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  • 101.
    Grahn Kronhed, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Community-based osteoporosis prevention: Physical activity in relation to bone density, fall prevention, and the effect of training programmes: The Vadstena Osteoporosis Prevention Project2003Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is based on studies of the ten-year community-based intervention programme entitled, the Vadstena Osteoporosis Prevention Project (VOPP). The specific aims of the research were to describe the effects of physical activity and training programmes on bone mass and balance performance in adults, to determine whether a fall risk prevention programme could motivate personal actions among the elderly, to ascertain whether the intervention programme could reduce the incidence of forearm and hip fractures.

    Two studies addressed training programmes for middle-aged and old people. First, VOPP participants who were aged 40–70 years and had low forearm bone mineral density (BMD) values were invited to take part in a one-year weight-bearing training study. Thirty of those individuals were included in the investigation. Additional bone mass measurements were performed at the hip and the lumbar spine, and balance and aerobic capacity were also tested. The training programme was performed twice a week (I). In the second study, healthy persons aged 70–75 years were invited to participate in a balance-training study. Fifteen persons joined an exercise group, and another fifteen were controls. The training programme comprised specific balance exercises and was carried out twice a week for nine weeks (II). The association between forearm BMD values and several lifestyle factors was explored in random samples of the population aged 20–72 years (n=880) in a cross-sectional study (III). Another study explored the association between calcaneal stiffness, forearm BMD, and lifestyle factors amongst participants aged 20–79 years (n=956) at the final registration of the VOPP (V). Effects of the VOPP interventions directed at environmental risk factors for falls and the promotion of physical activity were examined in people aged ≥ 65 years (IV). The incidence of forearm and hip fractures was studied amongst middle-aged and elderly individuals in the intervention and the control communities during the study period 1987–2001 (VI).

    The exercise group (n=15) in the weight-bearing training study showed increases in BMD at the greater trochanter (p<0.01), one-leg stance balance with the eyes closed and coordination tests (p<0.05), and aerobic capacity (p<0.05). No significant difference was found when the groups were compared concerning changes in the different tests during the intervention period (I). In the balance-training study, the exercise group showed post-training improvement in the following tests: standing on the right leg with eyes closed (p<0.01), standing on the right leg (p<0.01) and on the left leg (p<0.05) while turning the head, and walking 30 metres (p<0.01). There were significant differences between the groups in these tests when changes were compared at the post-intervention test (II). Age (p<0.0001) and body mass index (p≤.0001) were associated with forearm BMD in both sexes. Reported moderate physical activity levels in men were positively associated with forearm BMD (p<0.05) (III). In both sexes, reported moderate (p<0.05) and high (women p<0.05 and men p<0.001) physical activity levels were positively associated with calcaneal stiffness. The correlation coefficient between forearm BMD and calcaneal stiffness was 0.58 in women and 0.34 in men (V). Persons aged ≥ 65 years at the follow-up in 1994 reported more use of shoe/cane spikes

    and moderate physical activity levels compared to controls (IV). There was no change in the general incidence of forearm and hip fractures between the communities for the study period. However, there was a tendency towards decreasing incidence of forearm and trochanteric hip fracture in both sexes during the late intervention period in the intervention community (VI).

    A community-based intervention programme aimed at reducing the incidence of osteoporotic fractures must be regarded as a long-term project and should preferably be monitored over an extended post-intervention period.

    List of papers
    1. Effects of physical exercise on bone mass, balance skill and aerobic capacity in women and men with low bone mineral density, after one year capacity in women and men with low bone mineral density, after one year: a prospective study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of physical exercise on bone mass, balance skill and aerobic capacity in women and men with low bone mineral density, after one year capacity in women and men with low bone mineral density, after one year: a prospective study
    1998 (English)In: Scandinavian journal of medicine & science in sports, ISSN 0905-7188, Vol. 8, no 5 Pt 1, p. 290-298Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Vadstena is a small community in the county of Ostergötland, Sweden, where a project began in 1989 to prevent osteoporosis and to lower the expected incidence of osteoporotic fractures. Persons aged 40-70 years who had a low bone mineral density (BMD) value at screening of the distal radius by single-photon absorptiometry (SPA) were invited to participate in a training study during one year. The definition of low BMD was a densitometry value below -1 SD (standard deviation) from a sex- and age-specific reference value (z-score). Fifteen persons wanted to exercise in a group and 15 persons wanted to become a control group. All participants answered a questionnaire about lifestyle, occupation, diseases, medication and heredity. Clinical tests were made regarding mobility of the joints and muscles, balance and physical fitness. BMD for the hip and the lumbar spine were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) before and after the investigation period. The training programme was carried out for 60 min twice a week during one year and had the intention to improve bone mass, muscle strength and flexibility, balance skill and aerobic capacity. After the training period there was a significant increase in BMD at the greater trochanter (P < 0.01), in balance skill (standing on one leg with closed eyes and "ski step"-test) (P < 0.05) and in oxygen uptake capacity (P < 0.05) in the exercise group. In the control group, there was a significant increase in BMD at the lumbar spine (P < 0.05). However, these results should be judged with caution because several participants were over the age of 60, and at that age degenerative changes in the lumbar spine may increase to a greater or lesser extent. Regular weight-bearing exercises during one year seem to influence BMD at the greater trochanter in a training group comprising both women and men. However, our study was small in number and further training studies are needed to assess the effect of weight-bearing training on bone mass in different sex- and age-specific groups.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13678 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-05-19 Created: 2003-05-19
    2. The effect of short-term balance training on community-dwelling older adults
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effect of short-term balance training on community-dwelling older adults
    2001 (English)In: Journal of Aging & Physical Activity, ISSN 1063-8652, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 19-31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This study evaluated a balance-training program's influence in healthy older adults. Fifteen community-dwelling participants aged 70Ð75 years were randomized to an exercise group, and 15 gender- and age-matched participants, to a control group. The 9-week training program comprised ordinary-life balance, vestibular-habituation, and ball exercises and station training. Clinical balance tests were conducted before and after training. Tests that showed significant improvement in the exercise group after the intervention included standing on the right leg with eyes closed, standing on the right leg and the left leg while turning the head and walking 30 m. Significant between-group differences were found at posttest. A significant decrease was seen in the control group in the walking-forward test, and this change was significantly different between groups. The study indicates that balance performance in healthy older adults might be improved by balance training including exercises that stimulate multiple sensory systems and their central integration.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13679 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-05-19 Created: 2003-05-19 Last updated: 2009-05-15
    3. Association between physical activity and forearm bone mineral density in 20-72-year-olds
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association between physical activity and forearm bone mineral density in 20-72-year-olds
    Show others...
    2002 (English)In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 87-96Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Physical activity may influence bone mineral density (BMD) in different ways. In the present study the amount of physical activity and the associations between forearm BMD, body mass index, physical activity and several other lifestyle factors were explored. A random sample of the population in a Swedish municipality was invited to the study and examined by a questionnaire and by forearm bone mineral measurements using single photon absorptiometry. Forearm BMD was measured in 880 subjects. Forearm BMD was stable from 20 to 50 years of age in women and from 20 to 60 years of age in men. Reported moderate leisure-time physical activity levels in men were significantly associated with higher forearm BMD than low leisure-time physical activity levels ( p = 0.042). The findings that moderate levels of leisure-time physical activity in men were associated with higher forearm BMD, give some support to the hypothesis that increased amount of physical activity in a population might be of benefit in the prevention of osteoporosis. Further longitudinal studies of the effect of physical activity in the prevention of osteoporosis, falls and fractures are warranted.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Taylor & Francis, 2002
    Keywords
    Body Mass Index, Cross-SECTIONAL, Osteoporosis, Population-BASED, Prevention
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13680 (URN)10.1080/140381902320141498 (DOI)
    Available from: 2003-05-19 Created: 2003-05-19 Last updated: 2018-05-22
    4. Evaluation of an osteoporosis and fall risk intervention program for community-dwelling elderly.: a quasi-experimental study of behavioural modifications
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of an osteoporosis and fall risk intervention program for community-dwelling elderly.: a quasi-experimental study of behavioural modifications
    Show others...
    2006 (English)In: Aging Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 1594-0667, E-ISSN 1720-8319, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 235-241Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Osteoporosis and fall fractures are increasing problems amongst the elderly. The aim of this study was to explore whether combined population-based and individual interventions directed at risk factors for osteoporosis and falls result in behavioral changes in an elderly population.

    METHODS: A quasi-experimental design was used for the study. Persons aged >or=65 years were randomly selected in the intervention and control community. An intervention program was managed from the primary health care center and delivered to the community. Health education was designed to increase awareness of risk factors for the development of osteoporosis and falling. Questionnaires about lifestyle, health, previous fractures, safety behavior and physical activity level were distributed at baseline in 1989 and at the follow-ups in 1992 and 1994 in both communities.

    RESULTS: There was a difference of 17.7% between the dual intervention (receiving both population-based and individual interventions) and the control samples regarding the self-reported use of shoe/cane spikes, and a difference of 20.5% regarding the reported "moderate level" of physical activity in 1994. There was an increase in the number of participants in the dual intervention sample who, at baseline, had not reported equipping their homes with non-slip mats and removing loose rugs but who did report these changes in 1994. The increase in the reported use of shoe/cane spikes in the dual intervention sample was observed mainly for the period 1992-1994.

    CONCLUSIONS: A public health intervention model, including both population-based and individual interventions, can contribute to behavioral changes in the prevention of falls and changed physical activity patterns amongst elderly people.

    Keywords
    Environmental hazard, fall prevention, population-based
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13681 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-05-19 Created: 2003-05-19 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    5. Is calcaneal stiffness more sensitive to physical activity than forearm bone mineral density?: A population-based study of persons aged 20-79 years
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is calcaneal stiffness more sensitive to physical activity than forearm bone mineral density?: A population-based study of persons aged 20-79 years
    Show others...
    2004 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 333-339Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between forearm bone mineral density (BMD), calcaneal stiffness, and physical activity levels in a normal population using different non-invasive methods.

    Methods: The participants were invited to undergo bone measurements using single photon absorptiometry of the forearm and quantitative ultrasound (QUS) of the calcaneal bone, and also to complete a questionnaire. Physical activity levels were designated low, moderate, and high in the question on leisure-time activity.

    Results: There were 956 participants included in the present study. Forearm BMD in the eighth age decade was 0.40 g/cm2 (95% CI 0.33 - 0.46 g/cm2) lower than in the third decade among women and 0.28 g/cm2 (95% CI 0.18 - 0.37 g/cm2) lower among men. The differences in calcaneal stiffness between the same age decades were 22.4 (95% CI 17.5 - 27.4) among women and 15.8 (95% CI 8.0 - 23.5) among men. The correlation between forearm BMD and calcaneal stiffness was 0.58 (95% CI 0.52 - 0.64) in women and 0.34 (95% CI 0.25 - 0.42) in men. Reported moderate and high leisure-time activity levels in both genders were associated with higher calcaneal stiffness but not with forearm BMD.

    Conclusions: The QUS may be used to measure the effect of present physical activity levels on calcaneal bone at the population level. Further longitudinal studies are warranted in order to determine the most appropriate non-invasive method in population-based studies.

    Keywords
    community-based interventions, osteoporosis, prevention, quantitative ultrasound, questionnaire, reference values, single photon absorptiometry
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13682 (URN)10.1080/14034940410026273 (DOI)
    Available from: 2003-05-19 Created: 2003-05-19 Last updated: 2013-09-05
    6. Impact of a community-based osteoporosis and fall prevention program on fracture incidence
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of a community-based osteoporosis and fall prevention program on fracture incidence
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    2005 (English)In: Osteoporosis international, ISSN 0937-941X, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 700-706Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Associations between a 10-year community-based osteoporosis and fall prevention program and fracture incidence amongst middle-aged and elderly residents in an intervention community are studied, and comparisons are made with a control community. A health-education program was provided to all residents in the intervention community, which addressed dietary intake, physical activity, smoking habits and environmental risk factors for osteoporosis and falls. Both communities are small, semi-rural and situated in Östergötland County in southern Sweden. The analysis is based on incidences of forearm fractures in the population 40 years of age or older, and hip fractures in the population 50 years of age or older. Data for three 5-year periods (pre-, early and late intervention) are accumulated and compared. In the intervention community, forearm fracture incidence decreased in women. There are also tendencies towards decreasing forearm fracture incidence in men, and towards decreasing trochanteric hip fracture incidences in women and in men in the late intervention period. No such changes in fracture incidences are found in the control community. Cervical hip fracture incidence did not change in the intervention and the control communities. Although the reported numbers of fractures are small (a total of 451 forearm and 357 hip fractures), the numbers are based on total community populations and thus represent a true difference. The decrease in forearm fracture incidence among women, and the tendency towards decreasing trochanteric hip fractures, in contrast to the absence of change in cervical hip fractures, might be mainly due to a more rapid effect of fall preventive measures than an increase in bone strength in the population. For the younger age groups an expected time lag between intervention and effect might invalidate the short follow-up period for outcome measurements. Thus, the effect of the 10-year intervention program on fracture incidence should be followed during an extended post-intervention period.

    Keywords
    Fracture outcome, Fragility fractures, Prevention, Quasi-experimental
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13683 (URN)10.1007/s00198-004-1732-0 (DOI)
    Available from: 2003-05-19 Created: 2003-05-19 Last updated: 2013-09-05
  • 102.
    Grahnat, Carl Johan
    et al.
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Herard, Sebastian
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Ackzell, Annicka
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    High Probability of an Underlying Colorectal Cancer Among Patients Treated for Acute Diverticulitis. A Population-Based Cohort Follow-Up Study2016In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 40, no 9, p. 2283-2288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Patients treated conservatively for acute diverticulitis (AD) are recommended colonic assessment to rule out an underlying Colorectal cancer (CRC). This has been questioned in patients with a CT diagnosis of uncomplicated AD. We analyzed the frequency of CRC and compared the characteristics of the CRC patients with controls. Method A cohort of patients treated conservatively for AD during 2005-2011 was identified through an administrative database. Patients diagnosed with CRC within 1 year after the index admission and four randomly selected controls were identified. The patients files were reviewed to verify the diagnosis and obtain information about the clinical characteristics and the management. A blinded review was performed of CT examinations. The expected number of CRC was calculated from age, sex, and period-specific incidence data. The characteristics of the CRC patients were compared with the controls in a nested case-control study. Results 890 patients (298 men and 592 women) were treated conservatively for AD. 12 patients were diagnosed with CRC within 1 year, and ten of them in the sigmoid, giving a Standardized Incidence Ratio of 20.0 (95 % CI 10.2-35.7, pamp;lt;0.001) for sigmoidal cancer. All CRC patients were aged over 70 years. The cancer was missed in six CT scans at the primary reading and in five at the blinded review. Conclusion Patients conservatively treated for AD are at high risk for an underlying CRC, especially if older than 70 years, which motivates routine follow-up. A CT diagnosis of uncomplicated AD does not rule out CRC.

  • 103.
    Grams, Morgan E
    et al.
    Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
    Sang, Yingying
    Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD.
    Coresh, Josef
    Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD.
    Ballew, Shoshana
    Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD.
    Matsushita, Kunihiro
    Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD.
    Molnar, Miklos Z
    Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD.
    Szabó, Zoltán
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar
    Harold Simmons Center for Chronic Disease Research & Epidemiology, University of California Irvine Medical Center, Irvine.
    Kovesdy, Csaba P
    Nephrology Section, Memphis Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Memphis, TN.
    Acute Kidney Injury After Major Surgery: A Retrospective Analysis of Veterans Health Administration Data.2016In: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, ISSN 0272-6386, E-ISSN 1523-6838, Vol. 67, no 6, p. 872-880Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Few trials of acute kidney injury (AKI) prevention after surgery have been conducted, and most observational studies focus on AKI following cardiac surgery. The frequency of, risk factors for, and outcomes after AKI following other types of major surgery have not been well characterized and may present additional opportunities for trials in AKI.

    STUDY DESIGN: Observational cohort study.

    SETTING & PARTICIPANTS: 3.6 million US veterans followed up from 2004 to 2011 for the receipt of major surgery (cardiac; general; ear, nose, and throat; thoracic; vascular; urologic; and orthopedic) and postoperative outcomes.

    FACTORS: Demographics, health characteristics, and type of surgery.

    OUTCOMES: Postoperative AKI defined by the KDIGO creatinine criteria, postoperative length of stay, end-stage renal disease, and mortality.

    RESULTS: Postoperative AKI occurred in 11.8% of the 161,185 major surgery hospitalizations (stage 1, 76%; stage 2, 15%, stage 3 [without dialysis], 7%; and AKI requiring dialysis, 2%). Cardiac surgery had the highest postoperative AKI risk (relative risk [RR], 1.22; 95% CI, 1.17-1.27), followed by general (reference), thoracic (RR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.87-0.98), orthopedic (RR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.67-0.73), vascular (RR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.64-0.71), urologic (RR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.61-0.69), and ear, nose, and throat (RR, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.28-0.37) surgery. Risk factors for postoperative AKI included older age, African American race, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and, for estimated glomerular filtration rate < 90mL/min/1.73m(2), lower estimated glomerular filtration rate. Participants with postoperative AKI had longer lengths of stay (15.8 vs 8.6 days) and higher rates of 30-day hospital readmission (21% vs 13%), 1-year end-stage renal disease (0.94% vs 0.05%), and mortality (19% vs 8%), with similar associations by type of surgery and more severe stage of AKI relating to poorer outcomes.

    LIMITATIONS: Urine output was not available to classify AKI; cohort included mostly men.

    CONCLUSIONS: AKI was common after major surgery, with similar risk factor and outcome associations across surgery type. These results can inform the design of clinical trials in postoperative AKI to the noncardiac surgery setting.

  • 104.
    Grassi, Alberto
    et al.
    Ist Ortoped Rizzoli, Italy.
    Ardern, Clare
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar; La Trobe University, Australia.
    Marcheggiani Muccioli, Giulio Maria
    Ist Ortoped Rizzoli, Italy.
    Neri, Maria Pia
    Ist Ortoped Rizzoli, Italy.
    Marcacci, Maurilio
    Ist Ortoped Rizzoli, Italy.
    Zaffagnini, Stefano
    Ist Ortoped Rizzoli, Italy.
    Does revision ACL reconstruction measure up to primary surgery? A meta-analysis comparing patient-reported and clinician-reported outcomes, and radiographic results2016In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 50, no 12, p. 716-724Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose To compare patient-reported and clinician-reported outcomes, and radiographic results between patients who had had revision ACL reconstruction and those who had had primary ACL reconstruction. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis Data sources The MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE and SPORTDiscus electronic databases were searched on 6 August 2015, using 3 main concepts: (1) revision ACL reconstruction, (2) primary ACL reconstruction and (3) treatment outcomes. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Articles that compared patient-reported or clinician-reported outcomes or radiographic results between patients who had had revision ACL reconstruction and those who had had primary surgery with a minimum of 2 years follow-up were included. The outcomes evaluated were the Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale, objective International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) classification, Tegner Activity Scale, side-to-side difference in anterior tibial translation measured with KT-1000/2000 arthrometer, pivot shift test, tibiofemoral osteoarthritis grading on plain radiographs and subsequent knee surgeries. Results 8 studies (300 revision ACL reconstructions and 413 primary ACL reconstructions) were included in the meta-analysis. Patients who had had revision surgery reported inferior Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale scores (mean difference: 7.8 points), had inferior clinician-reported knee function as assessed with the objective IKDC classification (IKDC category A: 27% vs 57%; IKDC category C or D: 22% vs 8%) and pivot shift test (grade II or III: 7% vs 2%), and more radiographic evidence of tibiofemoral osteoarthritis (50% vs 25%) compared with patients who had had primary surgery. Conclusions Revision ACL reconstruction restored similar anterior-posterior knee laxity compared with primary ACL reconstruction. Patients who had had revision surgery reported inferior Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale scores, had inferior clinician-reported knee function and more radiographic signs of tibiofemoral osteoarthritis compared with patients with primary ACL reconstruction.

  • 105.
    Griffith, May
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Maisonneuve Rosemont Hospital, Canada.
    Alarcon, E. I.
    University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Brunette, I.
    Maisonneuve Rosemont Hospital, Canada; University of Montreal, Canada.
    Regenerative approaches for the cornea2016In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 280, no 3, p. 276-286Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cornea is the transparent front part of the eye that transmits light to the back of the eye to generate vision. Loss of corneal transparency, if irreversible, leads to severe vision loss or blindness. For decades, corneal transplantation using human donor corneas has been the only option for treating corneal blindness. Despite recent improvement in surgical techniques, donor cornea transplantation remains plagued by risks of suboptimal optical results and visual acuity, immune rejection and eventually graft failure. Furthermore, the demand for suitable donor corneas is increasing faster than the number of donors, leaving thousands of curable patients untreated worldwide. Here, we critically review the state of the art of biomaterials for corneal regeneration. However, the lessons learned from the use of the cornea as a disease model will allow for extension of the biomaterials and techniques for regeneration of more complex organs such as the heart.

  • 106.
    Grossmann, Benjamin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Procedural sedation: Aspects on methods, safety and effectiveness2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Safety and effectiveness are fundamental principles within the healthcare sector to provide quality of care and health improvement for patients. By ensuring that care is provided based on evidence-based knowledge, risks and complications can be minimised and the use of scarce resources optimised. An increasing demand for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures challenges the traditional methods for sedation regarding safety and effectiveness. It is desirable that the fundamental principles are improved when refining existing or developing new sedation methods. In this doctoral thesis, safety and effectiveness were evaluated for adult patient-controlled sedation (PCS) using propofol during two endoscopic procedures: endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP) and flexible bronchoscopy (FB); and different doses of rectal racemic ketamine for paediatric (< 4 years) burn wound care.

    Methods: Data on vital functions, sedation level, safety interventions, procedure feasibility, patient-reported outcome and experience measures, and recovery, from three clinical randomised controlled trials were collected. Costs of sedation for the endoscopic procedures were compiled in a cost-analysis study.

    Results: PCS with propofol and bedside anaesthetic personnel was shown to be a safe and effective alternative method of sedation during ERCP and FB compared with intravenous sedation with midazolam. The PCS method gives stable cardiorespiratory conditions with few adverse events and interventions, with a low risk of oversedation. PCS offers similar (FB) or better (ERCP) procedure feasibility and patient satisfaction during the procedures than midazolam. Recovery after PCS is quick, minimises the risk for prolonged hospitalisation and is thereby a potential cost-saving sedation method. The optimal dose of rectal racemic ketamine, 6 mg/kg with the addition of 0.5 mg/kg midazolam during severely painful procedures, gives minimal risk for outbreaks of pain, offers stable vital signs conditions and allows rapid recovery without affecting procedure feasibility.

    Conclusions: The sedation method can be adjusted to type of procedure and patient population. PCS with propofol offers an alternative and reliable method for adult sedation during endoscopic procedures, whereas rectal racemic ketamine combined with midazolam provides good conditions for burn care dressing procedures in young children.

    List of papers
    1. Sedation during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: A randomised controlled study of patient-controlled propofol sedation and that given by a nurse anaesthetist
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sedation during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: A randomised controlled study of patient-controlled propofol sedation and that given by a nurse anaesthetist
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 50, no 10, p. 1285-1292Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Different regimens are used for sedation during ERCP (endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography). Our objectives were to compare safety, ease of treatment, time to recovery and patients’ experiences using PCS (patient-controlled sedation) with propofol as well as sedation given by a nurse anaesthetist (ACS) with propofol or midazolam during ERCP.

    Material and methods: The study included 281 adults in 301 procedures. The PCS group (n=101) delivered bolus doses of 5 mg of propofol according to their need for sedation. The ACS group (n=100) had 2-8 mg/kg/hour of propofol infused, with the target for sedation being Level 3 of the Observer’s Assessment of Alertness/Sedation scale (OAA/S). The control group was given 2-3 mg of midazolam for induction and additional 1 mg if required.

    Results: PCS and ACS increased the ease of the procedure and reduced the numbers of sedation failures compared to midazolam sedation (ACS n=0; PCS n=4; midazolam n=20). The ACS group had more deeply sedated patients (OAA/S Level 2), desaturations and obstructed airways than the PCS and midazolam groups. Over 90% of all patients had recovered (Aldrete score≥9) by the time they returned to the ward. PCS resulted in the least fatigue and pain after the procedure. Patients’ preference for PCS and ACS were the same.

    Conclusion: PCS with propofol is superior to midazolam and comparable to ACS. PCS resulted in a rapid recovery, tended to be the safest and was almost as effective as ACS in ensuring a successful examination.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Taylor & Francis, 2015
    Keywords
    Conscious sedation, propofol, Cholangiopancreatography, Endoscopic Retrograde
    National Category
    Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-112371 (URN)10.3109/00365521.2015.1038848 (DOI)000361324600013 ()
    Available from: 2014-11-24 Created: 2014-11-24 Last updated: 2019-05-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Rectal ketamine during paediatric burn wound dressing procedures: a randomised dose-finding study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rectal ketamine during paediatric burn wound dressing procedures: a randomised dose-finding study
    2019 (English)In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 1081-1088Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Worldwide, ketamine is used during paediatric procedures, but no recommendations are available regarding a suitable dose for rectal administration during procedures involving high levels of pain and/or anxiety such as burn wound dressing change.

    Methods

    We evaluated three different single doses of rectally administered racemic ketamine mixed with a fixed dose of 0.5 mg/kg of midazolam. In total, 90 children – aged 6 months to 4 years – were randomised 1:1:1 to receive 4 mg/kg (K-4 group), 6 mg/kg (K-6 group) or 8 mg/kg (K-8 group) of racemic ketamine for a maximum of three consecutive procedures. Primary outcome measure was procedural pain evaluated by Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) behavioural scale. Secondary outcome included feasibility and recovery time. Patient safety was evaluated using surrogate outcomes.

    Results

    In total, 201 procedures in 90 children aged 19 ± 8 months were completed. The median maximum pain was FLACC 0 in all groups (p = 0.141). The feasibility was better for groups K-6 (p = 0.049) and K-8 (p = 0.027) compared with K-4, and the mean recovery time was the longest for group K-8 (36 ± 22 min) compared with groups K-4 (25 ± 15 min; p = 0.003) and K-6 (27 ± 20 min; p = 0.025). Median maximum sedation measured by the University of Michigan Sedation Scale (UMSS) was higher in group K-8 compared with group K-4 (p < 0.0001) and K-6 (p = 0.023). One child in group K-8 had a study drug-related serious adverse event — laryngospasm/airway obstruction. No rescue analgosedative medication was administered for group K-6.

    Conclusions

    A rectally administered mixture of racemic ketamine (6 mg/kg) and midazolam (0.5 mg/kg) during paediatric burn dressing procedures with a duration of approximately 30 min provides optimal conditions regarding pain relief, feasibility, recovery time and patient safety, with no need for rescue analgosedative medication.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Pergamon Press, 2019
    National Category
    Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-156837 (URN)10.1016/j.burns.2018.12.012 (DOI)000470856100010 ()31060760 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85065014700 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: County Council of Ostergotland, Sweden

    Available from: 2019-05-14 Created: 2019-05-14 Last updated: 2019-07-15Bibliographically approved
  • 107.
    Grossmann, Benjamin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Nilsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Rectal ketamine during paediatric burn wound dressing procedures: a randomised dose-finding study2019In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 1081-1088Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Worldwide, ketamine is used during paediatric procedures, but no recommendations are available regarding a suitable dose for rectal administration during procedures involving high levels of pain and/or anxiety such as burn wound dressing change.

    Methods

    We evaluated three different single doses of rectally administered racemic ketamine mixed with a fixed dose of 0.5 mg/kg of midazolam. In total, 90 children – aged 6 months to 4 years – were randomised 1:1:1 to receive 4 mg/kg (K-4 group), 6 mg/kg (K-6 group) or 8 mg/kg (K-8 group) of racemic ketamine for a maximum of three consecutive procedures. Primary outcome measure was procedural pain evaluated by Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) behavioural scale. Secondary outcome included feasibility and recovery time. Patient safety was evaluated using surrogate outcomes.

    Results

    In total, 201 procedures in 90 children aged 19 ± 8 months were completed. The median maximum pain was FLACC 0 in all groups (p = 0.141). The feasibility was better for groups K-6 (p = 0.049) and K-8 (p = 0.027) compared with K-4, and the mean recovery time was the longest for group K-8 (36 ± 22 min) compared with groups K-4 (25 ± 15 min; p = 0.003) and K-6 (27 ± 20 min; p = 0.025). Median maximum sedation measured by the University of Michigan Sedation Scale (UMSS) was higher in group K-8 compared with group K-4 (p < 0.0001) and K-6 (p = 0.023). One child in group K-8 had a study drug-related serious adverse event — laryngospasm/airway obstruction. No rescue analgosedative medication was administered for group K-6.

    Conclusions

    A rectally administered mixture of racemic ketamine (6 mg/kg) and midazolam (0.5 mg/kg) during paediatric burn dressing procedures with a duration of approximately 30 min provides optimal conditions regarding pain relief, feasibility, recovery time and patient safety, with no need for rescue analgosedative medication.

  • 108.
    Hadimeri, Henrik
    et al.
    Department of Nephrology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Hadimeri, Ursula
    Department of Radiology, Höglandssjukhuset, Eksjö, Sweden.
    Attman, Per-Ola
    Department of Nephrology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Nyberg, Gudrun
    Transplant Unit, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Dimensions of Arteriovenous Fistulas in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease2000In: Nephron. Clinical practice, ISSN 1660-8151, E-ISSN 2235-3186, Vol. 85, no 1, p. 50-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aim: Aneurysms are known manifestations of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). We investigated whether the dimensions of arteriovenous fistulas created for performance of haemodialysis were affected by the original disease.

    Methods: The lumen diameter of the fistula was studied by ultrasound in 19 patients with ADPKD and in 19 control patients. The patients’ sex, age, the duration of their fistulas, haemoglobin values and blood pressure levels were similar in both groups. The monitoring was performed along the forearm part of the vein, and the maximal diameter was measured. The diameters at the two needle insertion sites were also measured.

    Results: The ADPKD patients had a significantly higher fistula diameter than the control patients: 12 (range 8–19) mm versus 8 (range 6–24) mm at the widest level (p = 0.003). There were no significant differences in the diameters at the needle insertion sites.

    Conclusion: The receiving veins of arteriovenous fistulas in patients with ADPKD have an abnormality that causes a greater than normal dilatation in response to the arterialization. We postulate that this phenomenon is linked with the increased prevalence of aneurysms in ADPKD.

  • 109.
    Hadimeri, Ursula
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Factors affecting the physical characteristics of arterio-venous fistula in patients with renal failure2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Purpose

    A patent access is vital for a dialysis patient. The arterio-venous fistula (AVF), the most important access for haemodialysis (HD), is frequently affected by extensive complications such as stenosis and occlusions.

    Study I: To investigate whether the dimensions of AVFs used for performing haemodialysis were affected by the original disease.

    Study II: To investigate if the diameter of the distal radiocephalic fistula could influence left ventricular variables in stable haemodialysis patients.

    Study III: To investigate whether a single Far Infrared (FIR) light treatment could alter blood velocity, AVF diameter or inflammatory markers.

    Study IV: To evaluate in what extent the renal diagnosis and radiological interventions affected the dysfunction of AVF and results of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA).

    Materials and methods

    Study I: The lumen diameter of the AVF was studied by ultrasound in 19 patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and in 19 control patients. The monitoring was performed along the forearm part of the vein, the maximal diameter was measured. The diameters of the two needle insertion sites were also measured.

    Study II: Nineteen patients were investigated with echocardiography, using M-mode recordings and measurements in the 2D image. Ultrasound and doppler ultrasound were performed. Transsonic measurements were performed after the ultrasound investigation. Measurements of the diameter of the AVF were performed in four locations. Heart variables were analysed regarding left ventricular (LV) criteria.

    Study III: Thirty patients with native AVF in the forearm were included. Each patient was his/her own control. Ultrasound examinations of the AVF diameter and blood flow velocity were performed before and after a single Far Infrared light (FIR) treatment.

    Study IV: 522 radiological investigations and endovascular treatments between January 1, 2006 and December 31, 2014 were analysed in 174 patients, retrospectively. All investigations had been performed due to clinical suspicion of impaired AVF function. All stenoses were evaluated and the number, degree, length, location and relation to anastomosis were recorded. After PTA the remaining stenoses were evaluated again and complications were recorded.

    Results

    Study I: The diameter of the AVF at the maximal site in patients with ADPKD was significantly wider than that for the control patients.

    Study II: A larger AVF mean and maximal diameter worsened left ventricular characteristics.

    Study III: A single FIR treatment resulted in a significant increase in blood velocity over the AV fistula from a mean of 2.1±1.0 m/s to 2.3±1.0 m/s. The diameter of the arterialized vein became wider, i.e. 0.72±0.02 to 0.80±0.02 cm. The increase in fistula blood velocity correlated positively with baseline serum-urate and the increase in venous diameter correlated positively with the baseline plasma orosomucoid concentration.

    Study IV: The degree of AVF stenosis before PTA correlated significantly with the degree of remaining stenosis after intervention. Arterial stenosis was significantly more frequent among patients with diabetic nephropathy and interstitial nephritis. A shorter life span between PTAs was related to diabetic nephropathy.

    Conclusions

    Study I: The receiving veins of AVF in patients with ADPKD have an abnormality that causes a greater than normal dilatation in response to the arterialization.

    Study II: The maximal diameter of the distal AVF seems to be a sensitive marker of LV impairment in stable haemodialysis patients.

    Study III: A single FIR treatment increased AVF blood velocity and vein diameter. Thus, one FIR treatment can help maturation of AVF in the early postoperative course.

    Study IV: Repeated PTA was performed significantly more often in patients with diabetic nephropathy. Clinically significant stenosis should be dilated as soon as possible. Occlusion of the AVF should be thrombolyzed and/or dilated when diagnosed.

    List of papers
    1. Dimensions of Arteriovenous Fistulas in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dimensions of Arteriovenous Fistulas in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease
    2000 (English)In: Nephron. Clinical practice, ISSN 1660-8151, E-ISSN 2235-3186, Vol. 85, no 1, p. 50-53Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aim: Aneurysms are known manifestations of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). We investigated whether the dimensions of arteriovenous fistulas created for performance of haemodialysis were affected by the original disease.

    Methods: The lumen diameter of the fistula was studied by ultrasound in 19 patients with ADPKD and in 19 control patients. The patients’ sex, age, the duration of their fistulas, haemoglobin values and blood pressure levels were similar in both groups. The monitoring was performed along the forearm part of the vein, and the maximal diameter was measured. The diameters at the two needle insertion sites were also measured.

    Results: The ADPKD patients had a significantly higher fistula diameter than the control patients: 12 (range 8–19) mm versus 8 (range 6–24) mm at the widest level (p = 0.003). There were no significant differences in the diameters at the needle insertion sites.

    Conclusion: The receiving veins of arteriovenous fistulas in patients with ADPKD have an abnormality that causes a greater than normal dilatation in response to the arterialization. We postulate that this phenomenon is linked with the increased prevalence of aneurysms in ADPKD.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Basel: S. Karger, 2000
    National Category
    Rheumatology and Autoimmunity Surgery Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-154621 (URN)10.1159/000045629 (DOI)
    Available from: 2019-02-22 Created: 2019-02-22 Last updated: 2019-02-22Bibliographically approved
    2. Fistula diameter correlates with echocardiographic characteristics in stable hemodialysis patients
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fistula diameter correlates with echocardiographic characteristics in stable hemodialysis patients
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Nephrology @ Point of Care, ISSN 2059-3007, Vol. 1, no 1, p. e44-e48Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is a common finding in hemodialysis patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate if the diameter of the distal radiocephalic fistula could influence left ventricular variables in stable hemodialysis patients.

    Methods

    Nineteen patients were investigated. Measurements of the diameter of the arteriovenous (AV) fistula were performed in 4 different locations. The patients were investigated using M-mode recordings and measurements in the 2D image. Doppler ultrasound was also performed. Transonic measurements were performed after ultrasound investigation.

    Results

    Fistula mean and maximal diameter correlated with left ventricular characteristics. Fistula flow correlated neither with the left ventricular characteristics nor with fistula diameters.

    Conclusions

    The maximal diameter of the distal AV fistula seems to be a sensitive marker of LVH in stable hemodialysis patients.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wichtig Publishing, 2015
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130611 (URN)
    Note

    DOI does not work: 10.5301/pocj.5000193

    Available from: 2016-08-18 Created: 2016-08-18 Last updated: 2019-02-22
    3. A single treatment, using Far Infrared light improves blood flow conditions in arteriovenous fistula
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A single treatment, using Far Infrared light improves blood flow conditions in arteriovenous fistula
    2017 (English)In: Clinical hemorheology and microcirculation, ISSN 1386-0291, E-ISSN 1875-8622, Vol. 66, no 3, p. 211-217Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: A native arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is recommended for angio access in patients on chronic hemodialysis (HD). Fistula patency has been improved by exposure to Far Infrared light (FIR). OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether a single FIR treatment could alter blood velocity, AVF diameter or inflammatory markers. METHODS: Thirty patients with a native AVF in the forearm were included. Each patient was his/her own control. Ultrasound (US) examinations were performed before and after a single FIR treatment. RESULTS: A single FIR treatment resulted in a significant increase in blood velocity over the AV fistula from a mean of 2.1 +/- 1.0 m/s to 2.3 +/- 1.0 m/s (p = 0.02). The diameter of the arterialized vein became wider; 0,72 cm +/- 0.02 to 0,80 cm +/- 0.02, (p = 0.006). The increase in fistula blood velocity correlated positively with base line serum-urate p = 0.004) and the increase in venous diameter with the base line plasma orosomucoid concentration (p = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that a single FIR treatment significantly increased AVF blood velocity and vein diameter. Thus, one FIR treatment can help maturation of AVF in the early postoperative course.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    IOS PRESS, 2017
    Keywords
    Ultrasound; vascular access; Far Infrared therapy; hemodialysis
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-139673 (URN)10.3233/CH-170254 (DOI)000404475300004 ()28527196 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2017-08-16 Created: 2017-08-16 Last updated: 2019-02-22
  • 110.
    Hager, Jakob
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Aspects on how to affect mortality from rupture2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) is a disease that mainly affects elderly men, and ruptured AAA (rAAA) is associated with a mortality of > 80%. AAA seldom gives any symptoms prior to rupture.

    The aims of this thesis were to investigate different aspects of how to affect mortality from rAAA.

    In Study I, we identified 849 patients treated for rAAA during 1987-2004, and studied the 30-day survival after surgery, depending on whether they came directly to the treating hospital (one-stop) or were transferred via another hospital (two-stop). A two-stop referral pattern resulted in a 27% lower population-based survival rate for patients 65-74 years of age. However, the consequences would be small even if a one-stop referral pattern could be generally accomplished, due to the huge over-all mortality related to rAAA, hence an argument to find and treat AAA before rupture, e.g. by screening.

    In Study II, we examined the AAA-prevalence and the risk factors for AAA among 70-year-old men. The screening-detected AAA-prevalence was 2.3%, thus less than half the predicted. The most important risk factor was smoking.

    In Study III, we compared the screening-detected AAA-prevalence, the attendance rate, and the rate of opportunistic detection of AAA, between almost 8000 65- and 6000 70-year-old men. There was no difference in the screening-detected prevalence; probably due to the fact that almost 40% of the AAAs among the 70-year-old were already known prior to screening, compared to roughly 25% in the 65-year-old. The attendance rate was higher among the 65-year-old men, 85.7% compared 84.0% in the 70-year-old. Thus, there is no benefit of screening for AAA among 70- instead of 65-year-old men.

    In Study IV, a cost-effectiveness analysis, we found that screening for AAA still appears to be cost-effective, despite profound changes in disease pattern and AAA-management.

    In conclusion, we found that mortality from rAAA is not affected in any substantial way by different referral patterns and hence centralisation of services for AAA/rAAA is not a solution. A better alternative is to prevent rupture through early detection by screening. Screening 65-year-old men for AAA still appears to be cost-effective, despite profound changes in disease pattern and AAA-management during the last decade. Screening 70- instead of 65-year-old men will not increase the efficacy of screening.

    List of papers
    1. Population-based survival rate with a one- or two-stop referral pattern for patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Population-based survival rate with a one- or two-stop referral pattern for patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms
    2013 (English)In: International Journal of Angiology, ISSN 0392-9590, E-ISSN 1827-1839, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 492-500Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    Is there a difference in the population-based survival rate for patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (rAAA), handled by a "one-stop" or a "two-stop" referral pattern?

    METHODS:

    Ten regions in Sweden were identified where clear-cut "one-stop" or "two-stop" referral-patterns prevailed. From the Swedvasc Registry we identified 849 patients operated on for rAAA, 1987 to 2004, living in any of these ten regions, and related the number of survivors to the whole population served by each hospital.

    RESULTS:

    The population-based survival rate was 14% lower for patients following a "two-stop" compared to a "one-stop" referral pattern (P=0.084). For the group 65-74 years-of-age the difference was significant (P=0.021), but no corresponding effect was seen regarding operative mortality rate or sex.

    CONCLUSION:

    Compared to a "one-stop" referral pattern for rAAA, a "two-stop" referral pattern results in a lower population-based survival rate for patients 65-74 years old, but the consequences would be small even if a "one-stop" referral pattern could be generally accomplished.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Turin, Italy: Edizioni Minerva Medica, 2013
    Keywords
    Abdominal aortic aneurysm ruptured one-stop two-stop
    National Category
    Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-102480 (URN)23903308 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2013-12-12 Created: 2013-12-12 Last updated: 2017-12-06
    2. Lower Prevalence than Expected when Screening 70-year-old Men for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lower Prevalence than Expected when Screening 70-year-old Men for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm
    2013 (English)In: European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, ISSN 1078-5884, E-ISSN 1532-2165, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 453-459Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Screening 65-year-old men for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is a cost-effective method to reduce the mortality from ruptured AAA. However, contemporary results show a lower than expected prevalence of AAA, thus questioning the benefit of screening. Since the prevalence increases with age, a possible way to enhance the benefit of screening might be to screen older men. Our aim was to determine the contemporary screening-detected prevalence among 70-year-old men.

    Methods

    A total of 5,623 unscreened 70-year-old men were invited to ultrasound screening. Uni- and multivariable analyses were used to assess the risk factors for AAA.

    Results

    The attendance rate was 84.0%. The prevalence of previously unknown AAAs was 2.3%. When adding the 64 men with an already known AAA to the screening-detected ones, the total prevalence in the population was at least 3.0%, and the previously discovered AAAs constituted 37.4% of the total prevalence. “Ex smoker” and “Current smoker” were the most important risk factors.

    Conclusions

    When screening 70-year-old men for AAA, the prevalence was less than half that expected, despite a high attendance rate. Smoking was the strongest risk factor. Almost 40% of the men with AAAs were already known from other means than screening.

    Keywords
    Abdominal aortic aneurysm, Screening, Prevalence, Attendance rate, Swedvasc
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-102089 (URN)10.1016/j.ejvs.2013.07.014 (DOI)000326408400012 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation||King Gustav V and Queen Victorias foundation||

    Available from: 2013-12-02 Created: 2013-11-29 Last updated: 2017-12-06
    3. No benefit of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm among 70- instead of 65-year-old men
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>No benefit of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm among 70- instead of 65-year-old men
    2014 (English)In: International Angiology, ISSN 0392-9590, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 474-479Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Screening 65-year-old men for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) reduces mortality from ruptured AAA (rAAA). Lower than expected prevalence of AAA is now found, why screening at a higher age and rescreening has been discussed. Our aim was to determine if screening at 70 years of age, instead of 65, increases clinical effectiveness.

    Methods: 7951 and 5623 previously un-screened 65- and 70-year old men were invited to ultrasound screening.

    Results: The attendance rate was 85.7% and 84.0%, p<0.01, for the 65- and 70-year old men respectively. The screening-detected prevalence did not differ, being 1.9% and 2.3%, p=0.15, respectively, probably due to the fact that 23.5% and 37.4% of all known AAA among 65- and 70-year-old men, were detected by other means prior to screening, p<0.01. However, the total known prevalence differed between the age-groups, being at least 2.1% and 3.0% respectively, p<0.001.

    Conclusion: The screening-detected AAA-prevalence did not differ between 65- and 70-yearold men, due to the greater number of AAA known prior to screening among 70- compared to 65-year-old men. Screening men at 70 instead of 65 years of age would not result in detection of substantially more previously unknown AAA, thus not preventing rAAA and consequently not more saved life-years. Further, data also indicates that it is questionable if re-screening the 65-year-old male population after five years would generate any important clinical effect.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA, 2014
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-102927 (URN)000345727000010 ()
    Available from: 2014-01-08 Created: 2014-01-08 Last updated: 2017-03-27Bibliographically approved
    4. Changing Conditions - the same Conclusion: Cost-effective to Screen for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm among 65-year-old Men, based on Data from an Implemented Screening Programme
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changing Conditions - the same Conclusion: Cost-effective to Screen for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm among 65-year-old Men, based on Data from an Implemented Screening Programme
    Show others...
    2014 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Health economic analyses based on randomized trials have shown that screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) cost-effectively decreases AAA-related as well as allcause mortality. However, results from running screening programmes now reveal substantially changed conditions in terms of prevalence, attendance rate, costs and mortality after intervention. Our aim was to evaluate whether screening for AAA among 65-year-old men on a general basis is cost-effective under current clinical practice.

    Methods: A decision-analytic model, previously used to show the cost-effectiveness of an AAA-screening programme before decision to introduce screening in practice, was updated using results from implemented screening-programmes as well as data from contemporary published data and the Swedvasc registry.

    Results: The base-case analysis showed that the cost per life-year gained and quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained were 3252 € and 4231 €, respectively. The probability of screening being cost-effective was high.

    Conclusion: Despite profound changes in disease pattern and AAA-management, the current results are similar to those reported almost 10 years ago, and thus screening 65-year-old men for AAA still appears to be cost-effective.

    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-102928 (URN)
    Available from: 2014-01-08 Created: 2014-01-08 Last updated: 2017-03-27Bibliographically approved
  • 111.
    Hager, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Lundgren, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Population-based survival rate with a one- or two-stop referral pattern for patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms2013In: International Journal of Angiology, ISSN 0392-9590, E-ISSN 1827-1839, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 492-500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    Is there a difference in the population-based survival rate for patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (rAAA), handled by a "one-stop" or a "two-stop" referral pattern?

    METHODS:

    Ten regions in Sweden were identified where clear-cut "one-stop" or "two-stop" referral-patterns prevailed. From the Swedvasc Registry we identified 849 patients operated on for rAAA, 1987 to 2004, living in any of these ten regions, and related the number of survivors to the whole population served by each hospital.

    RESULTS:

    The population-based survival rate was 14% lower for patients following a "two-stop" compared to a "one-stop" referral pattern (P=0.084). For the group 65-74 years-of-age the difference was significant (P=0.021), but no corresponding effect was seen regarding operative mortality rate or sex.

    CONCLUSION:

    Compared to a "one-stop" referral pattern for rAAA, a "two-stop" referral pattern results in a lower population-based survival rate for patients 65-74 years old, but the consequences would be small even if a "one-stop" referral pattern could be generally accomplished.

  • 112.
    Hallböök, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Långvarigt Trendelenburgs läge kan orsaka ögonskador: Kortad operationstid i tippat läge och justering av tippningsvinkeln kan minska risken2018In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Risk of optic nerve injury after prolonged Trendelenburgs position Postoperative loss of vision due to acute ischaemic optic nerve injury is a rare complication following pelvic surgery. A steep Trendelenburgs position of the patient, high intraabdominal pressure and a long operative time in Trendelenburgs position are recognised risk factors associated with robot-assisted pelvic surgery. This manuscript presents the underlying pathophysiologic mechanism. Practical tips and tricks for prevention are discussed.

  • 113.
    Halldestam, Ingvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Gallstone disease: Population based studies on risk factors, symptomatology and complications2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background & aims: Gallstone disease is common, costly and its complications are sometimes life threatening. The aim of this thesis is to determine the prevalence and incidence in relation to putative risk factors in the general population. Furthermore, to identify individuals with asymptomatic gallstones who are at risk of developing complications and, finally, to identify those who are at risk of an unsatisfactory outcome after cholecystectomy.

    Material & methods: A sample of the adult (35-85 y.) general population was screened with ultrasound examination, blood tests and a questionnaire regarding digestive symptoms, life-style and quality of life. After excluding 115 subjects, who previously had a cholecystectomy, 739 participated. The examination was repeated after a minimum of five years. The individuals who were shown to have gallstones were followed in order to identify risk factors for developing complications. 200 consecutive symptomatic patients were operated with cholecystectomy on defined indications. They completed a questionnaire regarding digestive symptoms, life-style and quality of life before and three and twelve months after surgery.

    Results: The crude prevalence of gallstone disease was 17.2 % for women and 12.4% for men. It increased with age and was higher among women. Symptoms did not differ between subjects with and without gallstones, but those previously operated with cholecystectomy did worse both regarding symptoms and quality of life. The estimated crude annual gallstone incidence was 1.5%. This increased with age, but did not differ between the sexes. Gallstone development was positively related to elevated blood lipids and negatively related to alcohol consumption. Fourteen of 120 subjects with gallstones at the primary screening developed a complication demanding treatment during a follow-up interval of 87 (3-146) months. In the patient series operated on strict indications, 91.3 % of those who had reported typical gallstone related pain preoperatively, experienced total or partial pain relief 3 months postoperatively. With atypical pain preoperatively, the corresponding figure was 77.1 %. The findings 12 months postoperatively were similar. In the logistic regression analysis, young age, frequency of pain episodes, atypical pain, specific food intolerance and disturbing abdominal gas were positively related to the frequency of abdominal pain 12 months after surgery.

    Conclusion: The prevalence of gallstones was positively related to age and female gender. Previous cholecystectomy was associated with more symptoms and worse quality of life. The annual gallstone incidence of 1.5 % was high in comparison with other studies, but our population was older. In general, neither prevalent nor incident gallstones in the general population were associated with specific symptoms. The cumulative risk of developing a complication to gallstone disease during a 5-year followup interval was 7.6 % with no tendency to level off.

    Patients with typical pain had a better outcome after cholecystectomy. Young age, atypical pain and frequent pain episodes before surgery were major risk factors for a worse outcome in terms of persistent pain.

    List of papers
    1. Prevalence of gallstone disease in a Swedish population sample: Relations to occuption, childbirth, health status, life style, medications and blood lipids
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prevalence of gallstone disease in a Swedish population sample: Relations to occuption, childbirth, health status, life style, medications and blood lipids
    Show others...
    1998 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, Vol. 33, no 11, p. 1219-1225Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There are only a few Swedish studies on the prevalence of gallstone disease in selected age groups, and none including possible risk factors. Methods: Of a population sample of 1200 individuals (age, 35-85 years), 857 participated in the study. The study subjects were asked to answer a questionnaire about potential risk factors (occupation, childbirth, life style, and so forth), symptoms, and quality of life. Cholecystectomy had previously been done in 115 subjects, leaving 742 for ultrasound examination of the gallbladder. Results: The prevalence of gallstone disease increased with age, and at 75 years or more, 53% of the women and 32% of the men either had gallstones or had previously undergone cholecystectomy (32% and 13%, respectively). When comparing subjects with and without gallstones, there were no differences with regard to any variable, including blood lipid levels. The odds ratio of previous cholecystectomy was increased in subjects with an occupation requiring no specific education and reduced in subjects using wine or spirits every week. The odds ratio of abdominal pain was increased after previous cholecystectomy. Women in this group also experienced a lower quality of life. Conclusions: The age and sex distribution of gallstone disease was in the order of the magnitude seen in other Scandinavian countries. None of the studied variables differed between subjects with and without gallstones. Subjects previously operated on with cholecystectomy did worse with regard to symptoms and quality of life.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13291 (URN)10.1080/00365529850172601 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-05-13 Created: 2008-05-13
    2. Development of symptoms and complications in individuals with asymptomatic gallstones
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of symptoms and complications in individuals with asymptomatic gallstones
    2004 (English)In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, Vol. 91, no 6, p. 734-738Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Gallbladder stones are common in the developed world. Complications of gallstones contribute substantially to healthcare costs and may be life threatening. The identification of individuals likely to develop complications would be of benefit in clinical practice as elective cholecystectomy could then be performed.

    Methods: Seven hundred and thirty-nine subjects aged 35-85 years from the general population were screened for gallbladder problems by ultrasonography and questionnaire assessment of putative risk factors and digestive symptoms. Gallstones, cholesterolosis or sludge in the gallbladder were diagnosed in 123 (16·3 per cent) of 739 subjects, 120 of whom were followed for a median of 87 (range 3-146) months to May 2003 or until treatment was required.

    Results: Fourteen patients were admitted to hospital and treated for gallstone-related complications or symptoms. The cumulative risk of being treated during the first 5 years after detection of asymptomatic gallstones was 7·6 per cent and there was no indication of this risk levelling off. There were no significant differences between treated and untreated subjects with regard to digestive symptoms or any of the risk factors monitored at the initial screening, although treated subjects were significantly younger than those who were not treated.

    Conclusion: Nearly one in ten individuals with asymptomatic gallbladder stones in the general population may be expected to develop symptoms or complications that require treatment within 5 years. Age may be inversely related to the incidence of complications.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13292 (URN)10.1002/bjs.4547 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-05-13 Created: 2008-05-13 Last updated: 2009-08-18
    3. Incidence of gallstone disease in a general population sample: relations to symptomatology and potential risk factors
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Incidence of gallstone disease in a general population sample: relations to symptomatology and potential risk factors
    2008 (English)Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13293 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-05-13 Created: 2008-05-13
    4. Defined indications for elective cholcystectomy for gallstone disease
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Defined indications for elective cholcystectomy for gallstone disease
    2008 (English)In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 95, no 5, p. 620-626Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This study examined symptomatology and quality of life following elective cholecystectomy for symptomatic gallstone disease with defined indications for surgery.

    Methods: In this prospective study of 200 consecutive patients (161 women; median age 46·5 (range 24-79) years), strict indications for elective cholecystectomy were stipulated. Digestive symptoms and quality of life were recorded with a self-administered questionnaire before and at 3 and 12 months after surgery.

    Results: Of 149 patients who experienced abdominal pain with typical location before surgery, 136 (91·3 per cent) reported total remission or reduced frequency of that type of pain 12 months later. Of 35 patients who reported atypical or multiple pain location before operation, 27 (77 per cent) experienced reduced frequency or disappearance of that type of pain. Frequency of pain episodes, atypical or multiple pain location, specific food intolerance and frequency of disturbing abdominal gas at baseline correlated positively with the frequency of abdominal pain episodes at 12 months after surgery. There was a tendency towards an inverse relation to age.

    Conclusion: The frequency of persistent abdominal pain after elective cholecystectomy was low among patients with typical pain location before surgery. Atypical pain location, and frequent pain episodes before operation significantly reduced the chance of becoming pain-free.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13294 (URN)10.1002/bjs.6020 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-05-13 Created: 2008-05-13 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
  • 114.
    Halliday, T. A.
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Umeå University, Sweden.
    Sundqvist, J.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Hultin, M.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Wallden, J.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Post-operative nausea and vomiting in bariatric surgery patients: an observational study2017In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 61, no 5, p. 471-479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The risk of post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV) in patients undergoing bariatric surgery is unclear. The aim of the study was to investigate the risk of PONV and the use and effectiveness of PONV prophylaxis. Methods: This prospective observational study included 74 patients undergoing bariatric surgery with total intravenous anaesthesia. Patients were given PONV prophylaxis based on published guidelines and a simplified PONV risk score. Perioperative data were collected and a questionnaire was used at 2, 4, 6, 24, 48 and 72 h after the operation to evaluate PONV. Data are presented as risk (%) with the 95% confidence interval. Results: Sixty five per cent (54-75) of the patients experienced PONV in the first 24 post-operative hours and the risk increased with the number of risk factors for PONV. PONV occurred in 78% (66-87) of women and 26% (12-49) of men during the first 24 h. In relation to the guidelines, one patient received suboptimal PONV prophylaxis, 23% received optimal prophylaxis and 76% supra-optimal prophylaxis. The risk of PONV was 82% (59-94) with optimal prophylaxis and 59% (46-71) with supra-optimal prophylaxis. Of all patients, 34% (24-45) experienced severe PONV in the first 24 h that limited their activity. Conclusions: The incidence of PONV in bariatric surgery patients was high despite a PONV prophylaxis regime following current guidelines. These results cast doubt as to the effectiveness of the usual PONV prophylaxis in this patient group and point to the need for further investigation of PONV prophylaxis and treatment in bariatric surgery patients.

  • 115.
    Hasselgren, Kristina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Halldestam, Ingvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Fraser, M. P.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Benjaminsson Nyberg, Pernilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Does the Introduction of Laparoscopic Distal Pancreatectomy Jeopardize Patient Safety and Well-Being?2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Surgery, ISSN 1457-4969, E-ISSN 1799-7267, Vol. 105, no 4, p. 223-227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Purpose: Despite retrospective data indicating short-term superiority for laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy compared to open distal pancreatectomy, the implementation of the procedure has been slow. The aim of this study was to investigate whether patients operated with laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy during the early phase of introduction are at higher risk for complications than patients operated with open distal pancreatectomy.

    Methods: A retrospective single-center analysis of patients operated with laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy (n=37) from the introduction of the procedure and comparison regarding demographic data, preoperative data, operative factors, and postoperative outcomes to patients operated with open distal pancreatectomy was done.

    Results: Operation duration shortened (195 vs 143min, p=0.04) and severe complications reduced (37% vs 6%, p=0.02) significantly in the laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy group between the first half of the study and the second half. Blood loss was significantly (pamp;lt;0.001) lower in the laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy group (75mL) than in the open distal pancreatectomy group (550mL), while complication rate and hospital stay as well as the percentage of radical resections were the same.

    Conclusion: Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy can be introduced without jeopardizing patient safety and well-being during the early learning curve. The procedures should be compared in a prospective randomized manner.

  • 116.
    Hasselgren, Kristina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Malago, Massimo
    UCL, England.
    Vyas, Soumil
    UCL, England.
    Robles Campos, Ricardo
    Vizgen De La Arrixaca University Hospital, Spain.
    Brusadin, Roberto
    Vizgen De La Arrixaca University Hospital, Spain.
    Linecker, Michael
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Petrowsky, Henrik
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Clavien, Pierre Alain
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Machado, Marcel Autran
    University of Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Hernandez-Alejandro, Roberto
    University of Rochester, NY USA.
    Wanis, Kerollos
    Western University, Canada.
    Walter, Lars
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy does not affect future liver remnant growth and outcomes of associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy2017In: Surgery, ISSN 0039-6060, E-ISSN 1532-7361, Vol. 161, no 5, p. 1255-1265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The only potentially curative treatment for patients with colorectal liver metastases is hepatectomy. Associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy has emerged as a method of treatment for patients with inadequate future liver remnant. One concern about associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy is that preoperative chemotherapy may negatively affect the volume increase of the future liver remnant and outcomes. Methods. This study from the International Associating Liver Partition and Portal Vein Ligation for Staged Hepatectomy Registry (NCT01924741) includes 442 patients with colorectal liver metastases registered from 2012-2016. Future liver remnant hypertrophy (absolute increase, percent increase, and kinetic growth rate) and clinical outcome were analyzed retrospectively in relation to type and amount of chemotherapy. The analyzed groups included patients with no chemotherapy, 1 regimen of chemotherapy, amp;gt; 1 regimen, and a group that received monoclonal antibodies in addition to chemotherapy. Results. Ninety percent of the patients received neoadjuvant oncologic therapy including 42% with 1 regimen of chemotherapy, 44% with monoclonal antibodies, and 4% with amp;gt; 1 regimen. Future liver remnant increased between 74-92% with the largest increase in the group with 1 regimen of chemotherapy. The increase in milliliters was between 241 mL (amp;gt; 1 regimen) and 306 mL (1 regimen). Kinetic growth rate was between 14-18% per week and was greatest for the group with 1 regimen of chemotherapy. No statistical significance was found between the groups with any of the measurements of future liver remnant hypertrophy. Conclusion. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy, including monoclonal antibodies, does not negatively affect future liver remnant growth. Patients with colorectal liver metastases who might be potential candidates for associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy should be considered for neoadjuvant chemotherapy. (Surgery 2017;161:1255-65.)

  • 117.
    Hasselgren, Kristina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Multivisceral Resection in Patients with Advanced Abdominal Tumors2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Surgery, ISSN 1457-4969, E-ISSN 1799-7267, Vol. 105, no 3, p. 147-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aim: Multivisceral resection for advanced tumors can result in prolonged survival but may also increase the risk of postoperative morbidity and mortality. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether extensive resections increase the severity of postoperative complications. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was conducted between 2009 and 2014 at the Linkoping University Hospital surgical department. All patients with a confirmed or presumed malignant disease who underwent a non-standardized surgical procedure requiring a multivisceral resection were included. The primary endpoint was 90-day complications according to the Clavien-Dindo score. Results: Forty-eight patients were included, with an age range of 17-77years. A median of three organs was resected. The most common diagnoses were neuroendocrine tumor (n=8), gastric cancer (n=7), and gastrointestinal stromal tumor (n=6). One patient died during surgery. Complications grade 3b according to Clavien-Dindo score occurred in 10 patients. R0 resection was achieved in 32 patients. No correlation was observed between the number of anastomoses, perioperative blood loss, operative time, and complications. Only postoperative blood transfusion was correlated with severe complications (p=0.046); however, a tendency toward more complications with an increasing number of resected organs was observed (p=0.06). Conclusion: Multivisceral resection can result in R0, potentially curing patients with advanced tumors. Here, no correlation between extensive resections and complications was observed. Only postoperative blood transfusion was correlated with severe complications.

  • 118.
    Hedbrant, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bjorne, Assar
    Specialisttandvården, Lasarettet Ystad.
    Ny mätmetod för käkmuskulaturen kan finna orsaken till tinnitus: Slutrapport Nutek 92-119041997Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Tinnitus är en åkomma som i lindrigare eller allvarligare former drabbar 17% av västvärldens befolkning. Ca 85 000 svenskar har tinnitus på invalidiserande nivå. Förutom mänskligt lidande orsakar tinnitus samhällskostnader på ca 1.5 miljard kr årligen. Orsaken är till största delen okänd.

    Vissa tecken tyder på ett samband mellan tinnitus och funktionsstörning i en käkmuskel. Några olika icke–invasiva metoder för mätning av muskelstörning i M Pterygoideus Lateralis har utvärderas. Två av dessa är intressanta för fortsatta studier.

    Termografi användes för att diagnosticera muskelstörningar på ytligt liggande muskler. Vi såg åtskilliga varma områden på ytliga käk– och nackmuskler på de patienter som hade käkledsstörningar, samt möjligen tecken på onormal värme från M Pterygoideus Lateralis. Mätförhållandena var dock ej ideala.

    En metod att mäta EMG med adaptiv noise cancelling provades. EMG från en ryggmuskel, stört av en “EKG–signal” från hjärtat användes. Metoden fungerade bra. Fortsatt metodutveckling på t.ex. ryggmuskler borde göras.

  • 119.
    Heedman, Per-Anders
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Åstradsson, E.
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Blomquist, K.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Palliation of Malignant Biliary Obstruction: Adverse Events are Common after Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Surgery, ISSN 1457-4969, E-ISSN 1799-7267, Vol. 107, no 1, p. 48-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aim: Endoscopic stents in the common bile duct is the first treatment choice to alleviate symptoms of biliary obstruction due to malignant disease. When endoscopic stenting fails in palliative patients, one option is to use a percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage, but it is not clear whether and how it can reduce the symptom load. The aim of this study was to evaluate benefits and disadvantages of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage in palliative care. Material and Methods: Inclusion criteria were malignant disease and bilirubin 26 mu mol/L in plasma. A structured protocol for obtaining data from the medical records was used. Data were collected from the time of last computed tomography scan before the percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage was placed and during 14days afterward. Results and Conclusion: Inclusion criteria were fulfilled in 140 patients. Median age was 70years (33-91years). Some 126 patients had a remaining external percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage. Jaundice was the initial symptom in 62 patients (44%). Within the first week after percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage, the bilirubin decreased from 237 mu mol/L (31-634) to 180 mu mol/L (17-545). Only 25% reached a level below the double upper reference value. Pruritus occurred in 27% before the percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage, but the bilirubin value did not differ from patients without pruritus. However, the pruritus was relieved in 56% with percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage. Antibiotic prophylaxis protected to some extent from infectious complications. Adverse events were common and early mortality was high (16% within 14days). Jaundice should not by itself be an indication for percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage for palliation except when the aim is to prepare the patient for chemotherapy. It is mandatory that the patients are informed carefully about what can be expected regarding the positive effects and the risks of adverse events.

  • 120.
    Heitz, F.
    et al.
    Evangelische Huyssens Stiftung, Germany; Charite Univ Med Berlin, Germany; Free Univ Berlin, Germany; Humboldt Unive Berlin, Germany; Berlin Inst Hlth, Germany; AGO Study Grp, Germany.
    Harter, P.
    Evangelische Huyssens Stiftung, Germany; AGO Study Grp, Germany.
    Åvall Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Linkoping, Sweden; NSGO Study Grp, Germany.
    Reuss, A.
    Coordinating Ctr Clin Trials, Germany; AGO Study Grp, Germany.
    Pautier, P.
    Inst Gustave Roussy, France; GINECO Study Grp, Germany.
    Cormio, G.
    Univ Bari, Italy; Natl Canc Inst Giovanni Paolo II, Italy; MITO Study Grp, Germany.
    Colombo, N.
    Univ Milano Bicocca, Italy; Inst Europeo Oncol, Italy; MaNGO Study Grp, Germany.
    Reinthaller, A.
    Med Univ Vienna, Austria; AGO Austria Study Grp, Austria.
    Vergote, I.
    Univ Leuven, Belgium; BGOG Study Grp, Austria.
    Poveda, A.
    Inst Valenciano Oncol, Spain; GEICO Study Grp, Spain.
    Ottevanger, P. B.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands; DGOG Study Grp, Spain.
    Hanker, L. C.
    Univ Schleswig Holstein, Germany; AGO Study Grp, Germany.
    Leminen, A.
    Womens Hosp Med Ctr, Finland; NSGO Study Grp, Germany.
    Alexandre, J.
    Hop Univ Paris Ctr, France; GINECO Study Grp, Germany.
    Canzler, U.
    Tech Univ Dresden, Germany; AGO Study Grp, Germany.
    Sehouli, J.
    Charite Campus Virchow Klinikum, Germany; AGO Study Grp, Germany.
    Herrstedt, J.
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark; Zealand Univ, Denmark; NSGO Study Grp, Germany.
    Fiane, B.
    Stavanger Univ Hosp, Norway; NSGO Study Grp, Germany.
    Merger, M.
    Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma GmbH and Co KG, Germany.
    du Bois, A.
    AGO Study Grp, Germany.
    Early tumor regrowth is a contributor to impaired survival in patients with completely resected advanced ovarian cancer. An exploratory analysis of the Intergroup trial AGO-OVAR 122019In: Gynecologic Oncology, ISSN 0090-8258, E-ISSN 1095-6859, Vol. 152, no 2, p. 235-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Surgical assessment of residual tumor provides the strongest prognostic information in advanced ovarian cancer (AOC), with the best outcome observed after complete resection. Postoperative radiological assessment before initiation of chemotherapy can supplement the information obtained by surgical assessment; however, it may also reveal conflicting findings. Methods. Patients with AOC enrolled in the AGO-OVAR 12 trial underwent baseline imaging before the first chemotherapy cycle. The findings from surgical and radiologic assessment for disease extend were compared. Additionally, an integrated approach was assessed. Results. Complete data from all 3 assessment methods were available for 1345 patients. Of 689 patients with complete resection, tumor was observed in 28% and 22% of patients undergoing radiologic and integrated assessment, respectively. Patients with surgical- radiological and surgical-integrated concordant findings showed a 5-year overall survival (5Y-OS) of 72% and 71%, whereas patients with surgical-radiological and surgical-integrated discordant results showed inferior 5Y-OS of 47% and 49%, respectively. Patients with surgically assessed residual disease had a 5-YOS of 37%. The interval between surgery and baseline assessment was independently associated with discordance between assessment methods, which might reflect early tumor regrowth. Conclusions. Baseline tumor assessment before chemotherapy provides information that stratifies patients with complete resection into different prognostic groups. Integrating the data from different assessment methods might lead to improved definitions of prognostic groups. Further investigation to determine if earlier initiation of chemotherapy after debulking surgery could increase survival of patients with early tumor regrowth is warranted. (C) 2018 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  • 121.
    Heliövaara, Arja
    et al.
    Department of Plastic Surgery, Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Center, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Küseler, Annelise
    Cleft Palate Center, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Skaare, Pål
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway.
    Shaw, William
    Dental School, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
    Mølsted, Kirsten
    Copenhagen Cleft Palate Center, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Karsten, Agneta
    Division of Orthodontics, Department of Dental Medicine, Stockholm Craniofacial Team, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Brinck, Eli
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway.
    Rizell,, Sara
    Orthodontic clinic, University Clinics of Odontology Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Sæle, Paul
    Oral Health Center of Excellence/Western Norway, Bergen, Norway.
    Hurmerinta, Kirsti
    Department of Plastic Surgery, Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Center, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland;.
    Rønning, Elisabeth
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway.
    Najar Chalien, Midia
    Orthodontic clinic, University Clinics of Odontology Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bellardie,, Haydn
    Greater Manchester Cleft Unit, Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital, Manchester, UK.
    Mooney,, Jeanette
    Greater Manchester Cleft Unit, Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital, Manchester, UK.
    Eyres, Phil
    Dental School, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
    Semb, Gunvor
    Dental School, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK;Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet and Statped Sørøst, Oslo, Norway.
    Scandcleft randomised trials of primary surgery for unilateral cleft lip and palate: 6. Dental arch relationships in 5 year-olds.2017In: Journal of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, ISSN 2000-656X, E-ISSN 2000-6764, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 6p. 52-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aim:Good dentofacial growth is a major goal in the treatment of unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP). The aim was to evaluate dental arch relationships at age 5 years after four different protocols of primary surgery for UCLP. Design:Three parallel randomised clinical trials were undertaken as an international multi-centre study by 10 cleft teams in five countries: Denmark, Finland, Sweden, Norway, and the UK. Methods:Three different surgical procedures for primary palatal repair (Arms B, C, D) were tested against a common procedure (Arm A) in the total cohort of 448 children born with non-syndromic UCLP. Study models of 418 patients (273 boys) at the mean age of 5.1 years (range = 4.8–7.0) were available. Dental arch relationships were assessed using the 5-year index by a blinded panel of 16 orthodontists. Kappa statistics were calculated to assess reliability. The trials were tested statistically witht-and Chi-square tests. Results:Good-to-very good levels of intra- and interrater reliability were obtained (0.71–0.94 and 0.70–0.87). Comparisons within each trial showed no statistically significant differences in the mean 5-year index scores or their distributions between the common method and the local team protocol. The mean index scores varied from 2.52 (Trial 2, Arm C) to 2.94 (Trial 3, Arm D). Conclusion:The results of the three trials do not provide statistical evidence that one technique is better than the others. Further analysis of the possible influence of individual surgical skill and learning curve are being pursued in this dataset. Trial registration:ISRCTN29932826. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

  • 122.
    Hellström Ängerud, Karin
    et al.
    Institutionen för omvårdnad, Umeå Universitet.
    Ericsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Isaksson, R-M
    Norrbotten County Council, Department of Research, Luleå.
    Sederholm Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Differences in symptoms in relation to myocardial infarction.2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In myocardial infarction (MI) rapid diagnosis and treatment is crucial for the prognosis. Previous research has found that symptom presentation influence pre hospital delay times but studies about differences in MI symptoms between patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) are sparse and inconclusive. To enhance the understanding of symptom presentation in regard to MI type, we aimed to describe symptoms in relation to MI type and to find predictors of STEMI versus NSTEMI in patients with MI.

    Methods: Patients with MI (n=694) from the SymTime study were included. SymTime was a multicentre cross-sectional study of symptoms and actions in the prehospital phase of MI and data were collected using a previously validated questionnaire administered to MI patients within 24 h of admission to hospital.

    Results: Patients with STEMI were younger, more often men and smokers. Patients with NSTEMI were more likely to have a history of hypertension, MI and stroke. Chest pain was the most common symptom in both groups. Pain, discomfort, or pressure located in the jaw or teeth, vertigo/pre-syncope, cold sweat and nausea/vomiting were significantly more frequent in patients with STEMI (Table 1). In a multivariate logistic regression model patients with STEMI were more likely to present with cold sweat (OR 4.13, 95% CI 2.71–6.29) jaw pain (OR 2.14, 95% CI 1.02–4.50), and nausea (OR 2.01, 95% CI 1.20–3.33), and less likely to have a history of stroke (OR 0.35, 95% CI 0.15–0.84), fluctuating symptoms (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.36–0.83) and anxiety (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.32–0.92) compared to patients with NSTEMI.

    Conclusion: Patients with STEMI differed significantly from those with NSTEMI regarding symptom presentation. This knowledge is important for health care personnel to recognize symptoms alarming for STEMI when evaluating patients with MI symptoms.

  • 123.
    Hirbayashi, Hidehiro
    et al.
    Nara Medical University, Kashihara , Japan.
    Hariz, Marwan
    Umeå University.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Blomstedt, Patric
    Umeå University.
    Impact of Parameters of Radiofrequency Coagulation on Volume of Stereotactic Lesion inPallidotomy and Thalamotomy2012In: Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, ISSN 1011-6125, E-ISSN 1423-0372, Vol. 90, no 5, p. 307-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: One of the many reasons why lesional surgery for movement disorders has been more or less abandoned may have been the difficulty in predicting the shape and size of the stereotactic radiofrequency (RF) lesion. Objectives: To analyse the contribution of various RF coagulation parameters towards the volume of pallidotomies and thalamotomies. Methods: The relationship between temperature of coagulation, length of coagulated area and duration of coagulation on the one hand, and lesion volume on the other was retrospectively evaluated. Lesion diameters were measured on stereotactic thin-slice CT and MRI scans, and volumes of lesions were calculated concerning 36 pallidotomies and 14 thalamotomies in 46 patients who were operated using the same RF generator and same RF electrode. Results: The coagulation temperature, length of coagulated area and duration of coagulation were all correlated to the lesion volume. However, for a given length of coagulated area, the lesion´s size was most strongly influenced by the temperature. Despite this clear correlation, and the relatively homogenous coagulation parameters, the lesions’ volumes were markedly scattered. Conclusions: The volume of the stereotactic RF lesions could be correlated with the coagulation parameters, especially the temperature, at a group level, but could not be predicted in individual patients based solely on the RF coagulation parameters.

  • 124.
    Holm, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Acute coronary syndrome: bleeding, platelets and gender2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND

    Bleeding complications increase mortality in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Potential gender difference in bleeding regarding prevalence, location, severity and prognostic impact is still controversial and not well investigated. In regard to this aspect the relevance of triple antithrombotic therapy (TAT) is questioned. There is an ongoing debate on the clinical implications of TAT and furthermore assumed that bleeding complications, except impact on outcome, also are associated with great influence on health economy.

    The main focus of this thesis was to further investigate the incidence and impact of bleeding complications in patients treated for ACS, with special reference to gender disparities, TAT and health economics. The thesis will highlight the importance of improved bleeding prevention strategies for both men and women.

    METHOD

    Paper I, II and III

    Observational studies from the SWEDEHEART register.

    In paper I we investigated patients hospitalised with myocardial infarction (MI) during 2006–2008. Outcomes were in-hospital bleedings, in-hospital mortality and one-year mortality in hospital survivors.

    In paper II, all patients with MI, in the County of Östergötland, Sweden during 2010 were included and followed for one year. The patients' medical records were evaluated, in relation to short and long-term bleeding complications, bleeding location, withdrawal of platelet inhibiting drugs and nonfatal MI and death.

    Paper III included all patients discharged with (TAT) in the County of Östergötland 2009-2015. Information about bleeds and ischemic complications during one-year follow-up were retrieved from the medical records. Estimation of the health care costs associated with bleeding episodes were added to the evaluation.

    Paper IV

    Patients with MI, scheduled for coronary angiography were recruited. All patients received clopidogrel and aspirin. A subgroup of patients received GP IIb/IIIa-inhibitor. Outcomes were platelet aggregation assessed at several time points, using a Multiplate impedance aggregometer, measurement of P-selectin in plasma, evaluation of high residual platelet reactivity (HRPR) and low residual platelet reactivity (LRPR) respectively and incidence of bleeding complications. A comparison between women and men was performed.

    RESULTS

    Paper I

    A total number of 50.399 patients were included, 36.6% women. In-hospital bleedings were more common in women (1.9% vs. 3.1%, p<0.001) even after multivariable adjustment (OR 1.17, 95%, CI 1.01–1.37). The increased risk for women was found in STEMI (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.10–1.94) and in those who underwent PCI (OR 1.80, 95% CI 1.45–2.24).

    In contrast the risk was lower in medically treated women (OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.62–1.00). After adjustment, in-hospital bleeding was associated with higher risk of oneyear mortality in men (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.04–1.74), whereas this was not the case in women (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.72–1.31).

    Paper II

    In total 850 consecutive patients were included. The total incidence of bleeding events was 24.4% (81 women and 126 men, p=ns). The incidence of all in hospital bleeding events was 13.2%, with no gender difference. Women had significantly more minor nonsurgery related bleeding events than men (5% vs 2.2%, p=0.02). During follow-up, 13.5% had a bleeding, with more non-surgery related bleeding events among women, 14.7% vs 9.7% (p=0.03). The most common bleeding localisation was the gastrointestinal tract, more in women than men (12.1% vs 7.6%, p=0.03). Women also had more access site bleeding complications (4% vs 1.7%, p=0.04), while men had more surgery related bleeding complications (6.4% vs 0.9%, p≤0.001). Increased mortality was found only in men with non-surgery related bleeding events (p=0.008).

    Paper III

    Among 272 identified patients, 156 bleeds occurred post-discharge, of which 28.8% were of gastrointestinal origin. In total 54.4% had at least one bleed during or after the index event and 40.1% bled post-discharge of whom 28.7% experienced a TIMI major or minor bleeding. Women discontinued TAT prematurely more often than men (52.9 vs 36.1%, p=0.01) and bled more (48.6 vs. 37.1%, p=0.09). One-year mean health care costs were EUR 575 and EUR 5787 in non-bleeding and bleeding patients, respectively.

    Paper IV

    We recruited 125 patients (37 women and 88 men). We observed significantly more inhospital bleeding events in women as compared to men (18.9% vs 6.8%, p=0.04). There were no differences in platelet aggregation using three different agonists, reflecting treatment of GPIIb/IIIa inhibitors, clopidogrel and aspirin, at four different time-points nor were there any differences in p-selectin in plasma 3 days after admission.

    CONCLUSION

    There is a remarkably high bleeding incidence among patients treated with DAPT and even more so if treated with TAT. Female gender is an independent risk factor of inhospital bleeding after myocardial infarction, this higher bleeding risk in women appears to be restricted to invasively treated patients and STEMI patients. Even if women had higher short- and long-term mortality, there was no difference between the genders among those who bled. After multivariable adjustment the prognostic impact of bleeding complications was higher in men

    Women seem to experience more minor/minimal bleeding complications than men, predominantly GI bleeding events and access site bleeding events, with no apparent impact on outcome.

    In contrast men with non-surgery related bleeding complications had higher mortality. There is a lack of differences between the genders concerning platelet aggregation. Our results do not support gender disparities in platelet reactivity and excess dosing as a major explanation for increased bleeding risk in women. Improved bleeding prevention strategies are warranted for both men and women.

    List of papers
    1. Gender difference in prognostic impact of in-hospital bleeding after myocardial infarction - data from the SWEDEHEART registry.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender difference in prognostic impact of in-hospital bleeding after myocardial infarction - data from the SWEDEHEART registry.
    2016 (English)In: European heart journal. Acute cardiovascular care, ISSN 2048-8734, Vol. 6, p. 463-472Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Bleeding complications increase mortality in myocardial infarction patients. Potential gender difference in bleeding regarding prevalence and prognostic impact is still controversial.

    OBJECTIVES: Gender comparison regarding incidence and prognostic impact of bleeding in patients hospitalised with myocardial infarction during 2006-2008.

    METHODS: Observational study from the SWEDEHEART register. Outcomes were in-hospital bleedings, in-hospital mortality and one-year mortality in hospital survivors.

    RESULTS: A total number of 50,399 myocardial infarction patients were included, 36.6% women. In-hospital bleedings were more common in women (1.9% vs. 3.1%, p<0.001) even after multivariable adjustment (odds ratio (OR) 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.37). The increased risk for women was found in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.10-1.94) and in those who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (OR 1.80, 95% CI 1.45-2.24). In contrast the risk was lower in medically treated women (OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.62-1.00). After adjustment, in-hospital bleeding was associated with higher risk of one-year mortality in men (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.04-1.74), whereas this was not the case in women (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.72-1.31).

    CONCLUSIONS: Female gender is an independent risk factor of in-hospital bleeding after myocardial infarction. A higher bleeding risk in women appeared to be restricted to invasively treated patients and ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients. Even though women have higher short- and long-term mortality, there was no difference between the genders among bleeders. After multivariable adjustment the prognostic impact of bleeding complications was higher in men.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Sage Publications, 2016
    Keywords
    Myocardial infarction; bleeding; gender; prognosis
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124287 (URN)10.1177/2048872615610884 (DOI)000385817800008 ()26450782 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2016-01-25 Created: 2016-01-25 Last updated: 2019-01-10
    2. Bleeding complications after myocardial infarction in a real world population - An observational retrospective study with a sex perspective
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bleeding complications after myocardial infarction in a real world population - An observational retrospective study with a sex perspective
    Show others...
    2018 (English)In: Thrombosis Research, ISSN 0049-3848, E-ISSN 1879-2472, Vol. 167, p. 156-163Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The aim of the current study was to assess bleeding events, including severity, localisation and prognostic impact, in a real world population of men and women with myocardial infarction (MI). Methods and results: In total 850 consecutive patients were included during 2010 and followed for one year. Bleeding complications were identified by searching of each patients medical records and characterised according to the TIMI criteria. For this analysis, only the first event was calculated. The total incidence of bleeding events was 24.4% (81 women and 126 men, p=ns). The incidence of all inhospital bleeding events was 13.2%, with no sex difference. Women had significantly more minor non-surgery related bleeding events than men (5% vs 2.2%, p=0.02). During follow-up, 13.5% had a bleeding, with more non-surgery related bleeding events among women, 14.7% vs 9.7% (p=0.03). The most common bleeding localisation was the gastrointestinal tract, more in women than men (12.1% vs 7.6%, p=0.03). Women had also more access site bleeding complications (4% vs 1.7%, p=0.04), while men had more surgery related bleeding complications (6.4% vs 0.9%, p=0.001). Increased mortality was found only in men with non-surgery related bleeding events (p=0.008). Conclusions: Almost one in four patients experienced a bleeding complication through 12 months follow-up after a myocardial infarction. Women experienced more non-surgery related minor/minimal bleeding complications than men, predominantly GI bleeding events and access site bleeding events, with no apparent impact on outcome. In contrast men with non-surgery related bleeding complications had higher mortality. Improved bleeding prevention strategies are warranted for both men and women.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD, 2018
    Keywords
    Myocardial infarction; Bleeding; Sex; Mortality
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-149865 (URN)10.1016/j.thromres.2018.05.023 (DOI)000437845800027 ()29857272 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Ostergotland County Council [LIO610841]

    Available from: 2018-08-02 Created: 2018-08-02 Last updated: 2019-04-12
  • 125.
    Hruskova, Zdenka
    et al.
    Charles Univ Prague, Czech Republic; Gen Univ Hosp, Czech Republic.
    Pippias, Maria
    Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Stel, Vianda S.
    Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Abad-Diez, Jose M.
    Aragon Hlth Serv, Spain.
    Sanchez, Manuel Benitez
    Hosp Juan Ramon Jimenez, Spain.
    Caskey, Fergus J.
    Southmead Hosp, England; Univ Bristol, England.
    Collart, Frederic
    French Belgian ESRD Registry, Belgium.
    De Meester, Johan
    Dutch Speaking Belgian Renal Registry NBVN, Belgium.
    Finne, Patrik
    Univ Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki Univ Hosp, Finland; Finnish Registry Kidney Dis, Finland.
    Heaf, James G.
    Zealand Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Magaz, Angela
    Unidad Informac Pacientes Renales Comunidad Auton, Spain.
    Palsson, Runolfur
    Landspitali Natl Univ Hosp Iceland, Iceland; Univ Iceland, Iceland.
    Varberg Reisaeter, Anna
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Salama, Alan D.
    UCL, England.
    Segelmark, Mårten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Traynor, Jamie P.
    ISD Scotland, Scotland.
    Massy, Ziad A.
    Ambroise Pare Univ Hosp, France; INSERM, France; Univ Paris Saclay, France.
    Jager, Kitty J.
    Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Tesar, Vladimir
    Charles Univ Prague, Czech Republic; Gen Univ Hosp, Czech Republic.
    Characteristics and Outcomes of Patients With Systemic Sclerosis (Scleroderma) Requiring Renal Replacement Therapy in Europe: Results From the ERA-EDTA Registry2019In: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, ISSN 0272-6386, E-ISSN 1523-6838, Vol. 73, no 2, p. 184-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale amp; Objective: Data for outcomes of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) secondary to systemic sclerosis (scleroderma) requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT) are limited. We examined the incidence and prevalence of ESRD due to scleroderma in Europe and the outcomes among these patients following initiation of RRT. Study Design: Registry study of incidence and prevalence and a matched cohort study of clinical outcomes. Setting amp; Participants: Patients represented in any of 19 renal registries that provided data to the European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association (ERA-EDTA) Registry between 2002 and 2013. Predictor: Scleroderma as the identified cause of ESRD. Outcomes: Incidence and prevalence of ESRD from scleroderma. Recovery from RRT dependence, patient survival after ESRD, and graft survival after kidney transplantation. Analytical Approach: Incidence and prevalence were calculated using population data from the European Union and standardized to population characteristics in 2005. Patient and graft survival were compared with 2 age- and sex-matched control groups without scleroderma: (1) diabetes mellitus as the cause of ESRD and (2) conditions other than diabetes mellitus as the cause of ESRD. Survival analyses were performed using Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression. Results: 342 patients with scleroderma (0.14% of all incident RRT patients) were included. Between 2002 and 2013, the range of adjusted annual incidence and prevalence rates of RRT for ESRD due to scleroderma were 0.11 to 0.26 and 0.73 to 0.95 per million population, respectively. Recovery of independent kidney function was greatest in the scleroderma group (7.6% vs 0.7% in diabetes mellitus and 2.0% in other primary kidney diseases control group patients, both Pamp;lt;0.001), though time required to achieve recovery was longer. The 5-year survival probability from day 91 of RRT among patients with scleroderma was 38.9% (95% CI, 32.0%-45.8%), whereas 5-year posttransplantation patient survival and 5-year allograft survival were 88.2% (95% CI, 75.3%-94.6%) and 72.4% (95% CI, 55.0%-84.0%), respectively. Adjusted mortality from day 91 on RRT was higher among patients with scleroderma than observed in both control groups (HRs of 1.25 [95% CI, 1.05-1.48] and 2.00 [95% CI, 1.69-2.39]). In contrast, patient and graft survival after kidney transplantation did not differ between patients with scleroderma and control groups. Limitations: No data for extrarenal manifestations, treatment, or recurrence. Conclusions: Survival of patients with scleroderma who receive dialysis for more than 90 days was worse than for those with other causes of ESRD. Patient survival after transplantation was similar to that observed among patients with ESRD due to other conditions. Patients with scleroderma had a higher rate of recovery from RRT dependence than controls.

  • 126.
    Hult, Mari
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Bonn, Stephanie E.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Brandt, Lena
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Wirén, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping.
    Lagerros, Ylva Trolle
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Hlth Serv, Sweden.
    Womens Satisfaction with and Reasons to Seek Bariatric Surgerya Prospective Study in Sweden with 1-Year Follow-up2019In: Obesity Surgery, ISSN 0960-8923, E-ISSN 1708-0428, Vol. 29, no 7, p. 2059-2070Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Objectives Despite profound weight loss after bariatric surgery, some patients are dissatisfied with the results. Pre-surgery expectations, as well as post-surgery items of satisfaction, need to be clarified. The main objective in this study was to investigate the primary reasons to seek bariatric surgery and assess items of satisfaction 1-year post-surgery. Subjects/Methods This is a prospective cohort study of women (n = 50) undergoing bariatric surgery in Stockholm, Sweden. Presurgery assessment included reasons to seek surgery, expected weight loss, co-morbidities, and quality of life. Post-surgery assessment included items of satisfaction, weight loss, co-morbidities, and quality of life. In total, two women did not undergo surgery, and 40 women had complete data from all pre- and post-surgery assessments. Results Mean change in body mass index (BMI) pre- and post-surgery was -12.9 (3.7) kg/m(2). At 1-year post-surgery, the mean percent of excess weight loss (% EWL) was 86.9 (26.3). Pre-surgery, the most reported reason to seek surgery was "weight loss" (47.9%), while the most reported item of satisfaction post-surgery was "improved self-esteem" (55.6%). Satisfaction with the result 1-year post-surgery was associated with the extent of % EWL. Satisfied patients (n = 32) had a mean % EWL of 94.6 (22.9), while those not satisfied (n = 8) had a mean % EWL of 59.9 (17.6). Conclusions The primary reason to seek bariatric surgery was weight loss. However, despite profound weight loss, improved self-esteem was the item of most satisfaction post-surgery. Our findings may be useful in the clinical setting when informing patients pre- surgery about what to expect as well as when meeting a patient post-surgery to discuss results.

  • 127.
    Hultkvist, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Implications of myocardial dysfunction before and after aortic valve intervention2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND

    Postoperative heart failure in the setting of aortic valve surgery results in poor long-term survival. We hypothesized that there could be a myocardial factor that is not addressed by risk scores currently available. We speculated that this myocardial factor could be diastolic dysfunction. By evaluating postoperative heart failure, the EuroSCORE, the NT-proBNP level, and diastolic function, we might achieve a deeper understanding of the outcome for individuals with postoperative heart failure.

    METHODS

    This research project was built upon four cohort studies. The first two studies (I and II) were retrospective in nature, and studies III and IV were prospective, observational, and longitudinal. All work was based on data from clinical and national databases. In Study I, we compared the outcome of patients with or without postoperative heart failure, evaluated according to the preoperative risk score. In Study II, we explored the effect of underlying heart disease on the preoperative level of NT-proBNP and the relationships between NT-proBNP and severe postoperative heart failure and short-term mortality. In Study III, we described the dynamics

    of NT-proBNP, from a preoperative evaluation to a six-month follow-up, in patients that underwent one of two different procedures: a surgical aortic valve replacement and a transcatheter implantation. We related both pre- and postprocedural NT-proBNP levels to one-year mortality. In Study IV, we evaluated diastolic function in patients that underwent surgical aortic valve replacement and its influence on outcome. We also evaluated NT-proBNP levels and postoperative heart failure as predictors of long-term mortality.

    RESULTS

    Study I

    This study included 397 patients that underwent isolated surgical aortic valve replacements. Of these, 45 patients (11%) were treated for postoperative heart failure. With an average follow-up of 8.1 years (range 5.2-11.2), among patients at low risk (EuroSCORE≤7), the crude five-year survival rates were 58% in patients with postoperative heart failure and 89% in those without postoperative heart failure (p<0.001). Among patients with postoperative heart failure, those classified as low risk had the same poor long-term prognosis as those classified as high risk (EuroSCORE>7). In the high risk group, survival rates were similar between patients with or without postoperative heart failure (57% vs. 64%; p=0.60).

    Study II

    This study included a cohort of 2978 patients with coronary artery disease, aortic stenosis, and mitral regurgitation. Preoperative NTproBNP levels were found to be 1.7-fold higher in patients with aortic stenosis than in patients with coronary artery disease and 1.4-fold higher in patients with mitral regurgitation than in patients with coronary disease. The power of preoperative NT-proBNP for predicting severe postoperative heart conditions was good among patients with coronary heart disease and patients with mitral regurgitation, but not as good among patients with aortic stenosis. NT-proBNP also showed good discriminating power for short-term mortality among patients with coronary artery disease. Moreover, NT-proBNP was found to be an independent predictor for both severe postoperative heart failure and short-term mortality in patients with coronary artery disease.

    Study III

    This study included 462 patients that underwent preoperative evaluations for aortic valve disease. Aortic valve interventions elicited a rise in NT-proBNP that was more pronounced in patients undergoing surgical aortic valve replacement compared to patients undergoing transcatheter valve implantation. No deterioration in NT-proBNP was observed during the waiting time before the intervention, despite a median duration of four months. At six months after the intervention, NT-proBNP levels had decreased to or below the preoperative levels in all groups. Among patients that received surgical aortic valve replacements, pre-and early postoperative NT-proBNP levels showed good discriminatory power for oneyear mortality. This discriminatory power was not observed among patients that had undergone a transcatheter procedure; those patients had higher levels of both pre- and postoperative NT-proBNP compared to patients that had undergone surgery.

    Study IV

    We evaluated 273 patients that underwent aortic valve surgery. High left ventricular filling pressure was present in 22% (n=54) of patients at the time of surgery. At six months after surgery, diastolic function deteriorated in 24/193 (12%) patients and improved in 27/54 (50%) patients. Diastolic dysfunction was not found to be associated with long-term mortality. However, both postoperative heart failure and preoperative NTproBNP levels were associated with increases in long-term mortality. In a multivariable Cox analysis, NT-proBNP remained predictive of long-term mortality.

    CONCLUSION

    Postoperative heart failure contributed to long-term mortality, even in patients considered to be at low risk preoperatively. Our results suggested that pressure overload, followed by a volume overload led to a NTproBNP response that was more pronounced than the ischemia response. Elevated levels of NT-proBNP were associated with both short- and long-term mortality. In these studies, we could not corroborate the notion that high left ventricular filling pressure was associated with long-term mortality.

    List of papers
    1. The combined impact of postoperative heart failure and euroScore on long-term outcome after surgery for aortic stenosis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The combined impact of postoperative heart failure and euroScore on long-term outcome after surgery for aortic stenosis
    2011 (English)In: Journal of Heart Valve Disease, ISSN 0966-8519, E-ISSN 2053-2644, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 633-638Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY:

    Although the EuroSCORE was developed for predicting operative mortality after cardiac surgery, it has also been shown to predict long-term mortality. It has been reported that postoperative heart failure (PHF) in association with surgery, albeit comparatively benign in the short term, has a profound impact on five-year survival after surgery for aortic stenosis (AS). The study aim was to determine the combined impact of EuroSCORE and PHF on long-term survival after isolated aortic valve replacement (AVR) for AS.

    METHODS:

    A total of 397 patients (48% females; average age 70 +/- 10 years) who underwent AVR for AS at the authors' institution between 1995 and 2000 was studied. The cohort was subdivided according to the additive EuroSCORE into a high-risk group (EuroSCORE >7) and a low-risk group (EuroSCORE < or = 7), and further analyzed in relation to PHF.

    RESULTS:

    The average follow up was 8.1 years (range: 5.2-11.2 years). Forty-five patients (11%) were treated for procedure-associated PHF. Patients with or without PHF and a high-risk EuroSCORE had crude five-year survivals of 57% and 64%, respectively (p = 0.6), whereas those with or without PHF but with a low-risk EuroSCORE had crude five-year survivals of 58% and 89%, respectively (p = 0.0003).

    CONCLUSION:

    Both PHF and a high EuroSCORE were associated with poor long-term survival. The role of PHF per se for the long-term prognosis was illustrated by the fact that the negative impact on long-term survival was almost as profound in patients of the low-risk group as of the high-risk group.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-73431 (URN)000306675200005 ()22655493 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2012-01-03 Created: 2012-01-03 Last updated: 2019-05-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Impact of underlying heart disease per se on the utility of preoperative NT-proBNP in adult cardiac surgery
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of underlying heart disease per se on the utility of preoperative NT-proBNP in adult cardiac surgery
    Show others...
    2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 2, article id e0192503Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The primary aim was to investigate the role of underlying heart disease on preoperative NT-proBNP levels in patients admitted for adult cardiac surgery, after adjusting for the known confounders age, gender, obesity and renal function. The second aim was to investigate the predictive value of preoperative NT-proBNP with regard to severe postoperative heart failure (SPHF) and postoperative mortality. Methods A retrospective cohort study based on preoperative NT-proBNP measurements in an unselected cohort including all patients undergoing first time surgery for coronary artery disease (CAD; n = 2226), aortic stenosis (AS; n = 406) or mitral regurgitation (MR; n = 346) from April 2010 to August 2016 in the southeast region of Sweden (n = 2978). Concomitant procedures were not included, with the exception of Maze or tricuspid valve procedures. Results Preoperative NT-proBNP was 1.67 times (pamp;lt;0.0001) and 1.41 times (pamp;lt;0.0001) higher in patients with AS or MR respectively, than in patients with CAD after adjusting for confounders. NT-proBNP demonstrated significant discrimination with regard to SPHF in CAD (AUC = 0.79, 95% CI 0.73 +/- 0.85, pamp;lt;0.0001), MR (AUC = 0.80, 95% CI 0.72 +/- 0.87, pamp;lt;0.0001) and AS (AUC = 0.66, 95% CI 0.51 +/- 0.81, p = 0.047). In CAD patients NT-proBNP demonstrated significant discrimination with regard to postoperative 30-day or in-hospital mortality (AUC = 0.78; 95% CI 0.71 +/- 0.85, pamp;lt;0.0001). The number of deaths was too few in the AS and MR group to permit analysis. Elevated NT-proBNP emerged as an independent risk factor for SPHF, and postoperative mortality in CAD. Conclusions Patients with AS or MR have higher preoperative NT-proBNP than CAD patients even after adjusting for confounders. The predictive value of NT-proBNP with regard to SPHF was confirmed in CAD and MR patients but was less convincing in AS patients.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 2018
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-145771 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0192503 (DOI)000424517900085 ()29420603 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Region Ostergotland [LIO-443891]

    Available from: 2018-03-22 Created: 2018-03-22 Last updated: 2019-05-13
    3. Rise and fall of NT-proBNP in aortic valve intervention.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rise and fall of NT-proBNP in aortic valve intervention.
    2018 (English)In: Open heart, E-ISSN 2053-3624, Vol. 5, no 1, article id e000739Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To describe the dynamics of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) from preoperative evaluation to 6-month follow-up in patients undergoing aortic valve intervention, and to evaluate NT-proBNP with regard to 1-year mortality.

    Methods: At preoperative evaluation, we prospectively included 462 patients accepted for aortic valve intervention. The median time to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR; n=336) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI; n=126) was 4 months. NT-proBNP was measured at enrolment for preoperative evaluation, on the day of surgery, postoperatively on day 1, day 3 and at the 6-month follow-up. Subgroups of patients undergoing SAVR with aortic regurgitation and aortic stenosis with and without coronary artery bypass were also analysed.

    Results: NT-proBNP remained stable in all subgroups during the preoperative waiting period, but displayed a substantial transient early postoperative increase with a peak on day 3 except in the TAVI group, which peaked on day 1. At the 6-month follow-up, NT-proBNP had decreased to or below the preoperative level in all groups. In the SAVR group, NT-proBNP preoperatively and on postoperative days 1 and 3 revealed significant discriminatory power with regard to 1-year mortality (area under the curve (AUC)=0.79, P=0.0001; AUC=0.71, P=0.03; and AUC=0.79, P=0.002, respectively). This was not found in the TAVI group, which had higher levels of NT-proBNP both preoperatively and at the 6-month follow-up compared with the SAVR group.

    Conclusions: The dynamic profile of NT-proBNP differed between patients undergoing TAVI and SAVR. NT-proBNP in the perioperative course was associated with increased risk of 1-year mortality in SAVR but not in TAVI.

    Keywords
    aortic valve disease, heart failure, surgery-valve
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-149013 (URN)10.1136/openhrt-2017-000739 (DOI)29632678 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2018-06-25 Created: 2018-06-25 Last updated: 2019-05-13
  • 128.
    Humble, Caroline A. S.
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Huang, Stephen
    Univ Sydney, Australia.
    Jammer, Ib
    Univ Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hosp, Norway.
    Bjork, Jonas
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Chew, Michelle
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Prognostic performance of preoperative cardiac troponin and perioperative changes in cardiac troponin for the prediction of major adverse cardiac events and mortality in noncardiac surgery: A systematic review and meta-analysis2019In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 4, article id e0215094Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Increased postoperative cardiac troponin (cTn) independently predicts short-term mortality. Previous studies suggest that preoperative cTn also predicts major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) and mortality after noncardiac surgery. The value of preoperative and perioperative changes in cTn as a prognostic tool for adverse outcomes has been sparsely investigated. Methods and findings A systematic review and meta-analysis of the prognostic value of cTns for adverse outcome was conducted. Adverse outcome was defined as short-term (in-hospital or amp;lt; 30 days) and long-term (amp;gt; 30 days) MACE and/or all-cause mortality, in adult patients undergoing noncardiac surgery. The study protocol (CRD42018094773) was registered with an international prospective register of systematic reviews (PROSPERO). Preoperative cTn was a predictor of short-(OR 4.3, 95% CI 2.9-6.5, pamp;lt;0.001, adjusted OR 5.87, 95% CI 3.24-10.65, pamp;lt;0.001) and long-term adverse outcome (OR 4.2, 95% CI 1.0-17.3, p=0.05, adjusted HR 2.0, 95% CI 1.4-3.0, pamp;lt;0.001). Perioperative change in cTn was a predictor of short-term adverse outcome (OR 10.1, 95% CI 3.2-32.3, pamp;lt;0.001). It was not possible to conduct pooled analyses for adjusted estimates of perioperative change in cTn as predictor of short (a single study identified) and long-term (no studies identified) adverse outcome. Further, it was not possible to conduct pooled analyses for unadjusted estimates of perioperative change in cTn as predictor of long-term adverse outcome, since only one study was identified. Bivariate analysis of sensitivities and specificities were performed, and overall prognostic performance was summarized using summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curves. The pooled sensitivity and specificity for preoperative cTn and short-term adverse outcome was 0.43 and 0.86 respectively (area under the SROC curve of 0.68). There were insufficient studies to construct SROCs for perioperative changes in cTn and for long-term adverse outcome. Conclusion Our study indicates that although preoperative cTn and perioperative change in cTn might be valuable predictors of MACE and/or all-cause mortality in adult noncardiac surgical patients, its overall prognostic performance remains uncertain. Future large, representative, high-quality studies are needed to establish the potential role of cTns in perioperative cardiac risk stratification.

  • 129.
    Huss, Fredrik R.M.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    In vitro and in vivo studies of tissue engineering in reconstructive plastic surgery2005Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To correct, improve, and maintain tissues, and their functions, are common denominators in tissue engineering and reconstructive plastic surgery. This can be achieved by using autolo-gous tissues as in flaps or transplants. However, often autologous tissue is not useable. This is one of the reasons for the increasing interest among plastic surgeons for tissue engineering, and it has led to fruitful cross-fertilizations between the fields. Tissue engineering is defined as an interdisciplinary field that applies the principles of engineering and life sciences for development of biologic substitutes designed to maintain, restore, or improve tissue functions. These methods have already dramatically improved the possibilities to treat a number of medical conditions, and can arbitrarily be divided into two main principles:

    > Methods where autologous cells are cultured in vitro and transplanted by means of a cell suspension, a graft, or in a 3-D biodegradable matrix as carrier.

    > Methods where the tissue of interest is stimulated and given the right prerequisites to regenerate the tissue in vivo/situ with the assistance of implantation of specially designed materials, or application of substances that regulate cell functions - guided tissue regeneration.

    We have shown that human mammary epithelial cells and adipocytes could be isolated from tissue biopsies and that the cells kept their proliferative ability. When co-cultured in a 3-D matrix, patterns of ductal structures of epithelial cells embedded in clusters of adipocytes, mimicking the in vivo architecture of human breast tissue, were seen. This indicated that human autologous breast tissue can be regenerated in vitro.

    The adipose tissue is also generally used to correct soft tissue defects e.g. by autologous fat transplantation. Alas 30-70% of the transplanted fat is commonly resorbed. Preadipocytes are believed to be hardier and also able to replicate, and hence, are probably more useful for fat transplantation. We showed that by using cell culture techniques, significantly more pre-adipocytes could survive and proliferate in vitro compared to two clinically used techniques of fat graft handling. Theoretically, a biopsy of fat could generate enough preadipocytes to seed a biodegradable matrix that is implanted to correct a defect. The cells in the matrix will replicate at a rate that parallels the vascular development, the matrix subsequently degrades and the cell-matrix complex is replaced by regenerated, vascularized adipose tissue.

    We further evaluated different biodegradable scaffolds usable for tissue engineering of soft tissues. A macroporous gelatin sphere showed several appealing characteristics. A number of primary human ecto- and mesodermal cells were proven to thrive on the gelatin spheres when cultured in spinner flasks. As the spheres are biodegradable, it follows that the cells can be cultured and expanded on the same substrate that functions as a transplantation vehicle and scaffold for tissue engineering of soft tissues.

    To evaluate the in vivo behavior of cells and gelatin spheres, an animal study was performed where human fibroblasts and preadipocytes were cultured on the spheres and injected intra-dermally. Cell-seeded spheres were compared with injections of empty spheres and cell suspensions. The pre-seeded spheres showed a near complete regeneration of the soft tissues with neoangiogenesis. Some tissue regeneration was seen also in the ‘naked’ spheres but no effect was shown by cell injections.

    In a human pilot-study, intradermally injected spheres were compared with hyaluronan. Volume-stability was inferior to hyaluronan but a near complete regeneration of the dermis was proven, indicating that the volume-effect is permanent in contrast to hyaluronan which eventually will be resorbed. Further studies are needed to fully evaluate the effect of the macroporous gelatin spheres, with or without cellular pre-seeding, as a matrix for guided tissue regeneration. However, we believe that the prospect to use these spheres as an injectable, 3D, biodegradable matrix will greatly enhance our possibilities to regenerate tissues through guided tissue regeneration.

    List of papers
    1. Mammary epithelial cell and adipocyte co-culture in a 3-D matrix: The first step towards tissue-engineered human breast tissue
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mammary epithelial cell and adipocyte co-culture in a 3-D matrix: The first step towards tissue-engineered human breast tissue
    2001 (English)In: Cells Tissues Organs, ISSN 1422-6405, Vol. 169, no 4, p. 361-367Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Reconstruction of the female breast after cancer surgery is a demanding task where the methods used today suffer from several disadvantages. In the present study we have investigated the possibility to use tissue engineering methods to regenerate human autologous breast tissue. Human mammary epithelial cells and preadipocytes were derived from breast tissue biopsies from healthy women undergoing reduction mammoplasty, and the two celltypes were co-cultured with conventional cell culture methods as well as in 3-D matrices. The study shows that it is possible to harvest both human mammary epithelial cells and preadipocytes in a single session, propagate several subcultures, and that the cells maintain a normal intercellular distribution and growth-pattern when co-cultured in a 3-D collagen gel. We propose that growth and formation of a tissue closely resembling normal human breast tissue be readily obtained in the described in vitro cell culture set-up using basic tissue engineering principles. This concept may be of great importance in the development of new methods for reconstruction of the human breast.

    Keywords
    Tissue engineering, Adipocyte, Mammary epithelial cell, Breast tissue
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14344 (URN)10.1159/000047903 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-03-16 Created: 2007-03-16 Last updated: 2009-08-18
    2. Adipose tissue processed for lipoinjection shows increased cellular survival in vitro when tissue engineering principles are applied: Culture techniques and survival of fat
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adipose tissue processed for lipoinjection shows increased cellular survival in vitro when tissue engineering principles are applied: Culture techniques and survival of fat
    2002 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Hand Surgery, ISSN 0284-4311, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 166-171Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Correcting soft tissue defects by autologous fat grafting is a routine procedure in plastic surgery. Its efficacy and safety has been discussed extensively and several techniques of lipoinjection have been developed. However, one is bound to overcorrect by 30%-70% or need to repeat the procedure because of resorption of the transplant. The reasons are that many of the transplanted cells are already differentiated, and also that there is no nutritional support to the inner cell layers when they are transplanted as fragments. By culturing autologous adipocytes one can ensure that only non-differentiated, but committed, preadipocytes are transplanted and the procedure can be done in a way that ensures optimal nutritional support for the cells. In the present study we have compared our cell culture technique with two common clinical ways of processing liposuction material and found that (pre)adipocytes survive and proliferate significantly better in cell culture.

    Keywords
    words, cell culture, fat grafting, tissue engineering
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14345 (URN)
    Available from: 2007-03-16 Created: 2007-03-16 Last updated: 2009-08-18
    3. New degradable polymer scaffold for regeneration of the dermis In vitro and in vivo studies
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>New degradable polymer scaffold for regeneration of the dermis In vitro and in vivo studies
    Show others...
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14346 (URN)
    Available from: 2007-03-16 Created: 2007-03-16 Last updated: 2010-01-13
    4. Growth of cultured human ecto- and mesodermal cells on macroporous biodegradable gelatin spheres
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Growth of cultured human ecto- and mesodermal cells on macroporous biodegradable gelatin spheres
    Show others...
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14347 (URN)
    Available from: 2007-03-16 Created: 2007-03-16 Last updated: 2010-01-13
    5. Macroporous gelatine spheres as culture substrate, transplantation vehicle, and biodegradable scaffold for guided regeneration of soft tissues.: In vivo study in nude mice
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Macroporous gelatine spheres as culture substrate, transplantation vehicle, and biodegradable scaffold for guided regeneration of soft tissues.: In vivo study in nude mice
    2007 (English)In: Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive, and Aesthetic Surgery, ISSN 1748-6815, Vol. 60, no 5, p. 543-555Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In the course of development of a new type of filler for the correction of small defects in soft tissues we studied macroporous gelatine spheres as culture substrate, transplantation vehicle, and biodegradable scaffold for guided regeneration of soft tissues in vivo. We injected intradermally in nude mice gelatine spheres that had either been preseeded with human fibroblasts or preadipocytes, or left unseeded. We compared the extent of regenerated tissue with that found after injections of saline or single-cell suspensions of human fibroblasts or preadipocytes. Routine histological examinations and immunohistochemical staining for von Willebrand factor (indicating neoangiogenesis) were made after 7, 21, and 56 days. Injected saline or single-cell suspensions had no effect. However, a quick and thorough tissue regeneration with developing neoangiogenesis was elicited by the gelatine spheres and the effect of spheres preseeded with preadipocytes surpassed the effect of spheres preseeded with fibroblasts, which in turn surpassed the effect of unseeded gelatine spheres. We suggest that minor soft tissue defects such as wrinkles or creases can be corrected by injection of naked macroporous gelatine spheres, whereas larger defects are best corrected by injection of macroporous gelatine spheres preseeded with fibroblasts, or preadipocytes, or both.

    Keywords
    Filler, Soft tissue defect, Guided tissue regeneration, Tissue engineering, Animal, In vivo
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14348 (URN)10.1016/j.bjps.2005.10.031 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-03-16 Created: 2007-03-16 Last updated: 2009-08-18
    6. Use of macroporous gelatine spheres as a biodegradable scaffold for guided tissue regeneration in humans: An in vivo study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Use of macroporous gelatine spheres as a biodegradable scaffold for guided tissue regeneration in humans: An in vivo study
    2005 (English)In: Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive, and Aesthetic Surgery, ISSN 1748-6815Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14349 (URN)
    Available from: 2007-03-16 Created: 2007-03-16
  • 130.
    Hägg, Mary
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Hudiksvall, Uppsala University/County Council of Gävleborg, Gävle, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Tibbling, Lita
    Hudiksvall, Uppsala University/County Council of Gävleborg, Gävle, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Effect of oral IQoro(R) and palatal plate training in post-stroke, four-quadrant facial dysfunction and dysphagia: A comparison study2015In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, ISSN 0001-6489, E-ISSN 1651-2251, Vol. 135, no 9, p. 962-968Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conclusion: Training with either a palatal plate (PP) or an oral IQoro(R) screen (IQS) in patients with longstanding facial dysfunction and dysphagia after stroke can significantly improve facial activity (FA) in all four facial quadrants as well as swallowing capacity (SC). Improvements remained at late follow-up. The training modalities did not significantly differ in ameliorating facial dysfunction and dysphagia in these patients. However, IQS training has practical and economic advantages over PP training. Objectives: This study compared PP and oral IQS training in terms of (i) effect on four-quadrant facial dysfunction and dysphagia after a first-ever stroke, and (ii) whether the training effect persisted at late follow-up. Methods: Patients were included during two periods; 13 patients in 2005-2008 trained with a PP, while 18 patients in 2009-2012 trained with an IQS. Four-quadrant facial dysfunction was assessed with an FA test and swallowing dysfunction with a SC test: before and after a 3-month training period and at late follow-up. FA and SC significantly improved (p less than 0.001) in both groups. FA test scores after training and at late follow-up did not differ significantly between the groups, irrespective of whether the interval between stroke incidence and the start of training was long or short.

  • 131.
    Hägglund, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Waldén, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Injury recurrence is lower at the highest professional football level than at national and amateur levels: does sports medicine and sports physiotherapy deliver?2016In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 50, no 12, p. 751-758Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Previous injury is a well-documented risk factor for football injury. The time trends and patterns of recurrent injuries at different playing levels are not clear. Aim To compare recurrent injury proportions, incidences and patterns between different football playing levels, and to study time trends in recurrent injury incidence. Methods Time-loss injuries were collected from injury surveillance of 43 top-level European professional teams (240 team-seasons), 19 Swedish premier division teams (82 team-seasons) and 10 Swedish amateur teams (10 team-seasons). Recurrent injury was defined as an injury of the same type and at the same site as an index injury within the preceding year, with injury amp;lt;2 months defined as an early recurrence, and amp;gt;2 months as a delayed recurrence. Seasonal trend for recurrent injury incidence, expressed as the average annual percentage of change, was analysed using linear regression. Results 13 050 injuries were included, 2449 (18.8%) being recurrent injuries, with 1944 early (14.9%) and 505 delayed recurrences (3.9%). Recurrence proportions were highest in the second half of the competitive season for all cohorts. Recurrence proportions differed between playing levels, with 35.1% in the amateur cohort, 25.0% in the Swedish elite cohort and 16.6% in the European cohort (chi(2) overall effect, pamp;lt;0.001). A decreasing trend was observed in recurrent injury incidence in the European cohort, a -2.9% average annual change over the 14-year study period (95% CI -5.4% to -0.4%, p=0.026). Similarly, a decreasing tendency was also seen in the Swedish premier division. Conclusions Recurrence proportions showed an inverse relationship with playing level, and recurrent injury incidence has decreased over the past decade.

  • 132.
    Isaksson, Karolin
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Katsarelias, Dimitrios
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mikiver, Rasmus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Regional Cancer Center.
    Carneiro, Ana
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Ny, Lars
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Olofsson Bagge, Roger
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    A Population-Based Comparison of the AJCC 7th and AJCC 8th Editions for Patients Diagnosed with Stage III Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma in Sweden2019In: Annals of Surgical Oncology, ISSN 1068-9265, E-ISSN 1534-4681, Vol. 26, no 9, p. 2839-2845Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Cutaneous melanoma is steadily increasing worldwide. The new AJCC 8th edition was recently launched and introduced several changes in melanoma staging, particularly for stage III. We conducted a population-based registry study with the purpose to evaluate the impact and prognostic accuracy of the new classification in Sweden.

    Methods

    Consecutive patients diagnosed with stage III melanoma between January 2005 and September 2017 were identified by the Swedish Melanoma Registry (SMR) and included for analyses. Patients with multiple primary melanomas were excluded. Patients were classified according to the AJCC 7th as well as the 8th edition. Melanoma-specific survival (MSS) was retrieved from the Swedish Cause of Death Registry.

    Results

    A total of 2067 eligible patients were identified from the SMR; 1150 patients (57%) changed stage III subgroup when reclassified according to the AJCC 8th edition. The median 5- and 10-year MSS for the whole cohort of stage III melanoma patients was 59% and 51% respectively. The MSS for substage IIIA, B, and C were all improved when patients were reclassified by using to the AJCC 8th edition. The newly defined substage IIID had the worst prognosis with a 10-year MSS of 16%.

    Conclusions

    A high proportion of patients diagnosed with stage III melanoma in Sweden between 2005 and 2017 was restaged to another subgroup, when they were reclassified according to the AJCC 8th of staging manual. We established an improved MSS for all substages compared with the former AJCC 7th edition. This may have implications on decisions about adjuvant treatment.

  • 133.
    Islam, Mohammad Mirazul
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA USA.
    Buznyk, Oleksiy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Filatov Institute of Eye Diseases and Tissue Therapy of the NAMS of Ukraine, Odessa, Ukraine.
    Reddy, Jagadesh C
    Tej Kohli Cornea Institute, LV Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India.
    Pasyechnikova, Nataliya
    Filatov Institute of Eye Diseases and Tissue Therapy of the NAMS of Ukraine, Odessa, Ukraine.
    Alarcon, Emilio I
    Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, ON Canada.
    Hayes, Sally
    School of Optometry and Vision Sciences College of Biomedical and Life Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK; 7Cardiff Institute for Tissue Engineering and Repair (CITER), Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
    Lewis, Philip
    School of Optometry and Vision Sciences College of Biomedical and Life Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK; 7Cardiff Institute for Tissue Engineering and Repair (CITER), Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    He, Chaoliang
    Key Laboratory of Polymer Eco-materials, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, China.
    Iakymenko, Stanislav
    Filatov Institute of Eye Diseases and Tissue Therapy of the NAMS of Ukraine, Odessa, Ukraine.
    Liu, Wenguang
    School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin, China.
    Meek, Keith M
    School of Optometry and Vision Sciences College of Biomedical and Life Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK; 7Cardiff Institute for Tissue Engineering and Repair (CITER), Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
    Sangwan, Virender S
    Tej Kohli Cornea Institute, LV Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada.
    Biomaterials-enabled cornea regeneration in patients at high risk for rejection of donor tissue transplantation2018In: NPJ Regenerative medicine, ISSN 2057-3995, Vol. 3, article id 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The severe worldwide shortage of donor organs, and severe pathologies placing patients at high risk for rejecting conventional cornea transplantation, have left many corneal blind patients untreated. Following successful pre-clinical evaluation in mini-pigs, we tested a biomaterials-enabled pro-regeneration strategy to restore corneal integrity in an open-label observational study of six patients. Cell-free corneal implants comprising recombinant human collagen and phosphorylcholine were grafted by anterior lamellar keratoplasty into corneas of unilaterally blind patients diagnosed at high-risk for rejecting donor allografts. They were followed-up for a mean of 24 months. Patients with acute disease (ulceration) were relieved of pain and discomfort within 1-2 weeks post-operation. Patients with scarred or ulcerated corneas from severe infection showed better vision improvement, followed by corneas with burns. Corneas with immune or degenerative conditions transplanted for symptom relief only showed no vision improvement overall. However, grafting promoted nerve regeneration as observed by improved touch sensitivity to near normal levels in all patients tested, even for those with little/no sensitivity before treatment. Overall, three out of six patients showed significant vision improvement. Others were sufficiently stabilized to allow follow-on surgery to restore vision. Grafting outcomes in mini-pig corneas were superior to those in human subjects, emphasizing that animal models are only predictive for patients with non-severely pathological corneas; however, for establishing parameters such as stable corneal tissue and nerve regeneration, our pig model is satisfactory. While further testing is merited, we have nevertheless shown that cell-free implants are potentially safe, efficacious options for treating high-risk patients.

  • 134.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Regional Cancer Center.
    Aljabery, Firas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Modulation of the inflammatory response after sclerotherapy for hydrocoele/spermatocoele2019In: BJU International, ISSN 1464-4096, E-ISSN 1464-410X, Vol. 123, no 5A, p. E63-E68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To investigate the modulation of the inflammatory response after sclerotherapy for hydrocoele/spermatocoele.

    Patients and Methods

    All patients with hydrocoele or spermatocoele presenting at the Department of Urology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden, from 2006 to 2012, were included in this prospective observational study of sclerotherapy for hydrocoele/spermatocoele using polidocanol as a sclerosing agent and adjuvant antibiotic and anti‐inflammatory medication (AAAM) for modulation of the inflammatory response. Patients were clinically evaluated within 24–48 h after a complication or adverse event possibly related to sclerotherapy. Evaluation of cure was scheduled after 3 months and re‐treatment, if necessary was carried out in the same manner as the first treatment. Groups of patients were compared using the chi‐squared test and logistic regression analysis.

    Results

    From a total of 191 patients, AAAM was given to 126, of whom 5% had subclinical epididymitis/swelling (SES) compared to 26% of the patients without AAAM (P < 0.001). No other complication was observed. The rate of cure for the whole group of patients was 93% after one or two treatments and significantly higher in the group with AAAM than in the group without AAAM (96% vs 88%, P = 0.03).

    Conclusions

    Modulation of the inflammatory response after sclerotherapy resulted in a lower incidence of SES and an increased cure rate.

  • 135.
    Jancke, Georg
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Impact of surgical experience on recurrence and progression after transurethral resection of bladder tumour in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer2014In: SCANDINAVIAN JOURNAL OF UROLOGY, ISSN 2168-1805, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 276-283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: To evaluate the impact of experience in transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TUR-BT) on recurrence and progression in primary Ta/T1 urinary bladder cancer.

    Methods: Clinical and pathological characteristics of patients with primary Ta/T1 urinary bladder cancer were recorded prospectively from 1992 to 2007 inclusive. Data on surgeons’ experience were categorized as follows: (a) experience by training status (residents or specialists); (b) number of TUR-BTs performed by each surgeon during the registration period, with cut-off levels at > 100, > 150, > 200, > median, and > third quartile of surgical volume; (c) lifetime high-volume surgeons (> 100 TUR-BTs). Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using Cox regression with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in both univariate and multivariate analysis.

    Results: The analysis included 768 evaluable patients with a median follow-up of 60 months. Recurrence was observed in 478 patients (62%) and progression in 71 (9%). Surgery was performed by residents in 100 cases and specialists in 668, with recurrence in 75 (75%) and 403 (60%) patients, and progression in 9 (9%) and 62 (9%), respectively. Surgery performed by residents was statistically associated with recurrence (HR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.54-0.89) but not progression (HR = 0.72, 95% CI = 0.35-1.48). Surgical volume (b and c) was not found to have a significant impact on recurrence or progression in any of the analyses at the chosen cut-offs.

    Conclusions: Surgical experience (specialist/resident) was a predictive factor for recurrence after TUR-BT for Ta/T1 bladder cancer. However, surgeon volume was not associated with recurrence at the chosen cut-off levels. Training programs, checklist

  • 136.
    Janzon, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Henriksson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Hasvold, Pål
    AstraZeneca Nordic-Baltic, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Hjelm, Hans
    Nyköping Hospital, Nyköping, Sweden.
    Thuresson, Marcus
    Statisticon AB, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Long-term resource use patterns and healthcare costs after myocardial infarction in a clinical practice setting - results from a contemporary nationwide registry study2016In: European Heart Journal - Quality of Care and Clinical Outcomes, ISSN 2058-5225, Vol. 2, p. 291-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims Long-term contemporary nationwide data on resource use and healthcare costs after myocardial infarction (MI) in a clinical practice setting are not widely studied, and the aim of this study was to investigate resource use patterns and healthcare costs in patients with MI in a nationwide clinical practice setting.

    Methods and results This retrospective cohort study included all patients identified in the compulsory Swedish nationwide patient register with a diagnosis of MI between 1 July 2006 and 30 June 2011. Cardiovascular hospitalization and outpatient visits data from the patient register were combined with data from the cause of death register and the drug utilization register. For a subset of patients, data were also available from a primary care register. Healthcare resource use patterns and annual costs [reported in 2014 euros (€) converted from Swedish kronor (SEK) using the exchange rate €1 = SEK 9.33)] were estimated for the year prior to the occurrence of MI as well as for a maximum follow-up period of 6 years post-MI. The study included 97 252 patients with a diagnosis of MI with a total number of 285 351 observation years. The majority of healthcare consumption occurred within the first year of MI where patients were on average hospitalized 1.55 times, made 1.08 outpatient care visits, and 3.80 primary care visits. In the long term, for the majority of resource use categories, average consumption was higher in the years after MI compared with the year prior to MI. Healthcare costs at 6 years of follow-up were approximately €20 000 of which €12 460 occurred in the first year, and the major part was attributed to hospitalizations.

    Conclusion For patients with 6 years of follow-up after MI, healthcare costs were approximately €20 000. The major part of costs occurred in the first year after MI and was driven by hospitalizations

  • 137.
    Jarefors, Erik
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Hansson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Functional outcome in 17 patients whose mandibles were reconstructed with free fibular flaps2017In: Journal of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, ISSN 2000-656X, E-ISSN 2000-6764, Vol. 51, no 3, p. 178-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The vascularised free fibular flap is considered to be a reliable choice for reconstruction of oromandibular defects, especially after resection of malignant tumours in the area. This study evaluates the functional outcome of this method.

    Method: From January 2001 - May 2014, 37 patients were treated at the University Hospital of Linköping using the free fibular flap. The authors present the results from 17. This study reviewed their records and used the University of Washington Quality-of-Life questionnaire (UW-QoL), the Head and Neck Performance Status Scale (PSS), and interviews to assess their outcome.

    Results and conclusions: Functional evaluation showed a significant decrease in chewing (16 out of 17 patients), appearance (n = 10), salivation (n = 6), sensitivity in the mouth and skin (n = 16), occlusive problems in the mouth (n = 13), and range of mouth opening (n = 12). The remaining domains showed acceptable results, although most of them probably could not compare with the preoperative function. Out of 17 patients, six had to adjust their eating in public significantly, three thought their activity to be considerably restricted and two their recreation to be notably diminished. Common postoperative complications were infections or fistula in the mandible (n = 6), partial or complete rejection of the cutaneous flap (n = 4), and rupture of some of the sutures (n = 3). Nine patients required at least one more operation to repair defects, and six required a new soft tissue flap.

  • 138.
    Johan, Scheer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lars, Adolfsson
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Patterns of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) injury associated with severely dorsally displaced extra-articular distal radius fractures2012In: Injury, ISSN 0020-1383, E-ISSN 1879-0267, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 926-932Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to examine triangular fibrocartilage (TFCC) injury patterns associated with unstable, extra-articular dorsally displaced distal radius fractures.

    Methods: Twenty adult patients with an Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO), type A2 or A3, distal radius fracture with an initial dorsal angulation greater than 20° were included. Nine had a tip fracture (distal to the base) of the ulnar styloid and 11 had no such fracture. They were all openly explored from an ulnopalmar approach and TFCC injuries were documented. Eleven patients also underwent arthroscopy and intra-articular pathology was recorded.

    Results: All patients had TFCC lesions of varying severity, having an extensor carpi ulnaris subsheath avulsion in common. Eighteen out of 20 also displayed deep foveal radioulnar ligament lesions, with decreasingly dorsal fibres remaining. The extent of this foveal injury could not be appreciated by radiocarpal arthroscopy.

    Conclusions: Severe displacement of an extra-articular radius fracture suggests an ulnar-sided ligament injury to the TFCC. The observed lesions concur with findings in a previous cadaver study. The lesions follow a distinct pattern affecting both radioulnar as well as ulnocarpal stabilisers.

  • 139.
    Johan, Scheer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lars, Adolfsson
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Radioulnar laxity and clinical outcome after a distal radius fracture do not correlate after a distal radius fracture2011In: Journal of Hand Surgery - British and European Volume, ISSN 0266-7681, E-ISSN 1532-2211, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 503-508Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Injury to the triangular fibrocartilage complex associated with distal radius fracture may cause symptoms of ulnar instability. Assessed by a radioulnar stress test, increased laxity of the distal radio-ulnar joint has in two previous studies been depicted to be associated with poorer outcome. This prospective study of 40 adults investigates the correlation of this test with functional outcome as measured by DASH. No clinically significant difference was found in relation to this test at two and five years after injury. Therefore using this test alone to decide whether or not to perform an acute repair of the TFCC cannot be recommended.

  • 140.
    Johansson, Johannes
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Thermocoagulation in Deep Brain Structures: Modelling, simulation and experimental study of radio-frequency lesioning2006Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Radio-frequency (RF) lesioning is a method utilising high frequency currents for thermal coagulation of pathological tissue or signal pathways. The current is delivered from an electrode with a temperature sensor, permitting control of the current at a desired target temperature. In the brain RF-lesioning can e.g. be used for severe chronic pain and movement disorders such as Parkinson’s disease. This thesis focuses on modelling and simulation with the aim of gaining better understanding and predictability of the lesioning process in deep brain structures. The finite element method (FEM) together with experimental comparisons was used to study the effects of electrode dimensions, electrode target temperature, electric and thermal conductivity of the brain tissue, blood perfusion and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) filled cysts. Equations for steady current, thermal transport and incompressible flow were used together with statistical factorial design and regression analysis for this purpose.

    Increased target temperature, electrode tip length and electrode diameter increased the simulated lesion size, which is in accordance with experimental results. The influence of blood perfusion, modelled as an increase in thermal conductivity in non-coagulated tissue, gave smaller simulated lesions with increasing blood perfusion as heat was more efficiently conducted from the rim of the lesion. If no consideration was taken to the coagulation the lesion became larger with increased thermal conductivity instead, as the increase in conducted heat was compensated for through an increased power output in order to maintain the target temperature. Simulated lesions corresponded well to experimental in-vivo lesions.

    The electric conductivity in a homogeneous surrounding had little impact on lesion development. However this was not valid for a heterogeneous surrounding. CSF-filled cysts have a much higher electric conductivity than brain tissue focussing the current to them if the electrode tip is in contact with both. Heating of CSF can also cause considerable convective flow and as a result a very efficient heat transfer. This affected simulated as well as experimental lesion sizes and shapes resulting in both very large lesions if sufficient power compared to the cysts size was supplied and very small lesions if the power was low, mitigating the heat over a large volume.

    In conclusion especially blood perfusion and CSF can greatly affect the lesioning process and appear to be important to consider when planning surgical procedures. Hopefully this thesis will help improve knowledge about and predictability of clinical lesioning.

    List of papers
    1. Radio-frequency lesioning in brain tissue with coagulation-dependent thermal conductivity: modelling, simulation and analysis of parameter influence and interaction
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Radio-frequency lesioning in brain tissue with coagulation-dependent thermal conductivity: modelling, simulation and analysis of parameter influence and interaction
    Show others...
    2006 (English)In: Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, ISSN 0140-0118, E-ISSN 1741-0444, Vol. 44, no 9, p. 757-766Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Radio-frequency brain lesioning is a method for reducing e.g. symptoms of movement disorders. A small electrode is used to thermally coagulate malfunctioning tissue. Influence on lesion size from thermal and electric conductivity of the tissue, microvascular perfusion and preset electrode temperature was investigated using a finite-element model. Perfusion was modelled as an increased thermal conductivity in non-coagulated tissue. The parameters were analysed using a 24-factorial design (n = 16) and quadratic regression analysis (n = 47). Increased thermal conductivity of the tissue increased lesion volume, while increased perfusion decreased it since coagulation creates a thermally insulating layer due to the cessation of blood perfusion. These effects were strengthened with increased preset temperature. The electric conductivity had negligible effect. Simulations were found realistic compared to in vivo experimental lesions.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Heidleberg: Springer, 2006
    Keywords
    Electrosurgery, RF ablation, Brain, Blood perfusion, Finite-element method
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-15926 (URN)10.1007/s11517-006-0098-1 (DOI)000240378700003 ()16941099 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-33748485613 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com: Johannes D Johansson, Ola Eriksson, Joakim Wren, Dan Loyd and Karin Wårdell, Radio-frequency lesioning in brain tissue with coagulation-dependent thermal conductivity: modelling, simulation and analysis of parameter influence and interaction, 2006, Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, (44), 9, 757-766. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11517-006-0098-1 Copyright: Springer Science Business Media http://www.springerlink.com/

    Available from: 2008-12-16 Created: 2008-12-16 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    2. Comparison between a detailed and a simplified finite element model of radio-frequency lesioning in the brain
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison between a detailed and a simplified finite element model of radio-frequency lesioning in the brain
    Show others...
    2004 (English)In: 26th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, San Fransisco, USA, 2004, Vol. 4, p. 2510-2513Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A detailed and a simplified model of a lesioning electrode was made using the finite element method. 15 simulations of the lesioning procedure were performed for each model and the resulting lesion volumes were compared in order to investigate if the simplified model is adequate. The simplified model resulted in a very slight overestimation of the volume compared to the detailed model. It was thus concluded that the simplified model is adequate for simulations.

    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13995 (URN)10.1109/IEMBS.2004.1403723 (DOI)
    Available from: 2006-09-25 Created: 2006-09-25 Last updated: 2018-10-08Bibliographically approved
    3. Simulations of radio-frequency lesions with varying brain electrode dimensions
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Simulations of radio-frequency lesions with varying brain electrode dimensions
    Show others...
    2005 (English)In: 13th Nordic Baltic conference biomedical engineering and medical physics, Umeå, Sweden, 2005, Vol. 9, p. 62-63Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Radio-frequency (RF) lesioning in the

    brain was simulated using the finite element method

    (FEM). Heating for 60 s with temperature control in

    order to keep the tip at 80 °C was simulated. Length,

    L, (2 – 4 mm) and diameter, D, (0.5 – 2.5 mm) of the

    electrode tip were varied and the resulting lesion

    volumes were used to calculate a regression model:

    Lesion Volume = – 13.1D + 15.7LD + 13.1D2 mm3.

    The results can be useful for electrode design and

    prediction of lesion size.

    Keywords
    Radio-frequency surgery, Brain, Lesion size, Electrode dimensions, Finite Element Method (FEM)
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13996 (URN)
    Available from: 2006-09-25 Created: 2006-09-25 Last updated: 2017-02-21Bibliographically approved
    4. Impact of cysts during radio frequency (RF) lesioning in deep brain structures: a simulation and in-vitro study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of cysts during radio frequency (RF) lesioning in deep brain structures: a simulation and in-vitro study
    2007 (English)In: Journal of Neural Engineering, ISSN 1741-2560, E-ISSN 1741-2552, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 87-95Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Radiofrequency lesioning of nuclei in the thalamus or the basal ganglia can be used to reduce symptoms caused by e.g. movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Enlarged cavities containing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are commonly present in the basal ganglia and tend to increase in size and number with age. Since the cavities have different electrical and thermal properties compared with brain tissue, it is likely that they can affect the lesioning process and thereby the treatment outcome. Computer simulations using the finite element method and in vitro experiments have been used to investigate the impact of cysts on lesions' size and shape. Simulations of the electric current and temperature distributions as well as convective movements have been conducted for various sizes, shapes and locations of the cysts as well as different target temperatures. Circulation of the CSF caused by the heating was found to spread heat effectively and the higher electric conductivity of the CSF increased heating of the cyst. These two effects were together able to greatly alter the resulting lesion size and shape when the cyst was in contact with the electrode tip. Similar results were obtained for the experiments.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Institute of Physics Publishing (IOPP), 2007
    Keywords
    Electrosurgery, RF ablation, Brain, Blood perfusion, Finite-element method
    National Category
    Other Medical Engineering
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13997 (URN)10.1088/1741-2560/4/2/009 (DOI)000247947300015 ()17409483 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-34247183212 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Original Publication: Johannes D. Johansson, Dan Loyd, Karin Wårdell and Joakim Wren, Impact of cysts during radio frequency (RF) lesioning in deep brain structures: a simulation and in-vitro study, 2006, Journal of Neural Ingeneering, (4), 2, 87-95. http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1741-2560/4/2/009 Copyright: Institute of Physics Publishing http://www.iop.org/

    Available from: 2008-12-16 Created: 2008-12-16 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
  • 141. Johansson, K E
    et al.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Boeryd, B
    Fransson, S G
    Tibbling, Lita
    Oesophagitis, signs of reflux, and gastric acid secretion in patients with symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.1986In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 21, no 7, p. 837-847Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a study comprising 100 patients referred to a surgical clinic with symptoms suggestive of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease the value of different diagnostic procedures was investigated. Positive acid perfusion and 24-h pH tests were the commonest findings. Forty-nine per cent showed a normal oesophageal mucosa or diffuse oesophagitis at endoscopy. The severity of heartburn and regurgitation did not differ between patients with normal oesophageal mucosa and oesophagitis of various severities. The severity of macroscopic oesophagitis was significantly correlated to the total reflux time, the presence of reflux or a hiatal hernia at radiology, an open cardia or reflux at endoscopy, pressure transmission or reflux and low lower oesophageal sphincter pressure at manometry. Gastric hypersecretion was found in 66% of the patients. Gastric acid secretion was not correlated to the severity of oesophagitis or to the findings at 24-h pH test. In patients with severe oesophagitis the sensitivity for radiologic, manometric, and endoscopic signs of incompetence of the gastro-oesophageal junction was 94%.

  • 142.
    Johansson, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Flatebø, Torun
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway.
    Nicolaysen, Anne
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway.
    Nicolaysen, Gunnar
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Inhibition of constitutive nitric oxide synthase does not influence ventilation: matching in normal prone adult sheep with mechanical ventilation2016In: Anesthesia and Analgesia, ISSN 0003-2999, E-ISSN 1526-7598, Vol. 123, no 6, p. 1492-1499Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Local formation of nitric oxide (NO) in the lung in proportion to ventilation, leading to vasodilation, is a putative mechanism behind ventilation- perfusion matching. We examined the role of local constitutive NO formation on regional distributions of ventilation (V) and perfusion (Q) and ventilation-perfusion matching (V/Q) in mechanically ventilated adult sheep with normal gas exchange.

    Methods

    V and Q were analyzed in lung regions (≈1.5 cm3) before and after inhibition of constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS) with Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (25 mg/kg) in seven prone sheep ventilated with PEEP. V and Q were measured using aerosolized fluorescent and infused radiolabeled microspheres, respectively. The animals were exsanguinated while deeply anaesthetized; lungs were excised, dried at total lung capacity and divided into cube units. The spatial location for each cube was tracked and fluorescence and radioactivity per unit weight determined.

    Results

    Pulmonary artery pressure increased significantly after L-NAME (from mean 16.6 to 23.6 mmHg, P<0.01) while there were no significant changes in PaO2, PaCO2 or SD log(V/Q). Distribution of V was not influenced by L-NAME but a small redistribution of Q from ventral to dorsal lung regions resulting in less heterogeneity in Q along the gravitational axis was seen (p<0.01). Perfusion to regions with the highest ventilation (5th quintile of the V distribution) remained unchanged with L-NAME.

    Conclusions

    There was minimal or no influence of cNOS inhibition by L-NAME on the distributions of V and Q, and V/Q in prone anesthetized and ventilated adult sheep with normal gas exchange.

  • 143.
    Johansson, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Flatebö, Torun
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway.
    Nicolaysen, Anne
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway.
    Nicolaysen, Gunnar
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Minimal redistribution of regional ventilation-perfusion ratios by 10 and 20 cmH2O positive end-expiratory pressure in prone sheep2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) has posture dependent effects on the distributions of ventilation (V) and perfusion (Q). We examined if redistribution of regional ventilation-perfusion ratios (V/Q) by PEEP was identical in prone and supine.

    Methods

    Mechanically ventilated sheep (n=16) were studied in prone or supine with 0, 10 and 20 cmH2O PEEP. V and Q were measured with a fluorescent microsphere aerosol and an intravenous infusion of microspheres, respectively. The right lung was dried at total lung capacity and diced into approx. 1000 regions tracking the spatial location of each region.

    Results

    In prone V/Q was close to unity in all horizontal planes with 0 PEEP and remained so with 10 and 20 PEEP. In supine V/Q was imperfect in the most dependent planes with 0 and 10 PEEP. V/Q approached unity in these planes when 20 PEEP was applied, but V/Q in non-dependent planes increased. The slope of the linear relationship between vertical height and V/Q was not different from zero at any PEEP in prone, but was larger than zero with all PEEP levels in supine. Mean V/Q heterogeneity (SDlogV/Q) was lower in prone at all PEEP levels (0 PEEP: 0.22 vs. 0.37,  10 PEEP: 0.21 vs. and 0.32 and 20 PEEP: 0.19 vs. 0.39, P<0.01).

    Conclusions

    Redistribution of regional V/Q was minimal in prone with PEEP and remained close to ideal in all horizontal planes. The absence of high V/Q with PEEP in prone may be clinically important when recruitment fails in the supine posture.

  • 144.
    Johansson, Torsten
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Displaced Femoral Neck Fractures: A prospective randomized study of clinical outcome, nutrition and costs2002Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Displaced femoral neck fractures comprise more than a third of all hip fractures. There is controversy as to the optimal treatment. Despite attempts to improve the methods for internal fixation, complication rates have been almost unchanged: 20-40% non-union and late segmental collapse in another 10-20%. Internal fixation has been the preferred treatment in Scandinavia, whereas primary hemi- or total arthroplasty have been more prevalent in the rest of Europe and North America.

    In this study, patients 75 years or older, including those with mental impairment, were randomized to either internal fixation or cemented primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). A total of 146 hips in 143 patients were followed for two years. After one year 23% had died, and after two years 29%. Mortality was about the same in both groups. The accumulated mortality was pronounced among the mentally impaired patients.

    In the internal fixation group, 44% underwent further surgery. In the THA group, 18% dislocated. The dislocation rate was higher for the mentally impaired patients. The Harris hip scores were higher in the THA group, whereas pain was more common in the internal fixation group.

    The first 50 patients in each treatment group were studied concerning heterotopic ossification (HO), a well-known complication after THA. The incidence of HO in the THA group was similar to what is found after THA due to osteoarthritis. However, only 1/39 developed severe symptoms.

    A subgroup of 100 patients was included in a study concerning nutritional status and functional capacity using the Modified Norton scale, Katz index of ADL and a questionnaire measuring instrumental activities of daily living. The THA group fared better concerning weight change over time, locomotion and pain. The nutritional intervention did not show any measurable effects.

    All patients were followed until two years postoperatively and all fracturerelated hospital costs, including reoperations, were calculated. We found no difference in total costs between the treatment groups. Costs to the municipality were calculated comparing the baseline cost before surgery with the average cost per month during the first postoperative year. No difference was found between the treatment groups.

    On the basis of our results, we recommend arthroplasty for patients in this age group with normal mental function and high functional demands.

    List of papers
    1. Internal fixation versus total hip arthroplasty in the treatment of displaced femoral neck fractures
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internal fixation versus total hip arthroplasty in the treatment of displaced femoral neck fractures
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    2000 (English)In: Acta Orthopaedica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6470, Vol. 71, no 6, p. 597-602Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    100 patients 75 years or older, with displaced femoral neck fractures, were randomly assigned to osteosynthesis with two parallel and percutaneously inserted screws (Olmed) or total hip arthroplasty (Lubinus IP). Mean age was 84 (75-101) years, 74% were women and 45% had mental dysfunction. General complications were commoner in the arthroplasty group but the mortality rates did not differ. In the osteosynthesis group, fracture complications were seen in 27/50 hips. In the arthroplasty group, dislocation was the main complication and occurred in 11/50 cases. At 3 months and after 1 year, the Harris Hip Scores were significantly better in the arthroplasty group. When mental dysfunction was present, the dislocation rate after arthroplasty was 32%, whereas the reoperation rate after osteosynthesis was 5%. The opposite pattern of complications was found in patients with normal mental function, 12% versus 60%. The 2-year mortality rate among those with mental dysfunction was 26/45, compared to 7/55 of those with normal function (p < 0.001). We conclude that total hip arthroplasty should be considered for a displaced femoral neck fracture in old patients with normal mental function and high functional demands.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13728 (URN)
    Available from: 2002-05-12 Created: 2002-05-12 Last updated: 2009-08-19
    2. Heterotopic bone formation following internal fixation or arthroplasty for displaced femoral neck fractures: a prospective randomized study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Heterotopic bone formation following internal fixation or arthroplasty for displaced femoral neck fractures: a prospective randomized study
    2001 (English)In: International Orthopaedics, ISSN 0341-2695, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 223-225Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    One hundred hips in 99 patients of 75 years or older, with a displaced femoral neck fracture, were studied for heterotopic ossification (HO). The patients were randomized to either internal fixation or total hip arthroplasty (THA). In the THA group HO was found in 32 of 45 hips compared with 1 of 39 in the internal fixation group (P<0.0012). The frequency of HO after THA corresponds well with findings in other studies on patients receiving THA for osteoarthrosis. In cervical fractures the surgical procedure of total hip replacement seems to be a prerequisite for HO, indicating that the procedure itself is more important than the patient's age and the diagnosis. Severe symptoms due to HO were found in only one patient. HO following THA for a femoral neck fracture is of little clinical importance and prophylaxis is unnecessary.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13729 (URN)10.1007/s002640100263 (DOI)
    Available from: 2002-05-12 Created: 2002-05-12 Last updated: 2009-08-19
    3. Nutritional status and functional capacity after femoral neck fractures: a prospective randomized one-year follow-up study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nutritional status and functional capacity after femoral neck fractures: a prospective randomized one-year follow-up study
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    2000 (English)In: Aging, ISSN 1945-4589, E-ISSN 1945-4589, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 366-374Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two different surgical methods on nutritional status and functional capacity during the first postoperative year in patients with displaced femoral neck fractures. A further aim was to evaluate the effect of nutritional support. One hundred patients were randomly assigned to treatment with either primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) or osteosynthesis. Half of the patients in each treatment group received protein- and energy-enriched food in the hospital in addition to individual nutritional advice in order to optimize their intake of protein- and energy-rich food. Nutritional state and functional capacity were examined at baseline, one and three months, and one year after the operation. Pain was examined at three months and one year. The effect of nutritional intervention was equal within both surgical groups. Logistic regression showed that the dependent variable "living at one year" was significantly associated with serum albumin levels at one month. Advanced age, mental impairment and deteriorated nutritional status were predominant in the non-survivors. Overall, the primary THA group performed better compared with the osteosynthesis group concerning weight change over time, locomotion and pain. This study also showed that primary THA could safely be performed in the elderly without an increased postoperative mortality rate.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13730 (URN)11126523 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2002-05-12 Created: 2002-05-12 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    4. The total costs of a displaced femoral neck fracture: comparison of internal fixation and total hip replacement. A randomised study of 146 hips
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The total costs of a displaced femoral neck fracture: comparison of internal fixation and total hip replacement. A randomised study of 146 hips
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    2006 (English)In: International Orthopaedics, ISSN 0341-2695, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We randomised 143 patients –age 75 years or older–with displaced femoral neck fracture to either internal fixation or total hip replacement (THR) and compared the socio-economic consequences. In the internal fixation group, 34 of 78 hips underwent secondary surgery. In the THR group, 12 of 68 hips dislocated, the majority in mentally impaired patients. We calculated the total hospital costs for two years after operation. When secondary surgery was included, there was no difference in costs between the internal fixation and THR groups, or between the mentally impaired and lucid subgroups. The costs to the community were calculated comparing the baseline cost before surgery with the average cost per month during the first postoperative year. No difference was found between the treatment groups. The Harris hip scores were higher in the THR group, and pain was more common in the internal fixation group. In lucid patients, THR gives a better clinical result at the same cost.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13731 (URN)10.1007/s00264-005-0037-z (DOI)
    Available from: 2002-05-12 Created: 2002-05-12
  • 145.
    Jonsson, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    How to create and analyze a Heart Failure Registry with emphasis on Anemia and Quality of Life2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims

    Heart failure (HF) is a major cause of serious morbidity and death in the population and one of the leading medical causes of hospitalization among people older than 60 years. The aim of this thesis was to describe how to create and how to analyze a Heart Failure Registry with emphasis on Anemia and Quality of Life. (Paper I) We described the creation of the Swedish Heart Failure Registry (SwedeHF) as an instrument, which may help to optimize the handling of HF patients and show how the registry can be used to improve the management of patients with HF. (Paper II) In order to show how to analyze a HF registry we investigated the prevalence of anemia, its predictors, and its association with mortality and morbidity in a large cohort of unselected patients with HFrEF included in the SwedeHF, and to explore if there are subgroups of HF patients identifying high--‐risk patients in need of treatment. (Paper III) In order to show another way of analyzing a HF registry we assessed the prevalence of, associations with, and prognostic impact of anemia in patients with HFmrEF and HFpEF. (Paper IV) Finally we examined the usefulness of EQ--‐ 5D as a measure of patient--‐reported outcomes among HF patients using different analytical models and data from the SwedeHF, and comparing results about HRQoL for patients with HFpEF and HFrEF.

    Methods

    An observational study based on the SwedeHF database, consisting of about 70 variables, was undertaken to describe how a registry is created and can be used (Paper I). One comorbidity (anemia) was applied to different types of HF patients, HFrEF (EF <40%) (II) and HFmrEF (EF 40--‐49% ) or HFpEF (> 50%) (III) analyzing the data with different statistical methods. The usefulness of EQ--‐5D as measure of patient--‐ reported outcomes was studied and the results about HRQoL were compared for patients with HFpEF and HFrEF (IV).

    Results

    In the first paper (Paper I) we showed how to create a HF registry and presented some characteristics of the patients included, however not adjusted since this was not the purpose of the study. In the second paper (Paper II) we studied anemia in patients with HFrEF and found that the prevalence of anemia in HFrEF were 34 % and the most important independent predictors were higher age, male gender and renal dysfunction. One--‐year survival was 75 % with anemia vs. 81 % without (p<0,001). In the matched cohort after propensity score the hazard ratio associated with anemia was for all--‐cause death 1.34. Anemia was associated with greater risk with lower age, male gender, EF 30--‐39%, and NYHA--‐class I--‐II. In the third paper (Paper III) we studied anemia in other types of HF patients and found that the prevalence in the overall cohort in patients with EF > 40% was 42 %, in HFmrEF 38 % and in HFpEF (45%). Independent associations with anemia were HFpEF, male sex, higher age, worse New York Heart Association class and renal function, systolic blood pressure <100 mmHg, heart rate ≥70 bpm, diabetes, and absence of atrial fibrillation. One--‐year survival with vs. without anemia was 74% vs. 89% in HFmrEF and 71% vs. 84% in HFpEF (p<0.001 for all). Thus very similar results in paper II and III but in different types of HF patients. In the fourth paper (Paper IV) we studied the usefulness of EQ--‐5D in two groups of patients with HF (HFpEF and HFrEF)) and found that the mean EQ--‐5D index showed small reductions in both groups at follow--‐up. The patients in the HFpEF group reported worsening in all five dimensions, while those in the HFrEF group reported worsening in only three. The Paretian classification showed that 24% of the patients in the HFpEF group and 34% of those in the HFrEF group reported overall improvement while 43% and 39% reported overall worsening. Multiple logistic regressions showed that treatment in a cardiology clinic affected outcome in the HFrEF group but not in the HFpEF group (Paper IV).

    Conclusions

    The SwedeHF is a valuable tool for improving the management of patients with HF, since it enables participating centers to focus on their own potential for improving diagnoses and medical treatment, through the online reports (Paper I). Anemia is associated with higher age, male gender and renal dysfunction and increased risk of mortality and morbidity (II, III). The influence of anemia on mortality was significantly greater in younger patients in men and in those with more stable HF (Paper II, III). The usefulness of EQ--‐5D is dependent on the analytical method used. While the index showed minor differences between groups, analyses of specific dimensions showed different patterns of change in the two groups of patients (HFpEF and HFrEF). The Paretian classification identified subgroups that improved or worsened, and can therefore help to identify needs for improvement in health services (Paper IV).

    List of papers
    1. Heart failure registry: a valuable tool for improving the management of patients with heart failure
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Heart failure registry: a valuable tool for improving the management of patients with heart failure
    2010 (English)In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 25-31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Guidelines on how to diagnose and treat patients with heart failure (HF) are published regularly. However, many patients do not fulfil the diagnostic criteria and are not treated with recommended drugs. The Swedish Heart Failure Registry (S-HFR) is an instrument which may help to optimize the handling of HF patients. The S-HFR is an Internet-based registry in which participating centres (units) can record details of their HF patients directly online and transfer data from standardized forms or from computerized patient documentation. Up to December 2007, 16 117 patients from 78 units had been included in the S-HFR. Of these, 10 229 patients had been followed for at least 1 year, and 2133 deaths were recorded. Online reports from the registry showed that electrocardiograms were available for 97% of the patients. Sinus rhythm was found in 51% of patients and atrial fibrillation in 38%. Echocardiography was performed in 83% of the patients. Overall, 77% of patients were treated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers, 80% were on beta-blockers, 34% on aldosterone antagonists, and 83% on diuretics. The S-HFR is a valuable tool for improving the management of patients with HF, since it enables participating centres to focus on their own potential for improving diagnoses and medical treatment, through the online reports provided.

    Keywords
    Heart failure; Registry; Diagnostics; Medical treatment
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-52877 (URN)10.1093/eurjhf/hfp175 (DOI)
    Available from: 2010-01-13 Created: 2010-01-12 Last updated: 2017-12-12
    2. A comprehensive assessment of the association between anemia, clinical covariates and outcomes in a population-wide heart failure registry
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A comprehensive assessment of the association between anemia, clinical covariates and outcomes in a population-wide heart failure registry
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    2016 (English)In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 211, p. 124-131Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim was to investigate the prevalence of, predictors of, and association with mortality and morbidity of anemia in a large unselected cohort of patients with heart failure (HF) and reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and to explore if there were specific subgroups of high risk. Methods: In patients with HFrEF in the Swedish Heart Failure Registry, we assessed hemoglobin levels and associations between baseline characteristics and anemia with logistic regression. Using propensity scores for anemia, we assessed the association between anemia and outcomes with Cox regression, and performed interaction and sub-group analyses. Results: There were 24 511 patients with HFrEF (8303 with anemia). Most important independent predictors of anemia were higher age, male gender and renal dysfunction. One-year survival was 75% with anemia vs. 81% without (p &lt; 0.001). In the matched cohort after propensity score the hazard ratio associated with anemia was for all-cause death 1.34 (1.28-1.40; p &lt; 0.0001), CV mortality 1.28 (1.20-1.36; p &lt; 0.0001), and combined CV mortality or HF hospitalization 1.24 (1.18-1.30; p &lt; 0.0001). In interaction analyses, anemia was associated with greater risk with lower age, male gender, EF 30-39%, and NYHA-class I-II. Conclusion: In HFrEF, anemia is associated with higher age, male gender and renal dysfunction and increased risk of mortality and morbidity. The influence of anemia on mortality was significantly greater in younger patients, in men, and in those with more stable HF. The clinical implication of these findings might be in the future to perform targeted treatment studies. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    ELSEVIER IRELAND LTD, 2016
    Keywords
    Heart failure; Reduced ejection fraction; Anemia; Outcomes; Observational study
    National Category
    Mathematics Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127741 (URN)10.1016/j.ijcard.2016.02.144 (DOI)000373918100029 ()26999301 (PubMedID)