liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
123 101 - 116 of 116
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 101.
    Wang, Gang
    et al.
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60208 USA.
    Swick, Steven M.
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60208 USA.
    Matta, Micaela
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60208 USA.
    Mukherjee, Subhrangsu
    NIST, MD 20899 USA.
    Strzalka, Joseph W.
    Argonne Natl Lab, IL 60439 USA.
    Logsdon, Jenna Leigh
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60208 USA.
    Fabiano, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Huang, Wei
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60208 USA.
    Aldrich, Thomas J.
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60208 USA.
    Yang, Tony
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60208 USA.
    Timalsina, Amod
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60208 USA.
    Powers-Riggs, Natalia
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60208 USA.
    Alzola, Joaquin M.
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60208 USA.
    Young, Ryan M.
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60208 USA.
    DeLongchamp, Dean M.
    NIST, MD 20899 USA.
    Wasielewski, Michael R.
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60208 USA.
    Kohlstedt, Kevin L.
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60208 USA.
    Schatz, George C.
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60208 USA.
    Melkonyan, Ferdinand S.
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60208 USA.
    Facchetti, Antonio
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60208 USA; Flexterra Corp, IL 60077 USA.
    Marks, Tobin J.
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60208 USA.
    Photovoltaic Blend Microstructure for High Efficiency Post-Fullerene Solar Cells. To Tilt or Not To Tilt?2019In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 141, no 34, p. 13410-13420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Achieving efficient polymer solar cells (PSCs) requires a structurally optimal donor-acceptor heterojunction morphology. Here we report the combined experimental and theoretical characterization of a benzodithiophene-benzo-thiadiazole donor polymer series (PBTZF4-R; R = alkyl substituent) blended with the non-fullerene acceptor ITIC-Th and analyze the effects of substituent dimensions on blend morphology, charge transport, carrier dynamics, and PSC metrics. Varying substituent dimensions has a pronounced effect on the blend morphology with a direct link between domain purity, to some extent domain dimensions, and charge generation and collection. The polymer with the smallest alkyl substituent yields the highest PSC power conversion efficiency (PCE, 11%), reflecting relatively small, high-purity domains and possibly benefiting from "matched" donor polymer-small molecule acceptor orientations. The distinctive morphologies arising from the substituents are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations which reveal that substituent dimensions dictate a well-defined set of polymer conformations, in turn driving chain aggregation and, ultimately, the various film morphologies and mixing with acceptor small molecules. A straightforward energetic parameter explains the experimental polymer domain morphological trends, hence PCE, and suggests strategies for substituent selection to optimize PSC materials morphologies.

  • 102.
    Wang, Suhao
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Emerging efficient charge-transport landscape based on short-range order in conjugated polymers2019In: Synthetic metals, ISSN 0379-6779, E-ISSN 1879-3290, Vol. 251, p. 16p. 104-119Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The booming of classic semicrystalline polymers has led to the assumption and thus design guidelines that long-range order is a prerequisite to endow conjugated polymers with high charge carrier mobility. Consequently, tremendous research effort has been devoted to increasing the crystallinity of conjugated polymers, as a principal strategy to improve the solid-state long-range charge-transport properties. Indeed, noticeable progress in the polymer performance has been witnessed. However, only a limited level of crystallinity can be achieved due to the inherently disordered nature of the polymer chains, resulting in the bottlenecks of the charge carrier mobility of conjugated polymers. Encouragingly, the recent reports of substantially disordered, high-performance conjugated polymers have opened a new route for achieving efficient charge transport, and lead to new waves of progress in the field of organic electronics. The universal observation of short-range order (in the form of aggregation) in the emerging class of poorly ordered conjugated polymers seems to suggest that local order is sufficient for efficient charge transport, and that extended long-range crystallinity is not essential. This review discusses the molecular origin of the high mobilities observed in the state-of-the-art low-crystalline conjugated polymers, especially highlighting the crucial role of short-range order.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 103.
    Wang, Suhao
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fazzi, Daniele
    Univ Cologne, Germany.
    Puttisong, Yuttapoom
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jafari, Mohammad Javad
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Chen, Zhihua
    Flexterra Corp, IL 60077 USA.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Andreasen, Jens W.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
    Chen, Weimin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Facchetti, Antonio
    Flexterra Corp, IL 60077 USA; Northwestern Univ, IL 60208 USA; Northwestern Univ, IL 60208 USA.
    Fabiano, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Effect of Backbone Regiochemistry on Conductivity, Charge Density, and Polaron Structure of n-Doped Donor-Acceptor Polymers2019In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 31, no 9, p. 3395-3406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated the influence of backbone regiochemistry on the conductivity, charge density, and polaron structure in the widely studied n-doped donor-acceptor polymer poly[N,N-bis(2-octyldodecyl)-1,4,5,8-naphthalenediimide-2,6-diyl]-alt-5,5-(2,2-bithiophene) [P-(NDI2OD-T2)]. In contrast to classic semicrystalline polymers such as poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), the regioirregular (RI) structure of the naphthalenediimide (NDI)-bithiophene (T2) backbone does not alter the intramolecular steric demand of the chain versus the regioregular (RR) polymer, yielding RI-P(NDI2OD-T2) with similar energetics and optical features as its RR counterpart. By combining the electrical, UV-vis/infrared, X-ray diffraction, and electron paramagnetic resonance data and density functional theory calculations, we quantitatively characterized the conductivity, aggregation, crystallinity, and charge density, and simulated the polaron structures, molecular vibrations, and spin density distribution of RR-/RI-P(NDI2OD-T2). Importantly, we observed that RI-P(NDI2OD-T2) can be doped to a greater extent compared to its RR counterpart. This finding is remarkable and contrasts benchmark P3HT, allowing us to uniquely study the role of regiochemistry on the charge-transport properties of n-doped donor-acceptor polymers.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 104.
    Wang, Xin
    et al.
    Department of Printed Electronics, RISE Acreo, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Grimoldi, Andrea
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hakansson, Karl
    RISE Bioeconomy, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fall, Andreas
    RISE Bioeconomy, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    RISE Bioeconomy, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mengistie, Desalegn
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Edberg, Jesper
    Department of Printed Electronics, RISE Acreo, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Engquist, Isak
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nilsson, David
    Department of Printed Electronics, RISE Acreo, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gustafsson, Goran
    Department of Printed Electronics, RISE Acreo, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Anisotropic conductivity of Cellulose-PEDOT:PSS composite materials studied with a generic 3D four-point probe tool2019In: Organic electronics, ISSN 1566-1199, E-ISSN 1878-5530, Vol. 66, p. 258-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The conducive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiphene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) is widely used in organic electronics and printed electronics due to its excellent electronic and ionic conductivity. PEDOT:PSS films exhibit anisotropic conductivities originating from the interplay of film deposition processes and chemical structure. The previous studies found that high boiling point solvent treated PEDOT:PSS exhibits an anisotropy of 3-4 orders magnitude. Even though both the in-plane and out-of-plane conductivities are important for the device performance, the out-of-plane conductivity is rarely studied due to the complexity with the experiment procedure. Cellulose-based paper or films can also exhibit anisotropic behavior due to the combination of their intrinsic fibric structure and film formation process. We have previously developed a conducive paper based on PEDOT:PSS and cellulose which could be used as the electrodes in energy storage devices. In this work we developed a novel measurement set-up for studying the anisotropy of the charge transport in such composite materials. A tool with two parallel plates mounted with spring loaded probes was constructed enabling probing both lateral and vertical directions and resistances from in-plane and out-of-plane directions to be obtained. The measurement results were then input and analyzed with a model based on a transformation method developed by Montgomery, and thus the in-plane and out-of-plane conductivities could be detangled and derived. We also investigated how the conductivity anisotropy depends on the microstructure of the cellulose template onto which the conducive polymer self-organizes. We show that there is a relatively small difference between the in-plane and out-of-plane conductivities which is attributed to the unique 3D-structure of the composites. This new knowledge gives a better understanding of the possibilities and limitations for using the material in electronic and electrochemical devices.

    The full text will be freely available from 2021-12-17 00:01
  • 105.
    Wang, Zhen
    et al.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Ouyang, Liangqi
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Tian, Weiqian
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Marais, Andrew
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Tybrandt, Klas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wagberg, Lars
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Hamedi, Mahiar Max
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Layer-by-Layer Assembly of High-Performance Electroactive Composites Using a Multiple Charged Small Molecule2019In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 35, no 32, p. 10367-10373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly is a versatile tool for fabricating multilayers with tailorable nanostructures. LbL, however, generally relies on polyelectrolytes, which are mostly insulating and induce large interlayer distances. We demonstrate a method in which we replace polyelectrolytes with the smallest unit capable of LbL self-assembly: a molecule with multiple positive charges, tris(3-aminopropyl)amine (TAPA), to fabricate LbL films with negatively charged single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). TAPA introduces less defects during the LbL build-up and results in more efficient assembly of films with denser micromorphology. Twenty bilayers of TAPA/CNT showed a low sheet resistance of 11 k Omega, a high transparency of 91% at 500 nm, and a high electronic conductivity of 1100 S/m on planar substrates. We also fabricated LbL films on porous foams with a conductivity of 69 mS/m and used them as electrodes for supercapacitors with a high specific capacitance of 43 F/g at a discharging current density of 1 A/g.

  • 106.
    Wanzhu, Cai
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Jinan Univ, Peoples R China.
    Österberg, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jafari, Mohammad Javad
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Musumeci, Chiara
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wang, Chuan Fei
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zuo, Guangzheng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Complex Materials and Devices. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yin, Xiaolong
    Jinan Univ, Peoples R China.
    Luo, Xuhao
    Jinan Univ, Peoples R China.
    Johansson, Jim
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kemerink, Martijn
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ouyang, Liangqi
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dedoping-induced interfacial instability of poly(ethylene imine)s-treated PEDOT:PSS as a low-work-function electrode2020In: Journal of Materials Chemistry C, ISSN 2050-7526, E-ISSN 2050-7534, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 328-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transparent organic electrodes printed from high-conductivity PEDOT:PSS have become essential for upscaling all-carbon based, low-cost optoelectronic devices. In the printing process, low-work-function PEDOT:PSS electrodes (cathode) are achieved by coating an ultra-thin, non-conjugated polyelectrolyte that is rich in amine groups, such as poly(ethylene imine) (PEI) or its ethoxylated derivative (PEIE), onto PEDOT:PSS surfaces. Here, we mapped the physical and chemical processes that occur at the interface between thin PEIx (indicating either PEI or PEIE) and PEDOT:PSS during printing. We identify that there is a dedoping effect of PEDOT induced by the PEIx. Using infrared spectroscopy, we found that the amine-rich PEIx can form chemical bonds with the dopant, PSS. At lower PSS concentration, PEIx also shows an electron-transfer effect to the charged PEDOT chain. These interface reactions lock the surface morphology of PEDOT:PSS, preventing the redistribution of PSS, and reduce the work function. Subsequent exposure to oxygen during the device fabrication process, on the other hand, can result in redoping of the low-work-function PEDOT:PSS interface, causing problems for printing reproducible devices under ambient conditions.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 107.
    Warczak, Magdalena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Warsaw, Poland.
    Osial, Magdalena
    Univ Warsaw, Poland.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Glowacki, Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Warsaw Univ Technol, Poland.
    Electrogeneration of Hydrogen Peroxide via Oxygen Reduction on Polyindole Films2020In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 167, no 8, article id 086502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Efficient electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide via oxygen reduction is of great interest for industrial and clean energy applications. In this work, we report the application of conducting polymer-polyindole (PIN) films for electrogeneration of hydrogen peroxide. Polyindole films were electrochemically polymerized on gold substrates in non-aqueous electrolytes and then tested for electrocatalytic properties in acidic aqueous solutions. We find that PIN can serve as an electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction via a two-electron pathway. Electrolysis performance indicates that PIN is an efficient, selective, and stable electrocatalyst for hydrogen peroxide generation at low pH, and suggests PIN as a conducting polymer with useful electrocatalytic properties in scientific experiments and applications. (C) 2020 The Electrochemical Society ("ECS"). Published on behalf of ECS by IOP Publishing Limited.

  • 108.
    Willfahrt, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Stuttgart Media Univ, Germany.
    Steiner, Erich
    Stuttgart Media Univ, Germany.
    Hoetzel, Jonas
    Stuttgart Media Univ, Germany.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Printable acid-modified corn starch as non-toxic, disposable hydrogel-polymer electrolyte in supercapacitors2019In: Applied Physics A: Materials Science & Processing, ISSN 0947-8396, E-ISSN 1432-0630, Vol. 125, no 7, article id 474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Corn starch and citric acid, two low-cost and abundant materials, were used for establishing a novel screen printable hydrogel for printed electronics applications. Corn starch was modified with citric acid by melt-blending; the so obtained thermoplastic starch was ground to powder and added to a water-starch suspension. Ultrasonication was used to prepare hydrogels of different citric acid concentrations. The most promising hydrogel contained 10% citric acid by weight, provided an ionic conductivity of (2.30 +/- 0.07)mScm(-1) and appropriate rheological properties for screen and stencil printing. The hydrogel shows superb printability and prolonged stability against degradation. The corn starch hydrogel was used as printable gel polymer electrolyte in fully printed supercapacitors. The specific capacitance of the printed supercapacitor reached 54Fg(-1). The printable hydrogel-polymer electrolyte is easy to produce without in-depth chemical knowledge, is based on widely used and non-toxic materials, and may be used as a functional layer in other printed electronics applications such as printed batteries.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-06-22 07:23
  • 109.
    Xiao, Wei
    et al.
    East China Normal Univ, Peoples R China.
    Yang, Jianming
    East China Normal Univ, Peoples R China.
    Xiong, Shaobing
    East China Normal Univ, Peoples R China.
    Li, Danqin
    East China Normal Univ, Peoples R China.
    Li, Yanqing
    Soochow Univ, Peoples R China.
    Tang, Jianxin
    Soochow Univ, Peoples R China.
    Duan, Chungang
    East China Normal Univ, Peoples R China; Shanxi Univ, Peoples R China.
    Bao, Qinye
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. East China Normal Univ, Peoples R China; Shanxi Univ, Peoples R China.
    Exploring Red, Green, and Blue Light-Activated Degradation of Perovskite Films and Solar Cells for Near Space Applications2019In: SOLAR RRL, ISSN 2367-198X, article id 1900394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hybrid perovskite solar cells with a high specific power have great potential to become promising power sources mounted on spacecrafts in space applications. However, there is a lack of study on their photostability as light absorbers in those conditions. Herein, the stability of the perovskite films and solar cells under red, green, and blue (RGB) light illumination in medium vacuum that belongs to near space is explored. The perovskite active layers exhibit different degradations from morphological, chemical, and structural points of view. This is attributed to the strong coupling between photoexcited carriers and the crystal lattice and the diversity of RGB light absorption in the perovskite films. Device characterizations reveal that the efficiency loss of perovskite solar cells results from not only perovskite degradation, but also the photoexcited carriers reducing the energy barrier of ion migration and accelerating the migration to generate more deep-level trap defects. Moreover, comparative devices suggest that the well encapsulation can weaken the effect of vacuum on stability.

  • 110.
    Xiong, Kunli
    et al.
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Tordera, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. TNO, Netherlands.
    Jonsson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dahlin, Andreas B.
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Active control of plasmonic colors: emerging display technologies2019In: Reports on progress in physics (Print), ISSN 0034-4885, E-ISSN 1361-6633, Vol. 82, no 2, article id 024501Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years there has been a growing interest in the use of plasmonic nanostructures for color generation, a technology that dates back to ancient times. Plasmonic structural colors have several attractive features but once the structures arc prepared the colors arc normally fixed. Lately, several concepts have emerged for actively tuning the colors, which opens up for many new potential applications, the most obvious being novel color displays. In this review we summarize recent progress in active control of plasmonic colors and evaluate them with respect to performance criteria for color displays. It is suggested that actively controlled plasmonic colors are generally less interesting for emissive displays but could be useful for new types of electrochromic devices relying on ambient light (electronic paper). Furthermore, there are several other potential applications such as images to be revealed on demand and colorimetric sensors.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 111.
    Xiong, Shaobing
    et al.
    East China Normal Univ, Peoples R China.
    Song, Jingnan
    Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Yang, Jianming
    East China Normal Univ, Peoples R China.
    Xu, Jinqiu
    Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Ming
    Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Ma, Ruru
    East China Normal Univ, Peoples R China.
    Li, Danqin
    East China Normal Univ, Peoples R China.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liu, Feng
    Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Duan, Chungang
    East China Normal Univ, Peoples R China; Shanxi Univ, Peoples R China.
    Fahlman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bao, Qinye
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. East China Normal Univ, Peoples R China; Shanxi Univ, Peoples R China.
    Defect-Passivation Using Organic Dyes for Enhanced Efficiency and Stability of Perovskite Solar Cells2020In: SOLAR RRL, ISSN 2367-198X, article id 1900529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Perovskite solar cells are a highly competitive candidate for next-generation photovoltaic technology. Defects in the perovskite grain boundaries and on the film surfaces however have significant impacts on both the device efficiency and environmental stability. Herein, a strategy using organic dyes as additives to passivate the defect states and produce more n-type perovskite films, thereby improving charge transport and decreasing charge recombination, is reported. Based on this strategy, the power conversion efficiency of the perovskite solar cell is significantly increased from 18.13% to 20.18% with a negligible hysteresis. Furthermore, the rich hydrogen bonds and carbonyl structures in the organic dye can significantly enhance device stability both in terms of humidity and thermal stress. The results present a promising pathway using abundant and colorful organic dyes as additives to achieve high-performance perovskite solar cells.

  • 112.
    Xiong, Shaobing
    et al.
    East China Normal Univ, Peoples R China.
    Yuan, Meng
    Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Yang, Jianming
    East China Normal Univ, Peoples R China.
    Song, Jingnan
    Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Guo, Xuewen
    East China Normal Univ, Peoples R China.
    Li, Xiang
    East China Normal Univ, Peoples R China.
    Li, Bo
    East China Normal Univ, Peoples R China.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Duan, Chungang
    East China Normal Univ, Peoples R China; Shanxi Univ, Peoples R China.
    Liu, Feng
    Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Fahlman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bao, Qinye
    East China Normal Univ, Peoples R China; Shanxi Univ, Peoples R China.
    Engineering of the Back Contact between PCBM and Metal Electrode for Planar Perovskite Solar Cells with Enhanced Efficiency and Stability2019In: Advanced Optical Materials, ISSN 2162-7568, E-ISSN 2195-1071, Vol. 7, no 19, article id 1900542Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cathode interface plays a critical role in achieving high-performance fullerene/perovskite planar solar cells. Herein, the simple molecule Isatin and its derivatives are introduced at the back contact [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM)/Al as a cathode modification interlayer. It is revealed that the Isatin interlayers facilitate electron transport/extraction and suppress electron recombination, attributed to the formation of negative dipole potential steps and the passivation of the interfacial trap density. The average power conversion efficiencies of the resulting devices are significantly improved by 11% from 17.68% to 19.74%, with an enhancement in all device parameters including short-circuit current, open-circuit voltage, and fill factor. The hysteresis index is found to disappear. In addition, such interlayer enhances device stability under ambient conditions compared to the control devices due to suppression of moisture-induced degradation of the perovskite films. These findings provide a comprehensive understanding of the engineering of the back contact between PCBM and the metal electrode to improve efficiency and stability of perovskite solar cells.

  • 113.
    Xiong, Sixing
    et al.
    Huazhong Univ Sci and Technol, Peoples R China.
    Hu, Lin
    Huazhong Univ Sci and Technol, Peoples R China.
    Hu, Lu
    Huazhong Univ Sci and Technol, Peoples R China.
    Sun, Lulu
    Huazhong Univ Sci and Technol, Peoples R China.
    Qin, Fei
    Huazhong Univ Sci and Technol, Peoples R China.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fahlman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhou, Yinhua
    Huazhong Univ Sci and Technol, Peoples R China.
    12.5% Flexible Nonfullerene Solar Cells by Passivating the Chemical Interaction Between the Active Layer and Polymer Interfacial Layer2019In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 31, no 22, article id 1806616Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nonfullerene (NF) organic solar cells (OSCs) have been attracting significant attention in the past several years. It is still challenging to achieve high-performance flexible NF OSCs. NF acceptors are chemically reactive and tend to react with the low-temperature-processed low-work-function (low-WF) interfacial layers, such as polyethylenimine ethoxylated (PEIE), which leads to the S shape in the current-density characteristics of the cells. In this work, the chemical interaction between the NF active layer and the polymer interfacial layer of PEIE is deactivated by increasing its protonation. The PEIE processed from aqueous solution shows more protonated N+ than that processed from isopropyl alcohol solution, observed from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. NF solar cells (active layer: PCE-10:IEICO-4F) with the protonated PEIE interfacial layer show an efficiency of 13.2%, which is higher than the reference cells with a ZnO interlayer (12.6%). More importantly, the protonated PEIE interfacial layer processed from aqueous solution does not require a further thermal annealing treatment (only processing at room temperature). The room-temperature processing and effective WF reduction enable the demonstration of high-performance (12.5%) flexible NF OSCs.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 114.
    Xu, Kai
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sun, Hengda
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ruoko, Tero-Petri
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wang, Gang
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kroon, Renee
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Kolhe, Nagesh B.
    Univ Washington, WA 98195 USA.
    Puttisong, Yuttapoom
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fazzi, Daniele
    Univ Cologne, Germany.
    Shibata, Koki
    Chiba Univ, Japan.
    Yang, Chiyuan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sun, Ning
    Yunnan Univ, Peoples R China.
    Persson, Gustav
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Yankovich, Andrew B.
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Olsson, Eva
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Yoshida, Hiroyuki
    Chiba Univ, Japan; Chiba Univ, Japan.
    Chen, Weimin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fahlman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kemerink, Martijn
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jenekhe, Samson A.
    Univ Washington, WA 98195 USA.
    Mueller, Christian
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fabiano, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ground-state electron transfer in all-polymer donor-acceptor heterojunctions2020In: Nature Materials, ISSN 1476-1122, E-ISSN 1476-4660Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Doping of organic semiconductors is crucial for the operation of organic (opto)electronic and electrochemical devices. Typically, this is achieved by adding heterogeneous dopant molecules to the polymer bulk, often resulting in poor stability and performance due to dopant sublimation or aggregation. In small-molecule donor-acceptor systems, charge transfer can yield high and stable electrical conductivities, an approach not yet explored in all-conjugated polymer systems. Here, we report ground-state electron transfer in all-polymer donor-acceptor heterojunctions. Combining low-ionization-energy polymers with high-electron-affinity counterparts yields conducting interfaces with resistivity values five to six orders of magnitude lower than the separate single-layer polymers. The large decrease in resistivity originates from two parallel quasi-two-dimensional electron and hole distributions reaching a concentration of similar to 10(13) cm(-2). Furthermore, we transfer the concept to three-dimensional bulk heterojunctions, displaying exceptional thermal stability due to the absence of molecular dopants. Our findings hold promise for electro-active composites of potential use in, for example, thermoelectrics and wearable electronics. Doping through spontaneous electron transfer between donor and acceptor polymers is obtained by selecting organic semiconductors with suitable electron affinity and ionization energy, achieving high conductivity in blends and bilayer configuration.

  • 115.
    Zozoulenko, Igor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Singh, Amritpal
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Singh, Sandeep Kumar
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gueskine, Viktor
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Polarons, Bipolarons, And Absorption Spectroscopy of PEDOT2019In: ACS APPLIED POLYMER MATERIALS, ISSN 2637-6105, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 83-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electronic structure and optical absorption spectra of poly(3,4-ethyl-enedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) for different oxidation levels were studied using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT. It is shown, that the DFT-based predictions for the polaronic and bipolaronic states and the nature of corresponding optical transitions are qualitatively different from the widely used traditional picture based on semi-empirical pre-DFT approaches that still dominate the current literature. On the basis of the results of our calculations, the experimental Vis/NIR absorbance spectroscopy and the electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy are re-examined, and a new interpretation of the measured spectra and the spin signal, which is qualitatively different from the traditional interpretation, is provided. The findings and conclusions concerning the nature of polaronic and bipolaronic states, band structure and absorption spectra presented for PEDOT, are generic for a wide class of conducting polymers (such as polythiophenes and their derivatives) that have a similar structure of monomer units.

  • 116.
    Zuo, Guangzheng
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Complex Materials and Devices. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Linares, Mathieu
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Upreti, Tanvi
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Complex Materials and Devices. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kemerink, Martijn
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Complex Materials and Devices. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    General rule for the energy of water-induced traps in organic semiconductors2019In: Nature Materials, ISSN 1476-1122, E-ISSN 1476-4660, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 588-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Charge carrier traps are generally highly detrimental for the performance of semiconductor devices. Unlike the situation for inorganic semiconductors, detailed knowledge about the characteristics and causes of traps in organic semiconductors is still very limited. Here, we accurately determine hole and electron trap energies for a wide range of organic semiconductors in thin-film form. We find that electron and hole trap energies follow a similar empirical rule and lie similar to 0.3-0.4 eV above the highest occupied molecular orbital and below the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, respectively. Combining experimental and theoretical methods, the origin of the traps is shown to be a dielectric effect of water penetrating nanovoids in the organic semiconductor thin film. We also propose a solvent-annealing method to remove water-related traps from the materials investigated, irrespective of their energy levels. These findings represent a step towards the realization of trap-free organic semiconductor thin films.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
123 101 - 116 of 116
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf