liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1234567 101 - 150 of 332
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 101.
    Håkansson, L.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Adell, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Boeryd, B.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjögren, F.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjödahl, R.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Infiltration of mononuclear inflammatory cells into primary colorectal carcinomas: an immunohistological analysis1997In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 75, no 3, p. 374-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Local immunoregulation mediated by mononuclear tumour-infiltrating cells is considered of importance for tumour progression of colorectal cancer, although the balance between immunosuppressor and cytotoxic activities is unclear. Colorectal cancers from 26 patients were investigated using a panel of monoclonal antibodies in order to identify subsets of mononuclear inflammatory cells and to study their pattern of distribution in relation to tumour stage and cytotoxic immune reactivity against the tumour. In all but five tumours, mononuclear cells, lymphocytes or monocytes were present in fairly large numbers, particularly in the stroma. The infiltration of CD4+ mononuclear cells predominated over the CD8+ subset. Infiltration near the tumour cells was found in four cancers only. Stromal infiltration of CD11c+ macrophages was found in all but eight tumours. Small regressive areas, in which the histological architecture of the tumours was broken down, were found in 17 tumours with intense or moderate infiltration by CD4+ lymphocytes or CD11c+ macrophages. Probably this destruction of tumour tissue was caused by cytotoxic activity of the tumour-infiltrating mononuclear cells. In Dukes' class A and B tumours, CD4+ lymphocytes predominated over CD4+ cells with macrophage morphology, but the latter were increasingly found in Dukes' class C and D disease. The occurrence of MHC II-positive macrophages and lymphocytes in different Dukes' classes was similar to that of CD4+ cells. In contrast to this, CD11c+ and CD11a+ cells were more frequent in Dukes' A and B class tumours compared with Dukes' C and D. Four out of nine tumours of the latter stages showed a poor inflammatory reaction. The interpretation of our results is that the subsets of tumour-infiltrating mononuclear cells change with advancing Dukes' class and that the local immune control is gradually broken down in progressive tumour growth, even if some cytotoxic activity is still present.

  • 102.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Damm, Ole
    University Hospital, Malmö.
    Holmang, Sten
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Liedberg, Fredrik
    Växjö County Hospital.
    Ljungberg, Borje
    Umeå University Hospital.
    Malmstrom, Per-Uno
    Akad University Hospital.
    Mansson, Wiking
    Lund University Hospital.
    Strömberg, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijkstom, Hans
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    A population-based study of patterns of care for muscle-invasive bladder cancer in Sweden2009In: SCANDINAVIAN JOURNAL OF UROLOGY AND NEPHROLOGY, ISSN 0036-5599, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 271-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To analyse the management of muscle-invasive bladder cancer in a population-based national register, and specifically to investigate the role of curative therapy (i.e. cystectomy or radiotherapy) in relation to patient, tumour and hospital characteristics. Material and methods. The Swedish Bladder Cancer Register covers more than 90% of all patients in the country who have been diagnosed with such disease since 1997. Results from 1997-2003 were analysed regarding curative-intent treatment given within 3-6 months of diagnosis of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Results. In total, 3463 patients with clinical T2-T4 bladder cancer were included in the analysis. Of those patients, 1426 (41%) received curative-intent treatment in the form of radiotherapy (285, 20%) or cystectomy (1141, 80%). Male gender, age 76 years, favourable TNM category and registration at a high-volume hospital were associated with such treatment. Curative-intent treatment was given to significantly more patients registered at high-volume hospitals (1003/2227, 45%) than at low-volume hospitals (423/1235, 34%) (2=37.7, p0.00001). Cystectomy was performed more often in those registered at high-volume than at low-volume hospitals (826/2227, 37%, and 316/1235, 26%, respectively, 2=47.3, p0.00001). Conclusions. Lower rates of curative-intent treatment were found in patients registered at low-volume than at high-volume facilities, and the same was seen when comparing females with males, and patients aged 76-80 years with younger patients. Since many of these bladder cancer patients were registered at and eventually treated at hospitals handling fewer than 10 such cases annually, it seems desirable to concentrate treatment of this disease at more specialized centres.

  • 103.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Hagberg, O
    University of Lund Hospital.
    Holmang, S
    Sahlgrens University.
    Liedberg, F
    Vaxjo County Hospital.
    Ljungberg, B
    No University Hospital, Umeå.
    U Malmstrom, P
    University of Uppsala Hospital.
    Wijkstrom, H
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Mansson, W
    Skåne University Hospital.
    Higher excess mortality rate in women than in men with invasive bladder cancer in EUROPEAN UROLOGY SUPPLEMENTS, vol 11, issue 1, pp E870-U8322012In: EUROPEAN UROLOGY SUPPLEMENTS, Elsevier , 2012, Vol. 11, no 1, p. E870-U832Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 104.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Holmang, D
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Liedberg, F
    Vaxjo Central Hospital.
    Ljungberg, B
    North University Hospital, Umea.
    Malmstrom, P U
    Acad University Hospital, Uppsala.
    Mansson, W
    University Hospital, Lund.
    Wijkstom, H
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    INITIAL BCG INSTILLATION IS UNDER-USED IN T1 BLADDER CANCER in EUROPEAN UROLOGY SUPPLEMENTS, vol 10, issue 2, pp 148-1482011In: EUROPEAN UROLOGY SUPPLEMENTS, ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS , 2011, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 148-148Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 105.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Holmang, S
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Liedberg, F
    Vaxjo Central Hospital.
    Ljungberg, B
    No University Hospital, Umea.
    Malmstrom, P U
    Acad University Hospital, Uppsala.
    Mansson, W
    University Lund Hospital.
    COMPLICATIONS AFTER CYSTECTOMY AND ILEAL CONDUIT FOR BLADDER CANCER IS MORE COMMON IN SMALL VOLUME HOSPITALS in EUROPEAN UROLOGY SUPPLEMENTS, vol 10, issue 2, pp 43-432011In: EUROPEAN UROLOGY SUPPLEMENTS, ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS , 2011, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 43-43Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 106.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Sandblom, Dag
    Orebro University Hospital.
    Holmang, Sten
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    A Randomized Trial Comparing 2 Doses of Polidocanol Sclerotherapy for Hydrocele or Spermatocele2011In: Journal of Urology, ISSN 0022-5347, E-ISSN 1527-3792, Vol. 186, no 4, p. 1319-1323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Polidocanol sclerotherapy for hydrocele or spermatocele combines high efficiency with low morbidity, but the optimal dose is not known. We compared the efficacy and morbidity of 2 or 4 ml polidocanol sclerotherapy for hydrocele or spermatocele. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMaterials and Methods: From 1993 to 2005 a double-blind randomized clinical trial was conducted using 2 or 4 ml polidocanol (30 mg/ml) for sclerotherapy of hydrocele/spermatocele in 224 evaluable patients at 3 university hospitals. Fluid was evacuated and 2 or 4 ml polidocanol was administered by a nurse, with the amount injected concealed from others present. At 3-month followup morbidity was ascertained using a questionnaire completed by the patients. Fluid recurrence was determined clinically and generally re-treated. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: After the first treatment, cure was observed in 59% and 47% in the 4 and the 2 ml group, respectively (p = 0.04). More patients in the 4 ml group had complications (31% vs 18%, p = 0.04). Complications were mostly of low or moderate intensity and seldom required medication. After 1 to 4 treatments 200 of 224 patients (89%) were cured and another 10 (5%) had small amounts of residual fluid, with no difference between the groups. Of the patients with hydroceles/spermatoceles larger than 175 ml, 58% and 34% were cured after the first treatment in the 4 and 2 ml groups, respectively (p = 0.012), with no differences in complications between the groups. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: Polidocanol sclerotherapy was effective for the treatment of hydrocele or spermatocele in our patients, with 94% satisfactory results after 1 to 4 treatments. A dose of 4 ml was superior to 2 ml, particularly for larger hydroceles/spermatoceles.

  • 107.
    Jancke, Georg
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Damm, Ole
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Risk factors for local recurrence in patients with pTa/pT1 urinary bladder cancer2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, ISSN 0036-5599, E-ISSN 1651-2065, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 417-421Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. This study evaluated risk factors for local tumour recurrence, defined as recurrence at the same location in the bladder within 18 months after primary resection in patients with newly diagnosed pTa or pT1 bladder cancer. Patients and methods. The study included 472 patients with newly diagnosed pTa/T1 bladder cancer between 1992 and 2001. The patients were followed prospectively in accordance with a control programme and possible risk factors for tumour recurrence were registered. Results. Local tumour recurrence was observed in 164 (35%) patients, another 117 (25%) patients had recurrence at other locations in the bladder (non-local recurrence) and 191 (40%) had no recurrence at all. Tumour size and multiple tumours were significantly associated with a higher risk for developing local recurrence as opposed to non-local recurrence. Tumour category was of borderline statistical significance. Gender and tumour grade were not found to be risk factors for developing local recurrence. Conclusion. Tumour size and multiplicity are risk factors for development of recurrence at the same location in the bladder as the primary tumour. Local tumour recurrence may be a result of non-radical primary transurethral resection. One may consider recommending standard re-resection within 6-8 weeks in patients with tumours >3 cm or those with multiple primary tumours. © 2008 Informa UK Ltd. (Informa Healthcare, Taylor & Francis AS).

  • 108.
    Jancke, Georg
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Centre.
    Chebil, Gunilla
    County Hospital, Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Bladder Wash Cytology at Diagnosis of Ta-T1 Bladder Cancer Is Predictive for Recurrence and Progression2012In: Urology, ISSN 0090-4295, E-ISSN 1527-9995, Vol. 80, no 3, p. 625-631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of the bladder wash cytology finding at the primary diagnosis of Stage Ta-T1 urinary bladder cancer on recurrence and progression. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMETHODS The clinical and pathologic characteristics of all patients with primary Stage Ta-T1 urinary bladder cancer were prospectively registered. The data were divided according to the bladder wash cytology results at diagnosis. Multivariate analyses were performed to determine the influence of bladder wash cytology on recurrence and progression. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanRESULTS The analysis included 768 evaluable patients with a mean follow-up of 60 months. Recurrence was observed in 478 patients (62%) and progression in 71 (9%). High-grade malignant bladder wash cytology was predictive for recurrence and progression (P andlt; .001 and P = .036, respectively). Other factors affecting recurrence were missing bladder wash cytology data, tumors size 16-30 mm and andgt;30 mm, Stage T1 tumor category, and multiplicity (P = .008, P = .006, P andlt; .001, P = .002, and P andlt; .001, respectively). Progression was also associated with T1 tumor category, local recurrence, and primary concomitant carcinoma in situ (P andlt; .001, P andlt; .001, and P = .024, respectively). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanCONCLUSION High-grade malignant bladder wash cytology at the primary diagnosis was predictive for recurrence and progression. This could be taken into account in designing future follow-up schedules.

  • 109.
    Jancke, Georg
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Impact of tumour size on recurrence and progression in Ta/T1 carcinoma of the urinary bladder2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, ISSN 0036-5599, E-ISSN 1651-2065, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 388-392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of tumour size on recurrence and progression in a population-based series of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancers. Material and methods. Clinical and pathological characteristics of patients with primary Ta/bladder cancer were registered. The patients tumours were categorized by size into five size groups (1-10, 11-20, 21-30, 31-40 and andgt;40 mm) or three size groups (1-15, 16-30 and andgt;30 mm). Results. The analysis included 768 evaluable patients with a mean follow-up of 60 months. Recurrence was observed in 478 patients (62%) and progression in 71 (9%). Tumour size was associated with recurrence for tumours sized 21-30, 31-40 and andgt;40 mm (p = 0.03, p andlt; 0.001, p andlt; 0.001, respectively) in the five size group and for tumours sized 16-30 and andgt;30 mm (p = 0.003 and p andlt; 0.001) in the three size group. Other factors affecting recurrence were T1 tumour category, multiplicity and surgery performed by residents (p andlt; 0.001, p andlt; 0.001, p = 0.002, respectively). Considering progression, there was no significant association with tumour size, and T1 category and local recurrence were the only significant risk factors (both p andlt; 0.001). Conclusion. Tumour size andlt;= 15 mm is associated with a lower risk of recurrence but not progression. Dividing tumour size into three size groups gives additional information compared with two size groups with cut-off at 30 mm.

  • 110.
    Jancke, Georg
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Centre.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Residual tumour in the marginal resection after a complete transurethral resection is associated with local recurrence in Ta/T1 urinary bladder cancer2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, ISSN 0036-5599, E-ISSN 1651-2065, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 343-347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. This study investigated the presence of residual tumour in the marginal resection (MR) after a complete transurethral resection (TURB) of Ta/T1 transitional urinary bladder cancer. The association between positive MR and recurrence was analysed. Material and methods. After macroscopically complete TURB, a marginal resection of 7 mm (corresponding to the diameter of the resection loop) was removed around the entire resection area. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were performed to assess the influence of residual disease on recurrence. Results. In all, 94 patients with a median follow-up time of 36 months were included, and residual tumour in the MR was present in 24 (26%). The recurrence rates for all cases, for those with a tumour-positive and a tumour-free MR were 60 (64%), 20 (83%) and 40 (57%), respectively. Local recurrence was found in 14 (58%) of the patients with tumour presence in the MR compared to 13 (19%) of those with a tumour-free margin. A positive MR was significantly associated with overall recurrence (p andlt; 0.001) and local recurrence (p = 0.001). Conclusion. Incomplete transurethral resection of bladder cancer is common, as demonstrated in 26% patients with positive MR. The presence of tumour in the MR may be a risk factor for recurrence, and particularly local recurrence.

  • 111.
    Johansson, E
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Ingemansson, A
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Ryn, A-K
    Hallbook, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery UHL.
    Randomized trial of biofeedback or medical treatment for fecal incontinence in NEUROGASTROENTEROLOGY AND MOTILITY, vol 24, issue , pp 183-1832012In: NEUROGASTROENTEROLOGY AND MOTILITY, Blackwell Publishing , 2012, Vol. 24, p. 183-183Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 112.
    Johansson, J.
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Kalmar County Hospital, Linköping, Sweden, Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, PO Box 281, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hakansson, H.-O.
    Håkansson, H.-O., Department of Surgery, Kalmar County Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Mellblom, L.
    Department of Pathology, Kalmar County Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kempas, A.
    Department of Surgery, Växjö County Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Granath, F.
    Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Johansson, Karl-Erik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Nyren, O.
    Nyrén, O., Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Diagnosing Barrett's oesophagus: Factors related to agreement between endoscopy and histology2007In: European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepathology, ISSN 0954-691X, E-ISSN 1473-5687, Vol. 19, no 10, p. 870-877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIM: Few previous studies have addressed the agreement between endoscopy and histology regarding Barrett's oesophagus in unselected endoscopy patients. Our aim was to quantify this agreement, and to study its relation to clinical and endoscopic characteristics in consecutive patients coming for first-time gastroscopy. METHODS: We invited consecutive patients aged 18-79 years and endoscoped for the first time at endoscopy units exclusively serving defined catchment areas in southeast Sweden. Endoscopic and clinical data were recorded according to a predetermined protocol, and biopsies were taken from the distal oesophagus in all patients. RESULTS: Among 705 patients included, 17% [95% confidence interval (CI): 14-20] had endoscopically visible columnar mucosa above the oesophagogastric junction and 38% (95% CI: 34-42) had columnar mucosa in at least one biopsy irrespective of the endoscopic finding. The overall concordance between endoscopy and histology regarding presence (or absence) of columnar mucosa above the oesophagogastric junction was 74% (95% CI: 71-77) and the agreement beyond chance, as measured by Kappa (?) statistics, was fair, ?=0.38 (95% CI: 0.32-0.45). The agreement between the endoscopic assessment and intestinal metaplasia at biopsy was 86% (95% CI: 83-88), but ? was only 0.31 (95% CI: 0.21-0.41). Our data were consistent with a lower threshold for macroscopic detection of columnar epithelium above the oesophagogastric junction, when risk factors for Barrett's oesophagus were present. CONCLUSION: The agreement between macroscopic and microscopic assessments of Barrett's oesophagus is no more than fair, and partly dependent on the presence of patient characteristics suggestive of pathology in this region. © 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

  • 113.
    Johansson, J.
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden, Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, P.O. Box 281, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hakansson, H.-O.
    Håkansson, H.-O., Department of Surgery, Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden.
    Mellblom, L.
    Department of Pathology, Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden.
    Kempas, A.
    Department of Surgery, Växjö County Hospital, Växjö, Sweden.
    Johansson, Karl-Erik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Granath, F.
    Unit of Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nyren, O.
    Nyrén, O., Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Risk factors for Barrett's oesophagus: A population-based approach2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 148-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Given its often subclinical course, Barrett's oesophagus (BO) hardly lends itself to epidemiologically stringent evaluations. The objective of this study was to investigate risk factors for incident BO diagnosed in a defined population in southeast Sweden while paying particular attention to epidemiological aspects of the study design. Material and methods. Consecutive patients (aged 18-79 years) who were endoscoped with new indications at units exclusively responsible for all gastroscopies in defined catchment area populations were invited to take part in the study. Biopsies were taken above and immediately below the gastro-oesophageal junction, and exposure information was collected through self-administered questionnaires. Endoscopy-room-based cross-sectional data from 604 patients were supplemented with exposure data from 160 population controls. Associations, expressed as odds ratios (ORs), were modelled by means of multivariable logistic regression. Results. In the comparison with population controls, reflux symptoms and smoking indicated a 10.7- and 3.3-fold risk, respectively, for BO (95% confidence interval (CI) 3.5-33.4 and 1.1-9.9, respectively). Body mass was unrelated to risk. In the cross-sectional analysis among endoscopy-room patients, reflux symptoms were associated with an OR of 2.0 (95% CI 0.8-5.0). This association was, however, modified by the subjunctional presence of Helicobacter pylori, although the infection was not in itself significantly connected with risk, a combination of reflux symptoms and H. pylori infection was linked to an almost 5-fold risk (95% CI 1.4-16.5) as compared with the absence of both factors. The BO prevalence increased by 5% per year of age (95% CI 1-9%). Conclusions. Reflux is the predominant risk factor for BO, and proximal gastric colonization of H. pylori seems to amplify this risk. © 2007 Taylor & Francis.

  • 114.
    Johansson, K.
    et al.
    n/a.
    Ahn, Henrik Casimir
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Berg, Sören
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mellblom, L.
    n/a.
    Soderholm, Johan D
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Tholin, M.
    n/a.
    INTESTINAL MICROCIRCULATION, BARRIER FUNCTION AND MORPHOLOGY DURING LOW GRADE IAH/EXPERIMENTAL LAPAROSCOPY IN PIGS2009In: in ACTA CLINICA BELGICA, vol 64, issue 3, 2009, Vol. 64, no 3, p. 261-261Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 115.
    Johansson, K.
    et al.
    n/a.
    Bjorck, M.
    n/a.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    HAVE ROUTINES FOR RECORDING IAP AND AWARENESS IF IAH IMPROVED IN SWEDEN BETWEEN 2006 AND 2008?2009In: in ACTA CLINICA BELGICA, vol 64, no 3, 2009, Vol. 64, no 3, p. 261-261Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 116.
    Johansson, Patrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fohlin, Helena
    Arnesson, Lars-Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Dufmats, Monika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordenskjoeld, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Improved survival for women with stage I breast cancer in south-east Sweden: A comparison between two time periods before and after increased use of adjuvant systemic therapy2009In: ACTA ONCOLOGICA, ISSN 0284-186X, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 504-513Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. Continuous minor steps of improvement in the management of breast cancer have resulted in decreased mortality rates during the last decades. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical outcome of patients with stage I breast cancer diagnosed during two time periods that differed with respect to adjuvant systemic therapy. Material and methods. The studied population consisted of all women 60 years of age, who were diagnosed breast cancer stage I between 1986 and 1999 in south-east Sweden, a total of 1 407 cases. The cohort was divided into two groups based on the management programmes of 1986 and 1992, hereafter referred to as Period 1 and Period 2. Before 1992 the only adjuvant systemic therapy recommended was tamoxifen for hormone receptor positive patients aged 50 years or older. During Period 2 the use of adjuvant treatment was extended to younger patients at high risk, identified by a high tumour S-phase fraction, with either hormonal or cytotoxic treatment. Results. The estimated distant recurrence-free survival rate was significantly higher during Period 2 than during Period 1 (p = 0.008). Subgroup analysis showed that the most evident reduction of distant recurrence risk was among hormone receptor-negative patients (HR = 0.58, 95% CI 0.31-1.09, p = 0.09) and among patients with a high tumour S-phase fraction (HR = 0.53, 0.30-0.93, p = 0.028). The risk reduction between the periods was still statistically significant in multivariate analysis when adjusting for different tumour characteristics and treatment modalities, indicating an influence of other factors not controlled for. One such factor may be the duration of tamoxifen treatment, which likely was more frequently five years during Period 2 than during Period 1. Conclusions. We conclude that the causes of the increase in distant recurrence free survival for women with breast cancer stage I are complex. The results support though that high-risk subgroups of stage I breast cancer patients did benefit from increased use of systemic therapy as a consequence of an updated management programme.

  • 117.
    Juliusson, Gunnar
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Karlsson, Karin
    Skåne University Hospital.
    Lj Lazarevic, Vladimir
    Skåne University Hospital.
    Wahlin, Anders
    Umeå University.
    Brune, Mats
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Antunovic, Petar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery.
    Derolf, Asa
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Hagglund, Hans
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Karbach, Holger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lehmann, Soren
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Mollgard, Lars
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Stockelberg, Dick
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Hallbook, Helene
    Academic Hospital, Uppsala.
    Hoglund, Martin
    Academic Hospital, Uppsala.
    Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Rates and Long-Term Survival in Acute Myeloid and Lymphoblastic Leukemia Real-World Population-Based Data From the Swedish Acute Leukemia Registry 1997-20062011In: Cancer, ISSN 0008-543X, E-ISSN 1097-0142, Vol. 117, no 18, p. 4238-4246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) reduces relapse rates in acute leukemia, but outcome is hampered by toxicity. Population-based data avoid patient selection and may therefore substitute for lack of randomized trials. METHODS: We evaluated alloSCT rates within the Swedish Acute Leukemia Registry, including 3899 adult patients diagnosed from 1997 through 2006 with a coverage of 98% and a median follow-up of 6.2 years. RESULTS: AlloSCT rates and survival decreased rapidly with age andgt;55 years. The 8-year overall survival (OS) was 65% in patients andlt;30 years and 38% in patients andlt;60 years and was similar for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Among 1073 patients andlt;60 years, alloSCT was performed in 42% and 49% of patients with AML and ALL, respectively. Two-thirds of the alloSCTs were performed in first complete remission, and half used unrelated donors, the same in AML and ALL. Regional differences in management and outcome were found: 60% of AML patients andlt;40 years received alloSCT in all parts of Sweden, but two-thirds of AML patients 40-59 years had alloSCT in one region compared with one-third in other regions (Pandlt;.001), with improved 8-year OS among all AML patients in this age cohort (51% vs 30%; P = .005). CONCLUSIONS: More Swedish AML patients received alloSCT, and long-term survival was better than in recently published large international studies, despite our lack of selection bias. There was no correlation between alloSCT rate and survival in ALL. In adult AML patients andlt;60 years of age, a high alloSCT rate was associated with better long-term survival, but there was no such correlation in ALL.

  • 118.
    Juliusson, Gunnar
    et al.
    Lund Stem Cell Centre.
    Mollgard, Lars
    Karolinska University.
    Lehmann, Soren
    Karolinska Institute.
    Tidefelt, Ulf
    Örebro Med Centre Hospital.
    Stockelberg, Dick
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Brune, Mats L
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Lazarevic, Vladimir
    Lund University Hospital.
    Antunovic, Petar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery.
    Wahlin, Anders
    Umeå University Hospital.
    Hoglund, Martin
    Uppsala University Hospital.
    Proportion of Adult AML Patient Population Receiving Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation and Long-Term Outcome: Real World Data From the Swedish National Acute Leukemia Registry. in BLOOD, vol 114, issue 22, pp 903-9032009In: BLOOD, American Society of Hematology , 2009, Vol. 114, no 22, p. 903-903Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 119.
    Kald , Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery .
    Authors reply: Randomized clinical trial of groin hernia repair with titanium-coated lightweight mesh compared with standard polypropylene mesh (Br J Surg 2008; 952009In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 96, no 2, p. 221-221Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 120.
    Kald, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Audit of groin hernia repair1997Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Inguinal hernia repair is the most frequent procedure in general surgery. In the USA approximately 700,000 groin hernioplasties are carried out annually and accounts for almost US$ 3 billion in annual health care revenue. In Sweden approximately 20,000 hernia operations are performed annually and more than 3,000 of them are recurrent hernias. The renewed interest in cost-effectiveness and the introduction of new techniques, among them laparoscopic surgery, underlines the importance of quality assurance in hernia surgery. The aim of this thesis was to establish an audit of hernia surgery in a defined population allowing evaluation of management, riskfactors, outcome and economy.

    The method of control and definition of recurrence was studied. When recurrence was classified as "a weakness in the operated area necessitating a further operation or provision of a truss", the predictive value for postitive (recurrence) and negative (no recurrence) answers in the questionnaire was 38 and 99%, respectively. Thus, by using a questionnaire to identify symptomatic recurrences only a minority of the patients (10%) had to be examined at a follow-up .

    A study of eight Swedish hospitals showed that it is possible to include more than 99% in a medical audit of hernia operations within the frame-work of routine registration. In a three-year follow-up study of these hospitals, the total recurrence rate was 9.6% with an interhospital variation between 3.1 and 20.5%. Postoperative complications, direct hernia and recurrent hernia were factors associated with an increased risk for recurrence. The re-operation rate for recurrence may be an appropriate surrogate endpoint, although this underestimates the real recurrence rate by approximately 40%. An audit scheme based on prospective registration, annual analysis of outcome, regular use of questionnaire and selective follow-up, can identify significant inter hospital differences in outcome as well as variables associated with increased risk for recurrence, thereby raising quality awareness and facilitating the process of improvement.

    The introduction of a new technique, laparoscopic hernia repair, was studied in one of the units participating in the overall prospective registration. Two surgeons performed over 90% of the operations. After an initial period with 6 recurrences in the first 31 patients (recurrence rate 22.6%), the results improved and only one recurrence was diagnosed in the following 395 patients who underwent 360 transabdominal and 98 totally extraperitoneal repairs (recurrence rate 0.2%) with a mean (SD) follow-up of 19 (10) months. In the treatment of recurrent hernias a tenfold difference in recurrence rate was obtained by one unit using the laparoscopic approach with a preperitoneal mesh, compared to the three-year follow-up results from the eight hospitals studied. Laparoscopic hernia repair was cost-effective compared to the Shouldice operation among employed patients, due to faster recovery, provided that hoth direct and indirect costs were included. If laparoscopic herniarepair is considered the totally extraperitoneal operation should be used because of the risk for serious intraabdominal complications with the transabdominal technique.

  • 121.
    Kald, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Fridsten, S.
    Nordin, P.
    Nilsson, Erik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Outcome of repair of bilateral groin hernias: A prospective evaluation of 1487 patients2002In: European Journal of Surgery, ISSN 1102-4151, E-ISSN 1741-9271, Vol. 168, no 3, p. 150-153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To find out whether simultaneous repair of bilateral hernias increases the risk of recurrence compared with unilateral repair. Design: Prospective study. Setting: Swedish hospitals participating in the Swedish Hernia Register (SHR). Interventions: Prospective collection of data from the SHR, 1992-1999 inclusive. The Cox proportional hazard test was used for calculating odds ratio (OR). Main outcome measures: Hernia repairs were followed up in a life table fashion until re-operation for recurrence or death of the patient. Results: 33416 unilateral and 1487 bilateral operations on 2974 groin hernias were found. Direct hernias were more common in the bilateral than in the unilateral group, 1825, 61% compared with 13 336, 40%, (p < 0.0001). A laparoscopic method was used for 1774 (60%) of bilateral and 3285 (10%) unilateral repairs, and 455 bilateral operations (31%) were done as day cases compared with 18 376 (55%) unilateral ones (p < 0.0001 for both comparisons). The cumulative incidence of reoperation at three years for groin hernias after bilateral and unilateral repair was 4.1% (95% confidence interval 3.1% to 5.1%) and 3.4% (95% CI 3.1% to 3.7%, respectively. After adjustment for other risk factors, the OR for reoperation for recurrence after bilateral repair was 1.2 (95% C1 0.9 to 1.5) with unilateral repair as reference. The OR for reoperation after laparoscopic bilateral repair compared with open bilateral repair was 0.9 (95% CI 0.6 to 1.4). Conclusions: Simultaneous repair of bilateral hernias does not increase the risk of reoperation for recurrence and there is no significant difference in the risk of reoperration after bilateral repair using open or laparoscopic techniques.

  • 122.
    Kald, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Juul, Kristian N.
    Coloplast A/S, Clinical Development Global RD, Humlebaek, Denmark.
    Hjortswang, Henrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Quality of life is impaired in patients with peristomal bulging of a sigmoid colostomy2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 627-633Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Peristomal bulging caused by hernia or prolapse is common in patients with a sigmoidostomy. It is not known whether and to what extent peristomal bulging influences various daily activities. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of bulging by using a general and disease-specific health scale (Short Health Scale, SHS) and a stoma-specific quality of life (Stoma-QoL) questionnaire in patients with and without peristomal bulging. Material and methods. Seventy patients with sigmoidostomies were examined to identify peristomal bulging. The mean (SD) age was 71.7 (13.7) years and the patients had had their sigmoidostomies for a mean of 8.1 (7.9) years. Bulging was noticed in 46 patients (66%) while 24 had no bulging. Results. It was found that patients with bulging were at a disadvantage. In the SHS, patients with bulging reported significantly impaired QoL in 3 out of 4 scales regarding symptom load, worry and general sense of well-being. Also, in the Stoma-QoL questionnaire there was a significant difference between patients with and those without bulging. Conclusions. QoL evaluated with a general and disease-specific instrument (SHS) was significantly impaired in patients with bulging around a sigmoidostomy. The Stoma-QoL questionnaire showed a small but statistically significant difference between patients with and those without bulging but the clinical significance is uncertain. Further studies are required to evaluate the role of some of the individual items in the Stoma-QoL questionnaire. © 2008 Taylor & Francis.

  • 123.
    Kald, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Landin, S.
    Masreliez, C.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Mesh repair of parastomal hernias: New aspects of the Onlay technique2001In: Techniques in Coloproctology, ISSN 1123-6337, E-ISSN 1128-045X, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 169-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When a hernia becomes symptomatic with pain, obstruction, or mechanical distortion, need for a repair is likely. In this short note are new aspects on the Onlay mesh repair technique of parastomal hernias presented. The satisfactory results achieved in 5 patients are reported. One recurrence required a further successful repair.

  • 124.
    Kaplan, G.G.
    et al.
    Inflammatory Bowel Disease Clinic, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada, Departments of Medicine and Community Health Sciences, Teaching Research and Wellness Center, University of Calgary, 3280 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, AB T2N 4N1, Canada.
    Jackson, T.
    Department of Surgery, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Sands, B.E.
    Gastrointestinal Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States.
    Frisch, M.
    Department of Epidemiology Research, Division of Epidemiology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Andersson, Rolland E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Korzenik, J.
    Gastrointestinal Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States.
    The risk of developing Crohn's disease after an appendectomy: A meta-analysis2008In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0002-9270, E-ISSN 1572-0241, Vol. 103, no 11, p. 2925-2931Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Studies exploring the association between appendectomy and Crohn's disease (CD) have reported conflicting findings. We conducted a systematic review of the literature and a meta-analysis to assess the risk of CD following an appendectomy and determine the effect of time between appendectomy and CD diagnosis. METHODS: MEDLINE was used to identify observational studies evaluating the association between appendectomy and CD. Authors were contacted when data were insufficient. Relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using a random effects model. Studies that analyzed their data by the interval between the appendectomy and the diagnosis of CD were assessed separately. The Woolf ?2 statistic was used to test for homogeneity. Egger's test was used to evaluate publication bias. RESULTS: The summary RR estimate for CD following an appendectomy was significantly elevated (RR 1.61, 95% CI 1.28-2.02), though heterogeneity was observed (P < 0.0001). The risk was elevated within the first year following the operation (RR 6.69, 95% CI 5.42-8.25). The risk of CD was also significantly increased 1-4 yr following an appendectomy (RR 1.99, 95% CI 1.66- 2.38), however, after 5 yr or more, the risk fell to baseline levels (RR 1.08, 95% CI 0.99-1.18). Publication bias was not detected (P = 0.2). CONCLUSION: The meta-analysis demonstrated a significant risk of CD following an appendectomy, though heterogeneity was observed between the studies. The elevated risk early after an appendectomy, which diminishes thereafter, likely reflects diagnostic problems in patients with incipient CD. © 2008 by Am. Coll. of Gastroenterology.

  • 125.
    Karling, Pontus
    et al.
    Umeå University Hospital.
    Abrahamsson, Hasse
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Dolk, Anders
    Karolinska University.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Hellstrom, Per M
    Karolinska University.
    Knowles, Charles H
    St Bartholomews & Royal London School of Med & Dent,.
    Kjellstrom, Lars
    Ersta Hospital.
    Lindberg, Greger
    Karolinska University.
    Lindfors, Per-Johan
    Ersta Hospital.
    Nyhlin, Henry
    Ersta Hospital.
    Ohlsson, Bodil
    Malmo University Hospital.
    Schmidt, Peter T
    Karolinska University.
    Sjolund, Kristina
    Trelleborg Hospital.
    Sjovall, Henrik
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Function and dysfunction of the colon and anorectum in adults: Working team report of the Swedish Motility Group (SMoG)2009In: SCANDINAVIAN JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY, ISSN 0036-5521, Vol. 44, no 6, p. 646-660Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Symptoms of fecal incontinence and constipation are common in the general population. These can, however, be unreliably reported and are poorly discriminatory for underlying pathophysiology. Furthermore, both symptoms may coexist. In the elderly, fecal impaction always must be excluded. For patients with constipation, colon transit studies, anorectal manometry and defecography may help to identify patients with slow-transit constipation and/or pelvic floor dysfunction. The best documented medical treatments for constipation are the macrogols, lactulose and isphagula. Evolving drugs include lubiprostone, which enhances colonic secretion by activating chloride channels. Surgery is restricted for a highly selected group of patients with severe slow-transit constipation and for those with large rectoceles that demonstrably cause rectal evacuatory impairment. For patients with fecal incontinence that does not resolve on antidiarrheal treatment, functional and structural evaluation with anorectal manometry and endoanal ultrasound or magnetic resonance (MR) of the anal canal may help to guide management. Sacral nerve stimulation is a rapidly evolving alternative when other treatments such as biofeedback and direct sphincter repair have failed. Advances in understanding the pathophysiology as a guide to treatment of patients with constipation and fecal incontinence is a continuing important goal for translational research. The content of this article is a summary of presentations given by the authors at the Fourth Meeting of the Swedish Motility Group, held in Gothenburg in April 2007.

  • 126.
    Karlsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ryberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Dehnoei, Marjan Nosouhi
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Borch, Kurt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery UHL.
    Monstein, Hans-Jürg
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Association between cagA and vacA genotypes and pathogenesis in a Helicobacter pylori infected population from South-eastern Sweden2012In: BMC Microbiology, ISSN 1471-2180, E-ISSN 1471-2180, Vol. 12, no 129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    UNLABELLED: ABSTRACT:

    BACKGROUND: Chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancer have been shown to be related to infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). Two major virulence factors of H. pylori, CagA and VacA, have been associated with these sequelae of the infection. In this study, total DNA was isolated from gastric biopsy specimens to assess the cagA and vacA genotypes.

    RESULTS: Variations in H. pylori cagA EPIYA motifs and the mosaic structure of vacA s/m/i/d regions were analysed in 155 H. pylori-positive gastric biopsies from 71 individuals using PCR and sequencing. Analysis of a possible association between cagA and vacA genotypes and gastroduodenal pathogenesis was made by logistic regression analysis. We found that H. pylori strains with variation in the number of cagA EPIYA motif variants present in the same biopsy correlated with peptic ulcer, while occurrence of two or more EPIYA-C motifs was associated with atrophy in the gastric mucosa. No statistically significant relation between vacA genotypes and gastroduodenal pathogenesis was observed.

    CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study indicate that cagA genotypes may be important determinants in the development of gastroduodenal sequelae of H. pylori infection. In contrast to other studies, vacA genotypes were not related to disease progression or outcome. In order to fully understand the relations between cagA, vacA and gastroduodenal pathogenesis, the mechanisms by which CagA and VacA act and interact need to be further investigated.

  • 127.
    Karlsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ryberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nosouhi Dehnoei, Marjan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Borch, Kurt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Monstein, Hans-Jürg
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Variation in number of cagA EPIYA-C phosphorylation motifs between cultured Helicobacter pylori and biopsy strain DNA2012In: Infection, Genetics and Evolution, ISSN 1567-1348, E-ISSN 1567-7257, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 175-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Helicobacter pylori cagA gene encodes a cytotoxin which is activated by phosphorylation after entering the host epithelial cell. Phosphorylation occurs on specific tyrosine residues within EPIYA motifs in the variable 3'-region. Four different cagA EPIYA motifs have been defined according to the surrounding amino acid sequence; EPIYA-A, -B, -C and -D. Commonly, EPIYA-A and -B are followed by one or more EPIYA-C or -D motif. Due to observed discrepancies in cagA genotypes in cultured H. pylori and the corresponding DNA extracts it has been suggested that genotyping assays preferentially should be performed directly on DNA isolated from biopsy specimens. Gastric biopsies randomly selected from a Swedish cohort were homogenised and used for both direct DNA isolation and for H. pylori specific culturing and subsequent DNA isolation. In 123 of 153 biopsy specimens, the cagA EPIYA genotypes were in agreement with the corresponding cultured H. pylori strains. A higher proportion of mixed cagA EPIYA genotypes were found in the remaining 30 biopsy specimens. Cloning and sequencing of selected cagA EPIYA amplicons revealed variations in number of cagA EPIYA-C motifs in the mixed amplicons. The study demonstrates that culturing of H. pylori introduces a bias in the number of EPIYA-C motif. Consistent with other H. pylori virulence genotyping studies, we suggest that cagA EPIYA analysis should be performed using total DNA isolated from biopsy specimens.

  • 128.
    Karlsson, Matilda
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal Univ, Egypt.
    Three Years Experience of a Novel Biosynthetic Cellulose Dressing in Burns2018In: ADVANCES IN WOUND CARE, ISSN 2162-1918Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The use of porcine xenograft (PX) is widely spread in burn care. However, it may cause immunologic responses and other ethical and cultural considerations in different cultures. Therefore, there is a need for alternatives. The aim of this work is to test a novel biosynthetic cellulose dressing (Epiprotect((R))) on burn patients. Approach: Charts from 38 patients with superficial burns (SBs) (n=18) or excised burns (n=20) that got biosynthetic cellulose dressing instead of PX at a national burn center during 3 years were reviewed. Time to healing, length of stay, and wound infection were extracted from the medical records. Results: SBs hospitalization time was 11 days comparable to PXs reported by others. In the excised group, median duration of hospital stay was 35 days. Time to healing was 28 days. Seven wound infections were confirmed in the superficial group (39%) and 11 infections in the excised group (61%). Patients with superficial wounds reported pain relief on application. Innovation: A dressing (17x21cm) consisting of biosynthetic cellulose replacing PX. Conclusion: Outcome of treatment of SBs or temporary coverage of excised deep burns with biosynthetic cellulose is comparable to treatment with PX. However, biosynthetic cellulose has benefits such as providing pain relief on application and ethical or cultural issues with the material is nonexistent.

  • 129.
    Keita, Asa V.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stertman, Linda
    Uppsala University.
    Sun, Yi-Qian
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery .
    Larhed, Agneta
    Uppsala University.
    Sjoholm, Ingvar
    Uppsala University.
    Söderholm, Johan D
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Effects of chronic stress on the immune response to oral human serum albumin-conjugated starch microparticles in rats2007In: Journal of Neuroimmunology, ISSN 0165-5728, E-ISSN 1872-8421, Vol. 183, no 01-Feb, p. 33-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Uptake of antigens and bacteria over the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) is increased after chronic psychological stress. We investigated whether stress affects the immune response to particle-conjugated antigens taken up via the FAE. Rats were submitted to two 10-day periods of water avoidance stress and orally immunized during these periods. Stressed immunized rats displayed altered cell populations and a Th1-skewed immune response within the lymphoid follicles, together with enhanced delayed-type hypersensitivity. We conclude that chronic stress affects the cell-mediated immune response after oral immunization, which may have implications for the understanding of allergic and autoimmune diseases and development of oral vaccines. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 130.
    Keita, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Barrier function of the Follicle-Associated Epithelium in Stress and Crohn's disease2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The earliest observable signs of Crohn’s disease are microscopic erosions in the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) covering the Peyer’s patches. The FAE, which contains M cells, is specialised in sampling of luminal content and delivery to underlying immune cells. This sampling is crucial for induction of protective immune responses, but it also provides a route of entry for microorganisms into the mucosa. Crohn’s disease is associated with an increased immune response to bacteria, and the disease course can be altered by stress.

    The overall aim of this thesis was to study the effects of stress on the FAE and elucidate the role of FAE in the development of intestinal inflammation, specifically Crohn’s disease.

    Initially, rats were submitted to acute and chronic water avoidance stress to study the effects of psychological stress on the FAE. Stressed rats showed enhanced antigen and bacterial passage, and the passage was higher in FAE than in regular villus epithelium (VE). Further, stress gave rise to ultrastructural changes. Subsequent experiments revealed the stress-induced increase in permeability to be regulated by corticotropin-releasing hormone and mast cells. Furthermore, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) mimicked the stress effects on permeability, and the VIP effects were inhibited by a mast cell stabiliser.

    Human studies of ileal mucosa from patients with non-inflammatory disease and healthy controls showed a higher antigen and bacterial passage in FAE than in VE. In patients with Crohn’s disease, the bacterial passage across the FAE was significantly increased compared to non-inflammatory and inflammatory controls (ulcerative colitis). Furthermore, there was an enhanced uptake of bacteria into dendritic cells, and augmented TNF-α release in Crohn’s disease mucosa.

    Taken together this thesis shows that stress can modulate the uptake of luminal antigens and bacteria via the FAE, through mechanisms involving CRH and mast cells. It further shows that human ileal FAE is functionally distinct from VE, and that Crohn’s disease patients exhibit enhanced FAE permeability compared to inflammatory and non-inflammatory controls.

    This thesis presents novel insights into regulation of the FAE barrier, as well as into the pathophysiology of Crohn’s disease by demonstrating a previously unrecognised defect of the FAE barrier function in ileal Crohn’s disease.

    List of papers
    1. Increased antigen and bacterial uptake in follicle-associated epithelium induced by chronic psychological stress in rats
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Increased antigen and bacterial uptake in follicle-associated epithelium induced by chronic psychological stress in rats
    Show others...
    2004 (English)In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 494-500Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Chronic stress affects the course of inflammatory bowel disease and experimental colitis, and may also initiate intestinal inflammation in rats.

    Aim: To investigate the effects of stress on the M cell containing follicle associated epithelium, specialised in antigen uptake.

    Subjects and methods: Wistar rats were submitted to acute water avoidance stress for one hour or chronic water avoidance stress for 1 hour/day for 10 consecutive days. Permeability to 51Cr-EDTA, horseradish peroxidase, and chemically killed Escherichia coli K-12 was studied in both villus and follicle associated epithelium in Ussing chambers. Segments were further examined by light, electron, and confocal microscopy.

    Results: Acute stress increased horseradish peroxidase flux in villus as well as in follicle associated epithelium. Chronic stress further increased permeability to horseradish peroxidase in villus and follicle associated epithelium, in the latter by almost fourfold. Moreover, chronic stress induced over 30 times increased E coli passage in follicle associated epithelium whereas there was no significant increase in villus epithelium. Bacterial uptake was confirmed by confocal microscopy showing fluorescent bacteria penetrating and passing through the epithelial surface.

    Conclusions: These results show that the barrier function of follicle associated epithelium can be modulated, and that chronic stress enhances the uptake of luminal antigens and bacteria via the follicle associated epithelium. This can increase antigen exposure in Peyer’s patches thereby having implications in the initiation of proinflammatory immune responses within the intestinal mucosa.

    Keywords
    follicle associated epithelium, M cell, Peyer’s patch, inflammatory bowel disease, stress
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14562 (URN)10.1136/gut.2003.028506 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-07-03 Created: 2007-07-03 Last updated: 2009-08-21
    2. Characterization of antigen and bacterial transport in the follicle-associated epithelium of human ileum
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characterization of antigen and bacterial transport in the follicle-associated epithelium of human ileum
    Show others...
    2006 (English)In: Laboratory investigation, ISSN 0023-6837, Vol. 86, no 5, p. 504-516Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The follicle-associated epithelium (FAE), covering Peyer's patches, provides a route of entry for antigens and microorganisms. Animal studies showed enhanced antigen and bacterial uptake in FAE, but no study on barrier function of human FAE has been reported. Our aim was to characterize the normal barrier properties of human FAE. Specimens of normal ileum were taken from 30 patients with noninflammatory colonic disease. Villus epithelium (VE) and FAE were identified and mounted in Ussing chambers. Permeability to 51Cr-EDTA, transmucosal flux of the protein antigen, horseradish peroxidase (HRP), and transport of fluorescent Escherichia coli (chemically killed K-12 and live HB101) were measured. Uptake mechanisms were studied by confocal- and transmission electron microscopy, and by using pharmacological inhibitors in an in vitro coculture model of FAE and in human ileal FAE. HRP flux was substantially higher in FAE than in VE, and was reduced by an amiloride analog. Electron microscopy showed HRP-containing endosomes. Transport of E. coli K-12 and HB101 was also augmented in FAE and was confirmed by confocal microscopy. In vitro coculture experiments and electron microscopy revealed actin-dependent, mainly transcellular, uptake of E. coli K-12 into FAE. 51Cr-EDTA permeability was equal in FAE and VE. Augmented HRP flux and bacterial uptake but similar paracellular permeability, suggest functional variations of transcellular transport in the FAE. We show for the first time that FAE of human ileum is functionally distinct from regular VE, rendering the FAE more prone to bacterial–epithelial cell interactions and delivery of antigens to the mucosal immune system.

    Keywords
    E. coli, horseradish peroxidase, M cell, permeability, Peyer's patches
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14563 (URN)10.1038/labinvest.3700397 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-07-03 Created: 2007-07-03
    3. Increased uptake of non-pathogenic E. coli via the follicle-associated epithelium in ileal Crohn’s disease
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Increased uptake of non-pathogenic E. coli via the follicle-associated epithelium in ileal Crohn’s disease
    Show others...
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14564 (URN)
    Available from: 2007-07-03 Created: 2007-07-03 Last updated: 2010-01-13
    4. Stress-induced barrier disruption of the follicle-associated epithelium involves corticotropin-releasing hormone, vasoactive intestinal peptide and mast cells
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stress-induced barrier disruption of the follicle-associated epithelium involves corticotropin-releasing hormone, vasoactive intestinal peptide and mast cells
    2010 (English)In: Neurogastroenterology and Motility, ISSN 1350-1925, E-ISSN 1365-2982, Vol. 22, no 7, p. 770-e222Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background The follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) is specialized in uptake and sampling of luminal antigens and bacteria. We previously showed that stress increased FAE permeability in rats. An increased uptake may alter antigen exposure in Peyers patches leading to intestinal disease. The aim of this study was to elucidate mechanisms involved in the acute stress-induced increase in FAE permeability. Methods Rats were pretreated i.p. with corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor (CRH-R) antagonist, neurokinin receptor 1 (NK-1R) antagonist, atropine, the mast cell stabilizer doxantrazole (DOX), or NaCl, and submitted to 1-h acute water avoidance stress. FAE tissues were mounted in Ussing chambers for measurements of permeability to 51Cr-EDTA, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and chemically killed Escherichia coli K-12. Further, FAE segments were exposed in vitro in chambers to CRH, substance P (SP), carbachol, and DOX. Neurotransmitter- and receptor distribution was studied by immunohistochemistry. Key Results Stress-induced increases in uptake across FAE of HRP and E. coli were reduced by DOX, CRH-R antagonist and atropine, whereas the NK-1R antagonist decreased 51Cr-EDTA permeability. Exposure to CRH and carbachol increased HRP and E. coli passage, whereas SP increased bacterial and 51Cr-EDTA permeability. DOX counteracted all of these effects. Immunohistochemistry revealed CRH, acetylcholine, SP, and their receptors on mast cells within the Peyers patches, subepithelial dome, and adjacent villi. Conclusions & Inferences Corticotropin-releasing hormone and acetylcholine signaling affect mainly transcellular permeability while SP seems more selective toward the paracellular pathways. Our findings may be of importance for the understanding of the pathogenesis of stress-related intestinal disorders.

    Keywords
    inflammatory bowel disease; neurotrans-mitter; permeability; Peyers patches; Ussing chamber
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14565 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2982.2010.01471.x (DOI)000278525200009 ()
    Available from: 2007-07-03 Created: 2007-07-03 Last updated: 2017-12-13
  • 131.
    Keita, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, A H.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cigehn, M
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ericson, Ann-Charlott
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mckay, D M:
    University of Calgary, Canada .
    Söderholm, Johan D.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide regulates barrier function via mast cells in human intestinal follicle-associated epithelium and during stress in rats2013In: Neurogastroenterology and Motility, ISSN 1350-1925, E-ISSN 1365-2982, Vol. 25, no 6, p. e406-e417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) has been implicated as a regulator of intestinal barrier function and inflammation. Our aim was to elucidate the role of VIP in follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) and villus epithelium (VE) permeability following stress in rats and on human intestinal barrier function. Methods Rats were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with VIP receptor-antagonists (anti-VPACs), a mast cell stabilizer, doxantrazole (DOX), or NaCl, and submitted to acute water avoidance stress. Ileal segments were mounted in Ussing chambers to assess 51chromium-edta (51Cr-edta) and Escherichia (E.) coli (strain K-12) permeability. Rat ileal and human ileal and colonic segments were exposed to VIP +/- anti-VPACs or DOX. An in vitro co-culture model of human FAE was used to study epithelial-VIP effects. VIP/VPACs distribution was assessed by microscopy. Key Results Stress increased 51Cr-edta and E.coli permeability in VE and FAE. The increases were abolished by i.p. injection of DOX or anti-VPACs. Ileal VIP-exposure ex vivo increased bacterial passage and this was reduced by DOX. In human FAE ex vivo, VIP treatment doubled bacterial uptake, which was normalized by DOX or anti-VPACs. No barrier effects were observed in human colonic tissue. VPACs were found in rat and human ileal follicles, with partial mast cell co-localization. The co-culture model confirmed VIPmast cellepithelial interactions in the regulation of barrier function. Conclusions andamp; Inferences Stress affects the FAE barrier by mechanisms involving VIP and VPACs on mucosal mast cells. We suggest a regulatory role for VIP in the control of ileal permeability that may be relevant to bacterialepithelial interactions in stress-related intestinal disorders.

  • 132.
    Keita, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Salim, Sa´ad
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery .
    Jiang, T.
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine Linköping University.
    Yang, P-C
    Intestinal Disease Research Program McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.
    Franzén, Lennart
    Aleris Medilab Täby.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology.
    Magnusson, Karl-Eric
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology .
    Söderholm, Johan D
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Increased uptake of non-pathogenic E. coli via the follicle-associated epithelium in longstanding ileal Crohn's disease2008In: Journal of Pathology, ISSN 0022-3417, E-ISSN 1096-9896, Vol. 215, no 2, p. 135-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Crohn's disease (CD), inflammation is driven by luminal commensal micro-organisms, however, mechanisms of early phases of inflammation need further clarification. The earliest observable lesions of recurrent CD are microscopic erosions at the specialized follicle-associated epithelium (FAE), which lines the Peyer's patches. Therefore, our aim was to investigate the mucosal barrier to non-pathogenic bacteria in FAE of CD. The FAE of macroscopically normal ileum from patients with longstanding CD, ulcerative colitis, and controls was studied in Ussing chambers regarding electrophysiology and permeability to 51Cr-EDTA, horseradish peroxidase, and non-pathogenic E. coli strains. Transepithelial passage routes and uptake into dendritic cells were studied by confocal and electron microscopy. FAE of CD showed increased numbers of adherent bacteria, after E. coli exposure in Ussing chambers, as well as spontaneously in non-exposed archival surgical tissues. Further, we found increased uptake of fluorescent E. coli K-12 and HB101 across FAE of CD, but not in ulcerative colitis. Microscopy demonstrated intercellular and transcellular uptake of E. coli in CD, but only transcellular in controls. FAE exposed to E. coli demonstrated changes in conductance and 51Cr-EDTA permeability, suggesting that bacteria affected the paracellular pathway in CD mucosa. Following bacterial uptake, CD mucosa also demonstrated an increased percentage of E. coli co-localizing with dendritic cells, and augmented tissue release of TNF-α. Our data present novel insights into the pathophysiology of CD by demonstrating a previously unrecognized defect of FAE barrier to bacteria in ileal CD, leading to increased load of commensal bacteria to the inductive sites of mucosal immunity. Copyright © 2008 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 133.
    Keita, Åsa V
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gullberg, Elisabet
    Department of Pharmacy, Uppsala University, BMC, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ericson, Ann-Charlott
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cellbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Salim, Sa’ad Y
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wallon, Conny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kald, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Artursson, Per
    Department of Pharmacy, Uppsala University, BMC, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Söderholm, Johan D
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Characterization of antigen and bacterial transport in the follicle-associated epithelium of human ileum2006In: Laboratory investigation, ISSN 0023-6837, Vol. 86, no 5, p. 504-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The follicle-associated epithelium (FAE), covering Peyer's patches, provides a route of entry for antigens and microorganisms. Animal studies showed enhanced antigen and bacterial uptake in FAE, but no study on barrier function of human FAE has been reported. Our aim was to characterize the normal barrier properties of human FAE. Specimens of normal ileum were taken from 30 patients with noninflammatory colonic disease. Villus epithelium (VE) and FAE were identified and mounted in Ussing chambers. Permeability to 51Cr-EDTA, transmucosal flux of the protein antigen, horseradish peroxidase (HRP), and transport of fluorescent Escherichia coli (chemically killed K-12 and live HB101) were measured. Uptake mechanisms were studied by confocal- and transmission electron microscopy, and by using pharmacological inhibitors in an in vitro coculture model of FAE and in human ileal FAE. HRP flux was substantially higher in FAE than in VE, and was reduced by an amiloride analog. Electron microscopy showed HRP-containing endosomes. Transport of E. coli K-12 and HB101 was also augmented in FAE and was confirmed by confocal microscopy. In vitro coculture experiments and electron microscopy revealed actin-dependent, mainly transcellular, uptake of E. coli K-12 into FAE. 51Cr-EDTA permeability was equal in FAE and VE. Augmented HRP flux and bacterial uptake but similar paracellular permeability, suggest functional variations of transcellular transport in the FAE. We show for the first time that FAE of human ileum is functionally distinct from regular VE, rendering the FAE more prone to bacterial–epithelial cell interactions and delivery of antigens to the mucosal immune system.

  • 134.
    Keita, Åsa V.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderholm, Johan D.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery UHL.
    Barrier dysfunction and bacterial uptake in the follicle-associated epithelium of ileal Crohns disease2012In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, ISSN 0077-8923, E-ISSN 1749-6632, Vol. 1258, no 1, p. 125-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability to control uptake across the mucosa and protect from harmful substances in the gut lumen is defined as intestinal barrier function. The etiology of Crohns disease is unknown, but genetic, environmental, and immunological factors all contribute. The frontline between these factors lies in the intestinal barrier. The most important inflammation-driving environmental factor in Crohns disease is the microbiota, where Esherichia coli strains have been assigned a key role. The first observable signs of Crohns disease are small aphtoid ulcers over Peyers patches and lymphoid follicles. The overlaying follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) is specialized for luminal sampling and is an entry site for antigens and bacteria. We have demonstrated increased E. coli uptake across the FAE in Crohns disease, which may initiate inflammation. This short review will discuss barrier dysfunction and bacteria in the context of ileal Crohns disease, and how the FAE might be the site of initial inflammation.

  • 135.
    Keita, Åsa V.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderholm, Johan D
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    The intestinal barrier and its regulation by neuroimmune factors2010In: Neurogastroenterology and Motility, ISSN 1350-1925, E-ISSN 1365-2982, Vol. 22, no 7, p. 718-733Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The ability to control uptake across the mucosa and protect from damage of harmful substances from the lumen is defined as intestinal barrier function. A disturbed barrier dysfunction has been described in many human diseases and animal models, for example, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and intestinal hypersensitivity. In most diseases and models, alterations are seen both of the paracellular pathway, via the tight junctions, and of the transcellular routes, via different types of endocytosis. Recent studies of pathogenic mechanisms have demonstrated the important role of neuroimmune interaction with the epithelial cells in the regulation of barrier function. Neural impulses from extrinsic vagal and/or sympathetic efferent fibers or intrinsic enteric nerves influence mucosal barrier function via direct effects on epithelial cells or via interaction with immune cells. For example, by nerve-mediated activation by corticotropin-releasing hormone or cholinergic pathways, mucosal mast cells release a range of mediators with effects on transcellular, and/or paracellular permeability (for example, tryptase, TNF-alpha, nerve growth factor, and interleukins). Purpose In this review, we discuss current physiological and pathophysiological aspects of the intestinal barrier and, in particular, its regulation by neuroimmune factors.

  • 136.
    Keita, Åsa V
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderholm, Johan D
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Surgery UHL.
    Ericson, Ann-Charlott
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stress-induced barrier disruption of the follicle-associated epithelium involves corticotropin-releasing hormone, vasoactive intestinal peptide and mast cells2010In: Neurogastroenterology and Motility, ISSN 1350-1925, E-ISSN 1365-2982, Vol. 22, no 7, p. 770-e222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) is specialized in uptake and sampling of luminal antigens and bacteria. We previously showed that stress increased FAE permeability in rats. An increased uptake may alter antigen exposure in Peyers patches leading to intestinal disease. The aim of this study was to elucidate mechanisms involved in the acute stress-induced increase in FAE permeability. Methods Rats were pretreated i.p. with corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor (CRH-R) antagonist, neurokinin receptor 1 (NK-1R) antagonist, atropine, the mast cell stabilizer doxantrazole (DOX), or NaCl, and submitted to 1-h acute water avoidance stress. FAE tissues were mounted in Ussing chambers for measurements of permeability to 51Cr-EDTA, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and chemically killed Escherichia coli K-12. Further, FAE segments were exposed in vitro in chambers to CRH, substance P (SP), carbachol, and DOX. Neurotransmitter- and receptor distribution was studied by immunohistochemistry. Key Results Stress-induced increases in uptake across FAE of HRP and E. coli were reduced by DOX, CRH-R antagonist and atropine, whereas the NK-1R antagonist decreased 51Cr-EDTA permeability. Exposure to CRH and carbachol increased HRP and E. coli passage, whereas SP increased bacterial and 51Cr-EDTA permeability. DOX counteracted all of these effects. Immunohistochemistry revealed CRH, acetylcholine, SP, and their receptors on mast cells within the Peyers patches, subepithelial dome, and adjacent villi. Conclusions & Inferences Corticotropin-releasing hormone and acetylcholine signaling affect mainly transcellular permeability while SP seems more selective toward the paracellular pathways. Our findings may be of importance for the understanding of the pathogenesis of stress-related intestinal disorders.

  • 137.
    Kingsnorth, A
    et al.
    Derriford Hospital, England .
    Gingell-Littlejohn, M
    University of Glasgow, Scotland .
    Nienhuijs, S
    Catharina Hospital, Netherlands .
    Schuele, S
    Klinikum Bremen Mitte, Germany .
    Appel, P
    Herz Jesu Krankenhaus gGmbH, Germany .
    Ziprin, P
    University of London Imperial College of Science Technology and Med, England .
    Eklund, A
    Central Hospital Vasteras, Sweden .
    Miserez, M
    University of Ziekenhuizen Leuven, Belgium .
    Smeds, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Randomized controlled multicenter international clinical trial of self-gripping Parietex (TM) ProGrip (TM) polyester mesh versus lightweight polypropylene mesh in open inguinal hernia repair: interim results at 3 months2012In: Hernia, ISSN 1265-4906, E-ISSN 1248-9204, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 287-294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To compare clinical outcomes following sutureless Parietex (TM) ProGrip (TM) mesh repair to traditional Lichtenstein repair with lightweight polypropylene mesh secured with sutures. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThis is a 3-month interim report of a 1-year multicenter international study. Three hundred and two patients were randomized; 153 were treated with Lichtenstein repair (L group) and 149 with Parietex (TM) ProGrip (TM) precut mesh (P group) with or without fixation. The primary outcome measure was postoperative pain using the visual analog scale (VAS, 0-150 mm); other outcomes were assessed prior to surgery and up to 3 months postoperatively. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanCompared to baseline, pain score was lower in the P group at discharge (-10%) and at 7 days (-13%), while pain increased in the L group at discharge (+39%) and at 7 days (+21%). The difference between groups was significant at both time points (P = 0.007 and P = 0.039, respectively). In the P group, patients without fixation suffered less pain compared to those with single-suture fixation (1 month: -20.9 vs. -6.15%, P = 0.02; 3 months: -24.3 vs. -7.7%, P = 0.01). The infection rate was significantly lower in the P group during the 3-month follow-up (2.0 vs. 7.2%, P = 0.032). Surgery duration was significantly shorter in the P group (32.4 vs. 39.1 min; P andlt; 0.001). No recurrence was observed at 3 months in both groups. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanSurgery duration, early postoperative, pain and infection rates were significantly reduced with self-gripping polyester mesh compared to Lichtenstein repair with polypropylene mesh. The use of fixation increased postoperative pain in the P group. The absence of early recurrence highlights the gripping efficiency effect.

  • 138.
    Koch Frisén, Angelica
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Audit of Groin Hernia Repair II2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Groin hernia repair is one of the most common operations performed in general  surgery, and every fourth man is expected to have a hernia operation during his lifetime. Although 8% of all repairs are performed in women, there is little published literature relating specifically to female anatomy, risk factors and techniques. There is a continuing development of new mesh materials and health care reorganization with specialized surgical clinics changing the availability of basic surgery for surgeons under training.

    In 1997 a thesis was published by Anders Kald, Audit of Groin Hernia Repair, which aimed to establish an audit of hernia surgery, evaluating management, risk factors, outcome and economy. The aim of this thesis was to continue the audit of hernia surgery in Sweden, allowing evaluation of gender issues, a new mesh material, and performance of surgeons under training.

    Our data showed that women have a higher incidence of emergency groin hernia repair than men, and an increased rate of femoral recurrence after an inguinal hernia repair. Time to reoperation suggests that a primary misdiagnosis is common. Detection of femoral hernias could be increased by using preperitoneal techniques, visualizing all three groin hernia locations.

    Patients who received a lightweight mesh at their hernia operation had a shorter convalescence, with faster return to work and normal activity.

    It might be more efficient, but not necessarily better to let a specialized hernia surgeon perform the repair. Surgical trainees had more postoperative complications, but fewer patients had chronic pain at the long-term follow-up.

    List of papers
    1. Prospective evaluation of 6895 groin hernia repairs in women
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prospective evaluation of 6895 groin hernia repairs in women
    Show others...
    2005 (English)In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 92, no 12, p. 1553-1558Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although 8 per cent of groin hernia repairs are performed in women, there is little published literature relating specifically to women. This study compared differences in outcome between women and men after groin hernia repair.

    Methods: Data collected prospectively in the Swedish Hernia Register between 1992 and 2003 were analysed, including 6895 groin hernia repairs in women and 83 753 in men.

    Results: A higher proportion of emergency operations was carried out in women (16.9 per cent) than men (5.0 per cent), leading to bowel resection in 16.6 and 5.6 per cent respectively. During reoperation femoral hernias were found in 41.6 per cent of the women who were diagnosed with a direct or indirect inguinal hernia at the primary operation. The corresponding proportion for men was 4.6 per cent. The hernia repair was not classified as a standard operation (e.g. Shouldice, Lichtenstein, Plug/Mesh, TAPP/TEP) in 38.2 per cent of women and 11.2 per cent of men. Women had a significantly higher risk of reoperation for recurrence than men, and techniques associated with the lowest risk for reoperation in men had the highest risk in women.

    Conclusion: A greater proportion of women than men require emergency groin hernia repair, with consequently higher rates of bowel resection, complications and death. Surgical techniques developed for use in men may put women at unnecessary risk. Copyright © 2005 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-33238 (URN)10.1002/bjs.5156 (DOI)19237 (Local ID)19237 (Archive number)19237 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Better outcome for female groin hernia patients when using preperitoneal techniques
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Better outcome for female groin hernia patients when using preperitoneal techniques
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: It is not known why women have higher frequencies of postoperative complications and reoperation than men after groin hernia repair. This study analyses postoperative results for female hernia in order to identify the appropriate techniques to attain adequate repair and improve operative outcome.

    Method: A registry-based retrospective cohort study analysing data from 10 971 groin hernia repairs on women from the Swedish Hernia Register, 1992-2006.

    Results: Our data showed that the risk for reoperation was significantly reduced (RR 0.6 95% CI 0.4-0.8) by using a preperitoneal repair, and three times as many femoral hernias were diagnosed in elective repairs. Time to reoperation was increased from a median of 1 year to 3.5 years (p=0.002) when using a preperitoneal repair, and time to reoperation for femoral recurrence after an inguinal primary hernia was increased from 1 year to 5.2 years (p=0.025).

    Conclusions: Operative outcome for groin hernia repair in women was improved and risk for recurrence reduced by the utilisation of a preperitoneal approach. More femoral hernias were diagnosed in elective repairs and time to reoperation for femoral recurrence after an inguinal primary hernia was increased. We believe it is necessary to use a preperitoneal technique that visualizes all three locations for groin hernia in order to identify and adequately repair the hernia.

    Keywords
    Female, groin hernia repair, recurrence, outcome, technique, preperitoneal
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-63642 (URN)
    Available from: 2010-12-29 Created: 2010-12-29 Last updated: 2010-12-29
    3. Analysis of outcome of Lichtenstein groin hernia repair by surgeons in training versus a specialized surgeon
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Analysis of outcome of Lichtenstein groin hernia repair by surgeons in training versus a specialized surgeon
    Show others...
    2011 (English)In: Hernia, ISSN 1265-4906, E-ISSN 1248-9204, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 281-288Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Groin hernia repair is a common procedure in general surgery, and is taught to and performed by surgeons early in their training. The aim of this observational study was to compare hernia repair performance and results of surgical trainees with those of a specialized surgeon. The further aim sought to identify what factors may influence short and long-term outcome, and areas for improvement in surgical training.

    Methods: A non-randomized parallel cohort study was designed to compare a specialized surgeon with surgical trainees, performing the Lichtenstein repair in adult males. Two hundred repairs were included, of which 96 were performed by surgical trainees. Patient characteristics, surgical experience, and operative data including duration of procedural parts and surgical complexity were noted at surgery. Postoperative complications, recurrence, chronic pain and residual symptoms were assessed at longterm follow-up after a median of 34.5 months.

    Results: Surgical trainees had longer overall operative time consume, with an unproportionally longer time for mobilising the sac and cord. They perceived exposure and mobilisation as more difficult than the specialist, and also a greater demand on own experience during surgery. The trainee repairs had a higher rate of postoperative complications (14.7% versus 5.0%) but recurrence rate was the same as for specialist repairs. At long-term follow-up, specialist repairs had a higher symptom burden and more chronic pain.

    Conclusions: Comparison of a specialized surgeon to surgical trainees in performance and outcome for inguinal hernia surgery shows it was more efficient, but not necessarily better to let a specialized surgeon perform the repairs. The better long-term outcome for surgical trainees stands in contrast to the prejudice that it is better to have an experienced surgeon to perform standard procedures. It seems likely that targeted training in dissection and mobilisation could decrease level of perceived complexity and shorten operative time consume for surgical trainees. We believe that adequately supervised hernia surgery should remain as a part of the surgical training.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer, 2011
    Keywords
    Groin hernia, Surgical trainees, Lichtenstein, Pain
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-63643 (URN)10.1007/s10029-010-0780-y (DOI)000291603300006 ()
    Available from: 2010-12-29 Created: 2010-12-29 Last updated: 2017-12-11
    4. Randomized clinical trial of groin hernia repair with titanium-coated lightweight mesh compared with standard polypropylene mesh
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Randomized clinical trial of groin hernia repair with titanium-coated lightweight mesh compared with standard polypropylene mesh
    Show others...
    2008 (English)In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 95, no 10, p. 1226-1231Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Groin hernia repair is one of the commonest operations in general surgery. Existing techniques have very low and acceptable recurrence rates, but chronic pain and discomfort remain a problem for many patients. New mesh materials are being developed to increase biocompatibility, and the aim of this study was to compare a new titanium-coated lightweight mesh with a standard polypropylene mesh.

    Methods: A randomized controlled single-centre clinical trial was designed, with the basic principle of one unit, one surgeon, one technique (Lichtenstein under general anaesthesia) and two meshes. Pain before and after surgery, and during convalescence (primary outcomes) was estimated in 317 patients. At 1-year clinical follow-up, recurrence, pain, discomfort and quality of life (secondary outcomes) were evaluated.

    Results: Patients with the lightweight mesh returned to work after 4 days, compared with 6.5 days for the standard mesh (P = 0.040). The lightweight group returned to normal activity after 7 days, versus 10 days for the standard group (P = 0.005). There was no difference in postoperative pain or recurrence at the 1-year follow-up.

    Conclusion: Patients with the lightweight mesh had a shorter convalescence than those with the standard heavyweight mesh. Registration number: ISRCTN36979348 (http://www.controlled-trials.com). Copyright © 2008 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

    Keywords
    Adult Aged Hernia, Inguinal/*surgery Humans Male Middle Aged Pain Measurement Pain, Postoperative/etiology Polypropylenes/*therapeutic use Quality of Life Recurrence *Surgical Mesh Titanium/*administration & dosage Treatment Outcome
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-43370 (URN)10.1002/bjs.6325 (DOI)73656 (Local ID)73656 (Archive number)73656 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13
  • 139.
    Koch Frisén, Angelica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bringman, S.
    Department of Surgery, Södertälje Hospital, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Smeds, Staffan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Kald, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Randomized clinical trial of groin hernia repair with titanium-coated lightweight mesh compared with standard polypropylene mesh2008In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 95, no 10, p. 1226-1231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Groin hernia repair is one of the commonest operations in general surgery. Existing techniques have very low and acceptable recurrence rates, but chronic pain and discomfort remain a problem for many patients. New mesh materials are being developed to increase biocompatibility, and the aim of this study was to compare a new titanium-coated lightweight mesh with a standard polypropylene mesh.

    Methods: A randomized controlled single-centre clinical trial was designed, with the basic principle of one unit, one surgeon, one technique (Lichtenstein under general anaesthesia) and two meshes. Pain before and after surgery, and during convalescence (primary outcomes) was estimated in 317 patients. At 1-year clinical follow-up, recurrence, pain, discomfort and quality of life (secondary outcomes) were evaluated.

    Results: Patients with the lightweight mesh returned to work after 4 days, compared with 6.5 days for the standard mesh (P = 0.040). The lightweight group returned to normal activity after 7 days, versus 10 days for the standard group (P = 0.005). There was no difference in postoperative pain or recurrence at the 1-year follow-up.

    Conclusion: Patients with the lightweight mesh had a shorter convalescence than those with the standard heavyweight mesh. Registration number: ISRCTN36979348 (http://www.controlled-trials.com). Copyright © 2008 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 140.
    Koch Frisén, Angelica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Starck, Joachim
    Department of Surgery, Västervik Hospital, Västervik, Sweden.
    Smeds, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Nyström, PO
    Department of Surgery, Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kald, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Analysis of outcome of Lichtenstein groin hernia repair by surgeons in training versus a specialized surgeon2011In: Hernia, ISSN 1265-4906, E-ISSN 1248-9204, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 281-288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Groin hernia repair is a common procedure in general surgery, and is taught to and performed by surgeons early in their training. The aim of this observational study was to compare hernia repair performance and results of surgical trainees with those of a specialized surgeon. The further aim sought to identify what factors may influence short and long-term outcome, and areas for improvement in surgical training.

    Methods: A non-randomized parallel cohort study was designed to compare a specialized surgeon with surgical trainees, performing the Lichtenstein repair in adult males. Two hundred repairs were included, of which 96 were performed by surgical trainees. Patient characteristics, surgical experience, and operative data including duration of procedural parts and surgical complexity were noted at surgery. Postoperative complications, recurrence, chronic pain and residual symptoms were assessed at longterm follow-up after a median of 34.5 months.

    Results: Surgical trainees had longer overall operative time consume, with an unproportionally longer time for mobilising the sac and cord. They perceived exposure and mobilisation as more difficult than the specialist, and also a greater demand on own experience during surgery. The trainee repairs had a higher rate of postoperative complications (14.7% versus 5.0%) but recurrence rate was the same as for specialist repairs. At long-term follow-up, specialist repairs had a higher symptom burden and more chronic pain.

    Conclusions: Comparison of a specialized surgeon to surgical trainees in performance and outcome for inguinal hernia surgery shows it was more efficient, but not necessarily better to let a specialized surgeon perform the repairs. The better long-term outcome for surgical trainees stands in contrast to the prejudice that it is better to have an experienced surgeon to perform standard procedures. It seems likely that targeted training in dissection and mobilisation could decrease level of perceived complexity and shorten operative time consume for surgical trainees. We believe that adequately supervised hernia surgery should remain as a part of the surgical training.

  • 141.
    Kressner, Marit
    et al.
    Ersta Hospital.
    Bohe, Mans
    Malmo University Hospital.
    Cedermark, Bjorn
    Karolinska Institute.
    Dahlberg, Michael
    Sunderby Hospital.
    Damber, Lena
    Umea University Hospital.
    Lindmark, Gudrun
    Lund University.
    Ojerskog, Bjorn
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Johansson, Robert
    Umea University Hospital.
    Pahlman, Lars
    University Uppsala Hospital.
    The Impact of Hospital Volume on Surgical Outcome in Patients with Rectal Cancer2009In: DISEASES OF THE COLON and RECTUM, ISSN 0012-3706, Vol. 52, no 9, p. 1542-1549Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: This study was designed to investigate, in a population-based setting, the surgical outcome in patients with rectal cancer according to the hospital volume. METHODS: Since 1995 all patients with rectal cancer have been registered in the Swedish Rectal Cancer Registry. Hospitals were classified, according to number treated per year, as low-volume, intermediate-volume, or high-volume hospitals (andlt; 11, 11-25, or andgt;25 procedures per year). Postoperative mortality, reoperation rate within 30 days, local recurrence rate, and overall five-year survival were studied. For postoperative morbidity and mortality the whole cohort from 1995 to 2003 (n = 10,425) was used. For cancer-related outcome only, those with five-year follow-ups, from 1995 to 1998, were used (n = 4,355). RESULTS: In this registry setting the postoperative mortality rate was 3.6% in low-volume hospitals, and 2.2% in intermediate- volume and high-volume hospitals (P = 0.002). The reoperation rate was 10%, with no differences according to volume. The overall local recurrence rates were 9.4%, 9.3%, and 7.5%, respectively (P = 0.06). Significant difference was found among the nonirradiated patients (P = 0.004), but not among the irradiated patients (P = 0.45). No differences were found according to volume in the absolute five-year survival. CONCLUSION: Postoperative mortality and local recurrence in nonirradiated patients were lower in high-volume hospitals. No difference was seen between volumes in reoperation rates, overall local recurrence, or absolute five-year survival.

  • 142.
    Kullman, Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Letter: Covered biliary metal stent: which are worse-the concepts, current models, or insertion methods? Response2011In: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, ISSN 0016-5107, E-ISSN 1097-6779, Vol. 73, no 6, p. 1331-1331Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 143.
    Kullman, Eric
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Frozanpor, Farshad
    Söder Sjukhuset, Stockholm.
    Söderlund, Claes
    Söder Sjukhuset, Stockholm.
    Linder, Stefan
    Söder Sjukhuset, Stockholm.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Lindhoff-Larsson, Anna
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Toth, Ervin
    University Hospital MAS .
    Lindell, Gert
    University Hospital MAS.
    Jonas, Eduard
    Danderyd Hospital.
    Freedman, Jacob
    Danderyd Hospital.
    Ljungman, Martin
    Central Hospital Västerås.
    Rudberg, Claes
    Central Hospital Västerås.
    Ohlin, Bo
    Blekinge Hospital.
    Zacharias, Rebecka
    St Goran Hospital.
    Leijonmarck, Carl-Eric
    St Goran Hospital.
    Teder, Kalev
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Ringman, Anders
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Persson, Gunnar
    Ryhov Hospital.
    Gözen, Mehmet
    Västervik Hospital.
    Eriksson, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Statistics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Covered versus uncovered self-expandable nitinol stents in the palliative treatment of malignant distal biliary obstruction: results from a randomized, multicenter study2010In: GASTROINTESTINAL ENDOSCOPY, ISSN 0016-5107, Vol. 72, no 5, p. 915-923Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Covered biliary metal stents have been developed to prevent tumor ingrowth. Previous comparative studies are limited and often include few patients. Objective: To compare differences in stent patency, patient survival, and complication rates between covered and uncovered nitinol stents in patients with malignant biliary obstruction. Design: Randomized, multicenter trial conducted between January 2006 and October 2008. Setting: Ten sites serving a total catchment area of approximately 2.8 million inhabitants. Patients: A total of 400 patients with unresectable distal malignant biliary obstruction. Interventions: ERCP with insertion of covered or uncovered metal stent. Follow-up conducted monthly for symptoms indicating stent obstruction. Main Outcome Measurements: Time to stent failure, survival time, and complication rate. Results: The patient survival times were 116 days (interquartile range 242 days) and 174 days (interquartile range 284 days) in the covered and uncovered stent groups, respectively (P = .320). The first quartile stent patency time was 154 days in the covered stent group and 199 days in the uncovered stent group (P = .326). There was no difference in the incidence of pancreatitis or cholecystitis between the 2 groups. Stent migration occurred in 6 patients (3%) in the covered group and in no patients in the uncovered group (P = .030). Limitations: Randomization was not blinded. Conclusions: There were no significant differences in stent patency time, patient survival time, or complication rates between covered and uncovered nitinol metal stents in the palliative treatment of malignant distal biliary obstruction. However, covered stents migrated significantly more often compared with uncovered stents, and tumor ingrowth was more frequent in uncovered stents.

  • 144.
    Källström, Reidar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Construction, Validation and Application of a Virtual Reality Simulator for the Training of Transurethral Resection of the Prostate2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The fundamental of surgical training is the traditional apprenticeship method introduced by William Halsted which has been used for the last 100 years. It is based on learning in the operating room (OR) where the resident is guided by an experienced surgeon and gradually and methodically exposed to surgery. The continuous development of surgical methods together with the growing awareness of medical errors and ethical considerations have made the Halsted method outdated and there is an obvious need to be able to learn the skills of surgery without risking patient safety. New methods such as laparoscopy and endoscopy demand specific skills and abilities that may not be met by everyone. At the same time, the physical limitations of these new methods have made it possible to construct virtual reality (VR) simulators to practise and learn the skills necessary.

    This study is about the construction and evaluation of a VR-simulator for the training of transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). It also concerns the specific abilities needed to become a good surgeon.

    A simulator for training TURP was developed after a face validity study where 17 experienced urologists gave their opinion of the specific content necessary for the training of this procedure. After a content validity study by nine experienced urologists and application of necessary improvements, a group of 11 medical students and nine experienced urologists performed a construct validity test where the urologists showed significantly higher levels of both skill and effectiveness compared to the inexperienced students when performing a simulated TURP procedure. The students showed a positive learning curve, but did not reach the levels of the urologists. The results of the experienced urologists were used as the minimal criterion level when 24 urology residents practised the procedure. Training took place while on a course on benign enlargement of the prostate and its treatment options, with emphasis on the “gold standard” treatment – TURP. During the course they performed three guided and video-taped TURP-procedures each on selected patients. Between two of the procedures they performed criterion-based training in the simulator. This VR-to-OR study showed improvement in operative skills with the same patient outcome as in the normal clinical situation. It also showed that simulator training improved their skills even more. During their time on the course their personality traits (TCI) and cognitive abilities (Rey complex figure and recognition trial, tower of London, WAIS-III) were tested. The results showed that a better learning curve in the OR was associated with a better simulator learning curve and a good visuospatial memory. The associated personality traits were high levels of goal directedness, impulse control, responsibility, anticipation of harmful events and a balanced attachment style.

    In conclusion, we have demonstrated that it was technically possible to construct a useful simulator for the training of TURP (PelvicVision®) which may now be considered clinically validated for this purpose. Novice training and performance in the simulator improves the learning curve and predicts the resident’s performance in the OR. The results support the implementation of validated simulation technology in a criterion-based training curriculum for residents. Furthermore, the results showed preliminary data on personality traits and visuospatial abilities that are important for learning a complex surgical procedure.

    List of papers
    1. Use of a virtual reality, real-time, simulation model for the training of urologists in transurethral resection of the prostate
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Use of a virtual reality, real-time, simulation model for the training of urologists in transurethral resection of the prostate
    2005 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, ISSN 0036-5599, E-ISSN 1651-2065, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 313-320Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. There is a growing need to develop surgical skills outside the operating theatre. In this study we describe the development of a virtual reality training system for practising transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). Material and methods. A face validity study was performed using a questionnaire sent to 28 experienced urologists to find out the ideal characteristics of a simulated TURP. Based on the comments a simulator was constructed and a content validity study was then performed in which nine experienced urologists tested the simulator and answered a second questionnaire. After corrections to the simulator, a basic construct validity test was performed. Results. We have developed a computer-based simulator based on the requirements listed by 17 urologists. It consists of a modified resectoscope connected to a haptic device and supported by a frame. The software provides a virtual view of the prostatic lumen and resectoscope tip, a haptic rendering that generates force feedback and a simulation module that computes the information from the haptic device, resectoscope fluid tap and handle and the foot pedals. The software also simulates bleeding, absorption of irrigation fluid and pressure gradients. Variables are measured and presented in a result file after each "operation". Nine experienced urologists performed a content validity study and changes were made accordingly. A basic construct validity test performed by seven inexperienced students showed a significant improvement in performance after they each performed six simulated procedures. Conclusion. We have developed a simulator that may be used to practise TURP and which meets most of the demands raised in a face validity study. A basic construct validity test showed improved performance after repeated practice in the simulated environment.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-30805 (URN)10.1080/00365590510031246 (DOI)16432 (Local ID)16432 (Archive number)16432 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    2. Construct validity of a full procedure, virtual reality, real-time, simulation model for training in transurethral resection of the prostate.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Construct validity of a full procedure, virtual reality, real-time, simulation model for training in transurethral resection of the prostate.
    2010 (English)In: Journal of endourology / Endourological Society, ISSN 1557-900X, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 109-15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To examine the content and construct validity of a full procedure transurethral prostate resection simulation model (PelvicVision). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The full procedure simulator consisted of a modified resectoscope connected to a robotic arm with haptic feedback, foot pedals, and a standard desktop computer. The simulation calculated the flow of irrigation fluid, the amount of bleeding, the corresponding blood fog, the resectoscope movements, resection volumes, use of current, and blood loss. Eleven medical students and nine clinically experienced urologists filled in questionnaires regarding previous experiences, performance evaluation, and their opinion of the usefulness of the simulator after performing six (students) and three (urologists) full procedures with different levels of difficulty. Their performance was evaluated using a checklist. RESULTS: The urologists finished the procedures in half the time as the students with the same resection volume and blood loss but with fewer serious perforations of the prostatic capsule and/or sphincter area and less irrigation fluid uptake. The resectoscope tip movement was longer and the irrigation fluid uptake per resected volume was about 5 times higher for the students. The students showed a positive learning curve in most variables. CONCLUSION: There is proof of construct validity and good content validation for this full procedure simulator for training in transurethral resection of the prostate. The simulator could be used in the early training of urology residents without risk of negative outcome.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-53081 (URN)10.1089/end.2009.0114 (DOI)19961333 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2010-01-15 Created: 2010-01-15 Last updated: 2010-03-17
    3. Impact of Virtual Reality-Simulated Training on Urology Residents Performance of Transurethral Resection of the Prostate
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of Virtual Reality-Simulated Training on Urology Residents Performance of Transurethral Resection of the Prostate
    2010 (English)In: Journal of endourology, ISSN 0892-7790, E-ISSN 1557-900X, Vol. 24, no 9, p. 1521-5128Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There are today a number of VR-simulators for practicing the TURP procedure, but few data on the effect of training on surgical performance.

    Objective: To test if practicing the TURP procedure in a VR-simulator increases the skills and dexterity of urology residents when performing the procedure on patients. Design, setting and participants Twenty-four urology residents attended a five-day course on diagnosis and treatment of benign prostatic enlargement. Each of the residents did three video-recorded TURP procedures on patients.

    Intervention: Between two of the procedures the residents underwent criterion-based practice in a TURP simulator (PelvicVision).

    Measurements: The TURP procedure was peroperatively evaluated using objective structured assessment of technical skills (OSATS). The video-recordings of the procedures were analyzed on a minute to minute basis regarding the main action during that minute, if that action was successful, and errors.

    Results and Limitations: The participating residents rated patient safety as high, they believed they learned most from the real operations, and they gained knowledge about both the procedure and the instrumentation used. The mean practice time in the simulator was 198 minutes before reaching the criterion level. Comparison of the first and last TURP procedures showed an increase in autonomous operation time and in successful actions and a decrease in hemostasis time without increased blood loss. The proportion of residents believed able to perform a simple TURP procedure increased from 10% to about 75%. OSATSscores and self-evaluations were significantly improved. The scores increased significantly more with than without simulator practice. The patient follow-up showed no increased risks or poorer results regarding micturition.

    Conclusions: Practice in a simulator based environment improves the skills and dexterity of urology residents when performing the procedure on patients, without increased risks or poorer results for the patients.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., 2010
    Keywords
    Prostate, transurethral resection of prostate, computer simulation, education, medical, task performance and analysis
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-54462 (URN)10.1089/end.2009.0667 (DOI)000281864700026 ()
    Available from: 2010-03-17 Created: 2010-03-17 Last updated: 2017-12-12
    4. Simulator performance, psychometrics and personality testing guiding the choice of clinical discipline
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Simulator performance, psychometrics and personality testing guiding the choice of clinical discipline
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The complexity of surgical training has increased and surgery put high demands on personal abilities that cannot be met by all even after training. Selection of personnel is critical to many professions, including surgery, but the selection procedure of surgical apprenticeship is not well developed. It would be of value to get an early assessment of important personal features like the ability to learn complex procedures. Further, individuals learn in different ways and the personality may influence this ability. Other important aspects are visuospatial abilities, working memory and executive functioning. These variables are measured in the present study by: learning curves in a TURP VR-simulator, scores from the personality test TCI-R, Rey complex figure and recognition trial, Tower of London (dx) and tests from WAISIII.

    Twenty-four residents in urology performed three real TUR-P procedures and their performances were analyzed with OSATS and video-recordings. The learning curves from the OR were compared with the results from the simulation practice, personality tests and psychometrics using multiple linear regression. The findings from personality and psychometric data were also compared with the general population to see if there are any indications of a “surgical personality”. The urology residents in this sample have a welldeveloped character (effective, mature, reliable, goal-oriented, empathetic, tolerant, supportive, cooperative) and with high reward dependence (tender-hearted, dedicated, sociable) together with better executive planning abilities and better verbal working memory than normal.

    The connections between the operation learning curves and the variables above indicate that a better learning score is associated with a good learning score in a simulated environment, goal-directedness, a high level of impulse control, anticipation of harmful events and responsibility, a balanced attachment style and a good visual spatial memory.

    Keywords
    Surgical training, simulator, transurethral resection of prostate, psychometric tests, personality
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-54464 (URN)
    Available from: 2010-03-17 Created: 2010-03-17 Last updated: 2010-03-17Bibliographically approved
  • 145.
    Källström, Reidar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Hjertberg, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Svanvik, Joar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Construct validity of a full procedure, virtual reality, real-time, simulation model for training in transurethral resection of the prostate.2010In: Journal of endourology / Endourological Society, ISSN 1557-900X, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 109-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To examine the content and construct validity of a full procedure transurethral prostate resection simulation model (PelvicVision). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The full procedure simulator consisted of a modified resectoscope connected to a robotic arm with haptic feedback, foot pedals, and a standard desktop computer. The simulation calculated the flow of irrigation fluid, the amount of bleeding, the corresponding blood fog, the resectoscope movements, resection volumes, use of current, and blood loss. Eleven medical students and nine clinically experienced urologists filled in questionnaires regarding previous experiences, performance evaluation, and their opinion of the usefulness of the simulator after performing six (students) and three (urologists) full procedures with different levels of difficulty. Their performance was evaluated using a checklist. RESULTS: The urologists finished the procedures in half the time as the students with the same resection volume and blood loss but with fewer serious perforations of the prostatic capsule and/or sphincter area and less irrigation fluid uptake. The resectoscope tip movement was longer and the irrigation fluid uptake per resected volume was about 5 times higher for the students. The students showed a positive learning curve in most variables. CONCLUSION: There is proof of construct validity and good content validation for this full procedure simulator for training in transurethral resection of the prostate. The simulator could be used in the early training of urology residents without risk of negative outcome.

  • 146.
    Källström, Reidar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Hjertberg, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Svanvik, Joar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Impact of Virtual Reality-Simulated Training on Urology Residents Performance of Transurethral Resection of the Prostate2010In: Journal of endourology, ISSN 0892-7790, E-ISSN 1557-900X, Vol. 24, no 9, p. 1521-5128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There are today a number of VR-simulators for practicing the TURP procedure, but few data on the effect of training on surgical performance.

    Objective: To test if practicing the TURP procedure in a VR-simulator increases the skills and dexterity of urology residents when performing the procedure on patients. Design, setting and participants Twenty-four urology residents attended a five-day course on diagnosis and treatment of benign prostatic enlargement. Each of the residents did three video-recorded TURP procedures on patients.

    Intervention: Between two of the procedures the residents underwent criterion-based practice in a TURP simulator (PelvicVision).

    Measurements: The TURP procedure was peroperatively evaluated using objective structured assessment of technical skills (OSATS). The video-recordings of the procedures were analyzed on a minute to minute basis regarding the main action during that minute, if that action was successful, and errors.

    Results and Limitations: The participating residents rated patient safety as high, they believed they learned most from the real operations, and they gained knowledge about both the procedure and the instrumentation used. The mean practice time in the simulator was 198 minutes before reaching the criterion level. Comparison of the first and last TURP procedures showed an increase in autonomous operation time and in successful actions and a decrease in hemostasis time without increased blood loss. The proportion of residents believed able to perform a simple TURP procedure increased from 10% to about 75%. OSATSscores and self-evaluations were significantly improved. The scores increased significantly more with than without simulator practice. The patient follow-up showed no increased risks or poorer results regarding micturition.

    Conclusions: Practice in a simulator based environment improves the skills and dexterity of urology residents when performing the procedure on patients, without increased risks or poorer results for the patients.

  • 147.
    Källström, Reidar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Rousseau, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Bengtsson, Andreas
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Hjertberg, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Svanvik, Joar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Simulator performance, psychometrics and personality testing guiding the choice of clinical disciplineManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The complexity of surgical training has increased and surgery put high demands on personal abilities that cannot be met by all even after training. Selection of personnel is critical to many professions, including surgery, but the selection procedure of surgical apprenticeship is not well developed. It would be of value to get an early assessment of important personal features like the ability to learn complex procedures. Further, individuals learn in different ways and the personality may influence this ability. Other important aspects are visuospatial abilities, working memory and executive functioning. These variables are measured in the present study by: learning curves in a TURP VR-simulator, scores from the personality test TCI-R, Rey complex figure and recognition trial, Tower of London (dx) and tests from WAISIII.

    Twenty-four residents in urology performed three real TUR-P procedures and their performances were analyzed with OSATS and video-recordings. The learning curves from the OR were compared with the results from the simulation practice, personality tests and psychometrics using multiple linear regression. The findings from personality and psychometric data were also compared with the general population to see if there are any indications of a “surgical personality”. The urology residents in this sample have a welldeveloped character (effective, mature, reliable, goal-oriented, empathetic, tolerant, supportive, cooperative) and with high reward dependence (tender-hearted, dedicated, sociable) together with better executive planning abilities and better verbal working memory than normal.

    The connections between the operation learning curves and the variables above indicate that a better learning score is associated with a good learning score in a simulated environment, goal-directedness, a high level of impulse control, anticipation of harmful events and responsibility, a balanced attachment style and a good visual spatial memory.

  • 148.
    Lampi, Maria
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Disaster Medicine and Traumatology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Disaster Medicine and Traumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vikström, Tore
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Disaster Medicine and Traumatology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jonson, Carl-Oscar
    Region Östergötland, Center for Disaster Medicine and Traumatology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Disaster Medicine and Traumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Triage performance of Swedish physicians using the ATLS algorithm in a simulated mass casualty incident: a prospective cross-sectional survey2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 21, no 90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In a mass casualty situation, medical personnel must rapidly assess and prioritize patients for treatment and transport. Triage is an important tool for medical management in disaster situations. Lack of common international and Swedish triage guidelines could lead to confusion. Attending the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) provider course is becoming compulsory in the northern part of Europe. The aim of the ATLS guidelines is provision of effective management of single critically injured patients, not mass casualties incidents. However, the use of the ABCDE algorithms from ATLS, has been proposed to be valuable, even in a disaster environment. The objective for this study was to determine whether the mnemonic ABCDE as instructed in the ATLS provider course, affects the ability of Swedish physician's to correctly triage patients in a simulated mass casualty incident.Methods: The study group included 169 ATLS provider students from 10 courses and course sites in Sweden; 153 students filled in an anonymous test just before the course and just after the course. The tests contained 3 questions based on overall priority. The assignment was to triage 15 hypothetical patients who had been involved in a bus crash. Triage was performed according to the ABCDE algorithm. In the triage, the ATLS students used a colour-coded algorithm with red for priority 1, yellow for priority 2, green for priority 3 and black for dead. The students were instructed to identify and prioritize 3 of the most critically injured patients, who should be the first to leave the scene. The same test was used before and after the course.Results: The triage section of the test was completed by 142 of the 169 participants both before and after the course. The results indicate that there was no significant difference in triage knowledge among Swedish physicians who attended the ATLS provider course. The results also showed that Swedish physicians have little experience of real mass casualty incidents and exercises.Conclusion: The mnemonic ABCDE doesn't significantly affect the ability of triage among Swedish physicians. Actions to increase Swedish physicians' knowledge of triage, within the ATLS context or separately, are warranted.

  • 149.
    Landerholm, Kalle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Clinical and immunohistochemical studies of small bowel carcinoid tumours2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Small bowel carcinoid tumours arising from enterochromaffin cells in the jejunum and ileum are neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) characterized by secretion of serotonin, tachykinins and other bioactive substances. These substances may lead to the typical carcinoid syndrome as well as pronounced fibrosis locally and in the heart. Although the most frequent histological subtype of malignancy in the small bowel, small bowel carcinoids are rare and therefore difficult to study. We found that previous studies either described selected patients at referral centres, or were based on limited data from large registries. The main objective of this thesis was to investigate small bowel carcinoid patients from a geographically defined cohort with no selection bias.

    PAPERS I AND II

    The aims of papers I and II were to investigate the incidence, histopathological characteristics, stage atdiagnosis, symptomatology, surgical treatment, prognostic factors and survival of small bowel carcinoid.All patients resident in Jönköping County when diagnosed with small bowel carcinoid between 1960 and2005 were eligible for inclusion. After thorough review of medical records and reexamination of availabletumour specimens, 145 patients were included.

    A higher incidence of small bowel carcinoid than previously described was found: 1.12 per 100,000 persons and year. The incidence increased during the study period. Symptoms were most often uncharacteristic: the carcinoid syndrome was seen in only 13% of symptomatic patients. Many small bowel carcinoid tumours presented as surgical emergencies without preceding symptoms, often as intestinal obstruction (35%) caused by mesenteric fibrosis. The majority of small bowel carcinoid tumours had metastasized to the mesentery or the liver at diagnosis. Disease-specific survival after 5 years was 75.0% and after 10 years 63.5%. Independent prognostic factors for worse disease-specific survival were higher age at diagnosis, more advanced disease stage at diagnosis and incomplete tumour resection. Completeness of resection was of particular importance in patients with regional metastases.

    PAPER III

    There are previous case reports describing small bowel carcinoid in two first-degree relatives, but it is unknown whether this represents hereditary disease forms or chance. Paper III was the first article to describe metastasizing ileal carcinoid tumours in three consecutive generations − strongly suggestive of a hereditary disease form.

    PAPER IV

    We recently demonstrated expression of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) in several types of NETs, including small bowel carcinoid. The aim of paper IV was to investigate whether content of CART in small bowel carcinoid tumours is associated with tumour characteristics, symptoms and survival. CART expression was examined in all available tumour specimens from the patients in Papers I and II − 97 patients were included.

    Presence of CART IR tumour cells was associated with histological grade, but not with stage or age. CART expression in small bowel carcinoid tumours was not associated with clinical symptoms. Increasing levels of CART IR in small bowel carcinoid tumour cells was associated with worse disease-specific survival. CART was also found to increase cell viability in an enteroendocrine cell line in vitro. The results suggest that CART could be used as a prognostic biomarker and that CART is a potential anti-tumour treatment target.

    List of papers
    1. Epidemiology of Small Bowel Carcinoids in a Defined Population
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Epidemiology of Small Bowel Carcinoids in a Defined Population
    2010 (English)In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 34, no 7, p. 1500-1505Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This retrospective study describes the epidemiology of small bowel carcinoids in a geographically defined population, with no other selection bias.

    Methods: All patients (n = 145) resident in Jönkoping County when diagnosed with carcinoid in the jejunum or ileum from 1960 to 2005 were included. Medical records were reviewed in detail, and tumor specimens were histopathologically and immunohistochemically reexamined when required (n = 44).

    Results: The annual age-adjusted incidence of small bowel carcinoids was 1.12 (95% confidence interval 0.95-1.31) per 100,000 persons. Median age at diagnosis was 69 years. The predominating presenting symptom was uncharacteristic abdominal pain (50%), whereas a smaller number suffered from typical flushes (13%). Surprisingly, 14% presented with overt gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Most of the patients diagnosed based on their symptoms had metastases at diagnosis (44% regional, 40% distant). Metastasized tumors by definition belong to World Health Organization (WHO) histopathologic group 2; and when reexamined, most (83%) of the localized tumors were also found to belong to WHO group 2.

    Conclusions: In comparison to previous reports, a higher age-adjusted incidence of small bowel carcinoids was observed, and the patients were clearly older at the time of diagnosis. Even with metastatic disease, the presenting symptoms were usually uncharacteristic, and the carcinoid syndrome was infrequently seen.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer Science Business Media, 2010
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-58284 (URN)10.1007/s00268-010-0519-z (DOI)000279103400016 ()
    Available from: 2010-08-10 Created: 2010-08-09 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
    2. Survival and prognostic factors in patients with small bowel carcinoid tumour
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Survival and prognostic factors in patients with small bowel carcinoid tumour
    Show others...
    2011 (English)In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 98, no 11, p. 1617-1624Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies of small bowel carcinoid tumours usually presented overall or relative survival. This study, in addition, evaluated disease-specific survival in a cohort of patients in a geographically defined population.

    METHODS: Patients diagnosed with carcinoid of the jejunum or ileum in Jönköping County between 1960 and 2005 were eligible for inclusion. Available tumour specimens were re-examined to confirm the diagnosis. Medical records and pathology reports were reviewed in detail.

    RESULTS: A total of 145 patients were included in the study. One hundred and thirty-five patients underwent surgery in connection with the diagnosis. Resection was considered complete (R0) in 74 patients (54·8 per cent). Only two localized tumours recurred, whereas no patient with distant metastases was cured. Patients with regional metastases who underwent R0 resection had a better survival than patients with incomplete resection (P = 0·005), and a majority of patients remained recurrence-free. Median overall survival was 7·2 years and median disease-specific survival 12·3 years. In multivariable analysis, age 61-74 years (hazard ratio (HR) 3·78, 95 per cent confidence interval 1·86 to 7·68), age 75 years or more (HR 3·96, 1·79 to 8·74), distant metastases (HR 14·44, 1·59 to 131·36) and incomplete tumour resection (HR 2·71, 1·11 to 6·61) were associated with worse disease-specific survival. Later time period of diagnosis (HR 0·45, 0·24 to 0·84) was associated with better disease-specific survival.

    CONCLUSION: Age, disease stage and complete resection were identified as independent prognostic factors for survival in patients with small bowel carcinoid tumours. The importance of achieving R0 resection is therefore emphasized.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell, 2011
    National Category
    Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-71884 (URN)10.1002/bjs.7649 (DOI)000296193400019 ()21858790 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2011-11-09 Created: 2011-11-09 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
    3. First Report on Metastasizing Small Bowel Carcinoids in First-Degree Relatives in Three Generations
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>First Report on Metastasizing Small Bowel Carcinoids in First-Degree Relatives in Three Generations
    Show others...
    2010 (English)In: Neuroendocrinology, ISSN 0028-3835, E-ISSN 1423-0194, Vol. 91, no 4, p. 318-323Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aims: There is an established association between the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN 1) syndrome and foregut carcinoids. Some registry studies also indicate that offspring to carcinoid patients run an increased risk of developing a carcinoid tumor themselves. However, there are only scattered reports of gastrointestinal carcinoids in two generations. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics as well as the histopathological, immunohistochemical (IHC) and genetic data of metastasizing ileal carcinoids in three consecutive first-degree relatives. Methods: The histopathological and IHC analyses were performed on newly cut sections of the tumor specimens and included growth pattern, proliferation index (Ki67) as well as expression of established neuroendocrine markers and recently introduced cocaine-amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART). The genetic analyses were focused on establishing whether a connection with the MEN 1 syndrome existed in this family, by means of mutation screening using polymerase chain reaction, multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification, and genotyping using fluorescent-labeled microsatellite markers. Results: Histopathology and IHC revealed that the tumors were virtually identical, with only minor differences in proliferation index and expression of CART. Genetic analyses indicated that the inheritance of the small bowel carcinoids in the family was not linked to the MEN1 gene. Conclusion: Metastasizing small bowel carcinoids have been found in first-degree relatives in three consecutive generations. All three tumors were very similar when characterized by histopathology and IHC. Based on clinical findings and genetic analyses, it seems unlikely, although not completely excluded, that inheritance was linked to the MEN 1 syndrome

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-65612 (URN)10.1159/000299790 (DOI)
    Available from: 2011-02-13 Created: 2011-02-13 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
    4. Expression of Cocaine- and Amphetamine-Regulated Transcriptis Associated with Worse Survival in Small Bowel Carcinoid Tumors
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Expression of Cocaine- and Amphetamine-Regulated Transcriptis Associated with Worse Survival in Small Bowel Carcinoid Tumors
    Show others...
    2012 (English)In: Clinical Cancer Research, ISSN 1078-0432, E-ISSN 1557-3265, Vol. 18, no 13, p. 3668-3676Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide exerts several regulatory functions acting both as neurotransmitter and hormone. We recently showed that CART is expressed in various neuroendocrine tumors, including small bowel carcinoid. The main objective of the present study was to examine whether CART expression is associated with survival in small bowel carcinoid patients. Secondary aims were to assess if CART expression is associated with other tumor characteristics or clinical symptoms.

    Experimental Design: Specimens from 97 patients with small bowel carcinoids were examined for CART expression using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. A CART score was introduced based on the proportion of CART immunoreactive cells. On inclusion, specimens were examined by routine histopathological methods and detailed clinical patient data were retrieved. The effect of CART on cell viability was assessed in vitro using an enteroendocrine cell line.

    Results: Expression of CART (P = 0.011), and increasing CART score (P = 0.033) were associated with worse disease-specific survival. Adjusting for age, disease stage and tumor grade in multivariable analysis, CART expression was still associated with worse survival (Low CART hazard ratio (HR) 5.47, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.71 to 42.46; and High CART HR 9.44, 95% CI 1.14 to 78.14). Expression of CART correlated with higher tumor grade, but not with age or disease stage, neither with weight loss or any other symptom. Supporting our clinical data, we found that CART promoted tumor cell viability in vitro.

    Conclusion: Expression of CART in small bowel carcinoid tumors is associated with worse survival.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    American Association for Cancer Research, 2012
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-71887 (URN)10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-11-2513 (DOI)000307502600019 ()
    Note

    funding agencies|Futurum-Academy of Healthcare at Jonkoping County Council||Foundation for Clinical Cancer Research in Jonkoping||Swedish Research Council|522-2008-4216K2009-55X 21111-01-4K2007-55X-04499-33-3|Faculty of Medicine at Lund University||Novo Nordisk Foundation||Gyllenstiernska Krapperup Foundation||Fredrik and Ingrid Thuring Foundation||Magnus Bergwall Foundation||Crafoord Foundation||Albert Pahlsson Foundation||

    Available from: 2011-11-09 Created: 2011-11-09 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
  • 150.
    Landerholm, Kalle
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Falkmer, Sture
    Department of Clinical Pathology, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Järhult, Johannes
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Epidemiology of Small Bowel Carcinoids in a Defined Population2010In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 34, no 7, p. 1500-1505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This retrospective study describes the epidemiology of small bowel carcinoids in a geographically defined population, with no other selection bias.

    Methods: All patients (n = 145) resident in Jönkoping County when diagnosed with carcinoid in the jejunum or ileum from 1960 to 2005 were included. Medical records were reviewed in detail, and tumor specimens were histopathologically and immunohistochemically reexamined when required (n = 44).

    Results: The annual age-adjusted incidence of small bowel carcinoids was 1.12 (95% confidence interval 0.95-1.31) per 100,000 persons. Median age at diagnosis was 69 years. The predominating presenting symptom was uncharacteristic abdominal pain (50%), whereas a smaller number suffered from typical flushes (13%). Surprisingly, 14% presented with overt gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Most of the patients diagnosed based on their symptoms had metastases at diagnosis (44% regional, 40% distant). Metastasized tumors by definition belong to World Health Organization (WHO) histopathologic group 2; and when reexamined, most (83%) of the localized tumors were also found to belong to WHO group 2.

    Conclusions: In comparison to previous reports, a higher age-adjusted incidence of small bowel carcinoids was observed, and the patients were clearly older at the time of diagnosis. Even with metastatic disease, the presenting symptoms were usually uncharacteristic, and the carcinoid syndrome was infrequently seen.

1234567 101 - 150 of 332
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf