nitroglycerine (0.5mg/ml). Changes in the blood flow in the skin were measured by laser Doppler imaging urea and ethanol clearance. Simultaneous changes in tissue glucose, lactate, and pyruvate concentrations were recorded.

    Results: Perfusing skin with noradrenaline and nitroglycerine induced appreciable changes in all variables studied, depending on time and dose. The changes in glucose and lactate concentrations correlated with the change in blood flow assessed by either laser Doppler imaging or urea clearance. The changes in glucose and lactate that were induced by vasoconstriction (noradrenaline) continued until vasodilatation was induced by nitroglycerine.

    Conclusion: Noradrenaline given by microdialysis in healthy volunteers induced reproducible and dose-dependent hypoperfusion and ischaemia with simultaneous metabolic consequences. Among these, we particularly note that: tissue glucose concentrations responded rapidly to hypoperfusion but remained considerably higher than zero, which suggests an energy-dependent deficiency in cellular uptake; and vasoconstriction remained after cessation of the noradrenaline perfusion, implicating vasospasm and a lack of autoregulatory (recovery) capacity in skin. These findings are particularly interesting from the critical care perspective, where noradrenaline is used extensively for circulatory support. The metabolic consequences may be underestimated and our results suggest that further investigations are warranted.

  • 140.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Magnusson, Beatrice
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zettersten, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Implications for burn shock resuscitation of a new in vivo human vascular microdosing technique (microdialysis) for dermal administration of noradrenaline2012In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 38, no 7, p. 975-983Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Skin has a large dynamic capacity for alterations in blood flow, and is therefore often used for recruitment of blood during states of hypoperfusion such as during burn shock resuscitation. However, little is known about the blood flow and metabolic consequences seen in the dermis secondary to the use vasoactive drugs (i.e. noradrenaline) for circulatory support. The aims of this study were therefore: to develop an in vivo, human microdosing model based on dermal microdialysis; and in this model to investigate effects on blood flow and metabolism by local application of noradrenaline and nitroglycerin by the microdialysis system simulating drug induced circulatory support. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethod: Nine healthy volunteers had microdialysis catheters placed intradermally in the volar surface of the lower arm. The catheters were perfused with noradrenaline 3 or 30 mmol/L and after an equilibrium period all catheters were perfused with nitroglycerine (2.2 mmol/L). Dermal blood flow was measured by the urea clearance technique and by laser Doppler imaging. Simultaneously changes in dermal glucose, lactate, and pyruvate concentrations were recorded. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Noradrenaline and nitroglycerine delivered to the dermis by the microdialysis probes induced large time- and dose-dependent changes in all variables. We particularly noted that tissue glucose concentrations responded rapidly to hypoperfusion but remained higher than zero. Furthermore, vasoconstriction remained after the noradrenaline administration implicating vasospasm and an attenuated dermal autoregulatory capacity. The changes in glucose and lactate by vasoconstriction (noradrenaline) remained until vasodilatation was actively induced by nitroglycerine. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: These findings, i.e., compromised dermal blood flow and metabolism are particularly interesting from the burn shock resuscitation perspective where noradrenaline is commonly used for circulatory support. The importance and clinical value of the results obtained in this in vivo dermal model in healthy volunteers needs to be further explored in burn-injured patients.

  • 141.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Letter: Subcutaneous continuous glucose monitoring in severe burn patients2007In: Clinical Care Medicine, ISSN 0090-3493, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 1445-1446Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 142.
    Schildmeijer, Kristina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Arestedt, Kristofer
    Linnaeus University.
    Perk, Joep
    Linnaeus University.
    Assessment of adverse events in medical care: lack of consistency between experienced teams using the global trigger tool2012In: BMJ Quality and Safety, ISSN 2044-5415, E-ISSN 2044-5423, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 307-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Many patients are harmed as the result of healthcare. A retrospective structured record review is one way to identify adverse events (AEs). One such review approach is the global trigger tool (GTT), a consistent and well-developed method used to detect AEs. The GTT was originally intended to be used for measuring data over time within a single organisation. However, as the method spreads, it is likely that comparisons of GTT safety outcomes between hospitals will occur. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanObjective: To evaluate agreement in judgement of AEs between well-trained GTT teams from different hospitals. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: Five teams from five hospitals of different sizes in the southeast of Sweden conducted a retrospective review of patient records from a random sample of 50 admissions between October 2009 and May 2010. Inter-rater reliability between teams was assessed using descriptive and kappa statistics. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: The five teams identified 42 different AEs altogether. The number of identified AEs differed between the teams, corresponding to a level of AEs ranging from 27.2 to 99.7 per 1000 hospital days. Pair-wise agreement for detection of AEs ranged from 88% to 96%, with weighted kappa values between 0.26 and 0.77. Of the AEs, 29 (69%) were identified by only one team and not by the other four groups. Most AEs resulted in minor and transient harm, the most common being healthcare-associated infections. The level of agreement regarding the potential for prevention showed a large variation between the teams. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: The results do not encourage the use of the GTT for making comparisons between hospitals. The use of the GTT to this end would require substantial training to achieve better agreement across reviewer teams.

  • 143.
    Schildmeijer, Kristina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Sweden .
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Perk, Joep
    Linnaeus University, Sweden .
    Franzén Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    Linnaeus University, Sweden .
    Strengths and weaknesses of working with the Global Trigger Tool method for retrospective record review: focus group interviews with team members2013In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 3, no 9, p. 3131-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim was to describe the strengths and weaknesses, from team member perspectives, of working with the Global Trigger Tool (GTT) method of retrospective record review to identify adverse events causing patient harm. Design: A qualitative, descriptive approach with focus group interviews using content analysis. Setting: 5 Swedish hospitals in 2011. Participants: 5 GTT teams, with 5 physicians and 11 registered nurses. Intervention: 5 focus group interviews were carried out with the five teams. Interviews were taped and transcribed verbatim. Results: 8 categories emerged relating to the strengths and weaknesses of the GTT method. The categories found were: Usefulness of the GTT, Application of the GTT, Triggers, Preventability of harm, Team composition, Team tasks, Team members knowledge development and Documentation. Gradually, changes in the methodology were made by the teams, for example, the teams reported how the registered nurses divided up the charts into two sets, each being read respectively. The teams described the method as important and well functioning. Not only the most important, but also the most difficult, was the task of bringing the results back to the clinic. The teams found it easier to discuss findings at their own clinics. Conclusions: The GTT method functions well for identifying adverse events and is strengthened by its adaptability to different specialties. However, small, gradual methodological changes together with continuingly developed expertise and adaption to looking at harm from a patients perspective may contribute to large differences in assessment over time.

  • 144.
    Schildmeijer, Kristina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Sweden .
    Unbeck, Maria
    Danderyd Hospital, Sweden .
    Muren, Olav
    Danderyd Hospital, Sweden .
    Perk, Joep
    Linnaeus University, Sweden .
    Pukk Harenstam, Karin
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Retrospective record review in proactive patient safety work - identification of no-harm incidents2013In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 13Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In contrast to other safety critical industries, well-developed systems to monitor safety within the healthcare system remain limited. Retrospective record review is one way of identifying adverse events in healthcare. In proactive patient safety work, retrospective record review could be used to identify, analyze and gain information and knowledge about no-harm incidents and deficiencies in healthcare processes. The aim of the study was to evaluate retrospective record review for the detection and characterization of no-harm incidents, and compare findings with conventional incident-reporting systems. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: A two-stage structured retrospective record review of no-harm incidents was performed on a random sample of 350 admissions at a Swedish orthopedic department. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults were compared with those found in one local, and four national incident-reporting systems. Results: We identified 118 no-harm incidents in 91 (26.0%) of the 350 records by retrospective record review. Ninety-four (79.7%) no-harm incidents were classified as preventable. The five incident-reporting systems identified 16 no-harm incidents, of which ten were also found by retrospective record review. The most common no-harm incidents were related to drug therapy (n = 66), of which 87.9% were regarded as preventable. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: No-harm incidents are common and often preventable. Retrospective record review seems to be a valuable tool for identifying and characterizing no-harm incidents. Both harm and no-harm incidents can be identified in parallel during the same record review. By adding a retrospective record review of randomly selected records to conventional incident-reporting, health care providers can gain a clearer and broader picture of commonly occurring, no-harm incidents in order to improve patient safety.

  • 145.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Iredahl, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsen, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Huss, Fredrik
    Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rousseau, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Data visar att hyperbar syrgasbehandling kan vara skadlig2011In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 108, no 32-33, p. 1506-1506Article, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 146.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Larsen, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Iredahl, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Huss, Fredrik
    Brännskadecentrum, Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala.
    Rousseau, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Hyperbar syrgasbehandling kan vara skadlig vid kolmonoxidförgiftning2011In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 108, no 32-33, p. 1506-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 147.
    Sondergaard, S
    et al.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Fagerberg, A
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Orman, J
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Viksten, J L
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Hallen, K
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Einarsson, H
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Aneman, A
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    ORIGIN OF IMPEDANCE CHANGES RELATED TO LUNG PERFUSION IN ELECTRICAL IMPEDANCE TOMOGRAPHY in INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, vol 36, issue , pp S95-S952010In: INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, Springer Science Business Media , 2010, Vol. 36, p. S95-S95Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 148.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Surgery UHL.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Acute kidney injury is common, parallels organ dysfunction or failure, and carries appreciable mortality in patients with major burns: a prospective exploratory cohort study2008In: Critical Care, ISSN 1364-8535, E-ISSN 1466-609X, Vol. 12, no R124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence, time course, and outcome of acute kidney injury after major burns and to evaluate the impact of possible predisposing factors ( age, gender, and depth and extent of injury) and the relation to other dysfunctioning organs and sepsis.

    Method: We performed an explorative cohort study on patients with a TBSA% (percentage burned of total body surface area) of 20% or more who were admitted to a national burn centre. Acute kidney injury was classified according to the international consensus classification of RIFLE ( Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of kidney function, and End-stage kidney disease). Prospectively collected clinical and laboratory data were used for assessing organ dysfunction, systemic inflammatory response, and sepsis.

    Results: The incidence of acute kidney injury among major burns was 0.11 per 100,000 people per year. Of 127 patients, 31 (24%) developed acute kidney injury (12% Risk, 8% Injury, and 5% Failure). Mean age was 40.6 years (95% confidence interval [CI] 36.7 to 44.5), TBSA% was 38.6% (95% CI 35.5% to 41.6%), and 25% were women. Mortality was 14% and increased with increasing RIFLE class (7% normal, 13% Risk, 40% Injury, and 83% Failure). Renal dysfunction occurred within 7 days in 55% of the patients and recovered among all survivors. Age, TBSA%, and extent of full thickness burns were higher among the patients who developed acute kidney injury. Pulmonary dysfunction and systemic inflammatory response syndrome were present in all of the patients with acute kidney injury and developed before the acute kidney injury. Sepsis was a possible aggravating factor in acute kidney injury in 48%. Extensive deep burns (25% or more full thickness burn) increased the risk for developing acute kidney injury early (risk ratio 2.25).

    Conclusions: Acute kidney injury is common, develops soon after the burn, and parallels other dysfunctioning organs. Although acute kidney injury recovered in all survivors, in higher acute kidney injury groups, together with cardiovascular dysfunction, it correlated with mortality.

  • 149.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is as important as inhalation injury for the development of respiratory dysfunction in major burns2008In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 441-451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Respiratory dysfunction is common after major burns. The pathogenesis is, however, still under debate. The aim was to classify and examine underlying reasons for respiratory dysfunction after major burns. Consecutive adult patients (n = 16) with a total burned body surface area of 20% or more who required mechanical ventilation were assessed for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), inhalation injury, sepsis, ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), using conventional criteria, together with measurements of cardiovascular variables and viscoelastic properties of the lung including extravascular lung water.

    Nine patients developed ARDS within 6 days of injury. ARDS was characterized by a large reduction in the PEEP-adjusted PaO2:FiO2 ratio, pulmonary compliance, and increased extra vascular lung water together with increased renal dysfunction rates. Seven patients fulfilled the criteria for inhalation injury. They also had decreased PaO2:FiO2 ratios. There was an increase in extra vascular lung water and a decrease in compliance measures though not to the same extent as in the ARDS group. White blood cell counts dropped from (mean) 21.4 x 10exp9 /l (95% CI 15.3-27.5) in day 1 to 4.3 x 10exp9 /l (2.2-6.5) on day 3, and lower values tended to correlate with the development of ARDS. Sepsis occurred before onset of ARDS in only three cases. One patient fulfilled the criteria for VAP, but none was thought to have VILI.

    We found that respiratory dysfunction after burns is multifactorial, and ARDS and inhalation injury are most important. The early onset of ARDS, together with the changes in white blood cell count and organ dysfunction, favours a syndrome in which respiratory distress is induced by an inflammatory process mediated by the effect of the burn rather than being secondary to sepsis. The power of these conclusions is, however, hampered by the small number of patients in this study.