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  • 101.
    Nordigården, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    Rehme, Jakob
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics.
    DIY-Reailers' Development and Supplier Consequences - A Study of the Swedish DIY Market2006In: The International Conference on Information Technology in Business ITIB,2006, Warsawa: Warsaw Agricultural University , 2006, p. 343-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In many business contexts large retailers are developing capabilities that together with their purchasing clout mean that they can act as gatekeepers to the end-customers and gain positions as channel captains and by this push more and more responsibility towards upstream suppliers. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to a better understanding of DIY-retailers, their development and consequences for their suppliers. Some emphasis will be put on suppliers of wood products. A framework for analysis is used, which can be divided into three analysis areas; (1) technical, (2) commercial, and (3) logistical consequences.

  • 102.
    Nordigården, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics.
    Rehme, Jakob
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics.
    Brege, Staffan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    Chicksand, Daniel
    Warwick University.
    Walker, Helen
    Cardiff Business School.
    Outsourcing Decisions: The Case of Parallel Production2014In: International Journal of Operations & Production Management, ISSN 0144-3577, E-ISSN 1758-6593, Vol. 34, no 8, p. 974-1002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to investigate an underexplored aspect of outsourcing involving a mixed strategy in which parallel production is continued in-house at the same time as outsourcing occurs.Design/methodology/approach - The study applied a multiple case study approach and drew on qualitative data collected through in-depth interviews with wood product manufacturing companies.Findings - The paper posits that there should be a variety of mixed strategies between the two governance forms of "make" or "buy." In order to address how companies should consider the extent to which they outsource, the analysis was structured around two ends of a continuum: in-house dominance or outsourcing dominance. With an in-house-dominant strategy, outsourcing complements an organization's own production to optimize capacity utilization and outsource less cost-efficient production, or is used as a tool to learn how to outsource. With an outsourcing-dominant strategy, in-house production helps maintain complementary competencies and avoids lock-in risk.Research limitations/implications - This paper takes initial steps toward an exploration of different mixed strategies. Additional research is required to understand the costs of different mixed strategies compared with insourcing and outsourcing, and to study parallel production from a supplier viewpoint.Practical implications - This paper suggests that managers should think twice before rushing to a "me too" outsourcing strategy in which in-house capacities are completely closed. It is important to take a dynamic view of outsourcing that maintains a mixed strategy as an option, particularly in situations that involve an underdeveloped supplier market and/or as a way to develop resources over the long term.Originality/value - The concept of combining both "make" and "buy" is not new. However, little if any research has focussed explicitly on exploring the variety of different types of mixed strategies that exist on the continuum between insourcing and outsourcing.

  • 103. Noronha, C
    et al.
    Dahlgaard Park, Su Mi
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    Quality Management: Learning from failures2003In: Euro Asia : journal of management, ISSN 0872-8496, Vol. 13, no Editorial for Special Issue, p. 26-26Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 104.
    Rehme, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    Brege, Staffan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    Know Your Why's and How's - Towards a Contingency Model for Industrial E-procurement2005In: Strategies for Generating E-Business Returns on Investment / [ed] Namchul Shin, Hershey PA, USA: Idea Group Publishing , 2005, p. 125-142Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

         Companies invest in e-business and its supporting technology for their e-business initiatives. E-business applications such as supply chain management and customer relationship management improve transaction efficiency and scope economies as well as promoting new product and service offerings and close customer relationships. However, it is difficult for companies to capture these benefits as economic value or profits. Many companies launching e-businesses have not been successful at creating economic value. To justify continued expenditures, it may be necessary for IT managers to move beyond simply demonstrating the benefits of technology and objectively demonstrate the increase in economic value these technologies can produce. To create value from e-business, companies may have to develop appropriate strategies or unique value propositions to complement their e-business investments. This book presents a group of studies that yield significant new insights into the creation of e-business value.

  • 105.
    Sundström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Effectiveness in innovation: a study of software development projects2002Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Companies must simultaneously focus on cost and time efficient product development as well as enabling radical and incremental innovation for long-term survival. The companies in the study from high-tech industries face the demands on innovation within their software development projects.

    Software development projects are often characterised by a rational approach with focus on short-term results, careful planning and a step-by­ step process. Critical questions include what kind of innovation and behaviour this environment fosters on both organisational and individual level.

    The overall goal of this thesis is to discuss consequences on the capabilities for innovation when more work is performed in projects.

    The chosen empirical indicators of innovation, customer interaction and organising for innovation, provide a picture of projects primarily supporting incremental not radical innovation. Additionally, interaction with an external customer seems to bring clarity to priorities at the same time as an individual focus provides clarity for responsibilities.

  • 106.
    Svensson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, Anna
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics.
    Towards Commercialisation of Academic Research Results: Lessons Learned from Swedish Microelectronics Research2005In: RENT XIX - Entrepreneurship Competitiveness and Local Development: RENT XIX Proceedings ed by M. Raffa and L. Iandoli,,2005, Napels, Italy: RENT , 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 107.
    Tell, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    What do organizations know? Dynamics of justification contexts in R&D activities2004In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 443-471Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article suggests a framework for analysing organizational knowledge as a process of justification in different contexts. Drawing upon philosophy, it identifies four principal contexts for justification, implying four different knowledge types: objective knowledge, subjective knowledge, personal knowledge and institutional knowledge. The article provides empirical illustrations of these knowledge types and the justification processes involved from various studies of activities in R&D and engineering. The article contributes to the literature on organizational knowledge in several respects. First, it provides a pluralistic analysis of the concept of knowledge without resorting to an 'anything goes' approach. Second, the account of organizational knowledge focuses not on its inherent properties, but rather on the justification context for knowledge claims. Third, organizational knowledge is analysed in a weak sense, where justification contexts both inside and outside the organization play an important role in the dynamics of organizational knowledge. Fourth, the article questions simplified tacit/codified knowledge dichotomies, for example suggesting that more research in organizational knowledge should be refocused towards understanding subjective and institutional knowledge.

  • 108.
    Wasner, Reine
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The Outsourcing PRocess - Strategic and operational realities1999Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The combination of shorter product life cycles, increased product complexity, and resource !imitations in conjunction with the globalization of the economy puts immense pressure on corporations to become more efficient, or leaner, in their operations (Alexander 1985, Sanchez 1997, Harryson 1998). One way of managing such competitive pressures has been tooutsource certain acrivities and focus internally on what has popularly been termed core competenciq thus enabling expansion and growth without having to carry the entire financial burden This is especially true for the increasing number of firms that have assumed (whether by choice or as an imperative) the systems integrator role, which implies migrating upwards in the value chain. Examples include the electronics, aerospace and automotive industries GJimonian 1990, Mclvor, Humphreys & McAleer 1997, Prudente 1999). Numerous inclustry surveys; e.g. Andersen Consulting Vinkleman 1997), KPMG (Ailott & Law 1997; and PA Consulting Lonsdale & Cox 1997), testify to the frequent occurrence of outsourcing and Drucker (1994) also recognizes the advent ofoursourcing:

    Not in a very long time .. have there been as many new major management techniques as there are today: downsizing, outsourcing, total quality management, economic \0alue analysis, bcnchmarking, reengineering. Each is a powerful tool. But with the cxceptions of outsourcing and reengincering, these t0ols are designed primarily to do differcntly what is already bcing donc. Drucker (1994) p. 95

    In defining thc boundarics of thc f irm, make-buy decisions help shape the very identity of firms by determining the fundament from which ro creare competitive advantage. Make-buy decisions represent a complex set of considerations, facrors, and tradeoffs; and once made will have long-term consequences, changes becoming problematic because of the high switching costs typically involved. Conceptually, make-buy decisions reflect a firm's overarching straregic directions and are grounded in definitions of core competence. Fine & Whitney (1996) suggest that core competence areas are becoming less stable as the business environment is changing at an ever-faster pace and propose that the process of conceiving make-buy decisions should be considered a core competence in its own right. Under such conditions, the challenge for corporations then becomes how ro continuously adjust to and effectuate new outsourcing strategies depending on prevalent core competence considerations

    Previous research on the phenomenon of outsourcing has mainly focused on strategic. considerations, (i.e. what? and why?). Nevertheless, the process of carrying out the transfer of an activity from being internally controlled ro becoming externally managed (i.e. how?), may prove ro be equally difficult because of interdependencies at the operational level.

    Probert, Jones & Gregory (1993) point ro the failure of many companies ro integrate the make-buy decision inro the overall manufacturing strategy and the findings of Brown & Eisenhardt (1997) in their study of companies competing in highly dynamic and unpredictable markers, i.e. requiring frequent changes, show that managers devote a vast majority of their time analyzing a transition (e.g. a shift from one product development project, advertising campaign, or season of merchandise to the next; or entering and Jeaving markers, absorbing new acquisitions, launching new alliances, and bringing volume production on line), and only very limited time on planning the actual transition, integration or implementation The effects of outsourcing are far reaching, both in terms of physical, temporal, and organizational reach. Physically because there is an inherent complication of losing control as an activity is turned over to an external vendor. Temporally because it is difficult to judge how conditions will change over time and organizationally because outsourcing involves transferring a make-buy decision from the strategic to the operational leve! and transferring an activityfrom one organization to another. It is to this relatively neglected domain ofoutsourcing that the focus of this work tums.

    The purpose of this licentiate thesis is to contribute to an increased understanding of the phenomenon of outsourcing and its effects on the transfer of activities From my general purpose three main research questions can be formulated:

    • What is outsourcing in a manufacturing industry context,
    • How can the outsourcing process be charactcrizecP
    • What are the critical factors that affect and are affected by the outsourcing process?
  • 109.
    Wennberg, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    Wennberg, Ulrica
    Innovation through e-commerce: The human face of Electronic business - sustainability reporting in focus2001In: International journal of new product development & innovation management, ISSN 1464-6684, Vol. 2, no 4Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 110.
    Wennberg, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    Wennberg, Ulrika
    Innovation through Electronic Commerce: The Human Face of Electronic Business - Sustainability Reporting in Focus2000In: Innovation management and new product development / [ed] Paul Trott, Manchester: UMIST , 2000, p. -303Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book is suitable for undergraduates and postgraduates on a wide range of courses from marketing, strategic management, business studies and engineering.

    The subject of innovation management is often treated as a series of separate specialism’s, rather than an integrated task. The main aim of this book, however, is to bring together the areas of innovation management and new product development and to keep a strong emphasis on innovation as a management process.

    Written in an accessible style, this title sets three key areas for the student: Innovation management, managing technology and knowledge and new product development.

    As innovation continues to be at the forefront of economic and political debate about how to improve the competitiveness of economies and firms, Innovation Management and New Product Development will give you some insight into the problems faced by firms as they try to develop innovative products that will help them survive and prosper. This new edition includes new large sections on entrepreneurship, process innovation and counterfeit and imitation. Also this edition includes brand new cases covering new developments in the industry including CSI-DNA Fingerprinting, folding shipping containers.

    Show More Show Less  Innovation management, managing technology and knowledge and new product development.

  • 111.
    Winroth, Mats
    et al.
    Ingenjörshögskolan, Jönköping.
    Danilovic, Mike
    Ingenjörshögskolan, Jönköping.
    Björkvik, Lars
    Industriell marknadsföring Linköpings Universitet.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    Manufacturing strategies implications during transition towards collaborative manufacturing network2003In: Euroma-POMS Conference,2003, Como: Eurooma/POMS Conference , 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 112.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    Accounting for Customer Relationship Changes2007In: 23rd IMP Conference,2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 113.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    Accounting for Customer Relationship Dissolution - The Case of Arthur Andersen2006In: Nordic Workshop on Relationship Dynamics,2006, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 114.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    On customers in mergers and acquisitions2004Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis focuses on how customers are perceived in mergers and acquisitions. Mergers and acquisitions (M&As) are frequent, yet complex, phenomena in business life. One dimension making M&As complex is that they can affect (the merging companies' relationships to) other companies. With an M&A being a potential source of, for example, customer losses, one must ask how, and indeed whether, customers are taken into account in the M&A process, and what are the merging parties' notions concerning customers in relation to an M&A.

    This thesis takes a triangulation approach to the subject, including a literature and press release review and two case studies. The following is concluded: Customers are seldom focused on in the M&A literature, though they are commonly referred to indirectly, in an unproblematised way. By not considering customers as part of an M&A, the literature is neglecting an important aspect - one that has been emphatically recognised in business experience. In actual M&A practice, customers figure prominently in the underlying motives of M&As, and also when determining the degree of integration. Notions concerning customers are malleable, shifting during the course of tl1e M&A process, and also differ between the official view articulated in press releases, and in intra-company discussions regarding reasons for merging or acquiring. The official discourse commonly refers to customers indirectly and as targets, whereas they are treated as actors in intra-company discussions. Once M&A intentions are realised, the focus shifts from creating value to keeping value, and at this stage, customer considerations constrain the degree of integration. While there is no clear-cutline between the integration itself and a possible post-M&A phase, when evaluating an M&A the evaluation tools correspond to how customers are defined in official M&A motives.

  • 115.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    På jakt efter alternativa handledningsformer2006In: Pedagogiska utmaningar i tiden / [ed] Helene Hård af Segerstad, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press , 2006, p. 61-69Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Handledning kan ofta uppfattas som en fokuserad, men också resurskrävande undervisningsform. Förväntningar ställs inte bara på lärarens förmåga att stimulera till egentänkande, men också på att ofta kunna fatta snabba beslut och föra ett projekt framåt. Från studenter kan handledning uppfattas som ett tillfälle att få idéer bekräftade, en möjlighet att ställa specifika frågor och driva den egna lärprocessen framåt, eller som något nödvändigt ont där läraren förväntas vara den som tar initiativ.

    En kritik som därtill ofta riktas mot projekt härrör från grupprocesser och individens syn på sin roll i en gemensam uppgift. Ur lärarperspektivet ställs krav på att stimulera hela gruppen att känna ett gemensamt ansvar, bemöta eventuella gruppinterna konflikter, o s v.

    För att om möjligt komma förbi några av handledningens tillkortakommanden har en projektförberedande seminarieuppgift införts på grundläggande ekonomikurser (industriell ekonomi på ingenjörsutbildningar). Mer specifikt är avsikten med uppgiften att ge studenterna en första orientering och breddad förståelse för det ämne de senare ska fördjupa sig inom. Genom att besvara ett antal frågor och sedan diskutera dessa i tvärgrupper med andra studenter, där varje student individuellt får representera sin grupp, är avsikten att studenterna ska öka sin förmåga att självständigt reflektera och samtidigt lära sig genom att diskutera seminariesvaren med andra studenter.

    Arbetet baseras på studenters utvärdering av projektarbetet och intervjuer med handledare på kurserna. Avsikten med detta papper är att utvärdera om denna seminarieuppgift påverkat det slutliga projektet och kursen som helhet. En avslutande diskussion förs om huruvida denna typ av uppgifter utgör ett komplement till, eller en ersättning för, den traditionella handledningsformen, samt övriga lärdomar från införandet av uppgiften.

  • 116.
    Öberg, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    Anderson, Helén
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics.
    Do customers matter in mergers and acquisitions (literature)?2002In: Nordic Workshop onf Interorganisational Research,2002, 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 117.
    Öberg, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    Grundström, Christina
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    Commercialisation via Acquistion? - A Literature Review2007In: 16th IPSERA Conference,2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 118.
    Öberg, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Grundström, Christina
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    Jönsson, Petter
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics.
    Acquisitions of innovative firms and their impact on customer access2005In: Proceedings (online) of the 21st IMP Conference 2005, 1-3 September 2005, Rotterdam, The Netherlands., Rotterdam: RSM Erasmus University , 2005, p. 49-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditionally, the literature depicts acquisitions of technology or innovative firms as a means for the acquirer to obtain resources or knowledge. This paper challenges the traditional view. We take the perspective of an innovative firm ro ask the question: In what ways does the acquirer affect the cusromer access for the target company? This question is addressed where the acquirer is a company within a mature industry, the target is an innovative firm, and when the target's customers at the same time are competitors to the acquirer. The discussion takes its point of departure in a literature review and a case study which highlight issues of customer access in dimensions of ownership and integration. Three hypotheses targeting different aspects of customer access are developed. As this paper considers the situation from the target's perspective it contributes to the literature on acquisitions of innovative firms. Furthermore, it contributes to the innovation literature through highlighting the influence of ownership on an innovative company in the process of getting customer access.

  • 119.
    Öberg, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    Henneberg, Stefan
    University of Bath.
    Mouzas, Stefanos
    Lancaster University.
    Changing Network Pictures: The evidence from Mergers and Acquisitions2006In: IMP Journal Seminar,2006, Göteborg: Chalmers Tekniska Högskola , 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 120.
    Öberg, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    Henneberg, Stephan C.
    School of Management University of Bath.
    Mouzas, Stefanos
    School of Management University of Bath.
    Changing Network Pictures: The evidence from Mergers & Acquisitions2006In: Annual IMP Conference,2006, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mergers and acquisitions (M&As) may cause dramatic changes in a business network which in turn affect managerial cognition as well as managerial activities. We use the concepts of 'network pictures' and 'networking' to illustrate and analyse changes in managerial sensemaking and networking activities following an M&A. The paper focuses on the merging parties and those companies with which they have direct customer relationships. Based on three case studies comprising eight M&As, we show that managers may need to adapt their previous network pictures in a radical way following an M&A, but that these adaptations are not always realised as shifts in network pictures and adjustments in networking activities by all managers involved. Furthermore, whereas the merging parties' network pictures and networking activities are largely driven by their perception of customers' needs and developments, it is not certain that the M&As are enacted accordingly. The paper contributes to the understanding of M&As from a network perspective and to the conceptual interdependence of the constructs of network pictures and networking in a multi-actor situation.

  • 121.
    Öberg, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    Henneberg, Stephan C
    Manchester Business School The University of Manchester.
    Mouzas, Stefanos
    Management School Lancaster University.
    Organisational Manifestations Of Network Pictures2007In: 23rd IMP Conference 2007,2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 122.
    Öberg, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    Henneberg, Stephan C.
    Manchester Business School The University of Manchester.
    Mouzas, Stefanos
    Management School Lancaster University.
    Organisational Manifestations Of Network Pictures - Concept and case evidence2007In: 3rd IMP Journal Seminar,2007, Manchester Business School , 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 123.
    Öberg, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    Holtström, Johan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    Are Mergers and Acquisitions Contagious? Conceptualising parallel M&A: s among customers and suppliers2005In: IMP Conference,2005, Rotterdam: RSM Erasmus University , 2005, p. 49-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 124.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics.
    Gullander, Staffan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    Produktutveckling för företag i samverkan - Studie av små och medelstora svenska verkstadsföretag2003Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

       

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