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  • 101.
    Björk, Karl
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Tronci, Valeria
    Psychobiology Section, NIDA, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD, USA .
    Thorsell, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tanda, Gianluigi
    Psychobiology Section, NIDA, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD, USA .
    Hirth, Natalie
    University of Heidelberg, Mannheim, Germany .
    Heilig, Markus
    Laboratory of Clinical and Translational Studies, NIAAA, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA .
    Hansson, Anita C.
    Laboratory of Clinical and Translational Studies, NIAAA, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Sommer, Wolfgang H
    Laboratory of Clinical and Translational Studies, NIAAA, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    β-Arrestin 2 knockout mice exhibit sensitized dopamine release and increased reward in response to a low dose of alcohol2013In: Psychopharmacology, ISSN 0033-3158, E-ISSN 1432-2072, Vol. 230, no 3, p. 439-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale

    The rewarding effects of alcohol have been attributed to interactions between opioid and dopaminergic system within the mesolimbic reward pathway. We have previously shown that ablation of β-arrestin 2 (Arrb2), a crucial regulator of μ-opioid receptor function, attenuates alcohol-induced hyperlocomotion and c-fos activation in the nucleus accumbens.

    Objectives

    Here, we further investigated the role of Arrb2 in modulating alcohol-induced dopamine (DA) release and conditioned place preference (CPP). We also assessed the functional importance of Arrb2 for μ-opioid receptor surface expression and signaling following an acute alcohol challenge.

    Methods

    Alcohol-evoked (0.375, 0.75, and 1.5 g/kg intraperitoneally) DA release was measured by in vivo microdialysis in the shell of nucleus accumbens. Reward was assessed by the CPP paradigm. Receptor function was assessed by μ-receptor binding and [35S]GTP-γ-S autoradiography.

    Results

    In Arrb2 knockout mice accumbal DA levels reach maximum response at a lower dose compared to wild-type (wt) animals. In line with these results, Arrb2 knockout mice display increased CPP for alcohol as compared to wt mice. Finally, Arrb2 mutant mice display increased μ-opioid receptor signaling in the ventral and dorsal striatum and amygdala in response to a low dose of alcohol, indicating impaired desensitization mechanisms in these mice.

    Conclusions

    Our results show that Arrb2 modulates the response to low doses of alcohol on various levels including μ-opioid receptor signaling, DA release, and reward. They also reveal a clear dissociation between the effects of Arrb2 on psychomotor and reward behaviors.

  • 102.
    Björk, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Rehabilitation Center. Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Wetterö, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöwall, Christoffer
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Quality of life and acquired organ damage are intimately related to activity limitations in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus2015In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 16, no 188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune multi-organ disease, characterized by episodes of disease flares and remissions over time, which may restrain affected patients ability to perform daily activities. The purpose of the present study was to characterize variation in activity limitations among well-defined SLE patients, and to describe disease phenotypes, acquired organ damage and their relations to activity limitation and self-reported health, respectively. Methods: The disease phenotypes were organized into 4 different clinical groups and logistic regression analyses were used to identify how an elevated health assessment questionnaire (HAQ) score was related to disease variables such as phenotypes, disease activity and damage accrual. Correlation and multiple linear regression analyses were used to examine the association between each group of variables - background variables, disease variables and self-reported measurements - and the degree of elevated HAQ. Results: We found a higher proportion of activity limitation in patients with skin and joint involvement compared to others. The presence of activity limitation, as detected by the HAQ instrument, was significantly associated with quality of life (EuroQol-5D) and accrual of organ damage using the Systemic Lupus International Collaborative Clinics/ACR damage index. Conclusions: The findings highlight the differing requirements of the multi-professional rehabilitation interventions for the various SLE phenotypes in order to optimize the clinical care of the patients.

  • 103.
    Björk, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Valtersson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    School of Health Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Stenström, Birgitta
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Sverker, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Foot barriers in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: an interview study among Swedish women and men2018In: Arthritis care & research, ISSN 2151-464X, E-ISSN 2151-4658, Vol. 70, no 9, p. 1348-1354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Foot impairments are related to reduced mobility and participation restrictions in daily activities in patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The new biological medications are effective and reduce disease activity, but not disability to the same extent. Foot impairments are assumed to be related to participation restrictions also in patients with early RA, diagnosed after the introduction of biological medications. The knowledge of foot impairments needs to be more explored after the introduction of biological disease-modifying drugs (bDMARDs). The aim of this study was to explore the patients' perspective of foot impairments related to early RA.

    METHODS: The sample included 59 patients (20-63 years) who were interviewed about participation dilemmas in daily life using the Critical Incident Technique. The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Data related to foot impairments were extracted and analyzed thematically. A research partner validated the analysis. The study was approved by the Regional Ethics Committee.

    RESULTS: Patients with early RA described a variety of participation restrictions related to foot impairments: 1) foot hindrances in domestic life, 2) foot impairments influencing work, 3) leisure activities restricted by one's feet 4) struggling to be mobile 5) foot impairments as an early sign of rheumatic disease.

    CONCLUSION: There is a need to focus on foot impairments related to early RA, and for health care professionals to understand these signs. A suggestion for future research is to conduct a longitudinal follow-up of foot impairment related to medication, disease activity and disability in patients diagnosed after the introduction of bDMARDs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 104.
    Björnevik, Kjetil
    et al.
    University of Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Riise, Trond
    University of Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Boström, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Casetta, Ilaria
    University of Ferrara, Italy.
    Cortese, Marianna
    University of Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Granieri, Enrico
    University of Ferrara, Italy.
    Holmoy, Trygve
    University of Oslo, Norway; Akershus University Hospital, Norway.
    Kampman, Margitta T.
    University Hospital North Norway, Norway.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Magalhaes, Sandra
    McGill University, Canada.
    Pugliatti, Maura
    University of Bergen, Norway; University of Ferrara, Italy.
    Wolfson, Christina
    McGill University, Canada; McGill University, Canada.
    Myhr, Kjell-Morten
    University of Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Negative interaction between smoking and EBV in the risk of multiple sclerosis: The EnvIMS study2017In: Multiple Sclerosis, ISSN 1352-4585, E-ISSN 1477-0970, Vol. 23, no 7, p. 1018-1024Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Results from previous studies on a possible interaction between smoking and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS) are conflicting. Objectives: To examine the interaction between smoking and infectious mononucleosis (IM) in the risk of MS. Methods: Within the case-control study on Environmental Factors In Multiple Sclerosis (EnvIMS), 1904 MS patients and 3694 population-based frequency-matched healthy controls from Norway, Italy, and Sweden reported on prior exposure to smoking and history of IM. We examined the interaction between the two exposures on the additive and multiplicative scale. Results: Smoking and IM were each found to be associated with an increased MS risk in all three countries, and there was a negative multiplicative interaction between the two exposures in each country separately as well as in the pooled analysis (p=0.001). Among those who reported IM, there was no increased risk associated with smoking (odds ratio (OR): 0.95, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.66-1.37). The direction of the estimated interactions on the additive scale was consistent with a negative interaction in all three countries (relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI): -0.98, 95% CI: -2.05-0.15, p=0.09). Conclusion: Our findings indicate competing antagonism, where the two exposures compete to affect the outcome.

  • 105.
    Björnsdotter Åberg, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wang, Nancy
    Yale School Med, CT USA.
    Pelphrey, Kevin
    George Washington University, DC USA; Childrens National Medical Centre, DC 20010 USA.
    Kaiser, Martha D.
    Yale School Med, CT USA.
    Evaluation of Quantified Social Perception Circuit Activity as a Neurobiological Marker of Autism Spectrum Disorder2016In: JAMA psychiatry, ISSN 2168-6238, E-ISSN 2168-622X, Vol. 73, no 6, p. 614-621Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMPORTANCE Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is marked by social disability and is associated with dysfunction in brain circuits supporting social cue perception. The degree to which neural functioning reflects individual-level behavioral phenotype is unclear, slowing the search for functional neuroimaging biomarkers of ASD. OBJECTIVE To examine whether quantified neural function in social perception circuits may serve as an individual-level marker of ASD in children and adolescents. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS The cohort study was conducted at the Yale Child Study Center and involved children and adolescents diagnosed as having ASD and typically developing participants. Participants included a discovery cohort and a larger replication cohort. Individual-level social perception circuit functioning was assessed as functional magnetic resonance imaging brain responses to point-light displays of coherent vs scrambled human motion. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Outcome measures included performance of quantified brain responses in affected male and female participants in terms of area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), sensitivity and specificity, and correlations between brain responses and social behavior. RESULTS Of the 39 participants in the discovery cohort aged 4 to 17 years, 22 had ASD and 30 were boys. Of the 75 participants in the replication cohort aged 7 to 20 years, 37 had ASD and 52 were boys. A relative reduction in social perception circuit responses was identified in discovery cohort boys with ASD at an AUC of 0.75 (95% CI, 0.52-0.89; P = .01); however, typically developing girls and girls with ASD could not be distinguished (P = .54). The results were confirmed in the replication cohort, where brain responses were identified in boys with ASD at an AUC of 0.79 (95% CI, 0.64-0.91; P amp;lt; .001) and failed to distinguish affected and unaffected girls (P = .82). Across both cohorts, boys were identified at an AUC of 0.77 (95% CI, 0.64-0.86) with corresponding sensitivity and specificity of 76% each. Additionally, brain responses were associated with social behavior in boys but not in girls. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Quantified social perception circuit activity is a promising individual-level candidate neural marker of the male ASD behavioral phenotype. Our findings highlight the need to better understand effects of sex on social perception processing in relation to ASD phenotype manifestations.

  • 106.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Bojmar, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Sundqvist, Tommy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Nitrite, a novel method to decrease ischemia/reperfusion injury in the rat liver2015In: World Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 1007-9327, E-ISSN 2219-2840, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 1775-1783Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To investigate whether nitrite administered prior to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) reduces liver injury.

    METHODS: Thirty-six male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to 3 groups, including sham operated (n = 8), 45-min segmental ischemia of the left liver lobe (IR, n = 14) and ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) preceded by the administration of 480 nmol of nitrite (n = 14). Serum transaminases were measured after 4 h of reperfusion. Liver microdialysate (MD) was sampled in 30-min intervals and analyzed for glucose, lactate, pyruvate and glycerol as well as the total nitrite and nitrate (NOx). The NOx was measured in serum.

    RESULTS: Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) at the end of reperfusion was higher in the IR group than in the nitrite group (40 ± 6.8 μkat/L vs 22 ± 2.6 μkat/L, P = 0.022). Similarly, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was also higher in the I/R group than in the nitrite group (34 ± 6 μkat vs 14 ± 1.5 μkat, P = 0.0045). The NOx in MD was significantly higher in the nitrite group than in the I/R group (10.1 ± 2.9 μM vs 3.2 ± 0.9 μM, P = 0.031) after the administration of nitrite. During ischemia, the levels decreased in both groups and then increased again during reperfusion. At the end of reperfusion, there was a tendency towards a higher NOx in the I/R group than in the nitrite group (11.6 ± 0.7 μM vs 9.2 ± 1.1 μM, P = 0.067). Lactate in MD was significantly higher in the IR group than in the nitrite group (3.37 ± 0.18 mM vs 2.8 ± 0.12 mM, P = 0.01) during ischemia and the first 30 min of reperfusion. During the same period, glycerol was also higher in the IRI group than in the nitrite group (464 ± 38 μM vs 367 ± 31 μM, P = 0.049). With respect to histology, there were more signs of tissue damage in the I/R group than in the nitrite group, and 29% of the animals in the I/R group exhibited necrosis compared with none in the nitrite group. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) transcription increased between early ischemia (t = 15) and the end of reperfusion in both groups.

    CONCLUSION: Nitrite administered before liver ischemia in the rat liver reduces anaerobic metabolism and cell necrosis, which could be important in the clinical setting.

  • 107.
    Blomgran, Parmis
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Blomgran, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    A possible link between loading, inflammation and healing: Immune cell populations during tendon healing in the rat2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, no 29824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Loading influences tendon healing, and so does inflammation. We hypothesized that the two are connected. 48 rats underwent Achilles tendon transection. Half of the rats received Botox injections into calf muscles to reduce mechanical loading. Cells from the regenerating tissue were analyzed by flow cytometry. In the loaded group, the regenerating tissue contained 83% leukocytes (CD45(+)) day 1, and 23% day 10. The M1/M2 macrophage ratio (CCR7/CD206) peaked at day 3, while T helper (CD3(+)CD4(+)) and T-reg cells (CD25(+) Foxp3(+)) increased over time. With Botox, markers associated with down-regulation of inflammation were more common day 5 (CD163, CD206, CD25, Foxp3), and M1 or M2 macrophages and T-reg cells were virtually absent day 10, while still present with full loading. The primary variable, CCR7/CD206 ratio day 5, was higher with full loading (p = 0.001) and the T-reg cell fraction was lower (p amp;lt; 0.001). Free cage activity loading is known to increase size and strength of the tendon in this model compared to Botox. Loading now appeared to delay the switch to an M2 type of inflammation with more T-reg cells. It seems a prolonged M1 phase due to loading might make the tendon regenerate bigger.

  • 108.
    Blomgran, Parmis
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Blomgran, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Cox-2 inhibition and the composition of inflammatory cell populations during early and mid-time tendon healing2017In: Muscles, ligaments and Tendons journal, ISSN 2240-4554, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 223-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: During early tendon healing, the cells within the regenerating tissue are, to a large part, inflammatory leukocytes (CD45+). In a rat Achilles tendon healing model, the inflammation resolves between 5 and 10 days. In the same model, Cox inhibitors (NSAIDs) impair healing when given during the first 5 days, but have a positive effect if given later. We tested the hypothesis that a Cox inhibitor would exert these effects by influencing inflammation, and thereby the composition of the inflammatory cell subpopulations.Methods: Achilles tendon transection was performed in 44 animals. Animals were randomized to either parecoxib or saline injections. Healing was evaluated by mechanical testing day 7 after surgery and by flow cytometry day 3 and 10.Results: Cross-sectional area, peak force and stiffness were reduced by parecoxib 31, 33, and 25% respectively (p=0.005, p=0.002, and p=0.005). By flow cytometry, there was a strong effect of time (p<0.001) on virtually all inflammatory cell subpopulations (CD45, CD11b, CD68, CCR7, CD163, CD206, CD3, CD4), but no significant effect of parecoxib at any time point.Conclusion: The results suggest that the negative effects of Cox inhibitors on tendon healing might be exerted mainly via mechanisms not directly related to inflammatory cells.

  • 109.
    Blystad, Ida
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Håkansson, Irene
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tisell, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Quantitative MRI for Analysis of Active Multiple Sclerosis Lesions without Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agent2016In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, ISSN 0195-6108, E-ISSN 1936-959X, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 94-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Contrast-enhancing MS lesions are important markers of active inflammation in the diagnostic work-up of MS and in disease monitoring with MR imaging. Because intravenous contrast agents involve an expense and a potential risk of adverse events, it would be desirable to identify active lesions without using a contrast agent. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether pre-contrast injection tissue-relaxation rates and proton density of MS lesions, by using a new quantitative MR imaging sequence, can identify active lesions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-four patients with a clinical suspicion of MS were studied. MR imaging with a standard clinical MS protocol and a quantitative MR imaging sequence was performed at inclusion (baseline) and after 1 year. ROIs were placed in MS lesions, classified as nonenhancing or enhancing. Longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates, as well as proton density were obtained from the quantitative MR imaging sequence. Statistical analyses of ROI values were performed by using a mixed linear model, logistic regression, and receiver operating characteristic analysis. RESULTS: Enhancing lesions had a significantly (P &lt; .001) higher mean longitudinal relaxation rate (1.22 0.36 versus 0.89 +/- 0.24), a higher mean transverse relaxation rate (9.8 +/- 2.6 versus 7.4 +/- 1.9), and a lower mean proton density (77 +/- 11.2 versus 90 +/- 8.4) than nonenhancing lesions. An area under the receiver operating characteristic curve value of 0.832 was obtained. CONCLUSIONS: Contrast-enhancing MS lesions often have proton density and relaxation times that differ from those in nonenhancing lesions, with lower proton density and shorter relaxation times in enhancing lesions compared with nonenhancing lesions.

  • 110.
    Boij, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Aspects of inflammation, angiogenesis and coagulation in preeclampsia2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Preeclampsia is a major challenge to obstetricians, due to its impact on maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality and the lack of preventive and treatment strategies. The overall aim of this thesis is to increase the knowledge of the pathogenesis of preeclampsia including the role of inflammation, angiogenesis and coagulation, both locally at the fetomaternal interface and in the maternal circulation. Uncompensated maternal endothelial inflammatory responses to factors from stressed trophoblasts seem to be a major contributor to the syndrome, together with an imbalance in angiogenesis and an activated coagulation system. An increasing amount of data indicates an involvement of the immune system with defect tolerance to the conceptus as an integral part of the pathogenesis, at least in early-onset preeclampsia (EOP).

    We showed that a single administration of human preeclampsia serum in pregnant IL-10−/− mice induced the full spectrum of preeclampsia-like symptoms including hypoxic injury in uteroplacental tissues and endotheliosis in maternal kidneys. Importantly, preeclampsia serum, as early as 12 to 14 weeks of gestation, disrupted cross talk between trophoblasts and endothelial cells in an in vitro model of endovascular activity (Tube formation test). These results indicate that preeclamptic sera can be used to better understand the pathophysiology and to predict the disorder. Preeclampsia has been associated with increased inflammation, aberrant angiogenesis and activated coagulation, but their correlation and relative contribution are unknown. We found that markers for all these mechanisms were independently associated with preeclampsia. Cytokines, chemokines, and complement factors seem all to be part of a Th1-associated inflammatory reaction in preeclampsia, more pronounced in EOP than in late-onset preeclampsia (LOP), in line with a more homogeneous pathogenesis in EOP as based on placental pathology. In women with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), with an anticipated pathologic placentation, only differences in levels for sFlt-1 and PlGF were found in comparison with mothers without IUGR. Thus, sFlt-1 and PlGF seem to be indicators of placental pathology, while other biomarkers might also reflect maternal endothelial pathology. Chemokines, in contrast to cytokines, may prove to be useful markers in preeclampsia.

    A deficiency in regulatory T (Treg) cells causing reduced immune regulatory capacity has been proposed in preeclampsia. Utilizing recent advances in flow cytometry phenotyping, we found no major alterations in circulating Treg numbers in preeclamptic women compared with normal pregnant and non-pregnant women. However, preeclampsia was associated with increased fractions of CTLA-4+ and CCR4+ cells within Treg subpopulations, which is in line with a migratory defect of Treg cells, and potentially associated with a reduced number of suppressive Treg cells at the fetomaternal interface. As we found that corticosteroid treatment affected the results, it should be accounted for in studies of EOP. Chemokines are supposed to be part of the immune adaptation in pregnancy. We found a decreased expression of CCL18  (Th2/Tregassociated), in trophoblasts from preeclamptic compared to normal pregnant women, indicating a local regulatory defect in preeclampsia, in line with our finding of a possible migratory defect of circulating Treg cells. Due to increased expression of CCL20 (Th17) and CCL22 (Th2) in first trimester placenta and increased circulating levels of CXCL10 (Th1) and CCL20 (Th17) in third trimester preeclamptic women, we suggest that CCL20 and CCL22 may be important for implantation and early placentation while in third trimester of a preeclamptic pregnancy CXCL10 and CCL20 mainly mirror maternal increased endothelial inflammation and aberrant angiogenesis. In summary, we found that preeclampsia is associated with increased inflammation, aberrant angiogenesis and activated coagulation, caused by placental factors in maternal peripheral circulation, more pronounced in the early-onset form of preeclampsia. It also appears that there is a defective modulation of the immune system in preeclamptic pregnancies. The results provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of preeclampsia and have given suggestions to predictive markers for preeclampsia in the future.

    List of papers
    1. Sera from Preeclampsia Patients Elicit Symptoms of Human Disease in Mice and Provide a Basis for an in Vitro Predictive Assay
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sera from Preeclampsia Patients Elicit Symptoms of Human Disease in Mice and Provide a Basis for an in Vitro Predictive Assay
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    2010 (English)In: AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PATHOLOGY, ISSN 0002-9440, Vol. 177, no 5, p. 2387-2398Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Early diagnosis and treatment of preeclampsia would significantly reduce maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. However, its etiology and prediction have remained elusive. Based on the hypothesis that sera from patients with preeclampsia could function as a "blueprint" of causative factors, we describe a serum-based pregnancy-specific mouse model that closely mirrors the human condition as well as an in vitro predictive assay. We show that a single administration of human preeclampsia serum in pregnant IL-10(-/-) mice induced the full spectrum of preeclampsia-like symptoms, caused hypoxic injury in uteroplacental tissues, and elevated soluble fins-like tyrosine kinase 1 and soluble endoglin, markers thought to be related to the disease. The same serum sample(s) induced a partial preeclampsia phenotype in wild-type mice. Importantly, preeclampsia serum disrupted cross talk between trophoblasts and endothelial cells in an in vitro model of endovascular activity. Disruption of endovascular activity could be documented in serum samples as early as 12 to 14 weeks of gestation from patients who subsequently developed preeclampsia. These results indicate that preeclampsia patient sera can be used to understand the pregnancy-specific disease pathology in mice and can predict the disorder.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    American Society for Investigative Pathology (ASIP), 2010
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-62755 (URN)10.2353/ajpath.2010.100475 (DOI)000284182900026 ()
    Available from: 2010-12-03 Created: 2010-12-03 Last updated: 2016-11-11
    2. Biomarkers of Coagulation, Inflammation, and Angiogenesis are Independently Associated with Preeclampsia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biomarkers of Coagulation, Inflammation, and Angiogenesis are Independently Associated with Preeclampsia
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    2012 (English)In: AMERICAN JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTIVE IMMUNOLOGY, ISSN 1046-7408, Vol. 68, no 3, p. 258-270Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Problem Although preeclampsia has been associated with inflammation, coagulation, and angiogenesis, their correlation and relative contribution are unknown. Method of Study About 114 women with preeclampsia, 31 with early onset (EOP) and 83 with late onset preeclampsia (LOP), and 100 normal pregnant controls were included. A broad panel of 32 biomarkers reflecting coagulation, inflammation, and angiogenesis was analyzed. Results Preeclampsia was associated with decreased antithrombin, IL-4 and placental growth factor levels and with increased C3a, pentraxin-3, and sFlt-1 levels, with more marked differences in the EOP group. The Th1-associated chemokines CXCL10 and CXCL11 were significantly higher in the preeclampsia and EOP group than in controls, respectively. No correlations between the biomarkers were found in preeclampsia. Multivariate logistic regression tests confirmed the results. Conclusions Cytokines, chemokines and complement activation seem to be part of a Th1-like inflammatory reaction in preeclampsia, most pronounced in EOP, where chemokines may be more useful than cytokines as biomarkers. Biomarkers were not correlated suggesting partly independent or in time separated mechanisms.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley and Sons, 2012
    Keywords
    preeclampsia, coagulation, inflammation, angiogenesis, chemokines, cytokines and early onset preeclampsia
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-81815 (URN)10.1111/j.1600-0897.2012.01158.x (DOI)000307440300012 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|FORSS (Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden)||Futurum (the Research department of County of Jonkoping)||Swedish Research Council|2007-15809-48800-58|Linneaus University (Sweden)||

    Available from: 2012-09-26 Created: 2012-09-24 Last updated: 2016-11-11
    3. Regulatory T-cell Subpopulations in Severe or Early-onset Preeclampsia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regulatory T-cell Subpopulations in Severe or Early-onset Preeclampsia
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    2015 (English)In: American Journal of Reproductive Immunology, ISSN 1046-7408, E-ISSN 1600-0897, Vol. 74, no 4, p. 368-378Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Problem A deficiency in regulatory T (Treg) cells causing reduced immune regulatory capacity has been proposed in preeclampsia. Objective Utilizing recent advances in flow cytometry phenotyping, we aimed to assess whether a deficiency of Treg subpopulations occurs in preeclampsia. Method of study Six-color flow cytometry was used for Treg phenotyping in 18 preeclamptic women (one early-onset, one severe and 16 both), 20 women with normal pregnancy, and 20 non-pregnant controls. Results No differences were found in major Treg populations including CD127(low)CD25(+)/CD127(ow)FOXP3(+), resting (FOXP3(dim)CD45RA(+)), and activated (FOXP3(bright)CD45RA(-)) Treg cells, whereas preeclamptic women showed increased CTLA-4(+) and CCR4(+) proportions within resting/activated Treg populations. Corticosteroid treatment prior to blood sampling (n = 10) affected the distribution of Treg populations. Conclusions Although we found no major alterations in circulating Treg frequencies, differences in CTLA-4(+) and CCR4(+) frequencies suggest a migratory defect of Treg cells in preeclampsia. Corticosteroid treatment should be taken into account when evaluating Treg cells.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2015
    Keywords
    Early-onset preeclampsia; preeclampsia; pregnancy; regulatory T cells
    National Category
    Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122528 (URN)10.1111/aji.12410 (DOI)000362664200009 ()26118401 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|FORSS (Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden); Futurum, academy for Health and Care Jonkoping County Council, Sweden

    Available from: 2015-11-09 Created: 2015-11-06 Last updated: 2017-12-01
  • 111.
    Boij, Roland
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Mjosberg, Jenny
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Svensson Arvelund, Judit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hjorth, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Helsingborg Hospital, Sweden.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Regulatory T-cell Subpopulations in Severe or Early-onset Preeclampsia2015In: American Journal of Reproductive Immunology, ISSN 1046-7408, E-ISSN 1600-0897, Vol. 74, no 4, p. 368-378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Problem A deficiency in regulatory T (Treg) cells causing reduced immune regulatory capacity has been proposed in preeclampsia. Objective Utilizing recent advances in flow cytometry phenotyping, we aimed to assess whether a deficiency of Treg subpopulations occurs in preeclampsia. Method of study Six-color flow cytometry was used for Treg phenotyping in 18 preeclamptic women (one early-onset, one severe and 16 both), 20 women with normal pregnancy, and 20 non-pregnant controls. Results No differences were found in major Treg populations including CD127(low)CD25(+)/CD127(ow)FOXP3(+), resting (FOXP3(dim)CD45RA(+)), and activated (FOXP3(bright)CD45RA(-)) Treg cells, whereas preeclamptic women showed increased CTLA-4(+) and CCR4(+) proportions within resting/activated Treg populations. Corticosteroid treatment prior to blood sampling (n = 10) affected the distribution of Treg populations. Conclusions Although we found no major alterations in circulating Treg frequencies, differences in CTLA-4(+) and CCR4(+) frequencies suggest a migratory defect of Treg cells in preeclampsia. Corticosteroid treatment should be taken into account when evaluating Treg cells.

  • 112.
    Bojmar, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zhang, Haiying
    Children’s Cancer and Blood Foundation Laboratories, Departments of Pediatrics, and Cell and Developmental Biology, Drukier Institute for Children’s Health, Meyer Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, USA.
    Costa da Silva, Bruno
    Children’s Cancer and Blood Foundation Laboratories, Departments of Pediatrics, and Cell and Developmental Biology, Drukier Institute for Children’s Health, Meyer Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, USA.
    Karlsson, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Vincent, Theresa
    Departments of Physiology and Biophysics and Cell and Developmental Biology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, USA / Department of Medicine, Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Lyden, David
    Children’s Cancer and Blood Foundation Laboratories, Departments of Pediatrics, and Cell and Developmental Biology, Drukier Institute for Children’s Health, Meyer Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, USA.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    miR-18a is regulated between progressive compartments of cancers, and incorporated in exosomes with the potential of creating premetastatic niches and predict cancer outcome2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The ultimate cause of death for many cancer patients is the spread of the cancer via metastasis. Even so, there are still a lack of knowledge regarding the metastasis process. This study was performed to investigate the role of metastamirs in exosomes and their metastatic patterns. We used the well-established isogeneic murine cancer model of low metastatic 67NR cells, mimicking luminal/basal breast tumors, and highly metastatic 4T1 cells with characteristics of basal breast  tumors. We studied the exosomal properties and pre-metastatic effects in this metastasis model and compared human materials and exosomes of several other tumor types. Our data clearly demonstrated that exosomes from the highly metastatic cells home to the metastatic organs of their parental cells whereas exosomes from cells with low metastatic potential mostly located to lymph nodes. The exosome protein cargos also resembled their parental cells and potentially affects their target organs, and cells, differently. Furthermore, the exosomes from the highly metastatic cells had a more pronounced effect on tumor growth and pre-metastatic changes than the low metastatic exosomes. The microRNA-18a, a predictor of metastasis, was present to a higher extent in metastatic exosomes as compared to low metastatic exosomes, and altered the tumor progressive properties. Our findings support the role of exomirs as important players in the metastatic process, the value as biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets.

  • 113.
    Bolin, K.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berggren, F.
    UCB Pharma, Denmark.
    Berling, P.
    UCB Pharma, Denmark.
    Morberg, S.
    UCB Pharma, Denmark.
    Gauffin, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Patterns of antiepileptic drug prescription in Sweden: A register-based approach2017In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 136, no 5, p. 521-527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To determine drug utilization pathways from the incident healthcare visit due to epilepsy and three years onward. Material and methods: Anti-epileptic drug utilization was calculated using individual information on inpatient- and outpatient care utilization and drug sales. Throughout, we used national register information pertaining to pharmaceutical sales linked to diagnosis-related healthcare utilization. Information on pharmaceutical sales was collected for the 2007-2013 period. Results: For the entire studied period, a majority of new patients with epilepsy were initiated on anti-epileptic drug treatment with a monotherapy (98%); most of these patients remained on that first treatment (64%). The three most frequently prescribed drugs accounted for 72% of the initiated AED treatments. Patients with epilepsy (ICD-10: G40/41) were most commonly prescribed carbamazepine, lamotrigine and valproate. The most common second-line monotherapy was levetiracetam. About 12% of new patients with epilepsy who were initiated on AED treatment during the period eventually switched to an add-on therapy. The proportion of patients who were initiated on treatment with carbamazepine or valproate decreased, and the proportion of patients who remained on their initial monotherapy increased between 2007 and 2013. Conclusions: A limited number of anti-epileptic drugs accounted for the treatment of a majority of new patients with epilepsy (carbamazepine, lamotrigine and valproate accounted for more than 70%). Add-on therapies showed the same pattern, as the most frequently prescribed add-on regimens were the same ones that accounted for most of the monotherapies. There was a tendency towards fewer patients being initiated on AED treatment with either carbamazepine or valproate.

  • 114.
    Bolin, K.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berggren, F.
    UCB Pharma, Denmark.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Prevalence and cost of epilepsy in Sweden - a register-based approach2015In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 131, no 1, p. 37-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectivesTo estimate the prevalence of epilepsy, costs associated with in- and outpatient care, drug utilization and productivity losses due to epilepsy in Sweden for the years 2005 and 2011. MethodsCost components were calculated using registry data on inpatient- and outpatient-care utilization, drug sales and early pensions granted due to permanent disability and mortality. Moreover, by cross-identification of information in healthcare and pharmaceutical registries, we were able to distinguish between pharmaceuticals prescribed for epilepsy and non-epilepsy indications. ResultsThe prevalence of epilepsy was estimated at 0.62% in 2005 and 0.88% in 2011. The total cost of epilepsy increased during the same period, while the per-patient cost decreased from Euro2929 to Euro1729. Direct medical costs accounted for about 36% of the estimated total cost in 2005 and 60% in 2011. The estimated healthcare cost due to epilepsy as a share of total healthcare costs for all illnesses was about the same in 2005 as in 2011 (0.2%), while the corresponding pharmaceutical cost increased from about 0.5% in 2005 to almost 1% in 2011. ConclusionsThe per-patient cost of epilepsy is substantial, implying a significant aggregated cost incurred on society (despite a prevalenceless than1%). Our results suggest that the per-patient pharmaceutical utilization increased, while the per-patient physician visits and hospitalizations decreased, between 2005 and 2011. Moreover, we demonstrate that the 2005 prevalence measure was underestimated the true prevalence in 2005.

  • 115.
    Boman, Andrea
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Janefjord, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. CBD Solutions, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Halliday, Glenda
    Neuroscience Research Australia and University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden / UCL Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London, United Kingdom.
    Blennow, Kaj
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Garner, Brett
    Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute, Wollongong, Australia / School of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, Australia.
    Miller, Bruce
    Memory and Aging Center, University of California, San Francisco, United States.
    Saftig, Paul
    Institute of Biochemistry, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The role of LAMP-2 in AβPP processing and Aβ degradation; implications for Alzheimer’s Disease2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Dysfunction in the lysosomal network, i.e., the endosomal, lysosomal and autophagy systems, are implicated in the pathways in Alzheimer’s disease brain pathology. This dysfunction is mirrored in the cerebrospinal fluid where a specific subset of lysosomal network proteins are found at elevated levels, lysosomal associated membrane protein-2 (LAMP-2) being one of the identified lysosomal proteins. Here we report that hippocampus and frontal cortex in Alzheimer’s disease cases have increased mRNA and protein expression of LAMP-2, and thus these brain areas are likely involved in the increased LAMP-2 levels seen in cerebrospinal fluid from Alzheimer’s disease patients. The increased LAMP-2 levels correlated with increased levels of β-amyloid1-42 (Aβ1-42). Oligomeric Aβ1-42 caused an upregulation of intracellular LAMP-2 in neuroblastoma cells, but did not trigger the release of LAMP-2 to the extracellular milieu, indicating that other cell types or mechanisms are responsible for the LAMP-2 release seen in cerebrospinal fluid. Overexpression of LAMP-2 in neuroblastoma cells caused a trend of reduction of secreted Aβ1-42 and changed the processing pattern of the Aβ precursor protein. These results indicate that Aβ1-42 mediated increase of LAMP-2 expression can act as a regulator of Aβ generation and secretion. LAMP-2 overexpression did not change the cellular uptake of extracellularly added Aβ1-42, but caused a delayed clearance of Aβ1-42. Whether the prolonged intracellular localization of Aβ1-42 in LAMP-2 overexpressing cells can change the transmission or degradation of Aβ remains to be investigated.

  • 116.
    Bonfiglio, Ferdinando
    et al.
    Biodonostia Hlth Res Inst, Spain; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Zheng, Tenghao
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Garcia-Etxebarria, Koldo
    Biodonostia Hlth Res Inst, Spain; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hadizadeh, Fatemeh
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Bujanda, Luis
    Biodonostia Hlth Res Inst, Spain; Univ Basque Country, Spain.
    Bresso, Francesca
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Agreus, Lars
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Andreasson, Anna
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Dlugosz, Aldona
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Greger
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Schmidt, Peter T.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Ohlsson, Bodil
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Simren, Magnus
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Nardone, Gerardo
    Univ Federico II, Italy.
    Cuomo, Rosario
    Federico II Univ Hosp, Italy.
    Usai-Satta, Paolo
    Azienda Osped G Brotzu, Italy.
    Galeazzi, Francesca
    Padova Univ Hosp, Italy.
    Neri, Matteo
    G DAnnunzio Univ and Fdn, Italy; G DAnnunzio Univ and Fdn, Italy.
    Portincasa, Piero
    Univ Bari, Italy.
    Bellini, Massimo
    Univ Pisa, Italy.
    Barbara, Giovanni
    Univ Bologna, Italy.
    Latiano, Anna
    Casa Sollievo Sofferenza Hosp, Italy.
    Huebenthal, Matthias
    Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Germany.
    Thijs, Vincent
    Florey Inst Neurosci and Mental Hlth, Australia.
    Netea, Mihai G.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands; Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands; Univ Bonn, Germany.
    Jonkers, Daisy
    Maastricht Univ, Netherlands.
    Chang, Lin
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.
    Mayer, Emeran A.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.
    Wouters, Mira M.
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Boeckxstaens, Guy
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Camilleri, Michael
    Mayo Clin, MN USA; Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Franke, Andre
    Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Germany.
    Zhernakova, Alexandra
    Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Netherlands.
    DAmato, Mauro
    Biodonostia Hlth Res Inst, Spain; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Ikerbasque, Spain.
    Female-Specific Association Between Variants on Chromosome 9 and Self-Reported Diagnosis of Irritable Bowel Syndrome2018In: Gastroenterology, ISSN 0016-5085, E-ISSN 1528-0012, Vol. 155, no 1, p. 168-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND amp; AIMS: Genetic factors are believed to affect risk for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), but there have been no sufficiently powered and adequately sized studies. To identify DNA variants associated with IBS risk, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of the large UK Biobank population-based cohort, which includes genotype and health data from 500,000 participants. METHODS: We studied 7,287,191 high-quality single nucleotide polymorphisms in individuals who self-reported a doctors diagnosis of IBS (cases; n = 9576) compared to the remainder of the cohort (controls; n = 336,499) (mean age of study subjects, 40-69 years). Genome-wide significant findings were further investigated in 2045 patients with IBS from tertiary centers and 7955 population controls from Europe and the United States, and a small general population sample from Sweden (n = 249). Functional annotation of GWAS results was carried out by integrating data from multiple biorepositories to obtain biological insights from the observed associations. RESULTS: We identified a genome-wide significant association on chromosome 9q31.2 (single nucleotide polymorphism rs10512344; P = 3.57 x 10(-8)) in a region previously linked to age at menarche, and 13 additional loci of suggestive significance (P amp;lt; 5.0 x 10(-6)). Sex-stratified analyses revealed that the variants at 9q31.2 affect risk of IBS in women only (P = 4.29 x 10(-10) in UK Biobank) and also [GRAPHICS] associate with constipation-predominant IBS in women (P = .015 in the tertiary cohort) and harder stools in women (P = .0012 in the population-based sample). Functional annotation of the 9q31.2 locus identified 8 candidate genes, including the elongator complex protein 1 gene (ELP1 or IKB-KAP), which is mutated in patients with familial dysautonomia. CONCLUSIONS: In a sufficiently powered GWAS of IBS, we associated variants at the locus 9q31.2 with risk of IBS in women. This observation may provide additional rationale for investigating the role of sex hormones and autonomic dysfunction in IBS.

  • 117.
    Borch Petersen, Eline
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark,.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark,.
    Vestergaard, Martin
    University of Cambridge, Centre for the Neural Basis of Hearing.
    Sundewall Thorén, Elisabet
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark,.
    Danish Reading Span data from 283 hearing-aid users, including a sub-group analysis of their relationship to speech-in-noise performance2016In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 254-261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study provides descriptive statistics of the Danish reading span (RS) test for hearing-impaired adults. The combined effect of hearing loss, RS score, and age on speech-in-noise performance in different spatial settings was evaluated in a subset of participants. Design: Data from published and unpublished studies were re-analysed. Data regarding speech-in-noise performance with co-located or spatially separated sound sources were available for a subset of participants. Study sample: RS scores from 283 hearing-impaired participants were extracted from past studies, and 239 of these participants had completed a speech-in-noise test. Results: RS scores (mean = 41.91%, standard deviation = 11.29%) were related to age (p <0.01), but not pure-tone average (PTA) (p = 0.29). Speech-in-noise performance for co-located sound sources was related to PTA and RS score (both p < 0.01, adjusted R-squared = 0.226). Performance for spatially separated sounds was related to PTA (p < 0.01, adjusted R-squared = 0.10) but not RS score (p = 0.484). We found no differences between the standardized coefficients of the two regression models. Conclusions: The distribution of RS scores indicated a high test difficulty. We found that age should be controlled when RS scores are compared across populations. The experimental setup of the speech-in-noise test may influence the relationship between performance and RS score.

  • 118.
    Borch Petersen, Eline
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Snekkersten, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Vestergaard, Martin
    University of Cambridge, Centre for the Neural Basis of Hearing.
    Sundewall Thorén, Elisabet
    Snekkersten, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Normative Reading Span Data from 283 Hearing Aid Users and the Relationship to Performance in Speech-in-Noise Test2014In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 119.
    Bostner, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Bivik Eding, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Perez-Tenorio, Gizeh
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Franzén, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Konstantinell, Aelita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    S6 kinase signaling: tamoxifen response and prognostic indication in two breast cancer cohorts2015In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 331-343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Detection of signals in the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the estrogen receptor (ER) pathways may be a future clinical tool for the prediction of adjuvant treatment response in primary breast cancer. Using immunohistological staining, we investigated the value of the mTOR targets p70-S6 kinase (S6K) 1 and 2 as biomarkers for tamoxifen benefit in two independent clinical trials comparing adjuvant tamoxifen with no tamoxifen or 5 years versus 2 years of tamoxifen treatment. In addition, the prognostic value of the S6Ks was evaluated. We found that S6K1 correlated with proliferation, HER2 status, and cytoplasmic AKT activity, whereas high protein expression levels of S6K2 and phosphorylated (p) S6K were more common in ER-positive, and low-proliferative tumors with pAKT-s473 localized to the nucelus. Nuclear accumulation of S6K1 was indicative of a reduced tamoxifen effect (hazard ratio (HR): 1.07, 95% CI: 0.53-2.81, P=0.84), compared with a significant benefit from tamoxifen treatment in patients without tumor S6K1 nuclear accumulation (HR: 0.42, 95% CI: 0.29-0.62, Pless than0.00001). Also S6K1 and S6K2 activation, indicated by pS6K-t389 expression, was associated with low benefit from tamoxifen (HR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.50-1.87, P=0.92). In addition, high protein expression of S6K1, independent of localization, predicted worse prognosis in a multivariate analysis, P=0.00041 (cytoplasm), P=0.016 (nucleus). In conclusion, the mTOR-activated kinases S6K1 and S6K2 interfere with proliferation and response to tamoxifen. Monitoring their activity and intracellular localization may provide biomarkers for breast cancer treatment, allowing the identification of a group of patients less likely to benefit from tamoxifen and thus in need of an alternative or additional targeted treatment.

  • 120.
    Boström, A.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thulin, K.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Norrköping.
    Fredriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science.
    Reese, D.
    IFK Norrköping, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Rockborn, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Norrköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Risk factors for acute and overuse sport injuries in Swedish children 11 to 15 years old: What about resistance training with weights?2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 317-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To determine the 1-year self-reported incidence of overuse and traumatic sport injuries and risk factors for injuries in children participating in a summer sports camp representing seven different sports. 4363 children, 11 to 15 years old participating in a summer camp in seven different sports answered a questionnaire. Injury in this cross-sectional study was defined as a sport-related trauma or overload leading to pain and dysfunction preventing the person from participation in training or competition for at least 1 week. A number of risk factors for injury were investigated such as sex, age, number of hours spent on training in general, and on resistance training with weights. Nearly half [49%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 48–51%] of the participants had been injured as a result of participation in a sport during the preceding year, significantly more boys than girls (53%, 95% CI 50–55% vs 46%, 95% CI 43–48%; P < 0.001). Three factors contributed to increased incidence of sport injuries: age, sex, and resistance training with weights. Time spent on resistance training with weights was significantly associated with sport injuries in a logistic regression analysis. In children age 11 to 15 years, the risk of having a sport-related injury increased with age and occurred more often in boys than in girls. Weight training was the only modifiable risk factor that contributed to a significant increase in the incidence of sport injuries.

  • 121.
    Boström, Inger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Does the changing sex ratio of multiple sclerosis give opportunities for intervention?2015In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 132, p. 42-45Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In several international studies, an increasing women-to-men (w/m) ratio in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) has been reported. Such sex ratios have been analysed by year of onset or by year of birth. In a Swedish study, data from the Swedish MS register (SMSreg) were used to analyse the w/m ratio in Sweden. The sex ratio was analysed both by year of birth (8834 patients) and by year of onset (9098 patients). No increased w/m ratio was seen in this study. The age-specific sex ratio did not demonstrate any significant changes. However, a new investigation of the sex ratio in Sweden, based on data from all available data sources (19,510 patients), showed a significantly increased w/m ratio of MS in Sweden from 1.70 to 2.67. Environmental factors such as cigarette smoking, hormonal factors and nutrition are of interest in this context, but the cause of the increasing w/m ratio in MS is yet not possible to explain.

  • 122.
    Bouma, Gerd
    et al.
    Vrije University, Netherlands.
    Münch, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Microscopic Colitis2015In: Digestive Diseases, ISSN 0257-2753, E-ISSN 1421-9875, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 208-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microscopic colitis (MC) is the common denominator for lymphocytic and collagenous colitis (CC). It is now recognized as a relatively frequent cause of diarrhea that equals the prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease. Patients are typically middle-aged women, but disease may occur at every age. Patients with MC report watery, non-bloody diarrhea in the absence of endoscopic and radiologic abnormalities. Lymphocytic colitis is characterized by an increased number of intraepithelial lymphocytes, and CC by a thickened subepithelial collagen band, whereas in both an increased mononuclear infiltration of the lamina propria is found. The pathogenesis of MC is largely unknown, but may relate to autoimmunity, adverse reactions to drugs or (bacterial) toxins, and abnormal collagen metabolism in the case of CC. Budesonide is so far the only drug that has proven efficacy in randomized controlled trials both for the induction and maintenance of remission. Patients who are nonresponsive, dependent or who experience side effects on budesonide may benefit from thiopurine or anti-TNF treatment, but these options are still experimental. The long-term prognosis of MC is good; it does not appear to predispose to malignancies and can in some cases be self-limiting. Further research and randomized clinical trials are required to expand our understanding of the natural course and the pathogenesis of MC.

  • 123.
    Bragde, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Jansson, Ulf
    Ryhov Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Division of Forensic Genetics & Forensic Toxicology National Board of Forensic Medicine Linköping, Sweden.
    Söderman, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Celiac disease biomarkers identified by transcriptome analysis of small intestinal biopsies2018In: Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences (CMLS), ISSN 1420-682X, E-ISSN 1420-9071, Vol. 75, no 23, p. 4385-4401Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Establishing a celiac disease (CD) diagnosis can be difficult, such as when CD-specific antibody levels are just above cutoff or when small intestinal biopsies show low-grade injuries. To investigate the biological pathways involved in CD and select potential biomarkers to aid in CD diagnosis, RNA sequencing of duodenal biopsies from subjects with either confirmed Active CD (n=20) or without any signs of CD (n=20) was performed. Gene enrichment and pathway analysis highlighted contexts, such as immune response, microbial infection, phagocytosis, intestinal barrier function, metabolism, and transportation. Twenty-nine potential CD biomarkers were selected based on differential expression and biological context. The biomarkers were validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction of eight RNA sequencing study subjects, and further investigated using an independent study group (n=43) consisting of subjects not affected by CD, with a clear diagnosis of CD on either a gluten-containing or a gluten-free diet, or with low-grade intestinal injury. Selected biomarkers were able to classify subjects with clear CD/non-CD status, and a subset of the biomarkers (CXCL10, GBP5, IFI27, IFNG, and UBD) showed differential expression in biopsies from subjects with no or low-grade intestinal injury that received a CD diagnosis based on biopsies taken at a later time point. A large number of pathways are involved in CD pathogenesis, and gene expression is affected in CD mucosa already in low-grade intestinal injuries. RNA sequencing of low-grade intestinal injuries might discover pathways and biomarkers involved in early stages of CD pathogenesis.

  • 124.
    Brohede, Sabina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Wingren, Gun
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder among Swedish women: A population-based study2015In: Comprehensive Psychiatry, ISSN 0010-440X, E-ISSN 1532-8384, Vol. 58, p. 108-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is characterized by a highly distressing and impairing preoccupation with nonexistent or slight defects in appearance. Patients with BDD present to both psychiatric and non-psychiatric physicians. A few studies have assessed BDD prevalence in representative samples of the general population and have demonstrated that this disorder is relatively common. Our primary objective was to assess the prevalence of BDD in the Swedish population because no data are currently available. Methods: In the current cross-sectional study, 2891 randomly selected Swedish women aged 18-60 years participated. The occurrence of BDD was assessed using the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire (BDDQ), which is a validated self-report measure derived from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV criteria for BDD. In addition, symptoms of depression and anxiety were measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Results: The prevalence of BDD among Swedish women was 2.1%. The women with BDD had significantly more symptoms of depression and anxiety than the women without BDD. Depression (HADS depression score greater than= 8) and anxiety (HADS anxiety score greater than= 8) were reported by 42% and 72% of the women with BDD, respectively. Conclusions: The results of the present study indicate that BDD is relatively common among Swedish women (2.1%) and that it is associated with significant morbidity.

  • 125.
    Brohede, Sabina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Wyon, Yvonne
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wingren, Gun
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Body dysmorphic disorder in female Swedish dermatology patients2017In: International Journal of Dermatology, ISSN 0011-9059, E-ISSN 1365-4632, Vol. 56, no 12, p. 1387-1394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundIndividuals with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) are highly distressed and impaired owing to perceived defects in their physical appearance that are not noticeable to others. They are frequently concerned about their skin and often present to dermatologists rather than psychiatrists. However, BDD patients attending dermatology clinics may be at risk of not receiving an appropriate assessment and beneficial treatment. The aims of this study were to estimate the BDD prevalence rate among Swedish female dermatology patients and to assess the psychological condition of BDD patients compared to that of other dermatology patients. MethodsThe occurrence of BDD was estimated using the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire (BDDQ), a validated self-report measure for BDD. Symptoms of depression and anxiety were measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and quality of life was assessed using the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). ResultsThe prevalence rate of BDD among female Swedish dermatology patients was 4.9% (95% CI 3.2-7.4). Anxiety (HADS A11) was 4-fold more commonly reported by patients with positive BDD screening (48% vs. 11%), and depression (HADS D11) was over 10-fold more common in patients with positive BDD screening (19% vs. 1.8%) (Pamp;lt;0.001). The median DLQI score was 18 in the BDD group, compared to a score of 4 in the non-BDD group (Pamp;lt;0.001). ConclusionsOur results indicate that BDD is fairly common among female Swedish dermatology patients (4.9%) and that BDD patients have high levels of depression and anxiety and severely impaired quality of life.

  • 126.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Hedberg, Berith
    Jönköping Academic Qual Improvement and Leadership Heatlh, Sweden.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Communication between patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome and healthcare personnel during the initial visit to a continuous positive airway pressure clinic2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 3-4, p. 568-577Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. To describe facilitators and barriers from a patient perspective in communications between patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome and healthcare personnel during the first meeting when continuous positive airway pressure is initiated. Background. Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure treatment tends to be poor, especially at the initial phase of treatment. Communication between the patient and healthcare personnel has not been studied from the patient perspective, as either a barrier or facilitator for adherence. Methods. A descriptive design using qualitative content analysis was used. Interviews with 25 patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome took place after their initial visit at four continuous positive airway pressure clinics. A deductive analysis based on The 4 Habits Model (i.e. emphasise the importance of investing in the beginning of the consultation, elicit the patients perspective, demonstrate empathy and invest in the end of the consultation) was conducted. Results. Building confidence (i.e. structure building, information transfer, commitment) or hindering confidence (i.e. organisational insufficiency, stress behaviour, interaction deficit) was associated with investing in the beginning. Motivating (i.e. situational insight, knowledge transfer, practical training) or demotivating (i.e. expectations, dominance and power asymmetry, barriers) was associated with eliciting the patients perspective. Building hope (i.e. awareness, sensitivity, demonstration of understanding) or hindering hope (i.e. unprepared, uncommitted, incomprehension) was associated with showing empathy. Agreement (i.e. confirmation, responsibilities, comprehensive information) or disagreement (i.e. structural obscurity, irresponsibility, absent-mindedness) was associated with investing in the end. Conclusions. Understanding of facilitators and barriers, as described by patients, can be used to improve contextual conditions and communication skills among healthcare personnel. Relevance to clinical practice. A patient-centred communication technique should be used in relation to all stages of The 4 Habits Model to facilitate shared decision-making and improve adherence to continuous positive airway pressure treatment.

  • 127.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Department of Nursing, School of Health and Welfare, Sweden.
    Pakpour, A. H.
    Department of Nursing, School of Health and Welfare, Sweden; Social Determinants of Health Research Center Qazvin, Iran.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fridlund, B.
    CICE Linneus University, Sweden.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Psychometric properties of the Ethos Brief Index (EBI) using factorial structure and Rasch Analysis among patients with obstructive sleep apnea before and after CPAP treatment is initiated.2019In: Sleep and Breathing, ISSN 1520-9512, E-ISSN 1522-1709, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 761-768Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Continuous positive airway treatment (CPAP) is the recommended treatment for patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Outcome measures often focus on clinical and/or self-rated variables related to the medical condition. However, a brief validated instrument focusing on the whole life situation (i.e., ethos) suitable for clinical practice is missing. The aim of this study was to investigate factorial structure, categorical functioning of the response scale, and differential item functioning across sub-populations of the Ethos Brief Index (EBI) among patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) before and after initiation of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP).

    METHODS: A prospective design, including 193 patients with OSA (68% men, 59.66 years, SD 11.51) from two CPAP clinics, was used. Clinical assessment and overnight respiratory polygraphy were used to diagnose patients. Questionnaires administered before and after 6 months of CPAP treatment included EBI, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and global perceived health (initial item in SF-36). The validity and reliability of the EBI were investigated using Rasch and confirmatory factor analysis models. Measurement invariance, unidimensionality, and differential item functioning across gender groups, Apnea-Hypopnea Index, and ESS groups were assessed.

    RESULTS: The reliability of the EBI was confirmed using composite reliability and Cronbach's alpha. The results supported unidimensionality of the EBI in confirmatory factor analysis and the Rasch model. No differential item functioning was found. A latent profile analysis yielded two profiles of patients with low (n = 42) and high (n = 151) ethos. Patients in the low ethos group were younger and had higher depression scores, lower perceived health, and higher body mass index.

    CONCLUSIONS: The EBI is a valid tool with robust psychometric properties suitable for use among patients with OSA before and after treatment with CPAP is initiated. Future studies should focus on its predictive validity.

  • 128.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden; Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Iran.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gardner, Benjamin
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Promoting CPAP adherence in clinical practice: A survey of Swedish and Norwegian CPAP practitioners beliefs and practices2018In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 27, no 6, article id UNSP e12675Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The benefits of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment for obstructive sleep apnea are well established, but adherence tends to be low. Research exploring CPAP practitioners beliefs around determinants of CPAP adherence, and the actions they use in clinical practice to promote CPAP adherence is lacking. This study aimed to: (i) develop and validate a questionnaire to assess beliefs and current practices among CPAP practitioners; (ii) explore practitioners beliefs regarding the main determinants of patient adherence, and the actions practitioners most commonly use to promote CPAP adherence; and (iii) explore the associations between perceived determinants and adherence-promotion actions. One-hundred and forty-two CPAP practitioners in Sweden and Norway, representing 93% of all Swedish and 62% of all Norwegian CPAP centres, were surveyed via a questionnaire exploring potential determinants (18 items) and adherence-promotion actions (20 items). Confirmatory factor analysis and second-order structural equational modelling were used to identify patterns of beliefs, and potential associations with adherence-promotion actions. Patients knowledge, motivation and attitudes were perceived by practitioners to be the main determinants of CPAP adherence, and educating patients about effects, management and treatment adjustments were the most common practices. Knowledge was shown to predict educational and informational actions (e.g. education about obstructive sleep apnea and CPAP). Educational and informational actions were associated with medical actions (e.g. treatment adjustment), but knowledge, attitude and support had no association with medical actions. These findings indicate that a wide variety of determinants and actions are considered important, though the only relationship observed between beliefs and actions was found for knowledge and educational and informational actions.

  • 129.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Department of Nursing, School of Healthand Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    School of Healthand Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden; Social Determinants of Health ResearchCenter, Qazvin University of MedicalSciences, Ira.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hedberg, Berith
    Jönköping Academy for Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden; Region Jönköpings län, Futurum, Jönköping,Sweden.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Validation of CollaboRATE and SURE - two short questionnaires to measure shared decision making during CPAP initiation.2018In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, article id e12808Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment tends to be low. Brief validated instruments focusing on shared decision making have not been used in a CPAP context. The aim was to investigate factorial structure, categorical functioning of the response scale and differential item functioning across sub-populations of the CollaboRATE and Sure questionnaires among patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) before CPAP treatment is initiated. A prospective design, including 193 objectively diagnosed (polygraphy) OSA patients (68% men, 59.7 years, SD 11.5) from two CPAP clinics was used. Data were collected with the following questionnaires; Sure, CollaboRATE, Attitudes to CPAP Inventory, Epworth sleepiness scale, minimal insomnia symptoms scale, and hospital anxiety and depression scale. Objective CPAP use was collected after 6 months; 49% demonstrated decisional conflict on SURE and 51% scored low levels of shared decision making on CollaboRATE. Unidimensionality was found for both CollaboRATE (one factor explaining 57.4%) and SURE (one factor explaining 53.7%), as well as local independence. Differential item functioning showed both to be invariant across both male and female patients. Internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha 0.83) and composite reliability (0.89) were good. Latent class analyses showed that patients with low decisional conflict and high shared decision making were more adherent to CPAP treatment. CollaboRATE and SURE provided good validity and reliability scores to measure shared decision making and decisional conflict in relation to CPAP treatment. The questionnaires can be used by healthcare personnel as a tool to simplify the assessment of shared decision making.

  • 130.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden; Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Iran.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Development and psychometric evaluation of the Swedish propensity to achieve healthy lifestyle scale in patients with hypertension2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 21-22, p. 4040-4049Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PurposeTo develop and validate a Swedish questionnaire to measure propensity for behaviour change regarding food habits, physical activity and weight reduction in patients with hypertension. DesignCross-sectional design. MethodsA total of 270 consecutive patients with hypertension diagnosed at four primary care centres in Sweden were included. The 6-item Swedish version of the Propensity to Achieve Healthy Lifestyle Scale (PAHLS) was developed to measure propensity for behaviour change regarding food habits, physical activity and weight reduction. The PAHLS (i.e., including three items for preparedness and three items for capacity) was developed by three multiprofessional researchers inspired by the transtheoretical model of behaviour change in collaboration with clinically active nurses. Data were collected by questionnaires on food habits (i.e., the Food Frequency Questionnaire), physical activity (the International Physical Activity Questionnaire), propensity for a healthy lifestyle (the PHLQ), as well as during a clinical examination. Exploratory (EFA) and confirmatory factor analyses (CFA), as well as Rasch analysis, were used. ResultsOf the 270 patients (50% women), 27% scored low levels of physical activity on the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, and 34% of the patients were obese (body mass index 30kg/m(2)). The EFA (explaining 54% of the variance) showed unidimensionality for the PAHLS that was supported by both CFA and Rasch analyses. No floor and 1.9% ceiling effects were found. Multiple group CFA (an extension of structural equationmodelling) showed that the PAHLS operated equivalently across both male and female patients. Internal consistency (Cronbachs alpha 0.83) and composite reliability (0.89) were good. ConclusionThe initial testing of PAHLS provided good validity and reliability scores to measure propensity for behaviour change in patients with hypertension. Relevance to Clinical PracticeThe PAHLS can be used by nurses as a tool to simplify shared decision-making in relation to behavioural changes.

  • 131.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Department of Nursing, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Wahlin, Ake
    Institute of Gerontology, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Sex-Specific Associations Between Self-reported Sleep Duration, Cardiovascular Disease, Hypertension, and Mortality in an Elderly Population.2018In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 422-428Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Both short and long sleep durations have been associated to increased mortality. Knowledge about sex-specific differences among elderly regarding associations between sleep duration, cardiovascular health, and mortality is sparse.

    OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study are to examine the association between self-reported sleep duration and mortality and to investigate whether this association is sex specific and/or moderated by cardiovascular morbidity, and also to explore potential mediators of sleep duration effects on mortality.

    METHODS: A population-based, observational, cross-sectional design with 6-year follow-up with mortality as primary outcome was conducted. Self-rated sleep duration, clinical examinations, echocardiography, and blood samples (N-terminal fragment of proBNP) were collected. A total of 675 persons (50% women; mean age, 78 years) were divided into short sleepers (≤6 hours; n = 231), normal sleepers (7-8 hours; n = 338), and long sleepers (≥9 hours; n = 61). Data were subjected to principal component analyses. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and hypertension factors were extracted and used as moderators and as mediators in the regression analyses.

    RESULTS: During follow-up, 55 short sleepers (24%), 68 normal sleepers (20%), and 21 long sleepers (34%) died. Mediator analyses showed that long sleep was associated with mortality in men (hazard ratio [HR], 1.8; P = .049), independently of CVD and hypertension. In men with short sleep, CVD acted as a moderator of the association with mortality (HR, 4.1; P = .025). However, when using N-terminal fragment of proBNP, this effect became nonsignificant (HR, 3.1; P = .06). In woman, a trend to moderation involving the hypertension factor and short sleep was found (HR, 4.6; P = .09).

    CONCLUSION: Short and long sleep duration may be seen as risk markers, particularly among older men with cardiovascular morbidity.

  • 132.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Wahlin, Ake
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Sex-specific associations between self-reported sleep duration, depression, anxiety, fatigue and daytime sleepiness in an older community-dwelling population2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 290-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to explore whether associations between self-reported sleep duration, depressive symptoms, anxiety, fatigue and daytime sleepiness differed in older community-dwelling men and women. DesignCross-sectional. MethodsA community-dwelling sample of 675 older men and women (mean age 77.7years, SD 3.8years) was used. All participants underwent a clinical examination by a cardiologist. Validated questionnaires were used to investigate sleep duration, depressive symptoms, anxiety, fatigue and daytime sleepiness. Subjects were divided into short sleepers (6hours), n=231; normal sleepers (7-8hours), n=338; and long sleepers (9hours), n=61. ancovas were used to explore sex-specific effects. ResultsDepressive symptoms were associated with short sleep in men, but not in women. Fatigue was associated with both short and long sleep duration in men. No sex-specific associations of sleep duration with daytime sleepiness or anxiety were found. ConclusionNurses investigating sleep duration and its correlates, or effects, in clinical practice need to take sex into account, as some associations may be sex specific. Depressive symptoms and fatigue can be used as indicators to identify older men with sleep complaints.

  • 133.
    Bruhn, H.
    et al.
    Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden.
    Strandeus, M.
    Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden.
    Milos, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Lind, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden.
    Improved survival of Swedish glioblastoma patients treated according to Stupp2018In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 138, no 4, p. 332-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectivesThe median survival in glioblastoma (GBM) patients used to be less than 1year. Surgical removal of the tumor with subsequent concomitant radiation/temozolomide (the Stupp regimen) has been shown to prolong survival. The Stupp protocol was implemented in the county of Jonkoping in 2006. The purpose of this study was to examine if the Stupp treatment has prolonged overall survival, in an unselected patient cohort with histologically verified GBM. Material and MethodThis study includes all patients from the county of Jonkoping, with a diagnosis of GBM from January 2001 to December 2012. Patients were divided into 2 cohorts, 2001-2005 and 2006-2012, that is before and after implementation of the Stupp regimen. By reviewing the medical case notes, the dates of the histological diagnosis and of death were identified. The median and mean overall survival and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis were calculated and compared between the 2 cohorts. ResultsThe mean survival was 110days longer in the cohort treated according to the Stupp regimen. Four patients in the 2006-2012 cohort and 1 patient in the 2001-2005 cohort are still alive. When comparing survival in patients with radical surgery vs biopsy, those that underwent radical surgery survived longer. The significance was slightly greater in the 2001-2005 cohort (mean 163 vs 344days, Pamp;lt;.001) than in the 2006-2012 cohort (mean 220 vs 397days, P=.02). ConclusionSurvival significantly improved after the implementation of the Stupp regimen in the study region of Sweden.

  • 134.
    Brundin, L.
    et al.
    Van Andel Research Institute, MI 49503 USA.
    Sellgren, C. M.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Broad Institute MIT and Harvard, MA USA; Massachusetts Gen Hospital, MA USA.
    Lim, C. K.
    Macquarie University, Australia.
    Grit, J.
    Van Andel Research Institute, MI 49503 USA.
    Palsson, E.
    Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Landen, M.
    Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lundgren, Kristoffer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brundin, P.
    Van Andel Research Institute, MI 49503 USA.
    Fuchs, D.
    Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria.
    Postolache, T. T.
    University of Maryland, MD 21201 USA; Rocky Mt MIRECC, CO USA.
    Traskman-Bendz, L.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Guillemin, G. J.
    Macquarie University, Australia; NHMRC Centre Research Excellence Suicide Prevent CRESP, Australia.
    Erhardt, S.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    An enzyme in the kynurenine pathway that governs vulnerability to suicidal behavior by regulating excitotoxicity and neuroinflammation2016In: Translational Psychiatry, ISSN 2158-3188, E-ISSN 2158-3188, Vol. 6, no e865Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emerging evidence suggests that inflammation has a key role in depression and suicidal behavior. The kynurenine pathway is involved in neuroinflammation and regulates glutamate neurotransmission. In the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of suicidal patients, levels of inflammatory cytokines and the kynurenine metabolite quinolinic acid (QUIN), an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor agonist, are increased. The enzyme amino-beta-carboxymuconate-semialdehyde-decarboxylase (ACMSD) limits QUIN formation by competitive production of the neuroprotective metabolite picolinic acid (PIC). Therefore, decreased ACMSD activity can lead to excess QUIN. We tested the hypothesis that deficient ACMSD activity underlies suicidal behavior. We measured PIC and QUIN in CSF and plasma samples from 137 patients exhibiting suicidal behavior and 71 healthy controls. We used DSM-IV and the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale and Suicide Assessment Scale to assess behavioral changes. Finally, we genotyped ACMSD tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 77 of the patients and 150 population-based controls. Suicide attempters had reduced PIC and a decreased PIC/QUIN ratio in both CSF (Pamp;lt;0.001) and blood (P=0.001 and Pamp;lt;0.01, respectively). The reductions of PIC in CSF were sustained over 2 years after the suicide attempt based on repeated measures. The minor C allele of the ACMSD SNP rs2121337 was more prevalent in suicide attempters and associated with increased CSF QUIN. Taken together, our data suggest that increased QUIN levels may result from reduced activity of ACMSD in suicidal subjects. We conclude that measures of kynurenine metabolites can be explored as biomarkers of suicide risk, and that ACMSD is a potential therapeutic target in suicidal behavior.

  • 135.
    Bruno, Valentina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Tor Vergata Univ Hosp, Italy.
    Svensson Arvelund, Judit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rubér, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Piccione, Emilio
    Tor Vergata Univ Hosp, Italy.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Effects of low molecular weight heparin on the polarization and cytokine profile of macrophages and T helper cells in vitro2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 4166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is widely used in recurrent miscarriage treatment. The anticoagulant effects are established, while immunological effects are not fully known. Our aim was to assess LMWH effects on activation and polarization of central regulatory immune cells from healthy women, and on placenta tissues from women undergoing elective abortions. Isolated blood monocytes and T helper (Th) cells under different activation and polarizing conditions were cultured with or without LMWH. Flow cytometry showed that LMWH exposure induced increased expression of HLA-DR and CD206 in macrophages. This phenotype was associated with increased secretion of Th17-associated CCL20, and decreased secretion of CCL2 (M2-associated) and CCL22 (Th2), as measured by multiplex bead array. In accordance, LMWH exposure to Th cells reduced the proportion of CD25highFoxp3+ regulatory T-cells, intensified IFN-gamma secretion and showed a tendency to increase the lymphoblast proportions. Collectively, a mainly pro-inflammatory effect was noted on two essential tolerance-promoting cells. Although the biological significancies of these in vitro findings are uncertain and need to be confirmed in vivo, they suggest the possibility that immunological effects of LMWH may be beneficial mainly at an earlier gestational age to provide an appropriate implantation process in women with recurrent miscarriage.

  • 136.
    Brännström, Jonas K
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Dept of clinical science, Section of Logopedics, Phoiatrics and audiology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Ingo, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Månsson, Kristoffer N. T.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Denmark.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Denmark.
    The Process of Developing an Internet-Based Support System for Audiologists and First-Time Hearing Aid Clients2015In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 320-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In audiologic practice, complementary information sources and access to the clinician between appointments improve information retention and facilitate adjustment behaviors. An Internet-based support system is a novel way to support information sharing and clinician access. Purpose: This research forum article describes the process of developing an Internet-based support system for audiologists and their first-time hearing aid clients. Method: The iterative development process, including revisions by 4 research audiologists and 4 clinical audiologists, is described. The final system is exemplified. Conclusion: An Internet-based support system was successfully developed for audiologic practice.

  • 137.
    Brännström, Jonas
    et al.
    Clinical Sciences Lund, Sweden.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ingo, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Månsson, Kristoffer N T
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Sweden.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    The initial evaluation of an internet-based support system for audiologists and first-time hearing aid clientsThe process of developing an internet-based support system for audiologists and first-time hearing aid clients2016In: Internet Interventions, ISSN 2214-7829, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 82-91Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 138.
    Buznyk, Oleksiy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. National Academic Medical Science Ukraine, Ukraine.
    Pasyechnikova, Nataliya
    National Academic Medical Science Ukraine, Ukraine.
    Islam, Mohammad Mirazul
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Iakymenko, Stanislav
    National Academic Medical Science Ukraine, Ukraine.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bioengineered Corneas Grafted as Alternatives to Human Donor Corneas in Three High-Risk Patients2015In: Clinical and Translational Science, ISSN 1752-8054, E-ISSN 1752-8062, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 558-562Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Corneas with severe pathologies have a high risk of rejection when conventionally grafted with human donor tissues. In this early observational study, we grafted bioengineered corneal implants made from recombinant human collagen and synthetic phosphorylcholine polymer into three patients for whom donor cornea transplantation carried a high risk of transplant failure. These patients suffered from corneal ulcers and recurrent erosions preoperatively. The implants provided relief from pain and discomfort, restored corneal integrity by promoting endogenous regeneration of corneal tissues, and improved vision in two of three patients. Such implants could in the future be alternatives to donor corneas for high-risk patients, and therefore, merits further testing in a clinical trial.

  • 139.
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Carlsson, Anders K
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Olausson, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Multivariate proteomic analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with peripheral neuropathic pain and healthy controls: a hypothesis-generating pilot study2015In: Journal of Pain Research, ISSN 1178-7090, E-ISSN 1178-7090, Vol. 8, p. 321-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pain medicine lacks objective biomarkers to guide diagnosis and treatment. Combining two-dimensional gel proteomics with multivariate data analysis by projection, we exploratively analyzed the cerebrospinal fluid of eleven patients with severe peripheral neuropathic pain due to trauma and/or surgery refractory to conventional treatment and eleven healthy controls. Using orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis, we identified a panel of 36 proteins highly discriminating between the two groups. Due to a possible confounding effect of age, a new model with age as outcome variable was computed for patients (n=11), and four out of 36 protein spots were excluded due to a probable influence of age. Of the 32 remaining proteins, the following seven had the highest discriminatory power between the two groups: an isoform of angiotensinogen (upregulated in patients), two isoforms of alpha-1-antitrypsin (downregulated in patients), three isoforms of haptoglobin (upregulated in patients), and one isoform of pigment epithelium-derived factor (downregulated in patients). It has recently been hypothesized that the renin–angiotensin system may play a role in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain, and a clinical trial of an angiotensin II receptor antagonist was recently published. It is noteworthy that when searching for neuropathic pain biomarkers with a purely explorative methodology, it was indeed a renin–angiotensin system protein that had the highest discriminatory power between patients and controls in the present study. The results from this hypothesis-generating pilot study have to be confirmed in larger, hypothesis-driven studies with age-matched controls, but the present study illustrates the fruitfulness of combining proteomics with multivariate data analysis in hypothesis-generating pain biomarker studies in humans.

  • 140.
    Bäckström, Denise
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Larsen, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gedeborg, Rolf
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Deaths caused by injury among people of working age (18-64) are decreasing, while those among older people (64+) are increasing2018In: European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, ISSN 1863-9933, E-ISSN 1863-9941, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 589-596Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Injury is an important cause of death in all age groups worldwide, and contributes to many losses of human and economic resources. Currently, we know a few data about mortality from injury, particularly among the working population. The aim of the present study was to examine death from injury over a period of 14 years (1999-2012) using the Swedish Cause of Death Registry (CDR) and the National Patient Registry, which have complete national coverage.

    METHOD: CDR was used to identify injury-related deaths among adults (18 years or over) during the years 1999-2012. ICD-10 diagnoses from V01 to X39 were included. The significance of changes over time was analyzed by linear regression.

    RESULTS: The incidence of prehospital death decreased significantly (coefficient -0.22, r (2) = 0.30; p = 0.041) during the study period, while that of deaths in hospital increased significantly (coefficient 0.20, r (2) = 0.75; p < 0.001). Mortality/100,000 person-years in the working age group (18-64 years) decreased significantly (coefficient -0.40, r (2) = 0.37; p = 0.020), mainly as a result of decrease in traffic-related deaths (coefficient -0.34, r (2) = 0.85; p < 0.001). The incidence of deaths from injury among elderly (65 years and older) patients increased because of the increase in falls (coefficient 1.71, r (2) = 0.84; p < 0.001) and poisoning (coefficient 0.13, r (2) = 0.69; p < 0.001).

    CONCLUSION: The epidemiology of injury in Sweden has changed during recent years in that mortality from injury has declined in the working age group and increased among those people 64 years old and over.

  • 141.
    Caban, Janusz
    et al.
    Vastervik Hospital, Sweden.
    Fermergard, Robert
    Vastervik Hospital, Sweden.
    Abtahi, Jahan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Long-term evaluation of osteotome sinus floor elevation and simultaneous placement of implants without bone grafts: 10-Year radiographic and clinical follow-up2017In: Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, ISSN 1523-0899, E-ISSN 1708-8208, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 1023-1033Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundInsertion of an implant in the edentulous posterior maxilla is a challenging procedure because of poor bone quality and increased pneumatization of the maxillary sinus after tooth extraction. To increase the amount of bone, several surgical bone grafting techniques have been used?with considerable morbidity for patients. Osteotome sinus floor elevation (OSFE) is a less invasive technique. The clinical and radiographic outcome of 53 implants placed with this technique without bone graft has been reported previously. PurposeHere we report the clinical and radiographic findings after 10 years of implant load bearing. Material and methodsIn a retrospective study, 34 Astra implants in 25 patients were subjected to 10-year follow-up radiologically and clinically. Each patient received 1 or 2 conical Astra implants. The level of the marginal bone and the height of the residual peri-implant alveolar bone (RPAB) for each implant were measured from digital intra-oral radiographs. ResultsTwo implants in edentulous patients were lost at the 1-year follow-up, and 1 more at the 3-year examination. There was no loss between 3-year and 10-year follow-up. At 10-year follow-up 36 implants were included. Implants used in single-tooth replacements and in partially edentulous cases had a 100% survival rate. The mean marginal bone loss was 0.60.8 mm. The bone height at the time of implant insertion ranged from 1.8 to 6.9 mm, with a mean value of 4.3 +/- 1.0 mm. At 10-year follow-up the mean gain in bone at the implant sites for all implants was 2.6 +/- 1.2 mm. ConclusionsThe OSFE technique is a reliable method for rehabilitation of patients with atrophied posterior maxilla. However, the success of this method is associated with the amount of the residual bone. In the present study, this surgical approach without bone graft showed reliable long-term results with Astra implants.

  • 142.
    Capitanio, Arrigo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Dina, R. E.
    Imperial Coll NHS Trust, England.
    Treanor, Darren
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology. Leeds Teaching Hosp NHS Trust, England.
    Digital cytology: A short review of technical and methodological approaches and applications2018In: Cytopathology, ISSN 0956-5507, E-ISSN 1365-2303, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 317-325Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent years have been characterised by a rapid development of whole slide imaging (WSI) especially in its applications to histology. The application of WSI technology to cytology is less common because of technological problems related to the three-dimensional nature of cytology preparations (which requires capturing of z-stack information, with an increase in file size and usability issues in viewing cytological preparations). The aim of this study is to provide a review of the literature on the use of digital cytology and provide an overview of cytological applications of WSI in current practice as well as identifying areas for future development.

  • 143.
    Capitanio, Arrigo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Dina, Roberto E.
    Imperial Coll NHS Trust, England.
    Treanor, Darren
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology. Leeds Teaching Hosp NHS Trust, England.
    Reply to Van Es et al. Digital pathology: A constant evolution2019In: Cytopathology, ISSN 0956-5507, E-ISSN 1365-2303, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 264-264Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 144.
    Carlsson Almlöf, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Alexsson, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Imgenberg-Kreuz, Juliana
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sylwan, Lina
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Backlin, Christofer
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Leonard, Dag
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Nordmark, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Tandre, Karolina
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Eloranta, Maija-Leena
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Padyukov, Leonid
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Christine
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Jonsen, Andreas
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Rantapaa Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Bengtsson, Anders A.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Iva
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Ronnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sandling, Johanna K.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Syvanen, Ann-Christine
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Novel risk genes for systemic lupus erythematosus predicted by random forest classification2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 6236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genome-wide association studies have identified risk loci for SLE, but a large proportion of the genetic contribution to SLE still remains unexplained. To detect novel risk genes, and to predict an individuals SLE risk we designed a random forest classifier using SNP genotype data generated on the "Immunochip" from 1,160 patients with SLE and 2,711 controls. Using gene importance scores defined by the random forest classifier, we identified 15 potential novel risk genes for SLE. Of them 12 are associated with other autoimmune diseases than SLE, whereas three genes (ZNF804A, CDK1, and MANF) have not previously been associated with autoimmunity. Random forest classification also allowed prediction of patients at risk for lupus nephritis with an area under the curve of 0.94. By allele-specific gene expression analysis we detected cis-regulatory SNPs that affect the expression levels of six of the top 40 genes designed by the random forest analysis, indicating a regulatory role for the identified risk variants. The 40 top genes from the prediction were overrepresented for differential expression in B and T cells according to RNA-sequencing of samples from five healthy donors, with more frequent over-expression in B cells compared to T cells.

  • 145.
    Carlsson Almlöf, Jonas Carlsson
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Nystedt, Sara
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Leonard, Dag
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Eloranta, Maija-Leena
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Grosso, Giorgia
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Bengtsson, Anders A.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Jonsen, Andreas
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Iva
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Sandling, Johanna K.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Syvanen, Ann-Christine
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Whole-genome sequencing identifies complex contributions to genetic risk by variants in genes causing monogenic systemic lupus erythematosus2019In: Human Genetics, ISSN 0340-6717, E-ISSN 1432-1203, Vol. 138, no 2, p. 141-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, OMIM 152700) is a systemic autoimmune disease with a complex etiology. The mode of inheritance of the genetic risk beyond familial SLE cases is currently unknown. Additionally, the contribution of heterozygous variants in genes known to cause monogenic SLE is not fully understood. Whole-genome sequencing of DNA samples from 71 Swedish patients with SLE and their healthy biological parents was performed to investigate the general genetic risk of SLE using known SLE GWAS risk loci identified using the ImmunoChip, variants in genes associated to monogenic SLE, and the mode of inheritance of SLE risk alleles in these families. A random forest model for predicting genetic risk for SLE showed that the SLE risk variants were mainly inherited from one of the parents. In the 71 patients, we detected a significant enrichment of ultra-rare (0.1%) missense and nonsense mutations in 22 genes known to cause monogenic forms of SLE. We identified one previously reported homozygous nonsense mutation in the C1QC (Complement C1q C Chain) gene, which explains the immunodeficiency and severe SLE phenotype of that patient. We also identified seven ultra-rare, coding heterozygous variants in five genes (C1S, DNASE1L3, DNASE1, IFIH1, and RNASEH2A) involved in monogenic SLE. Our findings indicate a complex contribution to the overall genetic risk of SLE by rare variants in genes associated with monogenic forms of SLE. The rare variants were inherited from the other parent than the one who passed on the more common risk variants leading to an increased genetic burden for SLE in the child. Higher frequency SLE risk variants are mostly passed from one of the parents to the offspring affected with SLE. In contrast, the other parent, in seven cases, contributed heterozygous rare variants in genes associated with monogenic forms of SLE, suggesting a larger impact of rare variants in SLE than hitherto reported.

  • 146.
    Carlsson, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Kalmar Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jonsson Henningsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Kalmar Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Tjernberg, Ivar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Kalmar Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Subclinical Lyme borreliosis is common in south-eastern Sweden and may be distinguished from Lyme neuroborreliosis by sex, age and specific immune marker patterns2018In: Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases, ISSN 1877-959X, E-ISSN 1877-9603, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 742-748Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Determinants of a subclinical course of Lyme borreliosis (LB) remain largely unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the extent, sex and age profiles of subclinical Borrelia seroconversion in a LB endemic area in Sweden and to map blood cellular Borrelia-specific immune marker patterns in individuals with a previous subclinical LB course compared with patients previously diagnosed with Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB). Methods: A large group of 1113 healthy blood donors was screened for multiple IgG anti-Borrelia antibodies and asked to complete a health inquiry regarding previous LB. A group of subjects with anti-Borrelia-specific IgG antibodies but no previous history of LB (subclinical LB, n = 60) was identified together with 22 cases of previous LNB. Whole Borrelia spirochetes, strains B. afzelii ACA1 and B. garinii Ip90, were used for ex vivo whole blood stimulations, whereas outer surface protein enriched fractions of the same strains were used for stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). An extensive panel of immune markers was analysed in the supernatants after stimulation using multiplex bead arrays, and Borrelia-specific secretion was determined by subtracting the spontaneous secretion. Results: A total of 125/1113 blood donors reported previous clinical LB. In contrast, 66 donors denied previous LB but showed multiple IgG anti-Borrelia antibodies; these were defined as subclinical subjects, of whom 60 were available for further studies. The subclinical subjects consisted of significantly more men and had a younger age compared with the LNB patients (p amp;lt;= 0.01). Discriminant analysis revealed a distinct pattern of sex, age and PBMC B. garinii-specific levels of IL-10, IL-17A and CCL20 discriminating subclinical subjects from LNB patients. Conclusions: This study confirms that subclinical Borrelia seroconversion is common in south-eastern Sweden. The findings further suggest that male sex, younger age together with B. gariniii induced levels of IL-10, IL-17A and CCL20 may be associated with a subclinical course.

  • 147.
    Carlsson, R. M.
    et al.
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden; Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden; Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, L.
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden.
    Hallander, H. O.
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden.
    Ljungman, M.
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden.
    Olin, P.
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden.
    Gothefors, L.
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden; Umeå University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden.
    Netterlid, E.
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Two consecutive randomized controlled pertussis booster trials in children initially vaccinated in infancy with an acellular vaccine: The first with a five-component Tdap vaccine to 5-year olds and the second with five- or monocomponent Tdap vaccines at age 14-15 years2015In: Vaccine, ISSN 0264-410X, E-ISSN 1873-2518, Vol. 33, no 31, p. 3717-3725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prior study children from a DTaP efficacy trial were recruited at ages 5 and 15 years to randomized booster trials addressing immunogenicity and reactogenicity; 475 preschool children received mixed or separate injections of a reduced antigen vaccine (Tdap5, Sanofi Pasteur MSD) and an inactivated polio vaccine, and 230 adolescents received the same or another booster vaccine (Tdap1, SSI, Denmark). Pre-vaccination antibody concentrations against pertussis antigens were significantly higher at 15 than 5 years of age, probably due to natural boosting between the studies. Tdap5 induced comparable anti-PT concentrations at both ages, but antibody responses were significantly higher to filamentous haemagglutinin, pertactin and fimbriae 2/3 in adolescents. As expected, a higher amount of PT (Tdap1, 20 mu g) induced a stronger anti-PT response than a lower amount (Tdap5, 2.5 mu g). The frequency of adverse events was low and there were no serious adverse reactions. All local reactions had an early onset and a short duration. A large swelling or redness of more than half of the upper arm circumference was reported in 8/475 5-year-olds and in 6/230 15-year-olds. Children vaccinated with Tdap5 reported more moderate pain in adolescence than at preschool age, whereas itching was only reported in preschool children. Sweden introduced DTaP vaccines in 1996 after a 17-year hiatus with no general pertussis vaccination and pertussis was still endemic at the time of the studies. The frequency of adverse events was nevertheless low in both preschool children and adolescents and antibody responses were adequate. These studies document immunogenicity and reactogenicity in a trial cohort consecutively vaccinated with acellular pertussis vaccines from infancy to adolescence. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 148.
    Carlsson, R. M.
    et al.
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden; Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    von Segebaden, K.
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden.
    Bergstrom, J.
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden.
    Kling, A. M.
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lennart J
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Surveillance of infant pertussis in Sweden 1998-2012; severity of disease in relation to the national vaccination programme2015In: Eurosurveillance, ISSN 1025-496X, E-ISSN 1560-7917, Vol. 20, no 6, article id 21032Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, pertussis was excluded from the national vaccination programme in 1979 until acellular vaccination was introduced in a highly endemic setting in 1996. The general incidence dropped 10-fold within a decade, less in infants. Infant pertussis reached 40–45 cases per 100,000 in 2008 to 2012; few of these cases were older than five months. We present an observational 15-year study on the severity of infant pertussis based on 1,443 laboratory-confirmed cases prospectively identified from 1998 to 2012 in the national mandatory reporting system and followed up by telephone contact. Analyses were made in relation to age at onset of symptoms and vaccination history. Pertussis decreased in non-vaccinated infants (2003 to 2012, p < 0.001), indicating herd immunity, both in those too young to be vaccinated and those older than three months. The hospitalisation rates also decreased (last five-year period vs the previous five-year periods, p <0.001), but 70% of all cases in under three month-old infants and 99% of cases with apnoea due to pertussis were admitted to hospital in 1998 to 2012. Median duration of hospitalisation was seven days for unvaccinated vs four days for vaccinated infants aged 3–5 months. Nine unvaccinated infants died during the study period.

  • 149.
    Case, Laura K.
    et al.
    NIH, MD 20892 USA.
    Laubacher, Claire M.
    NIH, MD 20892 USA.
    Olausson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wang, Binquan
    NIH, MD 20892 USA.
    Spagnolo, Primavera A.
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA.
    Catherine Bushnell, M.
    NIH, MD 20892 USA.
    Encoding of Touch Intensity But Not Pleasantness in Human Primary Somatosensory Cortex2016In: Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0270-6474, E-ISSN 1529-2401, Vol. 36, no 21, p. 5850-5860Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Growing interest in affective touch has delineated a neural network that bypasses primary somatosensory cortex (S1). Several recent studies, however, have cast doubt on the segregation of touch discrimination and affect, suggesting that S1 also encodes affective qualities. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to examine the role of S1 in processing touch intensity and pleasantness. Twenty-six healthy human adults rated brushing on the hand during fMRI. Intensity ratings significantly predicted activation in S1, whereas pleasantness ratings predicted activation only in the anterior cingulate cortex. Nineteen subjects also received inhibitory rTMS over right hemisphere S1 and the vertex (control). After S1 rTMS, but not after vertex rTMS, sensory discrimination was reduced and subjects with reduced sensory discrimination rated touch as more intense. In contrast, rTMS did not alter ratings of touch pleasantness. Our findings support divergent neural processing of touch intensity and pleasantness, with affective touch encoded outside of S1.

  • 150.
    Case, Laura K
    et al.
    National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, NIH , Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.
    Čeko, Marta
    National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, NIH , Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.
    Gracely, John L
    National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, NIH , Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.
    Richards, Emily A
    National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, NIH , Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.
    Olausson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience (CSAN). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Bushnell, M Catherine
    National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, NIH , Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.
    Touch Perception Altered by Chronic Pain and by Opioid Blockade.2016In: eNeuro, ISSN 2373-2822, Vol. 3, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Touch plays a significant role in human social behavior and social communication, and its rewarding nature has been suggested to involve opioids. Opioid blockade in monkeys leads to increased solicitation and receipt of grooming, suggesting heightened enjoyment of touch. We sought to study the role of endogenous opioids in perception of affective touch in healthy adults and in patients with fibromyalgia, a chronic pain condition shown to involve reduced opioid receptor availability. The pleasantness of touch has been linked to the activation of C-tactile fibers, which respond maximally to slow gentle touch and correlate with ratings of pleasantness. We administered naloxone to patients and healthy controls to directly observe the consequences of µ-opioid blockade on the perceived pleasantness and intensity of touch. We found that at baseline chronic pain patients showed a blunted distinction between slow and fast brushing for both intensity and pleasantness, suggesting reduced C-tactile touch processing. In addition, we found a differential effect of opioid blockade on touch perception in healthy subjects and pain patients. In healthy individuals, opioid blockade showed a trend toward increased ratings of touch pleasantness, while in chronic pain patients it significantly decreased ratings of touch intensity. Further, in healthy individuals, naloxone-induced increase in touch pleasantness was associated with naloxone-induced decreased preference for slow touch, suggesting a possible effect of opioid levels on processing of C-tactile fiber input. These findings suggest a role for endogenous opioids in touch processing, and provide further evidence for altered opioid functioning in chronic pain patients.

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