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  • 101.
    Bernfort, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Rahmqvist, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Severity of chronic pain in an elderly population in Sweden-impact on costs and quality of life2015In: Pain, ISSN 0304-3959, E-ISSN 1872-6623, Vol. 156, no 3, p. 521-527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic pain is associated with large societal costs, but few studies have investigated the total costs of chronic pain with respect to elderly subjects. The elderly usually require informal care, care performed by municipalities, and care for chronic diseases, all factors that can result in extensive financial burdens on elderly patients, their families, and the social services provided by the state. This study aims to quantify the societal cost of chronic pain in people of age 65 years and older and to assess the impact of chronic pain on quality of life. This study collected data from 3 registers concerning health care, drugs, and municipal services and from 2 surveys. A postal questionnaire was used to collect data from a stratified sample of the population 65 years and older in southeastern Sweden. The questionnaire addressed pain intensity and quality of life variables (EQ-5D). A second postal questionnaire was used to collect data from relatives of the elderly patients suffering from chronic pain. A total of 66.5% valid responses of the 10,000 subjects was achieved; 76.9% were categorized as having no or mild chronic pain, 18.9% as having moderate chronic pain, and 4.2% as having severe chronic pain. Consumed resources increased with the severity of chronic pain. Clear differences in EQ-5D were found with respect to the severity of pain. This study found an association between resource use and severity of chronic pain in elderly subjects: the more severe the chronic pain, the more extensive (and expensive) the use of resources.

  • 102.
    Bernfort, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Chronic pain in a population 65 years and older: correlation with age of health care costs and quality of life2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 103.
    Bernhardsson, Susanne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Närhälsan Rehabilitation, Region Västra Götaland, Hönö, Sweden.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Maria E. H.
    Närhälsan Research and Development Primary Health Care, Region Västra Götaland, Gothenburg, Sweden; The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Clinical practice in line with evidence?: A survey among primary care physiotherapists in western Sweden2015In: Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, E-ISSN 1365-2753, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 1169-1177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale, aims and objectives

    Evidence-based practice is becoming increasingly important in primary care physiotherapy. Clinical practice needs to reflect current best evidence and be concordant with evidence-based clinical guidelines. There is limited knowledge about therapeutic interventions used in primary care physiotherapy in Sweden. The objectives were to examine preferred treatment interventions reported by publicly employed physiotherapists in primary care for three common musculoskeletal disorders (low back pain, neck pain and subacromial pain), the extent to which these interventions were supported by evidence, and associations with demographic variables.

    Methods

    419 physiotherapists in primary care in western Sweden were surveyed using a validated web-based questionnaire.

    Results

    The survey was completed by 271 respondents (65%). Median number of interventions reported was 7 (range 1–16). The most common treatment interventions across the three conditions were advice on posture (reported by 82–94%), advice to stay active (86–92%), and different types of exercise (65–92%). Most of these interventions were supported by evidence. However, interventions with insufficient evidence, such as advice on posture, TENS and aquatic exercise, were also used by 29–96%. Modalities such as laser therapy and ultrasound were sparingly used (<5%), which is in line with evidence. For neck pain, use of evidence-based interventions was associated with gender and for subacromial pain, with work experience.

    Conclusions

    Advice and exercise therapy were the interventions most frequently reported across the three diagnoses, illustrating an active treatment strategy. While most reported interventions are supported by evidence, interventions with unclear or no evidence of effect were also used to a high extent.

  • 104.
    Bielsten, Therese
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lasrado, Reena
    Univ Manchester, England.
    Keady, John
    Univ Manchester, England.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland.
    Living Life and Doing Things Together: Collaborative Research With Couples Where One Partner Has a Diagnosis of Dementia2018In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 28, no 11, p. 1719-1734Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to identify relevant content for a self-management guide by using the outcomes of previous research in combination with knowledge and experiences from couples where one partner has a diagnosis of dementia. The study was carried out in three phases: (a) literature search of previous research related to well-being and couplehood in dementia; (b) interviews with couples with dementia based on the findings of the literature search; and (c) further authentication of the findings within expert groups of people with dementia and carers. For analysis of data, we used a hybrid approach of thematic analysis with combined deductive and inductive approaches. The findings of this study indicated that the four main themes Home and Neighborhood, Meaningful Activities and Relationships, Approach and Empowerment, and Couplehood with related subthemes could be appropriate targets for a self-management guide for couples where one partner has a diagnosis of dementia.

  • 105.
    Biermann, Olivia
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Eckhardt, Martin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Emergency Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine.
    Carlfjord, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Forsberg, Birger C.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Collaboration between non-governmental organizations and public services in health - a qualitative case study from rural Ecuador2016In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 9, article id 32237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) have a key role in improving health in low-and middle-income countries. Their work needs to be synergistic, complementary to public services, and rooted in community mobilization and collective action. The study explores how an NGO and its health services are perceived by the population that it serves, and how it can contribute to reducing barriers to care. Design: A qualitative exploratory study was conducted in remote Ecuador, characterized by its widespread poverty and lack of official governance. An international NGO collaborated closely with the public services to deliver preventative and curative health services. Data were collected using focus group discussions and semistructured interviews with purposively sampled community members, healthcare personnel, and community health workers based on their links to the health services. Conventional qualitative content analysis was used, focusing on manifest content. Results: Emerging themes relate to the public private partnership (PPP), the NGO and its services, and community participation. The population perceives the NGO positively, linking it to healthcare improvements. Their priority is to get services, irrespective of the providers structure. The presence of an NGO in the operation may contribute to unrealistic expectations of health services, affecting perceptions of the latter negatively. Conclusions: To avoid unrealistic expectations and dissatisfaction, and to increase and sustain the populations trust in the organization, an NGO should operate in a manner that is as integrated as possible within the existing structure. The NGO should work close to the population it serves, with services anchored in the community. PPP parties should develop a common platform with joint messages to the target population on the providers structure, and regarding partners roles and responsibilities. Interaction between the population and the providers on service content and their expectations is key to positive outcomes of PPP operations.

  • 106.
    Birgitta Gunnarsson, A.
    et al.
    Department of Research and Development, Region Kronoberg, PO Box 1223, SE-351 12, Växjö, Sweden. birgitta.gunnarsson@kronoberg.se; Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. birgitta.gunnarsson@kronoberg.se.
    Wagman, Petra
    School of Health and Welfare, Department of Rehabilitation, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Hedin, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Family Medicine Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Håkansson, Carita
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Treatment of depression and/or anxiety - outcomes of a randomised controlled trial of the tree theme method® versus regular occupational therapy2018In: BMC Psychology, E-ISSN 2050-7283, Vol. 6, no 1, article id 25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Depression and anxiety disorders are a major concern in western countries, and because these often have a negative affect on everyday life interventions based on activities in everyday life are needed. The Tree Theme Method® (TTM) is a client-centred occupational therapy intervention designed to increase the ability to cope with, and to enhance satisfaction with, everyday life, both at home and at work. The aim of this study was to compare the short term outcomes of the TTM intervention with regular occupational therapy treatment for people with depression and/or anxiety disorders.

  • 107.
    Birken, Sarah A.
    et al.
    Univ N Carolina, NC 27515 USA.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Implementation science as an organizational process2018In: Health Care Management Review, ISSN 0361-6274, E-ISSN 1550-5030, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 181-181Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 108.
    Biurrun Manresa, Jose A.
    et al.
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Sörensen, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Andersen, Ole K.
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Arendt-Nielsen, Lars
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Dynamic Changes in Nociception and Pain Perception After Spinal Cord Stimulation in Chronic Neuropathic Pain Patients2015In: The Clinical Journal of Pain, ISSN 0749-8047, E-ISSN 1536-5409, Vol. 31, no 12, p. 1046-1053Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Patients with an implanted spinal cord stimulation (SCS) system for pain management present an opportunity to study dynamic changes in the pain system in a situation where patients are not stimulated (ie, experiencing severe pain) compared with a situation in which patients have just been stimulated (ie, pain free or greatly reduced pain). The aims of this study were (1) to determine if there are differences in nociceptive withdrawal reflex thresholds (NWR-T) and electrical pain thresholds (EP-T) before and after SCS; and (2) to establish if these differences are related to psychological factors associated with chronic pain. Methods: Seventeen volunteers with chronic neuropathic pain participated in the experiment. Electrical stimuli were applied to assess the NWR-T and the EP-T. In addition, psychological factors (ie, pain characteristics, depression, anxiety, and disability indexes) were also recorded. The NWR-T and EP-T were assessed with the SCS system off (at least 8 h before the experiment), and then reassessed 1 hour after the SCS system was turned on. Results: Ongoing pain intensity ratings decreased (P=0.018), whereas the NWR-T increased (P=0.028) after the SCS was turned on, whereas no significant difference was found for EP-T (P=0.324). Psychological factors were significant predictors for EP-T but not for NWR-T. Discussion: The results of this study suggest that pain relief after SCS is partially mediated by a decrease in the excitability of dorsal horn neurons in the spinal cord.

  • 109.
    Bjarnegård, Niclas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Reg Jonkoping Cty, Sweden.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Cinthio, M.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hedman, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Henriksson, J.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Vascular characteristics in young women: Effect of extensive endurance training or a sedentary lifestyle2018In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 223, no 2, article id UNSP e13041Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimTo explore whether high-level endurance training in early age has an influence on the arterial wall properties in young women. MethodsForty-seven athletes (ATH) and 52 controls (CTR), all 17-25 years of age, were further divided into runners (RUN), whole-body endurance athletes (WBA), sedentary controls (SC) and normally active controls (AC). Two-dimensional ultrasound scanning of the carotid arteries was conducted to determine local common carotid artery (CCA) geometry and wall distensibility. Pulse waves were recorded with a tonometer to determine regional pulse wave velocity (PWV) and pulse pressure waveform. ResultsCarotid-radial PWV was lower in WBA than in RUN (P amp;lt; .05), indicating higher arterial distensibility along the arm. Mean arterial pressure was lower in ATH than in CTR and in RUN than in WBA (P amp;lt; .05). Synthesized aortic augmentation index (AI@75) was lower among ATH than among CTR (-12.8 1.6 vs -2.6 +/- 1.2%, P amp;lt; .001) and in WBA than in RUN (-16.4 +/- 2.5 vs -10.7 +/- 2.0%, P amp;lt; .05), suggesting a diminished return of reflection waves to the aorta during systole. Carotid-femoral PWV and intima-media thickness (IMT), lumen diameter and radial distensibility of the CCA were similar in ATH and CTR. ConclusionElastic artery distensibility and carotid artery IMT are not different in young women with extensive endurance training over several years and in those with sedentary lifestyle. On the other hand, our data suggest that long-term endurance training is associated with potentially favourable peripheral artery adaptation, especially in sports where upper body work is added. This adaptation, if persisting later in life, could contribute to lower cardiovascular risk.

  • 110.
    Bjersing, Jan L.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Larsson, Anette
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Palstam, Annie
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ernberg, Malin
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Löfgren, Monika
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Kosek, Eva
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Stockholm Spine Centre, Sweden.
    Mannerkorpi, Kaisa
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Benefits of resistance exercise in lean women with fibromyalgia: involvement of IGF-1 and leptin2017In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 18, article id 106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Chronic pain and fatigue improves by exercise in fibromyalgia (FM) but underlying mechanisms are not known. Obesity is increased among FM patients and associates with higher levels of pain. Symptom improvement after aerobic exercise is affected by body mass index (BMI) in FM. Metabolic factors such as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) and leptin may be involved. In this study, the aim was to evaluate the role of metabolic factors in lean, overweight and obese women during resistance exercise, in relation to symptom severity and muscle strength in women with FM. Methods: Forty-three women participated in supervised progressive resistance exercise, twice weekly for 15-weeks. Serum free and total IGF-1, IGF-binding protein 3 (IGFBP3), adiponectin, leptin and resistin were determined at baseline and after 15-weeks. Level of current pain was rated on a visual analogue scale (0-100 mm). Level of fatigue was rated by multidimensional fatigue inventory (MFI-20) subscale general fatigue (MFIGF). Knee extension force, elbow flexion force and handgrip force were assessed by dynamometers. Results: Free IGF-1 (p = 0.047), IGFBP3 (p = 0.025) and leptin (p = 0.008) were significantly decreased in lean women (n = 18), but not in the overweight (n = 17) and the obese (n = 8). Lean women with FM benefited from resistance exercise with improvements in current pain (p= 0.039, n = 18), general fatigue (MFIGF, p = 0.022, n = 18) and improved elbow-flexion force (p = 0.017, n = 18). In overweight and obese women with FM there was no significant improvement in pain or fatigue but an improvement in elbow flexion (p = 0.049; p = 0.012) after 15 weeks of resistance exercise. Conclusion: The clearest clinical response to resistance exercise was found in lean patients with FM. In these individuals, individualized resistance exercise was followed by changes in IGF-1 and leptin, reduced pain, fatigue and improved muscular strength. In overweight and obese women FM markers of metabolic signaling and clinical symptoms were unchanged, but strength was improved in the upper limb. Resistance exercise combined with dietary interventions might benefit patients with FM and overweight.

  • 111.
    Bjorneboe, John
    et al.
    Norwegian School Sport Science, Norway.
    Kristensson, Karolina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Waldén, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bengtsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ronsen, Ola
    Aker Solut, Norway.
    Einar Andersen, Thor
    Norwegian School Sport Science, Norway.
    Role of illness in male professional football: not a major contributor to time loss2016In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 50, no 11, p. 699-702Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background There are limited data on the nature, type and incidence of illness in football. Previous studies indicate that gastrointestinal and respiratory tract illnesses are most common. Aim To describe the incidence and burden of illness in male professional football. Methods Over the 4-year study period, 2011-2014, 73 professional football teams in Europe participated, with a total of 1 261 367 player-days recorded. All time-loss illnesses were recorded by the medical staff of each club. A recordable illness episode was any physical or psychological symptom (not related to injury) that resulted in the player being unable to participate fully in training or match play. Results A total of 1914 illness episodes were recorded. The illness incidence was 1.5 per 1000 player-days, meaning that, on average, a player experienced an illness episode every second season, with a median of 3 days absence per illness episode. Severe illness (absence amp;gt;4 weeks) constituted 2% of all illnesses. Respiratory tract illness was the most common (58%), followed by gastrointestinal illness (38%). Respiratory tract illness, gastrointestinal illness and cardiovascular illness caused the highest illness burden. Conclusions The illness incidence among male professional football players is low compared with the injury incidence. We found that the highest illness burden was caused by illness to the respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract and cardiovascular system.

  • 112.
    Björk, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Rehabilitation Center. Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Wetterö, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöwall, Christoffer
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Quality of life and acquired organ damage are intimately related to activity limitations in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus2015In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 16, no 188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune multi-organ disease, characterized by episodes of disease flares and remissions over time, which may restrain affected patients ability to perform daily activities. The purpose of the present study was to characterize variation in activity limitations among well-defined SLE patients, and to describe disease phenotypes, acquired organ damage and their relations to activity limitation and self-reported health, respectively. Methods: The disease phenotypes were organized into 4 different clinical groups and logistic regression analyses were used to identify how an elevated health assessment questionnaire (HAQ) score was related to disease variables such as phenotypes, disease activity and damage accrual. Correlation and multiple linear regression analyses were used to examine the association between each group of variables - background variables, disease variables and self-reported measurements - and the degree of elevated HAQ. Results: We found a higher proportion of activity limitation in patients with skin and joint involvement compared to others. The presence of activity limitation, as detected by the HAQ instrument, was significantly associated with quality of life (EuroQol-5D) and accrual of organ damage using the Systemic Lupus International Collaborative Clinics/ACR damage index. Conclusions: The findings highlight the differing requirements of the multi-professional rehabilitation interventions for the various SLE phenotypes in order to optimize the clinical care of the patients.

  • 113.
    Björk, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Valtersson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    School of Health Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Stenström, Birgitta
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Sverker, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Foot barriers in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: an interview study among Swedish women and men2018In: Arthritis care & research, ISSN 2151-464X, E-ISSN 2151-4658, Vol. 70, no 9, p. 1348-1354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Foot impairments are related to reduced mobility and participation restrictions in daily activities in patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The new biological medications are effective and reduce disease activity, but not disability to the same extent. Foot impairments are assumed to be related to participation restrictions also in patients with early RA, diagnosed after the introduction of biological medications. The knowledge of foot impairments needs to be more explored after the introduction of biological disease-modifying drugs (bDMARDs). The aim of this study was to explore the patients' perspective of foot impairments related to early RA.

    METHODS: The sample included 59 patients (20-63 years) who were interviewed about participation dilemmas in daily life using the Critical Incident Technique. The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Data related to foot impairments were extracted and analyzed thematically. A research partner validated the analysis. The study was approved by the Regional Ethics Committee.

    RESULTS: Patients with early RA described a variety of participation restrictions related to foot impairments: 1) foot hindrances in domestic life, 2) foot impairments influencing work, 3) leisure activities restricted by one's feet 4) struggling to be mobile 5) foot impairments as an early sign of rheumatic disease.

    CONCLUSION: There is a need to focus on foot impairments related to early RA, and for health care professionals to understand these signs. A suggestion for future research is to conduct a longitudinal follow-up of foot impairment related to medication, disease activity and disability in patients diagnosed after the introduction of bDMARDs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 114.
    Björk, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Valtersson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Katz, Patricia
    University of California, San Francisco, USA.
    Validation and internal consistency of the Swedish version of the Valued Life Activities scale.2016In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 30, no 12, p. 1211-1219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The objective was to create a linguistically and culturally validated Swedish version of the Valued Life Activities scale. The aim was also to describe its content and concurrent validity and its internal consistency in persons with rheumatoid arthritis.

    METHODS: The Valued Life Activities scale was translated to Swedish and culturally adapted. In order to describe the content validity, both the Swedish and original Valued Life Activities scale were linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. The concurrent validity and internal consistency were evaluated in 737 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. To establish concurrent validity, the scale was correlated to disease activity, activity limitations, and life satisfaction. Internal consistency was assessed with Cronbach's alpha.

    RESULTS: The equivalence of meaning between the Swedish and the original Valued Life Activities scale was ensured by harmonization review. Content validity was high when linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Concurrent validity showed a strong correlation with the activity limitations (r = 0.87), moderate with life satisfaction (r = -0.61), and weak with disease activity (r = 0.38). Internal consistency was excellent (Cronbach's alpha = 0.97).

    CONCLUSIONS: The Swedish Valued Life Activities scale has been tested in a large and well-characterized sample and found to be a linguistically valid and culturally adapted self-reported measure of participation. Content validity of the Valued Life Activities scale was excellent, concurrent validity strong, and the internal consistency excellent. Since both individual preferences and International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health concepts of disability are taken into account, the Swedish Valued Life Activities scale appears to be a promising new scale addressing important aspects of participation.

  • 115.
    Black, Melissa H.
    et al.
    Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Mandi, Soheil
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Hlth Care Serv, Sweden.
    Milbourn, Benjamin
    Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Thompson, Craig
    Curtin Univ, Australia.
    DAngelo, Axel
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Hlth Care Serv, Sweden.
    Strom, Eva
    Swedish Publ Employment Serv, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Curtin Univ, Australia; Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Lerner, Matthew
    SUNY Stony Brook, NY 11794 USA.
    Halladay, Alycia
    Autism Sci Fdn, NY USA.
    Gerber, Alan
    SUNY Stony Brook, NY 11794 USA.
    Esposito, Christopher
    SUNY Stony Brook, NY 11794 USA.
    Girdler, Sonya
    Curtin Univ, Australia; Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Bolte, Sven
    Curtin Univ, Australia; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Hlth Care Serv, Sweden; Stockholm Hlth Care Serv, Sweden.
    Perspectives of key stakeholders on employment of autistic adults across the united states, australia, and sweden2019In: Autism Research, ISSN 1939-3792, E-ISSN 1939-3806Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite efforts to improve employment outcomes for autistic individuals, internationally their employment rates remain low. There is a need to better understand the factors influencing successful employment for autistic adults in the labor market from the perspectives of multiple key stakeholders. This study represents the second in a series of papers conducted as part of an International Society for Autism Research policy brief aimed at improving employment outcomes for autistic individuals. A community consultation methodology using focus groups, forums, and interviews was applied with autistic individuals (n = 19), family members (n = 18), service providers (n = 21), employers (n = 11), researchers (n = 5), and advocacy group representatives (n = 5) in Australia, Sweden, and the United States, aiming to identify the factors perceived to determine gaining and maintaining employment for autistic individuals. Directed content analysis, guided by the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), was conducted to investigate the key factors influencing employment outcomes for autistic individuals. Meaningful verbal concepts, or units of text with common themes, were also derived from the qualitative data and then linked and compared to the ICF Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Core-sets. Across countries, activity and participation and environmental factor categories of the ICF were the most associated with employment outcomes. Results suggest that removal of environmental barriers and enhancing environmental facilitators may assist to remediate ASD-related difficulties in the workplace. Autism Res 2019, (c) 2019 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Lay Summary This study sought to understand the perspectives of autistic individuals and key stakeholders on factors influencing if autistic adults get and keep jobs. Across Australia, Sweden, and the United States, focus groups and interviews were conducted to understand international perspectives on what helps and hinders getting and keeping a job for autistic individuals. The environment, including supports, relationships, attitudes, and services, were perceived to be the most important for workplace success. Intervention targeting barriers and facilitators in the workplace environment may support autistic adults to be successful in the labor market.

  • 116.
    Black, Melissa H.
    et al.
    Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Parsons, Richard
    Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Tang, Julia S. Y.
    Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Morris, Susan
    Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Lee, Hoe
    Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Curtin Univ, Australia; Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Disembedding performance and eye gaze behavior of adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder2019In: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, ISSN 1750-9467, E-ISSN 1878-0237, Vol. 66, article id UNSP 101417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Atypical visual perception in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) may contribute to superiority in disembedding tasks. Gaze behavior has provided some insights in to mechanisms underlying this purported superiority in children, however evidence is limited and requires additional investigation. Method: The performance and gaze behavior of 27 adolescents with ASD and 27 matched typically developing (TD) peers were examined during the Figure Ground Subtest of the Test of Visual Perception Skills-third edition (TVPS-3). Results: Compared to their TD counterparts, adolescents with ASD were no different in accuracy, however, had a longer response time. Differences in gaze behavior were also observed, characterized by adolescents with ASD spending less time viewing the incorrect and target figures, and spending a greater proportion of time viewing irrelevant areas of the stimuli compared to TD adolescents. Conclusions: Results suggest that while altered visual perception was observed, this did not contribute to superiority in disembedding tasks in adolescents with ASD. Future research is required to elucidate conditions under which altered visual perception may contribute to behavioral superiority.

  • 117.
    Blane, Alison
    et al.
    Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin Univ, Australia; Jonkoping Univ, Sweden; La Trobe Univ, Australia.
    Lee, Hoe C.
    Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Dukic Willstrand, Tania
    Swedish Natl Rd and Transport Res Inst VTI, Sweden.
    Investigating cognitive ability and self-reported driving performance of post-stroke adults in a driving simulator2018In: Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, ISSN 1074-9357, E-ISSN 1945-5119, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 44-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Safe driving is a complex activity that requires calibration. This means the driver can accurately assess the level of task demand required for task completion and can accurately evaluate their driving capability. There is much debate on the calibration ability of post-stroke drivers. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the cognition, self-rated performance, and estimation of task demand in a driving simulator with post-stroke drivers and controls. Methods: A between-groups study design was employed, which included a post-stroke driver group and a group of similarly aged older control drivers. Both groups were observed driving in two simulator-based driving scenarios and asked to complete the NASA Task Load Index (TLX) to assess their perceived task demand and self-rate their driving performance. Participants also completed a battery of psychometric tasks to assess attention and executive function, which was used to determine whether post-stroke cognitive impairment impacted on calibration. Results: There was no difference in the amount of perceived task demand required to complete the driving task. Despite impairments in cognition, the post-stroke drivers were not more likely to over-estimate their driving abilities than controls. On average, the post-stroke drivers self-rated themselves more poorly than the controls and this rating was related to cognitive ability. Conclusion: This study suggests that post-stroke drivers may be aware of their deficits and adjust their driving behavior. Furthermore, using self-performance measures alongside a driving simulator and cognitive assessments may provide complementary fitness-to-drive assessments, as well as rehabilitation tools during post-stroke recovery.

  • 118.
    Blane, Alison
    et al.
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Lee, Hoe C.
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin University, Australia; Jonköping University, Sweden; La Trobe University, Australia.
    Dukic Willstrand, Tania
    Swedish National Rd and Transport Research Institute VTI, Sweden.
    Assessing Cognitive Ability and Simulator-Based Driving Performance in Poststroke Adults2017In: Behavioural Neurology, ISSN 0953-4180, E-ISSN 1875-8584, article id 1378308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Driving is an important activity of daily living, which is increasingly relied upon as the population ages. It has been well-established that cognitive processes decline following a stroke and these processes may influence driving performance. There is much debate on the use of off-road neurological assessments and driving simulators as tools to predict driving performance; however, the majority of research uses unlicensed poststroke drivers, making the comparability of poststroke adults to that of a control group difficult. It stands to reason that in order to determine whether simulators and cognitive assessments can accurately assess driving performance, the baseline should be set by licenced drivers. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess differences in cognitive ability and driving simulator performance in licensed community-dwelling poststroke drivers and controls. Two groups of licensed drivers (37 poststroke and 43 controls) were assessed using several cognitive tasks and using a driving simulator. The poststroke adults exhibited poorer cognitive ability; however, there were no differences in simulator performance between groups except that the poststroke drivers demonstrated less variability in driver headway. The application of these results as a prescreening toolbox for poststroke drivers is discussed.

  • 119.
    Blane, Alison
    et al.
    Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Lee, Hoe
    Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin Univ, Australia; Jonkoping Univ, Sweden; La Trobe Univ, Australia.
    Willstrand, Tania Dukic
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden; Swedish Natl Rd and Transport Res Inst VTI, Sweden.
    Cognitive ability as a predictor of task demand and self-rated driving performance in post-stroke drivers - Implications for self-regulation2018In: Journal of Transport and Health, ISSN 2214-1405, E-ISSN 2214-1405, Vol. 9, p. 169-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Driving is a highly complex task requiring multiple cognitive processes that can be adversely affected post-stroke. It is unclear how much ability post-stroke adults have to self-evaluate their driving performance. Furthermore, the impact of cognitive decline on this evaluation has not been previously investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the perceived level of task demand involved in driving tasks, and to examine differences between perceived and observed driving performance in post-stroke drivers in comparison to a control group. A further aim of the research was to investigate the influence of cognition on self-rated driving performance. A total of 78 participants (35 post-stroke and 43 controls) were assessed using a series of cognitive tasks and were observed whilst driving. Participants were asked to rate their own driving performance and the task demand involved while driving using the NASA Task Load Index. Between group analyses were conducted to determine differences in the level of self-rated performance and task demand. Further analyses were conducted to investigate whether cognition accounted for differences in task demand or self-rated performance. Overall, the results suggested that the post-stroke drivers exhibited deficits in cognition, but they did not report increased levels of task demand when driving. Post-stroke adults also rated themselves more conservatively than the controls for on-road performance, which was associated with their reduced propensity for risk. The study suggests that cognitive deficits may influence post-stroke drivers to amend their driving behaviour, in order to bring the task demand within a manageable level. Understanding the mechanisms involved in self-rated performance and estimations of task demand can help promote accurate self-regulation practices in post-stroke drivers. Furthermore, measuring calibration may assist practitioners with assessing fitness-to-drive, as well as with tailoring driving rehabilitation.

  • 120.
    Blom, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden Sundsvall Hospital, Sweden .
    Hogberg, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Olofsson, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Vasternorrland County Council, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Ingela
    Umeå University, Sweden Vasternorrland County Council, Sweden .
    Strong association between earlier abuse and revictimization in youth2014In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 14, no 715Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Violence victimization among youth is recognized as a public health problem. The objective was to analyze the risk pattern of emotional, physical, and sexual abuse during the past 12 months by gender, sociodemographic factors, health risk behaviors, and exposure to abuse before the age of 15, among young men and women attending youth health centers in Sweden. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted using a nationally representative sample of youth health centers. A total of 2,250 young women and 920 young men aged 15-23 completed a self-administered questionnaire. Odds ratios (OR) and adjusted odds ratios (AOR) with 95% CI were calculated. Results: A consistent and strong association was noted between exposure to all types of violence during the past year and victimization before the age of 15 for all types of violence for both women and men. The only exceptions were childhood sexual victimization and sexual violence during the past year for men. Younger age was associated with all violence exposure for the women and with emotional violence for the men. For the women, drug use was associated with all types of violence, while the association with hazardous alcohol use and not living with parents was restricted to physical and sexual violence exposure, present smoking was restricted to emotional and physical violence exposure, and partnership and living in urban areas were restricted to sexual violence. For men, not being partnered, hazardous alcohol consumption, and drug use meant increased risk for physical violence, while smoking and living in urban areas were associated with sexual violence. After adjustment, immigration had no association with violence exposure. Conclusions: Violence victimization in young men and women is often not a single experience. Findings underline the importance of early interventions among previously abused youth.

  • 121.
    Blom, Kerstin
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Tarkian Tillgren, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wiklund, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Danlycke, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Forssen, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Söderström, Alexandra
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johansson, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Jernelov, Susanna
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lindefors, Nils
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Kaldo, Viktor
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Internet-vs. group-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia: A randomized controlled non-inferiority trial2015In: Behaviour Research and Therapy, ISSN 0005-7967, E-ISSN 1873-622X, Vol. 70, p. 47-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to compare guided Internet-delivered to group-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for insomnia. We conducted an 8-week randomized controlled non-inferiority trial with 6-months follow-up. Participants were forty-eight adults with insomnia, recruited via media. Interventions were guided Internet-delivered CBT (ICBT) and group-delivered CBT (GCBT) for insomnia. Primary outcome measure was the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), secondary outcome measures were sleep diary data, depressive symptoms, response- and remission rates. Both treatment groups showed significant improvements and large effect sizes for ISI (Within Cohens d: ICBT post = 1.8, 6-months follow-up = 2.1; GCBT post = 2.1, 6-months follow-up = 2.2). Confidence interval of the difference between groups posttreatment and at FU6 indicated non-inferiority of ICBT compared to GCBT. At post-treatment, two thirds of patients in both groups were considered responders (ISI-reduction greater than 7p). Using diagnostic criteria, 63% (ICBT) and 75% (GCBT) were in remission. Sleep diary data showed moderate to large effect sizes. We conclude that both guided Internet-CBT and group-CBT in this study were efficacious with regard to insomnia severity, sleep parameters and depressive symptoms. The results are in line with previous research, and strengthen the evidence for guided Internet-CBT for insomnia. Trial registration: The study protocol was approved by, and registered with, the regional ethics review board in Linkoping, Sweden, registration number 2010/385-31.

  • 122.
    Blomstrand, Peter
    et al.
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Engvall, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Festin, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Maret, Eva
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Maret-Ouda, John
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Left ventricular diastolic function, assessed by echocardiography and tissue Doppler imaging, is a strong predictor of cardiovascular events, superior to global left ventricular longitudinal strain, in patients with type 2 diabetes.2015In: European heart journal cardiovascular Imaging, ISSN 2047-2412, Vol. 16, no 9, p. 1000-1007Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: The aim of the study was to determine whether left ventricular systolic function, in terms of global left ventricular longitudinal strain (GLS), and diastolic function, expressed as the ratio between early diastolic transmitral flow and mitral annular motion velocities (E/e'), can predict cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: We prospectively investigated 406 consecutive patients, aged 55-65 years, with diabetes mellitus, who participated in the CARDIPP study. Echocardiography, pulse pressure (pp), and glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) were analysed. Twelve cases of myocardial infarction and seven cases of stroke were identified during the follow-up period of 67 ± 17 months. Univariate Cox regression analysis showed that E/e' was a strong predictor of cardiovascular events (hazards ratio 1.12; 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.18, P < 0.001). E/e' was prospectively associated with cardiovascular events independent of age, sex, GLS, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), pp, and HbA1c in multivariate analysis. Receiver operating characteristic curves showed that E/e' and HbA1c were the strongest predictors for cardiovascular events, both having an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.71 followed by LVEF with an AUC of 0.65 and GLS of 0.61. In a Kaplan-Meyer analysis, the cumulative probability of an event during the follow-up period was 8.6% for patients with an E/e' ratio >15 compared with 2.6% for patients with E/e' ≤15, P = 0.011.

    CONCLUSION: In middle-aged patients with type 2 diabetes, E/e' is a strong predictor of myocardial infarction and stroke, comparable with HbA1c and superior to GLS and LVEF.

  • 123.
    Blomstrand, Peter
    et al.
    Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden; Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Sjöblom, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Acad Hlth and Care, Sweden.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Engvall, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Ödeshög.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Overweight and obesity impair left ventricular systolic function as measured by left ventricular ejection fraction and global longitudinal strain2018In: Cardiovascular Diabetology, ISSN 1475-2840, E-ISSN 1475-2840, Vol. 17, article id 113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Obesity is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus, left ventricular diastolic dysfunction and heart failure but it is unclear to which extent it is related to left ventricular systolic dysfunction. The aim of the study was to explore the effects of overweight and obesity on left ventricular systolic function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and a control group of non-diabetic persons. Methods: We prospectively investigated 384 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and 184 controls who participated in the CARDIPP and CAREFUL studies. The participants were grouped according to body mass index (normal weight amp;lt; 25 kg/m(2), overweight 25-29 kg/m(2), and obesity amp;gt;= 30 kg/m(2) ). Echocardiography was performed at the beginning of the study and after 4-years in the patient group. Results: Univariable and multivariable regression analysis revealed that variations in left ventricular ejection fraction, global longitudinal strain, left ventricular mass and diastolic function expressed as E/e (the ratio between early diastolic mitral flow and annular motion velocities) all are related to body mass index. The mean and standard deviation of left ventricular ejection fraction and global longitudinal strain values were 57% (8%) vs. - 18.6% (2.3%) for normal weight patients, 53% (8%) vs. - 17.5% (2.3%) for overweight, and 49% (9%) vs. - 16.2% (3.0%) for obese (p amp;lt; 0.05 vs. p amp;lt;0.05). Corresponding results in the control group were 58% (6%) vs. -22.3% (3.0%), 55% (7%) vs. - 20.8% (3.1%) and 54% (8%) - 19.6% (4.0%) (p amp;lt;0.05 vs. p amp;lt;0.05). Patients who gained weight from baseline to follow-up changed left ventricular ejection fraction (median and interquartile range) by - 1.0 (9.0) % (n =187) and patients who lost weight changed left ventricular ejection fraction by 1.0 (10.0) % (n =179) (p amp;lt;0.05). Conclusion: Overweight and obesity impair left ventricular ejection fraction and global longitudinal strain in both patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and non-diabetic persons.

  • 124.
    Bodegard, J
    et al.
    AstraZeneca AB, Sweden .
    Sundstrom, J
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Svennblad, B
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Finspång, Primary Health Care in Finspång.
    Nilsson, P M.
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Johansson, G
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Changes in body mass index following newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and risk of cardiovascular mortality: A cohort study of 8486 primary-care patients2013In: Diabetes & Metabolism, ISSN 1262-3636, E-ISSN 1878-1780, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 306-313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims. - Elevated body mass index (BMI) is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study explored the association between BMI changes in the first 18 months of newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and the risk of long-term CVD mortality. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods. - A total of 8486 patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and no previous history of CVD or cancer were identified from 84 primary-care centres in Sweden. During the first year after diagnosis, patients were grouped according to BMI change: Increase, or andgt;= +1 BMI unit; unchanged, or between +1 and-1 BMI unit; and decrease, or andlt;=-1 BMI unit. Associations between BMI change and CVD mortality, defined as death from stroke, myocardial infarction or sudden death, were estimated using adjusted Cox proportional hazards models (NCT 01121315). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults. - Baseline mean age was 60.0 years and mean BMI was 30.2 kg/m(2). Patients were followed for up to 9 years (median: 4.6 years). During the first 18 months, 53.4% had no change in their BMI, while 32.2% decreased and 14.4% increased. Compared with patients with unchanged BMI, those with an increased BMI had higher risks of CVD mortality (hazard ratio: 1.63, 95% CI: 1.11-2.39) and all-cause mortality (1.33, 1.01-1.76). BMI decreases had no association with these risks compared with unchanged BMI: 1.06 (0.76-1.48) and 1.06 (0.85-1.33), respectively. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion. - Increased BMI within the first 18 months of type 2 diabetes diagnosis was associated with an increased long-term risk of CVD mortality. However, BMI decrease did not lower the long-term risk of mortality.

  • 125.
    Boersma, Katja
    et al.
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Södermark, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology.
    Flink, Ida K.
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Linton, Steven J.
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Efficacy of a transdiagnostic emotion-focused exposure treatment for chronic pain patients with comorbid anxiety and depression: a randomized controlled trial2019In: Pain, ISSN 0304-3959, E-ISSN 1872-6623, Vol. 160, no 8, p. 1708-1718Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The comorbidity between chronic pain and emotional problems has proven difficult to address with current treatment options. This study addresses the efficacy of a transdiagnostic emotion-focused exposure treatment ("hybrid") for chronic pain patients with comorbid emotional problems. Adults (n = 115) with chronic musculoskeletal pain and functional and emotional problems were included in a 2-centre, parallel randomized controlled, open-label trial comparing this treatment to an active control condition receiving a guided Internet-delivered pain management treatment based on CBT principles (iCBT). The hybrid treatment (n = 58, 10-16 sessions) integrates exposure in vivo for chronic pain based on the fear-avoidance model with an emotion-regulation approach informed by procedures in Dialectical Behavior Therapy. The iCBT (n = 57; 8 treatment modules) addresses topics such as pain education, coping strategies, relaxation, problem solving, stress, and sleep management using standard CBT techniques. Patient-reported outcomes were assessed before and after treatment as well as at a 9-month primary end point. Across conditions, 78% participants completed post-treatment and 81% follow-up assessment. Intent-to-treat analyses showed that the hybrid had a significantly better post-treatment outcome on pain catastrophizing (d = 0.39) and pain interference (d = 0.63) and significantly better follow-up outcomes on depression (d = 0.43) and pain interference (d = 0.51). There were no differences on anxiety and pain intensity. Observed proportions of clinically significant improvement favoured the hybrid on all but one comparison, but no statistically significant differences were observed. We conclude that the hybrid emotion-focused treatment may be considered an acceptable, credible, and efficacious treatment option for chronic pain patients with comorbid emotional problems.

  • 126.
    Bonn, Stephanie E.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Löf, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ostenson, Claes-Goeran
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lagerros, Ylva Trolle
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Sweden.
    App-technology to improve lifestyle behaviors among working adults - the Health Integrator study, a randomized controlled trial2019In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 19, article id 273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundMobile health, mHealth is recognized as a strategy to improve lifestyle behaviors. Research targeting specific lifestyle behaviors has shown that interventions using smartphones can be effective. However, few studies have evaluated solutions with multicomponent interventions, tailoring the intervention to the specific needs of the participant using a combination of mHealth and conventional treatment. To accomplish this, we developed Health Integrator, an mHealth platform with services and offers in the areas of diet, physical activity, sleeping habits, stress, alcohol and tobacco use. In the system, the user selects an area of intervention together with a health coach and set weekly goals. This study protocol presents the design and methodology of the Health Integrator Study, a randomized controlled trial to promote improved lifestyle behaviors.MethodsA three-arm parallel randomized controlled trial (1:1:1) is conducted in the Stockholm County, Sweden. In total, 209 employees at a four different companies representing both white and blue collar workers, have been recruited.Participants are randomized to either a control group or to one of two intervention groups receiving a 3-month lifestyle behavior change program including either 1) use of Health Integrator and monthly health coaching sessions or 2) only Health Integrator.At baseline and follow-up after 3- and 6-months, all participants answer questionnaires assessing lifestyle behaviors and quality of life. At baseline and the 3-month follow-up (end of intervention period), weight, height, waist circumference and blood pressure are measured, and all participants wear an Actigraph accelerometer for 7days to assess physical activity. Blood lipid profile and HbA1c are measured among all participants at baseline. If baseline measures fall outside the normal range, a second measurement is done after 3months.DiscussionThe Health Integrator Intervention Study will evaluate if a personalized intervention combining mHealth and conventional programs for lifestyle change, with or without additional health coach sessions, can improve lifestyle behaviors and quality of life. Based on the results from this trial, Health Integrator can easily be implemented within a broad public.Trial registrationClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03579342. Retrospectively registered, first submitted May 8, 2018.

  • 127.
    Borgestig, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Falkmer, Torbjorn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Curtin University, Australia .
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Improving computer usage for students with physical disabilities through a collaborative approach: A pilot study2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 463-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an assistive technology (AT) intervention to improve the use of available computers as assistive technology in educational tasks for students with physical disabilities during an ongoing school year. Methods: Fifteen students (aged 12-18) with physical disabilities, included in mainstream classrooms in Sweden, and their teachers took part in the intervention. Pre-, post-, and follow-up data were collected with Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS), a computer usage diary, and with the Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Devices Scale (PIADS). Teachers opinions of goal setting were collected at follow-up. Results: The intervention improved the goal-related computer usage in educational tasks and teachers reported they would use goal setting again when appropriate. At baseline, students reported a positive impact from computer usage with no differences over time regarding the PIADS subscales independence, adaptability, or self-esteem. Discussion: The AT intervention showed a positive effect on computer usage as AT in mainstream schools. Some additional support to teachers is recommended as not all students improved in all goal-related computer usage. A clinical implication is that students computer usage can be improved and collaboratively established computer-based strategies can be carried out by teachers in mainstream schools.

  • 128.
    Borgestig, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Folke Bernadotte Regional Habilitation Centre and Department of Women´s and Children´s Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sandqvist, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Ahlsten, Gunnar
    Folke Bernadotte Regional Habilitation Centre and Department of Women´s and Children´s Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Torbjorn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia; School of Occupational Therapy, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Gaze-based assistive technology in daily activities in children with severe physical impairments: an intervention study2017In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 129-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To establish the impact of a gaze-based assistive technology (AT) intervention on activity repertoire, autonomous use, and goal attainment in children with severe physical impairments, and to examine parents’ satisfaction with the gaze-based AT and with services related to the gaze-based AT intervention.

    Methods: Non-experimental multiple case study with before, after, and follow-up design. Ten children with severe physical impairments without speaking ability (aged 1–15 years) participated in gaze-based AT intervention for 9–10 months, during which period the gaze-based AT was implemented in daily activities.

    Results: Repertoire of computer activities increased for seven children. All children had sustained usage of gaze-based AT in daily activities at follow-up, all had attained goals, and parents’ satisfaction with the AT and with services was high.

    Discussion: The gaze-based AT intervention was effective in guiding parents and teachers to continue supporting the children to perform activities with the AT after the intervention program.

  • 129.
    Borgestig, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Folke Bernadotte Regional Habilitation Centre and Department of Women´s and Children´s Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sandqvist, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Parsons, Richard
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia / School of Occupational Therapy, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eye gaze performance for children with severe physical impairments using gaze-based assistive technology: a longitudinal study2016In: Assistive technology, ISSN 1040-0435, E-ISSN 1949-3614, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 93-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gaze-based assistive technology (gaze-based AT) has the potential to provide children affected by severe physical impairments with opportunities for communication and activities. This study aimed to examine changes in eye gaze performance over time (time on task and accuracy) in children with severe physical impairments, without speaking ability, using gaze-based AT. A longitudinal study with an AB design was conducted on ten children (aged 1–15 years) with severe physical impairments, who were beginners to gaze-based AT at baseline. Thereafter, all children used the gaze-based AT in daily activities over the course of the study. Compass computer software was used to measure time on task and accuracy with eye selection of targets on screen, and tests were performed with the children at baseline, after 5 months, 9–11 months, and after 15–20 months. Findings showed that the children improved in time on task after 5 months and became more accurate in selecting targets after 15–20 months. This study indicates that these children with severe physical impairments, who were unable to speak, could improve in eye gaze performance. However, the children needed time to practice on a long-term basis to acquire skills needed to develop fast and accurate eye gaze performance.

  • 130.
    Borgquist, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kostnadseffektivitetens betydelse vid prioritering av läkemedel2013In: Läkemedelsboken 2014 / [ed] Helena Ramström, Läkemedelsverket, Uppsala, Uppsala: Läkemedelsverket , 2013, p. 1182-1193Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 131.
    Borgquist, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lundell, Lars
    Karolinska institutet Department of Clinical Sciences Intervention and Technology - Stockholm, Sweden Karolinska Institutet Department of surgery - Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Stefan
    Lund University - Clinical Sciences, Malmö Malmö, Sweden Lund University - Clinical Sciences, Malmö Malmö, Sweden.
    Magsårssjukdomens paradigmskiften – från högspecialiserad vårdorganisation till egenvård [The paradigm shift for peptic ulcer disease]2018In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge development and paradigm shift for peptic ulcer disease is described over a fifty-year period using four levels of knowledge that place demands on the healthcare organization. When medical knowledge reached a healing level, continuity became subordinate. However, accessibility to treatment became more important. An important task for future healthcare will be to define and create broader knowledge structures. Efficiency losses can occur when control instruments apply to medical problems at low levels of knowledge which are not mature for this.

  • 132.
    Borgquist, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    W-Dahl, Annette
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Dale, Havard
    Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway..
    Lidgren, Lars
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Stefansdottir, Anna
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Prosthetic joint infections - a need for health economy studies2014In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 85, no 3, p. 218-220Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 133.
    Borgstrom Bolmsjo, Beata
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Jakobsson, Ulf
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Molstad, Sigvard
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Midlov, Patrik
    Lund University, Sweden.
    The nutritional situation in Swedish nursing homes - A longitudinal study2015In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 128-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Poor nutritional status is widespread among the elderly and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to longitudinally describe the nutritional status in elderly people living in nursing homes. Nutritional status was recorded longitudinally in elderly people living in 11 different nursing homes in Sweden. Participants were examined at baseline by specially trained nurses who also assisted with questionnaires and collected data for current medical treatment from patient records. Nutritional status was evaluated at baseline and after 24 months with the mini nutritional assessment (MNA). The study included 318 subjects. The mean age of the participants was 85.0 years (range 65-101). At baseline, 41.6% were well nourished, 40.3% at risk of malnutrition, and 17.7% malnourished according to the MNA. Survival was significantly lower in the malnourished group. After 24 months, almost half of the population had died. The group of participants who survived at 24 months represents a population of better nutritional state, where 10.6% were malnourished at baseline increasing to 24.6% after 24 months. After 24 months, 38.7% of the participants showed a decline in nutritional state. The group with deteriorating MNA scores had higher weight, BMI values, and a higher hospitalization rate. The prevalence of malnutrition in nursing home residents increased over time and it is important to evaluate nutritional state regularly. Nutritional interventions should be considered in better nourished groups, as well as in malnourished individuals, to prevent a decline in nutritional state.

  • 134.
    Borgstrom Bolmsjo, Beata
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Molstad, Sigvard
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Midlov, Patrik
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Prevalence and treatment of heart failure in Swedish nursing homes2013In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 13, no 118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Since the burden of care for elderly patients with heart failure (HF) can be decreased by therapeutic measures, it is important that such patients are identified correctly. This study explores the prevalence of HF in nursing homes in Sweden, with special consideration of the risk of failure to diagnose HF in the study population. A second aim is to explore medication and the adherence to guidelines for the treatment of HF. Methods: 429 patients from 11 nursing homes were included during 2008-2011. Information about diagnoses and medications from patient records, blood samples, questionnaire responses and blood pressure measurements were collected. The baseline characteristics of the patients, their medications and one-year mortality were identified and then compared regarding HF diagnosis and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels. A BNP level of greater than 100 ng/L was used to identify potential cases of HF. Results: The point prevalence of HF diagnosis in the medical records in the study population was 15.4%. With the recommended cut-off value for BNP, up to 196 subjects in the study population (45.7%) qualified for further screening of potential HF. The subjects in the HF and non-HF groups were similar with the exception of mean age, BNP levels and Mini Mental State Examination results which were higher in the HF group, and the eGFR and blood pressure, which were lower when HF. The subjects with higher BNP values were older and had lower eGFR, Hb, diastolic blood pressure and BMI. The subjects with HF diagnoses were in many cases not treated according to the guidelines. Loop diuretics were often used without concomitant ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers. The subjects without HF diagnoses in the medical records at inclusion but with BNP values greater than 100 ng/L had less appropriate HF medication. The one-year mortality was 52.9% in the population with HF. Conclusions: Our study suggests that the estimated prevalence of HF in nursing homes in Sweden would increase if BNP measurements were used to select patients for further examinations. The pharmacological treatment of HF varied substantially, as did adherence to guidelines.

  • 135.
    Borgström Bolmsjö, Beata
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Molstad, Sigvard
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Gallagher, Martin
    University of Sydney, Australia.
    Chalmers, John
    University of Sydney, Australia.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Ödeshög.
    Midlov, Patrik
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Risk factors and consequences of decreased kidney function in nursing home residents: A longitudinal study2017In: Geriatrics & Gerontology International, ISSN 1444-1586, E-ISSN 1447-0594, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 791-797Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to study the renal function and the relationship of deterioration in renal function with major outcomes in elderly nursing home residents. A second aim was to compare the internationally recommended formulae for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) consisting of both creatinine and cystatin C in a nursing home population. Methods: A total of 429 patients from 11 nursing homes were included during 2008-2011. GFR was estimated, from formulae based on both creatinine and cystatin C, at baseline and after 1 and 2 years. The patients were divided into groups based on chronic kidney disease level, and comparisons were made for mortality, morbidity, the use of medications and between the different formulae for eGFR. Results: Survival was lower in the groups with lower renal function. Over 60% of the residents had impaired renal function. Those with impaired renal function were older, had a higher number of medications and a higher prevalence of heart failure. Higher number of medications was associated with a greater risk of rapid decline in renal function with an odds ratio of 1.2 (95% confidence interval 1.06-1.36, P = 0.003). The compared eGFR formulae based on both cystatin C and creatinine were in excellent concordance with each other. Conclusions: Decreased renal function was associated with increased mortality. A majority of nursing home residents had declining renal function, which should be considered when prescribing medications. The more medications, the higher the risk for rapidly declining renal function.

  • 136.
    Boud, David
    et al.
    Deakin University, Geelong, Australia / University of Technology, Sydney, Australia / Middlesex University, London, UK.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kelly, Michelle
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    O’Keeffe, Dara
    Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland.
    Learning through observation2019In: Interprofessional Simulation in Health Care: Materiality, Embodiment, Interaction / [ed] Madeleine Abrandt Dahlgren, Hans Rystedt, Li Felländer-Tsai & Sofia Nyström, Cham: Springer, 2019, p. 115-137Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter has a particular focus on the observers’ role in simulation-based learning activities. Simulation-based learning is often organised so that participants rotates between active participation in the scenario and participation as observers. The research examples provided show that the conditions for learning are related to the locations where and the ways the observers are situated, and to how the instructions to the observers are formulated. Arguments are put forward that the observers’ role in simulation has unexploited potential for developing skills of noticing.

  • 137.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Hedberg, Berith
    Jönköping Academic Qual Improvement and Leadership Heatlh, Sweden.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Communication between patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome and healthcare personnel during the initial visit to a continuous positive airway pressure clinic2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 3-4, p. 568-577Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. To describe facilitators and barriers from a patient perspective in communications between patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome and healthcare personnel during the first meeting when continuous positive airway pressure is initiated. Background. Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure treatment tends to be poor, especially at the initial phase of treatment. Communication between the patient and healthcare personnel has not been studied from the patient perspective, as either a barrier or facilitator for adherence. Methods. A descriptive design using qualitative content analysis was used. Interviews with 25 patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome took place after their initial visit at four continuous positive airway pressure clinics. A deductive analysis based on The 4 Habits Model (i.e. emphasise the importance of investing in the beginning of the consultation, elicit the patients perspective, demonstrate empathy and invest in the end of the consultation) was conducted. Results. Building confidence (i.e. structure building, information transfer, commitment) or hindering confidence (i.e. organisational insufficiency, stress behaviour, interaction deficit) was associated with investing in the beginning. Motivating (i.e. situational insight, knowledge transfer, practical training) or demotivating (i.e. expectations, dominance and power asymmetry, barriers) was associated with eliciting the patients perspective. Building hope (i.e. awareness, sensitivity, demonstration of understanding) or hindering hope (i.e. unprepared, uncommitted, incomprehension) was associated with showing empathy. Agreement (i.e. confirmation, responsibilities, comprehensive information) or disagreement (i.e. structural obscurity, irresponsibility, absent-mindedness) was associated with investing in the end. Conclusions. Understanding of facilitators and barriers, as described by patients, can be used to improve contextual conditions and communication skills among healthcare personnel. Relevance to clinical practice. A patient-centred communication technique should be used in relation to all stages of The 4 Habits Model to facilitate shared decision-making and improve adherence to continuous positive airway pressure treatment.

  • 138.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gardner, Benjamin
    University College London, UK.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Arestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linnaeus University & Palliative Research Centre, Ersta Sköndal University College and Ersta Hospital, Stockholm.
    Validation of the CPAP Habit Index-5: A Tool to Understand Adherence to CPAP Treatment in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea.2014In: Sleep Disorders, ISSN 2090-3545, E-ISSN 2090-3553, Vol. 2014, p. 1-9, article id 929057Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Long-term adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is low among patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The potential role of "habit" in sustaining adherence to CPAP use has not been studied. This study aimed to establish the relevance of habit to CPAP adherence, via validation of an adaptation of the Self-Report Habit Index (the CPAP Habit Index-5; CHI-5). Analyses focused on the homogeneity, reliability, and factor structure of the CHI-5 and, in line with theoretical predictions, its utility as a predictor of long-term CPAP adherence in middle-aged patients with OSA. A prospective longitudinal design was used. 117 patients with objectively verified OSA intended for CPAP treatment were recruited. Data was collected via clinical examinations, respiratory recordings, questionnaires, and CPAP devices at baseline, 2 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months. The CHI-5 showed satisfactory homogeneity interitem correlations (0.42-0.93), item-total correlations (0.58-0.91), and reliability ( α = 0.92). CHI-5 data at 6 months showed a one-factor solution and predicted 63% of variance in total CPAP use hours after 12 months. Based on the satisfactory measurement properties and the high amount of CPAP use variance it explained, the CHI-5 can be seen as a useful tool in clinical practice.

  • 139.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Department of Nursing, School of Health and Welfare, Sweden.
    Pakpour, A. H.
    Department of Nursing, School of Health and Welfare, Sweden; Social Determinants of Health Research Center Qazvin, Iran.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fridlund, B.
    CICE Linneus University, Sweden.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Psychometric properties of the Ethos Brief Index (EBI) using factorial structure and Rasch Analysis among patients with obstructive sleep apnea before and after CPAP treatment is initiated.2019In: Sleep and Breathing, ISSN 1520-9512, E-ISSN 1522-1709, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 761-768Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Continuous positive airway treatment (CPAP) is the recommended treatment for patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Outcome measures often focus on clinical and/or self-rated variables related to the medical condition. However, a brief validated instrument focusing on the whole life situation (i.e., ethos) suitable for clinical practice is missing. The aim of this study was to investigate factorial structure, categorical functioning of the response scale, and differential item functioning across sub-populations of the Ethos Brief Index (EBI) among patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) before and after initiation of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP).

    METHODS: A prospective design, including 193 patients with OSA (68% men, 59.66 years, SD 11.51) from two CPAP clinics, was used. Clinical assessment and overnight respiratory polygraphy were used to diagnose patients. Questionnaires administered before and after 6 months of CPAP treatment included EBI, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and global perceived health (initial item in SF-36). The validity and reliability of the EBI were investigated using Rasch and confirmatory factor analysis models. Measurement invariance, unidimensionality, and differential item functioning across gender groups, Apnea-Hypopnea Index, and ESS groups were assessed.

    RESULTS: The reliability of the EBI was confirmed using composite reliability and Cronbach's alpha. The results supported unidimensionality of the EBI in confirmatory factor analysis and the Rasch model. No differential item functioning was found. A latent profile analysis yielded two profiles of patients with low (n = 42) and high (n = 151) ethos. Patients in the low ethos group were younger and had higher depression scores, lower perceived health, and higher body mass index.

    CONCLUSIONS: The EBI is a valid tool with robust psychometric properties suitable for use among patients with OSA before and after treatment with CPAP is initiated. Future studies should focus on its predictive validity.

  • 140.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden; Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Iran.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gardner, Benjamin
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Promoting CPAP adherence in clinical practice: A survey of Swedish and Norwegian CPAP practitioners beliefs and practices2018In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 27, no 6, article id UNSP e12675Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The benefits of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment for obstructive sleep apnea are well established, but adherence tends to be low. Research exploring CPAP practitioners beliefs around determinants of CPAP adherence, and the actions they use in clinical practice to promote CPAP adherence is lacking. This study aimed to: (i) develop and validate a questionnaire to assess beliefs and current practices among CPAP practitioners; (ii) explore practitioners beliefs regarding the main determinants of patient adherence, and the actions practitioners most commonly use to promote CPAP adherence; and (iii) explore the associations between perceived determinants and adherence-promotion actions. One-hundred and forty-two CPAP practitioners in Sweden and Norway, representing 93% of all Swedish and 62% of all Norwegian CPAP centres, were surveyed via a questionnaire exploring potential determinants (18 items) and adherence-promotion actions (20 items). Confirmatory factor analysis and second-order structural equational modelling were used to identify patterns of beliefs, and potential associations with adherence-promotion actions. Patients knowledge, motivation and attitudes were perceived by practitioners to be the main determinants of CPAP adherence, and educating patients about effects, management and treatment adjustments were the most common practices. Knowledge was shown to predict educational and informational actions (e.g. education about obstructive sleep apnea and CPAP). Educational and informational actions were associated with medical actions (e.g. treatment adjustment), but knowledge, attitude and support had no association with medical actions. These findings indicate that a wide variety of determinants and actions are considered important, though the only relationship observed between beliefs and actions was found for knowledge and educational and informational actions.

  • 141.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Department of Nursing, School of Healthand Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    School of Healthand Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden; Social Determinants of Health ResearchCenter, Qazvin University of MedicalSciences, Ira.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hedberg, Berith
    Jönköping Academy for Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden; Region Jönköpings län, Futurum, Jönköping,Sweden.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Validation of CollaboRATE and SURE - two short questionnaires to measure shared decision making during CPAP initiation.2019In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 28, no 5, article id UNSP e12808Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment tends to be low. Brief validated instruments focusing on shared decision making have not been used in a CPAP context. The aim was to investigate factorial structure, categorical functioning of the response scale and differential item functioning across sub-populations of the CollaboRATE and Sure questionnaires among patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) before CPAP treatment is initiated. A prospective design, including 193 objectively diagnosed (polygraphy) OSA patients (68% men, 59.7 years, SD 11.5) from two CPAP clinics was used. Data were collected with the following questionnaires; Sure, CollaboRATE, Attitudes to CPAP Inventory, Epworth sleepiness scale, minimal insomnia symptoms scale, and hospital anxiety and depression scale. Objective CPAP use was collected after 6 months; 49% demonstrated decisional conflict on SURE and 51% scored low levels of shared decision making on CollaboRATE. Unidimensionality was found for both CollaboRATE (one factor explaining 57.4%) and SURE (one factor explaining 53.7%), as well as local independence. Differential item functioning showed both to be invariant across both male and female patients. Internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha 0.83) and composite reliability (0.89) were good. Latent class analyses showed that patients with low decisional conflict and high shared decision making were more adherent to CPAP treatment. CollaboRATE and SURE provided good validity and reliability scores to measure shared decision making and decisional conflict in relation to CPAP treatment. The questionnaires can be used by healthcare personnel as a tool to simplify the assessment of shared decision making.

  • 142.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden; Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Iran.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Development and psychometric evaluation of the Swedish propensity to achieve healthy lifestyle scale in patients with hypertension2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 21-22, p. 4040-4049Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PurposeTo develop and validate a Swedish questionnaire to measure propensity for behaviour change regarding food habits, physical activity and weight reduction in patients with hypertension. DesignCross-sectional design. MethodsA total of 270 consecutive patients with hypertension diagnosed at four primary care centres in Sweden were included. The 6-item Swedish version of the Propensity to Achieve Healthy Lifestyle Scale (PAHLS) was developed to measure propensity for behaviour change regarding food habits, physical activity and weight reduction. The PAHLS (i.e., including three items for preparedness and three items for capacity) was developed by three multiprofessional researchers inspired by the transtheoretical model of behaviour change in collaboration with clinically active nurses. Data were collected by questionnaires on food habits (i.e., the Food Frequency Questionnaire), physical activity (the International Physical Activity Questionnaire), propensity for a healthy lifestyle (the PHLQ), as well as during a clinical examination. Exploratory (EFA) and confirmatory factor analyses (CFA), as well as Rasch analysis, were used. ResultsOf the 270 patients (50% women), 27% scored low levels of physical activity on the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, and 34% of the patients were obese (body mass index 30kg/m(2)). The EFA (explaining 54% of the variance) showed unidimensionality for the PAHLS that was supported by both CFA and Rasch analyses. No floor and 1.9% ceiling effects were found. Multiple group CFA (an extension of structural equationmodelling) showed that the PAHLS operated equivalently across both male and female patients. Internal consistency (Cronbachs alpha 0.83) and composite reliability (0.89) were good. ConclusionThe initial testing of PAHLS provided good validity and reliability scores to measure propensity for behaviour change in patients with hypertension. Relevance to Clinical PracticeThe PAHLS can be used by nurses as a tool to simplify shared decision-making in relation to behavioural changes.

  • 143.
    Bruce, C. R.
    et al.
    La Trobe University, Australia.
    Unsworth, C. A.
    La Trobe University, Australia; CQUniversity, Australia; Jonköping University, Sweden; Curtin University, Australia.
    Dillon, M. P.
    La Trobe University, Australia.
    Tay, R.
    RMIT University, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin University, Australia.
    Bird, P.
    Gosforth Clin, Australia.
    Carey, L. M.
    La Trobe University, Australia; Florey Institute Neurosci and Mental Health Neurorehabil and, Australia.
    Hazard perception skills of young drivers with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) can be improved with computer based driver training: An exploratory randomised controlled trial2017In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, ISSN 0001-4575, E-ISSN 1879-2057, Vol. 109, p. 70-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Young drivers with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are at higher risk of road traffic injuries than their peers. Increased risk correlates with poor hazard perception skill. Few studies have investigated hazard perception training using computer technology with this group of drivers. Objectives: *Determine the presence and magnitude of the between-group.and within- subject change in hazard perception skills in young drivers with ADHD who receive Drive Smart training. *Determine whether training facilitated change in hazard perception is maintained over time. Methods: This was a feasibility study, randomised control trial conducted in Australia. The design included a delayed treatment for the control group. Twenty-five drivers with a diagnosis of ADHD were randomised to the Immediate Intervention or Delayed Intervention group.The Immediate Intervention group received a training session using a computer application entitled Drive Smart. The Delayed Intervention group watched a documentary video initially (control condition), followed by the Drive Smart computer training session. The participants hazard perception skill was measured using the Hazard Perception Test (HPT). Findings: After adjusting for baseline scores, there was a significant betweengroup difference in post-intervention HPT change scores in favour of the Immediate Intervention group. The magnitude of the effect was large. There was no significant within-group delayed intervention effect. A significant maintenance effect was found at 6 week follow-up for the Immediate Intervention group. Conclusions: The hazard perception skills of participants improved following training with large effect size and some maintenance of gain. A multimodal approach to training is indicated to facilitate maintenance. A full-scale trial is feasible.

  • 144.
    Buchanan, Angus
    et al.
    Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia .
    Peterson, Sunila
    Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia .
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia .
    A qualitative exploration of the recovery experiences of consumers who had undertaken shared management, person-centred and self-directed services2014In: International Journal of Mental Health Systems, ISSN 1752-4458, E-ISSN 1752-4458, Vol. 8, no 23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The mental health sector across states in Australia is moving to offering individualised funds and shared management, person-centred and self-directed (SPS) services. However, little is known about the recovery experiences of consumers with mental illness who had used a SPS service that was recently introduced in Western Australia. This study explored the recovery experiences of these consumers. Methods: Data relating to sixteen consumers lived experiences were analysed using an abbreviated grounded theory approach. These data had been developed in the past by consumers, the Guides (staff) and an independent evaluator. Results: Four over-arching categories, and related sub-categories, emerged. These suggested that consumers recovery experiences included them gaining: 1) a greater sense of empowerment; 2) expanded connections with the community, others and the self; 3) an enriched sense of the self; and 4) an enhanced quality of life. Conclusions: Access to SPS services, including having access to individualised funds, high quality shared management and person-centred relationships with the Guides, and a chance to self-direct services enabled consumers to have control over all aspects of their recovery journey, facilitated change and growth, and improved their capacity to self-direct services. Most consumers encountered a number of positive recovery experiences at varied levels that enhanced their lived experiences.

  • 145.
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Dags att folkbilda om smärta2016In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 10 AprilArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 146.
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gender differences in dispensed analgesics in Sweden during 2006-2015 - an observational, nationwide, whole-population study2018In: International Journal of Women's Health, ISSN 1179-1411, E-ISSN 1179-1411, Vol. 10, p. 55-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A potentially illuminating way of looking at gender differences in health and disease is to study differences in drug utilization. The aim of this study was to describe gender differences in dispensed analgesics (including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]) in Sweden during 2006-2015.

  • 147.
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Genombrottssmärta2013In: BestPractice Smärta, p. 17-19Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 148.
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Intrathekal smärtbehandling med zikonotid – erfarenheter från Linköping2015In: BestPractice Smärta, Vol. 10, p. 11-13Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 149.
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Lättläst översikt om smärta2015In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, article id 112:DSUTArticle, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 150.
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Långvarig smärta efter kirurgi, neuropatisk smärta, CRPS2017In: Information från Läkemedelsverket, ISSN 1101-7104, Vol. 3, p. 34-38Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Neuropatisk smärta orsakas definitionsmässigt av en skada eller sjukdom i det somatosensoriska nervsystemet. Långvarig postoperativ smärta (LPOS) är tämligen vanligt, framför allt efter ingrepp som exempelvis amputation, torakotomi, eller mastektomi. I många fall anses LPOS vara av neuropatisk karaktär, och den farmakologiska behandlingen utgår då i stor utsträckning från rekommendationerna för behandling av neuropatisk smärta, med fokus på vissa antidepressiva läkemedel (amitriptylin, duloxetin) och gabapentinoider (gabapentin, pregabalin). Topikal behandling med till exempel lidokainplåster kan vara av stort värde när smärtan utlöses av lätt beröring av huden (allodyni). Överlag bör stor försiktighet råda angående långtidsanvändning av opioider. Vid LPOS efter bukkirurgi bör man speciellt beakta opioidernas negativa effekter på tarmfunktionen, eftersom en ”ond cirkel” kan uppkomma mellan ökade doser opioider och ökad smärta. Komplext regionalt smärtsyndrom (CRPS) kan uppkomma i en extremitet efter trauma av lindrig karaktär och/eller immobilisering (till exempel gipsning). Även om CRPS typ 1 definitionsmässigt inte är ett neuropatiskt smärttillstånd, är de farmakologiska behandlingsprinciperna ändå i stor utsträckning desamma som för neuropatisk smärta. Mer forskning behövs för att på sikt kunna få fram bättre, mer mekanism-baserade behandlingsmetoder.

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