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  • 101.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    How does background affect attitudes to socioscientific issues in Taiwan?2011In: Public Understanding of Science, ISSN 0963-6625, E-ISSN 1361-6609, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 722-732Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based upon the goal of scientific literacy and the importance of socioscientific issues (SSIs), the purpose of this study was to investigate the Taiwanese public’s awareness of, inclinations to buy/use, and their attitudes towards three attributes of SSIs including genetically modified food (GM food), organic food, and DDT and malaria (DDT). Data from a total of 865 participants across ten populations (six different educational levels and four different vocations) were validated and analyzed. The results revealed that the awareness regarding GM food and DDT increased with the levels of education. The inclinations to buy/use and the attitudes towards the three SSIs, were not related to levels of education, vocation or gender, but were related to attributes of the SSIs. The implications for education and policy development are discussed

  • 102.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    SEE-SEP: From a separate to a holistic view on socio-scientific issues2010In: Asia-Pacific Forum on Science Learning and Teaching, E-ISSN 1609-4913, Vol. 11, no 1, p. Article 2-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The trend of socioscientific issues (SSIs) has been emergent in the science- and technology-dominated society of today. Accordingly, during the past 20 years, students’ skills of argumentation and informal reasoning about SSIs have achieved greater emphasis and profile in school education. Based upon the importance of SSIs, more and more researchers have investigated how students reason and make arguments about SSIs, and also explored the dimensions influencing students’ arguments and also involved in the various SSIs. This article has a threefold purpose. Firstly, we want to address the different roles of SSIs in science education nowadays, and secondly, after reviewing the divergent dimensions involved in SSIs from previous literature, we want to provide a holistic view to represent the essence of SSIs via the SEE-SEP model (connecting six subject areas of Sociology/culture, Environment, Economy, Science, Ethics/morality and Policy with three aspects of value, personal experience and knowledge) developed here. Thirdly, to support the SEE-SEP model, examples extracted from former studies are presented. The implications for research and for school science education are discussed.

  • 103.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Chang, Chun-Yen
    NTNU.
    Tseng, Y-H
    NTNU.
    Cultural comparison of scientific literacy in media (SLiM) – From the perspective of biology subject2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 104.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Chang, C-Y
    NTNU.
    Comparing Swedish senior high and undergraduate students’ scientific literacy in media (SLiM) regarding biological terms2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 105.
    Chang, Shu-Nu
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The learning effect of modelling ability instruction2008In: Asia-Pacific Forum on Science Learning and Teaching, ISSN 1609-4913, E-ISSN 1609-4913, Vol. 9, no 2, article id 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To achieve the goal of scientific literacy, besides conveying science and technology concepts, cultivating students' modeling ability has become important. However, in-service teachers face the difficulty that their teaching load increases while they are still bound by limited teaching hours. Teachers may know of modeling ability, life related content and hands-on activities which are all important and beneficial for science learning; however, they very often find it is hard to engage all these methods into their limited teaching hours. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to develop an efficient method of instruction based upon the frameworks of cognitive apprenticeship and modeling ability to promote students' modeling ability and scientific concept regarding battery. A topic oriented instructional design has been adopted to develop a four-lesson instruction (200 minutes in total). There were 149 non-science majors from three classes invited to participate in this study. They were randomly assigned different instructions, and students' performances were evaluated by three kinds of tests: the general modeling ability test, concept tests and context-based modeling tests. The results indicate cognitive apprenticeship and modeling ability instruction could significantly improve students' modeling ability and also enhance their learning regarding the concept of the battery. However, it is remarkable to point out that, "modeling ability instruction" and the "video lab" provided in this study play the crucial roles. The implication of this study is also discussed.

  • 106.
    Charlotta, Nordlöf
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Tekniklärares attityder till teknikämnet och teknikundervisningen2018Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Teachers are important for students’ achievement and students’ attitudes in education in general; actually, the teacher is seen as one of the most important factors for student achievement. The teacher is important, for both the students’ achievements and mind-sets. Attitudes matters in teaching and education, which is known from previous attitude research. In technology education, teachers’ attitudes to technology education needs to be further investigated, and that is where this licentiate thesis, based on two studies, is contributing. The main research question was; What are Swedish technology teachers’ attitudes to the technology subject and to technology teaching? In this licentiate thesis, technology teachers’ attitudes were investigated by mixed methods, in two studies. The first study was based on quantitative research and an inquiry based on 1153 technology teachers in Sweden. The second study is qualitative and is based on ten interviews with Swedish technology teachers. In the first study four dimensions of attitude were found in the material; Technology education is important, Conditions are favourable for technology education, Curriculum is in focus in technology education and Confidence, interest and knowledge of the teacher is high. Further, three teacher clusters were identified, Positive, Negative and Mixed, based on teachers’ attitudes towards technology education. Predictors for cluster belonging were identified, and for a positive attitude, education in technology was identified to be the most influential predictor. In the second study, teachers’ perceived control, as a part of attitude, was studied in particular. Perceived control consist of two attitude components: self-efficacy and context dependency. Three sub-themes of self-efficacy were found; Experience, education and interest, Subject knowledge, and Preparation. Further, four sub-themes of context dependency were found; Collegial support, Syllabus, Resources and Status. Teachers in this study have different attitudes to different parts of technology education, but teachers educated in technology generally seem to have advantages, when it comes to attitudes. The results further tells that contextual factors both can limit and boost technology education.

    Time for teaching technology, time for technology teachers to meet and time for education of technology teachers, seems to be a key to how to find ways forward and how to improve teachers’ attitudes towards technology teaching. 

    List of papers
    1. Swedish Technology Teachers’ Attitudes to their Subject and its Teaching
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Swedish Technology Teachers’ Attitudes to their Subject and its Teaching
    2017 (English)In: Research in Science & Technological Education, ISSN 0263-5143, E-ISSN 1470-1138, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 195-214Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: From previous research among science teachers itis known that teachers’ attitudes to their subjects affect important aspects of their teaching, including their confidence and the amount of time they spend teaching the subject. In contrast, less is known about technology teachers’ attitudes.

    Purpose: Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate Swedish technology teachers’ attitudes toward their subject, and how these attitudes may be related to background variables.

    Sample: Technology teachers in Swedish compulsory schools(n = 1153) responded to a questionnaire about teachers’ attitudes,experiences, and background.

    Methods: Exploratory factor analysis was used to investigate attitude dimensions of the questionnaire. Groupings of teachers based on attitudes were identified through cluster analysis, and multinomial logistic regression was performed to investigate the role of teachers’ background variables as predictors for cluster belonging.

    Results: Four attitudinal dimensions were identified in the questionnaire, corresponding to distinct components of attitudes.Three teacher clusters were identified among the respondents characterized by positive, negative, and mixed attitudes toward the subject of technology and its teaching, respectively. The most influential predictors of cluster membership were to be qualified for teaching technology, having participated in in-service-training, teaching at a school with a proper overall teaching plan for the subject of technology and teaching at a school with a defined number of teaching hours for the subject.

    Conclusions: The results suggest that efforts to increase technology teachers’ qualifications and establishing a fixed number of teaching hours and an overall teaching plan for the subject of technology may yield more positive attitudes among teachers toward technology teaching. In turn, this could improve the status of the subject as well as students’ learning.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London: Taylor & Francis Group, 2017
    Keywords
    Attitudes; technology education; technology teachers
    National Category
    Didactics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-135311 (URN)10.1080/02635143.2017.1295368 (DOI)000400179000005 ()
    Available from: 2017-03-13 Created: 2017-03-13 Last updated: 2018-05-14Bibliographically approved
    2. Self-efficacy or context dependency?: Exploring teachers’ perceptions of and attitudes towards technology education
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-efficacy or context dependency?: Exploring teachers’ perceptions of and attitudes towards technology education
    2019 (English)In: International journal of technology and design education, ISSN 0957-7572, E-ISSN 1573-1804, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 123-141Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Educational research on attitudes shows that both teaching and student learningare affected by the attitudes of the teacher. The aim of this study is to examine technologyteachers’ perceptions of and attitudes towards teaching technology in Swedish compulsoryschools, focusing on teachers’ perceived control. The following research question is posed:How do the teachers perceive self-efficacy and context dependency in teaching technology?Qualitative interviews were performed with 10 technology teachers in the compulsoryschool (ages 7–16), and the data was analysed using thematic analysis. Based on an attitudeframework, three sub-themes of self-efficacy were found: experience, education andinterest, subject knowledge, and preparation. Furthermore, four sub-themes of contextdependency were found; collegial support, syllabus, resources and status. The results showthat, according to the teachers in this study, self-efficacy mainly comes from experience,education and interest. Moreover, contextual factors can both limit and boost the teachers,but overall there are negative attitudes because of a lack of support and resources, whichimpedes the teaching. Teachers educated in technology education generally express morepositive attitudes and thus seem to have advantages in relation to technology teaching, butstill they sometimes express negative attitudes in the field of perceived control. Someimplications of this study are that it is necessary to promote teacher education in technologyand to reserve resources for technology education in schools, thereby supportingteachers in controlling contextual and internal factors that affect their teaching. Thissupport to teachers is especially important if there is an intention for the subject to developin new directions.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Dordrecht: Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2019
    Keywords
    Technology education; Technology teachers; Attitudes; Self-efficacy; Context dependency
    National Category
    Didactics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-143310 (URN)10.1007/s10798-017-9431-2 (DOI)000456950800007 ()2-s2.0-85035778879 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2017-12-03 Created: 2017-12-03 Last updated: 2019-02-27Bibliographically approved
  • 107.
    Charlotta, Nordlöf
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Tid för teknik – om tekniklärares attityder till sin undervisning2018In: Teknikdidaktisk forskning för lärare: Bidrag från en forskningsmiljö / [ed] Karin Stolpe och Gunnar Höst, Linköping: NATDID, Nationellt centrum för naturvetenskapernas och teknikens didaktik , 2018, 1, p. 23-29Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    För lärare innebär attityder till teknikundervisning mer än bara inställning till undervisningen. Det handlar också om lärarnas uppfattningar om ämnets betydelse för eleverna och för samhällsutvecklingen, om ämnets status jämfört med andra ämnen, om upplevd självförmåga hos lärarna och om upplevda förutsättningar för att kunna undervisa -alltså ett antal aspekter av attityd

    som påverkar undervisningen. Forskning visar att attityd till teknikämnet hos en lärare ser olika ut för olika delar av undervisningen. Sannolikheten att en lärare har en mer positiv attityd ökar om han eller hon är utbildad tekniklärare, har deltagit i fortbildningar samt om läraren jobbar på en skola där man låter ämnet synas och ta plats. Tid kan vara en nyckel till mer positiva attityder hos tekniklärare, men frågan om tid ägs till stor del av andra än lärarna själva.

  • 108.
    Christenson, Nina
    et al.
    Karlstad University.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Investigating students’ use of knowledge, value and personal experiences (KVP) in relation to the different attributes of socioscientific issues2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 109.
    Christenson, Nina
    et al.
    Karlstad University.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Höglund, H.-O.
    Karlstad University.
    Upper secondary students’ use of scientific knowledge in arguing socioscientific issues2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 110.
    Colnerud, Gunnel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Elvstrand, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Olsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Developmental Psychology.
    Szklarski, Andrzej
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Thornberg, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Skolans moraliska och demokratiska praktik: Värdepedagogiska texter I2004Report (Other academic)
  • 111.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Bilingual and second language interactions: Views from Scandinavia2013In: International Journal of Bilingualism, ISSN 1367-0069, E-ISSN 1756-6878, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 121-131Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 112.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Conversation analysis and emergency calls2013In: The Encyclopedia of Applied Linguistics / [ed] Carol A. Chapelle, Wiley-Blackwell, 2013, p. 982-985Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Calls for emergency assistance are operated by a range of organizations across the world, including local police authorities, medical institutions, and dedicated dispatch centers.

  • 113.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science.
    Gender as a practical concern in children's management of play participation2011In: Conversation and Gender / [ed] Susan A. Speer & Elizabeth Stokoe, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press , 2011, 1, p. 294-309Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Conversation analysts have begun to challenge long-cherished assumptions about the relationship between gender and language, asking new questions about the interactional study of gender and providing fresh insights into the ways it may be studied empirically. Drawing on a lively set of audio- and video-recorded materials of real-life interactions, including domestic telephone calls, children's play, mediation sessions, police-suspect interviews, psychiatric assessments and calls to telephone helplines, this volume is the first to showcase the latest thinking and cutting-edge research of an international group of scholars working on topics at the intersection of gender and conversation analysis. Theoretically, it pushes forward the boundaries of our understanding of the relationship between conversation and gender, charting new and exciting territory. Methodologically, it offers readers a clear, practical understanding of how to analyse gender using conversation analysis, by presenting detailed demonstrations of this method in use.

  • 114.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Broth, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Levin, Lena
    VTI, Linköping.
    Förarutbildning i praktiken: En studie av lärande i trafikförankrad interaktion2013Report (Other academic)
  • 115.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Danby, Susan
    Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.
    Emmison, Michael
    University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Osvaldsson, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work.
    Cobb-More, Charlotte
    Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.
    "Basically it's the Usual Whole Teen Girl Thing": Stage-of-Life Categories on a Children's and Young people's Helpline2018In: Symbolic interaction, ISSN 0195-6086, E-ISSN 1533-8665, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 25-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the practices of membership categorization in the interactions of clients and counselors on a national Australian helpline (Kids Helpline [KHL]) for children and young persons. Our focus is on membership categories drawn from three membership category devices (MCDs): stage-of-life (SOL), age, and family. Analysis draws on data across different contact modalities—email and web-counseling sessions—to examine how category-generated features are relevantly occasioned, attended to, and managed by the parties in the course of interaction. This shows clients' use of MCDs in presenting their trouble and building a relevant case for their grievance. By examining counselors' subsequent receipts of the clients' complaints, we are able to trace some of the cultural knowledge that the clients' categorizations make relevant to the counselors. Moreover, the analysis demonstrates how the inherent flexibility of MCDs allows counselors to exploit these same categorial resources and to re-specify the clients' trouble in a more positive fashion to accomplish counseling work. In explicating how taken-for-granted notions of the lifespan as well as of family relations are mobilized by participants in KHL's sessions, the findings contribute to previous studies of social interaction in counseling, and to research on social identity and categorization more broadly.

  • 116.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Landqvist, Håkan
    Akademin för utbildning, kultur och kommunikation, Mälardalens högskola.
    Persson Thunqvist, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Osvaldsson, Karin
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Finding out what’s happened: Two procedures for opening emergency calls2012In: Discourse Studies, ISSN 1461-4456, E-ISSN 1461-7080, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 371-397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines two corpora of telephone calls to the Swedish emergency services SOSAlarm. The focus of analysis is on the procedural consequentiality of the routine opening by theoperator. In the first corpus, the summons are answered by identification of the service via the emergency number. In the second corpus, the protocol has been altered, such that the opening entails the emergency number combined with a standard query concerning the nature of the incident. Through sequential and categorial analysis of the two collections, we highlight the distinct trajectories of action ensuing from the two opening protocols. The stand-alone emergency number opening typically results in callers asking for a specific service. In contrast, opening turns that endwith a direct query about the incident tend to solicit brief descriptions of the trouble. We discuss the benefits of the latter procedure in terms of topical progression and institutional relevance, proposing that the work of emergency assistance agencies worldwide might consider implementing opening routines with a similar design.

  • 117.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Osvaldsson, Karin
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Working towards trouble: Some categorial resources for accomplishing disputes in a correctional youth facility2012In: Disputes in Everyday Life: Social and Moral Orders of Children and Young People / [ed] Susan Danby & Maryanne Theobald, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2012, p. 141-163Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Volume 15 of Sociological Studies of Children and Youth investigates the interactional procedures used by children and young people as disputes arise in varying contexts of their everyday life. Disputes are a topic of angst and anxiety for children, young people and adults alike, and yet are important times for interactional matters to be addressed. A particular intention of the book is its ethnomethodological focus, bringing a fine-grained analysis and understanding to disputes and related interactional matters. Such analysis highlights the in situ competency of children and young people as they manage their social relationships and disputes to offer insight into how children arrange their social lives within the context of school, home, neighbourhood, correctional, club and after school settings. This volume offers a contemporary understanding of the relational matters of childrens peer cultures to better understand and address the complex nature of children and young peoples everyday lives in todays society. 

  • 118.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Persson-Thunqvist, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Osvaldsson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    ‘‘SOS 112 what has occurred?’’: Managing openings in children’s emergency calls2012In: Discourse, Context & Media, ISSN 2211-6958, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 183-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the initial exchanges in calls to the Swedish emergency services, focusing on callers’ responses to the standardised opening phrase “SOS one one two, what has occurred?”. Comparisons across three age groups – children, teenagers and adults – revealed significant differences in caller behaviour. Whereas teenagers and adults offered reports of the incident, child callers were more prone to request dispatch of specific assistance units. This pattern was only observable when children were accompanied by an adult relative, which leads us to propose that child callers may be operating under prior adult instruction concerning how to request help. The second part of the analysis examines the local organisation of participants' actions, showing how turn-design and sequencing manifest the local concerns of the two parties. The analysis thus combines quantitative and qualitative methods to explore the ways through which the parties jointly produce an early sense of emergency incidents. These results are discussed in terms of children's agency and competence as informants granted to them by emergency operators, and how such competence ascriptions run against commonsense conceptualisations of children as less-than-full-fledged members of society.

  • 119.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Tholander, Michael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Morality in professional practice2014In: Journal of Applied Linguistics and Professional Practice, ISSN 2040-3658, E-ISSN 2040-3666, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 155-164Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 120.
    Dahlstedt, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Petersson, Kenneth
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Sammanhållningens genealogi – viljan att ordna2018In: Förortsdrömmar: Ungdomar, utanförskap och viljan till inkludering / [ed] Magnus Dahlstedt, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2018, p. 201-221Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta kapitel handlar om just viljan att förebygga konflikter och att skapa gemenskap och sammanhållning och hur denna vilja har gestaltats i olika tider. Dagens debatt om utanförskapets problem och de olika interventioner som följer i dess spår har påfallande likheter med debatten om den ”sociala frågan”, som den fördes under det sena 1800-talet. Den sociala frågan, nu som då, handlar om hur alla människor ska fås med på resan in i det framtida välfärdssamhället – där en rad interventioner riktas mot de delar av befolkningen och de geografiska områden som fallit utanför samhällsgemenskapen (Petersson m.fl. 2015). Utifrån en genealogisk belysning ägnar vi oss i kapitlet åt att spåra den samtida förståelsen av utanförskapets problem, med särskilt fokus på hur det relateras till städernas mångetniska periferier, bakåt i tiden, närmare bestämt till den senare delen av 1800-talet och just debatten om ”den sociala frågan”.

    Kapitlet är upplagt enligt följande: Inledningsvis redogör vi för huvudlinjerna i en genealogisk ansats, där vi argumenterar för värdet av att göra en genealogisk spårning, för att åskådliggöra hur samtida problembilder knyter an till skilda historiska praktiker. Därefter presenteras i tur och ordning de historiska praktiker som bildar en historisk fond för samtida förståelser av det så kallade utanförskapsproblemet; det tidiga 1800-talets kristna filantropi; det sena 1700-talets husförhör; det sena 1800-talets räddningsprojekt i form av Frälsningsarmén samt idén om det lokala samhällets Gemeinschaft. Efter denna genomgång närmar vi oss samtiden med fokus på återkomsten av dessa historiska praktiker som kan skönjas i form av nutida strävanden efter mobilisering av lokala krafter och uppslutning bakom gemensamma värden. Detta som uttryck för en gemensam vilja att skapa sammanhållning och ordning i en tid av hot, splittring och osäkerhet.

  • 121.
    Dakers, John R.
    et al.
    Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Hallström, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    de Vries, Marc J.
    Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Introduction2019In: Reflections on Technology for Educational Practitioners: Philosophers of Technology Inspiring Technology Education / [ed] John R. Dakers, Jonas Hallström & Marc J. de Vries, Boston, MA: Brill Academic Publishers, 2019, p. 1-11Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 122.
    Dakers, John R.
    et al.
    Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Hallström, JonasLinköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.de Vries, Marc J.Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Reflections on Technology for Educational Practitioners: Philosophers of Technology Inspiring Technology Education2019Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reflections on Technology for Educational Practitioners analyzes the use of philosophy of technology in technology education and unpacks the concept of ‘reflective practitioners’ (Donald Schön) in the field. Philosophy of technology develops ideas and concepts that are valuable for technology education because they show the basic characteristics of technology that are important if technology education is to present a fair image of what technology is. Each chapter focuses on the oeuvre of one particular philosopher of which a description is given and then insights are offered about technology as developed by that philosopher and how it has been fruitful for technology education in all its aspects: motives for having it in the curriculum, goals for technology education, content of the curriculum, teaching strategies, knowledge types taught, ways of assessing, resources, educational research for technology education, amongst others.

  • 123.
    Dalgren, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Att göra pedagogisk praktik tillsammans: Socialt samspel i förskolans vardag2017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna studies övergripande syfte är att åskådliggöra hur social interaktion mellan förskolepedagoger och barn i vardagliga förskoleaktiviteter genomförs och därigenom också visa hur pedagogisk praktik åstadkoms i samspelet. Mer specifikt analyseras hur det går till och vad som händer när interaktionen organiseras genom multimodalt handlande och fråga-svar-sekvenser, och hur dessa interaktionella fenomen kan tjäna pedagogiska syften. Som teoretiska och analytiska utgångspunkter använder sig studien av etnometodologiskt perspektiv och konversationsanalys. Detta innebär att delar av det videofilmade materialet har transkriberats och analyserats i detalj.

    Resultatet presenteras i sex empiriska kapitel och visar konkret och detaljerat hur deltagarna ”gör” förskolepedagogisk praktik tillsammans. Studiens analyser belyser hur pedagoger och barn genomför interaktionella projekt, eftersträvar intersubjektivitet och etablerar organisatoriska principer för gemensamma aktiviteter. Analyserna visar också hur ett yngre förskolebarn kan delta aktivt i måltider utan tal, hur vardagliga aktiviteter transformeras till problemlösningsprojekt och hur lokala pedagogiska praktiker orienterade mot sociala (måltids)normer, språk, fysik och matematik kan genereras spontant i förskolans vardag. Avhandlingen lyfter slutligen begreppet inbäddad undervisning och försöker därigenom definiera och empiriskt konkretisera den typ av undervisning som bedrivs i förskolan.

  • 124.
    Dalgren, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Questions and answers, a seesaw and embodied action: how a preschool teacher and children accomplish educational practice2017In: Children’s Knowledge-In-Interaction: Studies In Conversation Analysis / [ed] Amanda Bateman, Amelia Church, Singapore: Springer, 2017, 1, p. 37-56Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the educational practice of the Swedish preschool, teaching and learning often take place in everyday activities and are intertwined with play and care. This chapter examines how this educational practice is accomplished by a Swedish preschool teacher and three children in interaction. More specifically, the present chapter shows how complex physical concepts are incorporated into early childhood education through a playful seesaw activity. In the analysis of the video-recorded activity, this chapter demonstrates how question-answer sequences function as important interactional and educational resources for the participants when they organize their interaction. Through question-answer sequences, vis-á-vis a seesaw and embodied action, it becomes possible for the preschool teacher to capture and direct the children’s attention towards physical phenomena, in line with the curriculum, as well as create a shared experience of these physical phenomena in playful practice. Thus, this chapter displays how teaching and learning are intertwined with play, in situ, in preschool practice.

  • 125.
    Danby, Susan
    et al.
    Queensland University of Technology, Australia.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Rendle-Short, Johanna
    Australian National University, Australia.
    Butler, Carly
    Loughborough University, UK.
    Osvaldsson Cromdal, Karin
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Emmison, Michael
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Parentification: Counselling talk on a helpline for children and young people2015In: The Palgrave Handbook of Child Mental Health / [ed] Michelle O'Reilly & Jessica Nina Lester, Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, p. 578-596Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This Handbook illustrates the importance of examining child mental health from a different perspective, one that assumes that psychiatric categories are made real in and through both written and spoken language. It gathers a range of applied and theoretical analyses from leading scholars and clinicians in order to examine the conversational practices of children diagnosed with mental health disorders alongside those of their parents, families and practitioners. The contributors move away from viewing mental illness as an objective truth; instead reintroducing the relevance of language in constructing and deconstructing the assumptions that surround the diagnosis and treatment of childhood mental health disorders. Including chapters on ADHD, autism, depression, eating disorders and trauma, this collection addresses the diversity involved in discussing child mental health.Divided into six parts: the place of conversation/discourse analysis; critical approaches; social constructions of normal/abnormal; situating and exploring the difficulties involved; managing problem behaviour and discussing different practices involved; this Handbook presents a comprehensive overview of child mental health. It is an essential reference resource for all those involved or interested in child mental health.

  • 126.
    Danielsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Linneuniversitetet.
    Löfgren, Ragnhild
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Jahic Pettersson, Alma
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Gains and losses: Metaphors in chemistry classrooms2018In: Global developments in literacy research for science education / [ed] Kok-Sing Tang & Kristina Danielsson, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 219-235Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter reports on findings from classroom communication in secondary chemistry teaching and learning. The data was analyzed qualitatively regarding the use of metaphors and analogies in relation to atoms and ion formation, with an intention to shed light on students’ scientific understanding as well as on their enculturation into the disciplinary discourse. Theoretically we draw on social semiotics, which allows analyses of language use in its widest sense, comprised of verbal language, images, action, gestures, and more. In our data, we identified common disciplinary metaphors in science, as well as metaphors connected to everyday life. Through the analyses based on systemic functional linguistics (SFL), we also identified anthropomorphic metaphors, with particles, atoms, and ions being humanized with intentions and feelings. Linguistic choices signaling metaphoric language were mainly noted in relation to quite obvious metaphors whereas no such signals or explanations were noted in connection to anthropomorphic metaphors. The study has implications for the design of classroom practices, including the use of discussions to enhance a more reflective use and understanding of the gains and losses around metaphors.

  • 127.
    Danielsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholms Universitet.
    Löfgren, Ragnhild
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Jahic Pettersson, Alma
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Gains and losses: Pictorial language in chemistry classrooms2014In: International Science Education Conference, ISEC, Singapore, 25-27 november, 2014, Singapore, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on findings from two data sets in chemistry learning; one from a multidisciplinary project on teacher lead whole-class teaching, and one from a small-scale study on teacher students’ animations of chemical reactions. The data was analysed as to the use of pictorial language in relation to atoms and ion formation with an intention to shed light on students’ scientific understanding as well as their enculturation into the disciplinary discourse. Theoretically we draw on social semiotics, allowing analyses of language use in its widest sense, comprising verbal language, images, action, gestures, etc., though here with a main focus on verbal language.  In both learning contexts, we identified common disciplinary metaphors as well as more occasional metaphors. By the use of analyses based on systemic functional grammar (SFG) we also noted more “hidden” metaphoric use, with particles, atoms, and ions being humanised with intentions and feelings. Also, we identified interesting patterns as to the ways students use metaphors to sort out difficulties in understanding chemical processes. The study has implications for the design of classroom practices, not the least as regards possibilities to use meta-discussions to enhance a more reflective use and understanding of the gains and losses around analogies; both as regards teaching material and student-generated analogies.

  • 128.
    Eckhardt, Marc
    et al.
    University of Kiel, Germany .
    Urhahne, Detlef
    University of Halle Wittenberg, Germany .
    Conrad, Olaf
    University of Hamburg, Germany .
    Harms, Ute
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science.
    How effective is instructional support for learning with computer simulations?2013In: Instructional science, ISSN 0020-4277, E-ISSN 1573-1952, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 105-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study examined the effects of two different instructional interventions as support for scientific discovery learning using computer simulations. In two well-known categories of difficulty, data interpretation and self-regulation, instructional interventions for learning with computer simulations on the topic "ecosystem water" were developed and tested using a sample of 124 eighth graders in science classes. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of instructional support for domain-specific factual, conceptual, and procedural knowledge acquisition. Students who received either only instructional support for data interpretation or only for self-regulation achieved the highest learning outcomes. However, a combination of instructional support for data interpretation and self-regulation seemed detrimental for knowledge acquisition. Students who received instructional interventions for both data interpretation and self-regulation also showed the highest values of perceived cognitive load. High cognitive load could be a reason for why a combination of particular instructional interventions does not lead to the expected positive learning outcomes.

  • 129.
    Elfström Pettersson, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Barn som medskapare i dokumentation2014In: Berättande i förskolan / [ed] Bim Riddersporre, Barbro Bruce, Stockholm: Natur och kultur, 2014, 1, p. 204-228Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 130.
    Elfström Pettersson, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Barns delaktighet i förskolans dokumentation2019In: Venue, ISSN ISSN 2001-788X, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1-4Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    I många förskolor brottas man med frågan om hur barnen kan bli eller göras delaktiga i förskolans dokumentation. Pedagogisk dokumentation anses ofta vara ett sätt att göra barn delaktiga. Min studie visar att barn inte nödvändigtvis blir delaktiga bara för att man använder pedagogisk dokumentation, utan att de kan bli mer eller mindre delaktiga oavsett vilken dokumentationsmetod som används.

  • 131.
    Elfström Pettersson, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Barns delaktighet i förskolans dokumentation - exempel från pedagogisk dokumentation och portfolio2014Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Barns delaktighet och inflytande är viktiga inslag i förskolans läroplan. I riktlinjerna skrivs det även fram att barns delaktighet och inflytande i dokumentation och utvärderingar är av största vikt. Pedagogisk dokumentation med inspiration från Reggio Emilia är en av flera dokumentationsformer i svensk förskola och en form som ofta ses som ett sätt att göra barn delaktiga. En annan form av dokumentation som är vanlig i svensk förskola är portfolio. I min presentation visar jag exempel på olika sätt som barn kan vara delaktiga när man använder två former av dokumentation i en svensk förskola.

  • 132.
    Elfström Pettersson, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Children’s participation in pedagogical documentation: Reflections from a study in a Swedish preschool2012In: 40th Annual Congress of the Nordic Educational Research Association 8-10 March 2012: Abstract book, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this poster I am presenting my licentiate project on digital documentation in Swedish preschools. The aim of the study is how participation and democracy are constructed and enacted in (pedagogical) documentation in a preschool using digital media.

    In July 2011 a revised curriculum for Swedish preschool came into force, including a whole new chapter emphasizing preschools’ obligation to systematically document and evaluate their quality. It furthermore states that children (and parents) shall be able to participate in this evaluation (Skolverket, 2010). Documentation is considered a means for developing everyday preschool. Albeit not supposed to evaluate individual children, each child’s development and learning should be documented and analyzed, which might seem contradictive. Studying documentation practices, and in particular children’s participation in them, is crucial because of this new emphasis on documentation, of the previously mentioned ambiguity within the revised curriculum, and of a discrepancy between Swedish observational/documentational traditions, building on developmental psychology, and the intentions of drawing on Reggio Emilia ideas, prescribed in the new curriculum.

    In a pilot study of a teacher and a child documenting in front of the computer I found that although the teacher was concerned about the child’s participation some aspects restricted this ambition, e.g. her notion of what (pedagogical) documentation is, what it should consist of, and how the computer made this participation possible or not. While the teacher and the boy had different views on what to choose, the aim was consensus, therefore it can be seen as a deliberative conversation. The teacher’s assumption that the child’s was mainly interested in seeing himself in the photos, would direct the child’s interest towards himself, and thus towards the governing of himself.

    The theoretical perspectives for the study will be the concepts of deliberation, by Englund (2010), and governmentality, by Foucault (1991). Since in this case participation and control is not contingent just upon human practices but also due to device such as digital camera, computer, printer, paper, I will also consider how ”matter matters” drawing on the thoughts of Barad’s (2003) agential realism.

  • 133.
    Elfström Pettersson, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Children’s Participation in Preschool Documentation Practices2013In: 23rd EECERA Conference: Values, culture and contexts: Abstract book, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Research aims

    The aim of this research is to study children’s participation in preschool documentation practices and the role of artefacts such as computers, toys and children’s crafts in these practices. In this paper I will use data from videorecordings of documentation practices in a Swedish preschool in order to analyse how participation is enacted.

    Relationship to previous research works

    Previous research has focused on either children’s participation or preschool documentation.

    Theoretical and conceptual framework

    The analysis is inspired by post-humanist theory stressing the intra-action (Barad, 2007) of humans, discourses and material. Agencies emerge through this intra-action, that is; the components do not have agency by/in themselves.

    The benefit of the approach is seeing the artefacts involved as contributing to the production of the documentation practice.

    Paradigm, methodology and methods

    Case study was chosen as a research method, the case here being the documentation activity as well as one specific preschool. Video recording was used as an extractive modality, capturing situations that could be analysed later.

    Ethical considerations

    To ensure that the study was conducted ethically correct it was vetted by the Central Ethical Review Board. Teachers, parents and children were asked to consent to participating in the study.

    Main finding or discussion

    The preliminary results evinces that artefacts played an important role for children’s participation. For example, the use of the computer when documenting enabled a child to participate in changing the objective of the documentation.

    Implications, practice or policy

    The implications of this study for practice are the importance of considering the complexity of relations between children, adults and objects such as computers or toys when focusing on children’s participation in documentation practices.

  • 134.
    Elfström Pettersson, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Children's participation in preschool documentation practices2015In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 231-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish preschool curriculum not only prescribes documentation and quality assessment, it also requires children’s participation in the documentation process, although it offers no directions on how the documenting should be done, which can leave teachers unsure of how to do it. This study differs from research that presents pedagogical documentation as a way of enabling children’s participation in preschool in that it explores children’s participation in producing different forms of documentation in a Swedish preschool – and it finds that such participation is complex. The findings imply that, whether documentation is activity-integrated or retrospective, different forms of participation are possible.

  • 135.
    Elfström Pettersson, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Documentation in Swedish preschool’s systematic quality work2015In: NERA 2015 - Marketisation and Differentiation in Education: Abstract book, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper I present a part of a larger project on documentation in Swedish preschools. In the study I explore how documentation in Swedish preschool’s systematic quality work is done. The aim is to understand what preschool teachers and models for systematic quality work produce together. By focusing both the teachers and the models I will try to discern how both these actors are involved in documentation and what they produce together. Since 2012 the Swedish Education Act prescribes all education to be planned, followed up and developed by the municipal accountable school authority as well as by the head of local schools (or preschools) (SFS 2010:800). The aim is to make quality and equality visible, to develop the fulfilment of national goals and to create participation and dialogue about this fulfilment and possible inadequacies. This systematic quality work should be done continuously and comprise certain steps which should be documented. The steps are presented visually, as a model, in the form of a ‘wheel’ by the National Agency of Education (Skolverket, 2012). According to Sheridan, et al. (2013) there is a lack of knowledge about how preschool teacher’s deal with systematic quality work.

    There is also a need to develop methods and approaches. Interviewing preschool teachers about documentation Löfgren (2014), concluded that these teachers produced images of their work in line with quality measurement instruments used in their municipalities. Therefore, studying how a model for systematic quality work and preschool teachers together produce documentation is crucial. Since I am interested in how documentation is produced by preschool teachers together with models, the study will draw on the theory of agential realism (Barad, 1996), where agency is seen as material-discursive and where humans and non-humans can be, more or less, equally active. This perspective will contribute to understanding of how both models and teachers are involved in documentation. Additionally, documentality (Steyerl, 2003) and governmentality (Foucault, 1991) are also considered. Since documents are involved in evaluation and development of preschool quality, these perspectives will contribute to understanding of how documents govern preschool practice, in this case, specifically the documentation practice.

  • 136.
    Elfström Pettersson, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dokumentation i förskolans systematiska kvalitetsarbete 2015In: Nationell konferens i pedagogiskt arbete: program, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna presentation är en del av ett doktorandprojekt om dokumentation i svenska förskolor. I studien undersöker jag dokumentation i förskolans systematiska kvalitetsarbete. Syftet är att förstå 33

    vad förskollärare och modeller (eller mallar) för systematiskt kvalitetsarbete producerar tillsammans. Genom att fokusera på både lärarna och modellerna försöker jag urskilja hur båda dessa aktörer är inblandade i dokumentation, vad som därigenom möjliggörs och vad som blir synligt eller osynligt.

    Sedan 2012 föreskriver skollagen att all utbildning ska planeras, följas upp och utvecklas av huvudmannen och rektor respektive förskolechef (SFS 2010: 800). Avsikten med detta är att finna utvecklingsområden för att uppfylla de nationella målen samt att skapa dialog för att finna orsaker till eventuella brister. Det systematiska kvalitetsarbetet bör enligt Skolverket (2012) ske kontinuerligt och presenteras visuellt som en process i olika faser i form av ett "hjul". Empirin består av dokumentation från två förskoleenheter som använder sig av lokala mallar eller modeller vilka anknyter till Skolverkets presenterade modell.

    Enligt Sheridan et al. (2013) råder det brist på kunskap om hur förskollärare hanterar systematiskt kvalitetsarbete. Det finns också behov av att utveckla metoder och strategier. Detta är en anledning till varför det är viktigt att studera hur dokumentation i systematiskt kvalitetsarbete produceras. Eftersom jag är intresserad av hur dokumentationen produceras av förskolepersonal och modeller tillsammans, ser jag Actor Network Theory (Latour, 2005) som en möjlig teoretisk grund. Detta perspektiv skulle kunna bidra till förståelsen av hur både modellerna och förskolepersonalen är involverade i dokumentationen.

  • 137.
    Elfström Pettersson, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    How a template for documentation in Swedish preschool systematic quality work produces qualities2018In: Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood, ISSN 1463-9491, E-ISSN 1463-9491, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores how a template in documentation of preschool systematic quality development work acts to produce elements of quality. Assuming that documentation produces rather than represents preschool quality, and using a post-humanist agential realist perspective, the article shows how thematic work, care and education become elements of quality. But by turning care into a theme, education and care run the risk of being dichotomised, and care downplayed. The article concludes that when producing rather than looking back on and evaluating preschool quality, documentation has the potential to serve as a vantage point for preschool actors to discuss where they might be going and to think around qualities rather than quality.

  • 138.
    Elfström Pettersson, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    How a template for documentation in Swedish preschool systematic quality work produces qualities2019In: Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood, ISSN 1463-9491, E-ISSN 1463-9491, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 194-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores how a template in documentation of preschool systematic quality development work acts to produce elements of quality. Assuming that documentation produces rather than represents preschool quality, and using a post-humanist agential realist perspective, the article shows how thematic work, care and education become elements of quality. But by turning care into a theme, education and care run the risk of being dichotomised, and care downplayed. The article concludes that when producing rather than looking back on and evaluating preschool quality, documentation has the potential to serve as a vantage point for preschool actors to discuss where they might be going and to think around qualities rather than quality.

  • 139.
    Elfström Pettersson, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    “Intra-visuals” – Experimenting with drawing as a way of doing research2018In: NERA 2018 - 46th CONGRESSEducational Research: Boundaries, Breaches and Bridges: Abstract book, 2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to describe how drawing can be a part of a research method in a posthumanist agential realist (Barad, 2007) approach. Drawing was tried as a means for taking into account the intra-action of teachers, children and different kinds of devices in an early childhood education setting. It is one of many methods that can be used in research (Knight, o.a., 2015). In a previous study, a situation in a Swedish preschool was video-recorded: a group of children and teachers discussing photographs displayed on a wall in order to document and evaluate a previous activity. From the video-recording a set of drawings were made which enabled focusing on different aspects of the video-recorded sequence, as well as on the role of the researcher. The drawings were initially a way of (visually) transcribing the video-recording. However, it became obvious that the drawings participated actively in providing further views on the situation. By making different kinds of drawings: including and excluding dialogue, humans, actions and objects, different ways of understanding the video-sequence arose, which enabled concentrating on the in-between of the situation. Instead of focusing on actors or on spoken words, the drawings enabled focusing on actions between the entities. They actively facilitated focusing on flows between entities, rather than on words or entities themselves. The flows produced a narrative in the situation that, instead of evaluating a previous activity, moved away from what had happened and took new turns, developed into a new story. Thus, in preschool, documentation may function productive, producing narratives that might be used as future possibilities rather than as evaluations. The making of the drawings, in itself, also contributed actively: drawing made it possible to engage further with the video recordings. While making the drawings, parts of my body engaged other than those that engaged in typing or reading. As McNiff (2008, s. 33) puts it: “the use of our hands, bodies, and other senses as well as the activation of dormant dimensions of the mind, may offer ways of solving and re-visioning problems that are simply not possible through descriptive and linear language”. In addition, thinking is often considered as located solely in the brain, but thinking and movements might also be seen as connected (Sheets Johnstone, 2011). Thus, in this study, the drawing activities and the drawings were involved in the production of the analysis.

    References

    Barad, K. (2007).   Meeting the Universe Halfway: Quantum Physics and the Entanglement of Matter   and meaning. London: Duke University Press.

    Knight, L.,   McArdle, F., Cumming, T., Bone, J., Li, L., Peterken, C., & Ridgeway, A.   (2015). Intergenerational collaborative drawing: A research method for   researching with/about young children. Australasian Journal of Early   Childhood, 40(4), 21-29.

    McNiff, S.   (2008). Arts-Based Research. In J. G. Knowles, & A. L. Cole, Handbook   of the Arts in Qualitative Research: Perspectives, Methodologies, Examples,   and Issues (pp. 29-40). Los Angeles: Sage.

    Sheets Johnstone,   M. (2011). Primacy of Movement. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Pub. Co.

     

     

     

     

  • 140.
    Elfström Pettersson, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Playing a part in preschool documentation: A study of how participation is enacted in preschool documentation practices and how it is affected by material agents2013Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study is to explore how children’s participation is constructed and enacted in preschool documentation and what kinds of activities evolve between teachers, children and material objects in preschool documentation practices. The study is based on videorecorded observations of teachers and children documenting different preschool activities in two preschool groups. The video observations are analysed using theoretical perspectives on power relations, governmentality, documentality and agentic realism. The results are presented in two research articles. The results show the complexity of children’s participation in preschool documentation practice. In the first article two different documentation methods, with different theoretical underpinnings, were used in the preschool: portfolio and pedagogical documentation. The results show that, regardless of documentation method, children’s participation varied from attendance to involvement and influence, which can be seen as two ends of a power relation. Power relations between teachers and children also varied between situations as well as within individual situations. The result of the second article shows that children’s participation in preschool documentation practices, as well as the documentation itself, was affected and controlled not only by the humans present, but also by different material agents, such as photos and colour-coded labels. Taking material agents into account allows for a broader understanding of documentation practices, which in turn could open up for new forms of children’s participation in preschool documentation.

    List of papers
    1. Children's participation in preschool documentation practices
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children's participation in preschool documentation practices
    2015 (English)In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 231-247Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish preschool curriculum not only prescribes documentation and quality assessment, it also requires children’s participation in the documentation process, although it offers no directions on how the documenting should be done, which can leave teachers unsure of how to do it. This study differs from research that presents pedagogical documentation as a way of enabling children’s participation in preschool in that it explores children’s participation in producing different forms of documentation in a Swedish preschool – and it finds that such participation is complex. The findings imply that, whether documentation is activity-integrated or retrospective, different forms of participation are possible.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Sage Publications, 2015
    Keywords
    Childhood, children’s participation, children’s rights, pedagogical documentation, preschool practice
    National Category
    Pedagogical Work
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105830 (URN)10.1177/0907568213513480 (DOI)000353984500007 ()2-s2.0-84930347007 (Scopus ID)
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 729-2010-200
    Available from: 2014-04-09 Created: 2014-04-09 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    2. Sticky Dots and Lion Adventures Playing a Part in Preschool Documentation Practices
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sticky Dots and Lion Adventures Playing a Part in Preschool Documentation Practices
    2015 (English)In: International Journal of Early Childhood, ISSN 0020-7187, E-ISSN 1878-4658, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 443-460Article in journal (Other academic) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This article is based on a study of Swedish preschool documentation practices. The 2010 revised version of the Swedish preschool curriculum emphasizes documentation as an important practice. The Swedish preschool curriculum also emphasizes children’s participation in documentation and evaluation. The main reason for this can be found in the very first words of the curriculum: ‘Democracy forms the foundation of the preschool’ (Swedish National Agency of Education, 2011, p. 3). This is connected to children’s right to make their voices heard in all matters affecting them according to UNCRC. However, the curriculum does not give any guidelines on how to carry out this practice. A quality audit by the Swedish Schools Inspectorate in 2011 found that preschool teachers were uncertain about how to document (Skolinspektionen, 2011). This, and a lack of knowledge about documentation, sometimes impedes teachers’ documentation practices in the preschools (Palmer, 2012). With the term documentation practices I refer to all events connected to making and using documentations in the preschool; these include, for example, taking photographs, writing captions, printing documents, looking at and talking about photos, and discussing events depicted in photos or drawings. In documentation practices different kinds of artefacts or devices are present and used (e.g., cameras, computers, printers, pencils, and paper) or produced (e.g, printed photos, texts, and drawings). Through methods that are shaped by an agential realist construct, the main objective of this article is to explore how different kinds of material agents, such as computers, photos, teachers and children, can intra-act (Barad, 2007) in the production of children’s participation in preschool documentation practices. The reason for using the term intra-act rather than interact is that, in Barad’s terms, the world is not seen as consisting of separate entities, which the word interaction implies. Instead entities (which could be human or non-human) are temporarily separated or produced through intra-action; ‘relations do not follow relata, but the other way around’ (Barad, 2007, pp. 136-137). This means that entities are not themselves agential, but become agential through intra-action, and that there is no way of determining, in advance, that any of them are active agents. Agency is also not situated within entities, but is rather produced through intra-action, suggesting that also material objects can become active.

    What is documented in Swedish preschools can vary considerably, from activities and/or achievements of individual children to activities that encompass the whole preschool. Documentation can be done for different reasons, such as showing parents what their children have been doing,  assessing individual children or evaluating preschool quality as a whole, and it can also be used as a tool for developing the preschool practice (Vallberg-Roth, 2012). There are thus different aims, from documenting in order to be able to remember and evaluate or assess to documenting in order to make way for and develop new activities (Swedish National Agency of Education, 2011).

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer Netherlands, 2015
    Keywords
    Early childhood education, Children’s participation, Pedagogical documentation, Preschool practice, Childhood
    National Category
    Pedagogical Work
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-112873 (URN)10.1007/s13158-015-0146-9 (DOI)
    Note

    On the day of the defence date the status of this article was Manuscript.

    Available from: 2014-12-18 Created: 2014-12-18 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
  • 141.
    Elfström Pettersson, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Production and Products of Preschool Documentation: Entanglements of children, things, and templates2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of the present study is to produce knowledge about how children, things, documents, computers, teachers, templates and other entities take part in and produce documentation in preschool systematic quality development work. The thesis asks questions about how and what is produced as quality in preschool documentation. Through a posthumanist agential realist approach, the study engages empirically in video recordings of preschool documentation practices from one Swedish preschool, and in documentation from four other Swedish preschools.

    The results, presented in four articles, show that documentation practice is complex and entangled with a variety of entities, human and non-human, and spaces and time. The study shows how children’s participation in production of documentation does not depend on which documentation method is used. In the study, objects such as computers, images and coloured labels, together with teachers’ attitudes and agendas, have an impact on the way that children are involved in producing documentation. The results also show that the products of documentation, intra-acting with a local template, with past and present preschool traditions and policies, produce rather than represent certain elements of quality such as teachers’ actions, children’s interests and thematic work. The thesis produces knowledge about how the focus of preschool documentation shifts away from individual children and towards teachers’ activities, and creates possibilities for what preschool practices and quality may become.

    List of papers
    1. Children's participation in preschool documentation practices
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children's participation in preschool documentation practices
    2015 (English)In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 231-247Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish preschool curriculum not only prescribes documentation and quality assessment, it also requires children’s participation in the documentation process, although it offers no directions on how the documenting should be done, which can leave teachers unsure of how to do it. This study differs from research that presents pedagogical documentation as a way of enabling children’s participation in preschool in that it explores children’s participation in producing different forms of documentation in a Swedish preschool – and it finds that such participation is complex. The findings imply that, whether documentation is activity-integrated or retrospective, different forms of participation are possible.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Sage Publications, 2015
    Keywords
    Childhood, children’s participation, children’s rights, pedagogical documentation, preschool practice
    National Category
    Pedagogical Work
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105830 (URN)10.1177/0907568213513480 (DOI)000353984500007 ()2-s2.0-84930347007 (Scopus ID)
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 729-2010-200
    Available from: 2014-04-09 Created: 2014-04-09 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    2. Sticky Dots and Lion Adventures Playing a Part in Preschool Documentation Practices
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sticky Dots and Lion Adventures Playing a Part in Preschool Documentation Practices
    2015 (English)In: International Journal of Early Childhood, ISSN 0020-7187, E-ISSN 1878-4658, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 443-460Article in journal (Other academic) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This article is based on a study of Swedish preschool documentation practices. The 2010 revised version of the Swedish preschool curriculum emphasizes documentation as an important practice. The Swedish preschool curriculum also emphasizes children’s participation in documentation and evaluation. The main reason for this can be found in the very first words of the curriculum: ‘Democracy forms the foundation of the preschool’ (Swedish National Agency of Education, 2011, p. 3). This is connected to children’s right to make their voices heard in all matters affecting them according to UNCRC. However, the curriculum does not give any guidelines on how to carry out this practice. A quality audit by the Swedish Schools Inspectorate in 2011 found that preschool teachers were uncertain about how to document (Skolinspektionen, 2011). This, and a lack of knowledge about documentation, sometimes impedes teachers’ documentation practices in the preschools (Palmer, 2012). With the term documentation practices I refer to all events connected to making and using documentations in the preschool; these include, for example, taking photographs, writing captions, printing documents, looking at and talking about photos, and discussing events depicted in photos or drawings. In documentation practices different kinds of artefacts or devices are present and used (e.g., cameras, computers, printers, pencils, and paper) or produced (e.g, printed photos, texts, and drawings). Through methods that are shaped by an agential realist construct, the main objective of this article is to explore how different kinds of material agents, such as computers, photos, teachers and children, can intra-act (Barad, 2007) in the production of children’s participation in preschool documentation practices. The reason for using the term intra-act rather than interact is that, in Barad’s terms, the world is not seen as consisting of separate entities, which the word interaction implies. Instead entities (which could be human or non-human) are temporarily separated or produced through intra-action; ‘relations do not follow relata, but the other way around’ (Barad, 2007, pp. 136-137). This means that entities are not themselves agential, but become agential through intra-action, and that there is no way of determining, in advance, that any of them are active agents. Agency is also not situated within entities, but is rather produced through intra-action, suggesting that also material objects can become active.

    What is documented in Swedish preschools can vary considerably, from activities and/or achievements of individual children to activities that encompass the whole preschool. Documentation can be done for different reasons, such as showing parents what their children have been doing,  assessing individual children or evaluating preschool quality as a whole, and it can also be used as a tool for developing the preschool practice (Vallberg-Roth, 2012). There are thus different aims, from documenting in order to be able to remember and evaluate or assess to documenting in order to make way for and develop new activities (Swedish National Agency of Education, 2011).

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer Netherlands, 2015
    Keywords
    Early childhood education, Children’s participation, Pedagogical documentation, Preschool practice, Childhood
    National Category
    Pedagogical Work
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-112873 (URN)10.1007/s13158-015-0146-9 (DOI)
    Note

    On the day of the defence date the status of this article was Manuscript.

    Available from: 2014-12-18 Created: 2014-12-18 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    3. Teachers’ actions and children’s interests: Quality becomings in preschool documentation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teachers’ actions and children’s interests: Quality becomings in preschool documentation
    2017 (English)In: Nordisk Barnehageforskning, ISSN 1890-9167, E-ISSN 1890-9167, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    High quality is considered to be important for children’s development and learning in early childhood education. Swedish preschool teachers are required to systematically develop their practice and support children’s learning, using documentation and taking children’s interests into account. From a posthumanist perspective, preschool documentation, models and templates could be seen as actively producing certain elements of quality.  Reading  documentation from eight Swedish preschool groups diffractively through different texts, such as the national curriculum, supportive texts and research, this article discusses how teachers’ actions and children’s interests are produced as important quality aspects in one of these groups.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Høgskolen i Oslo og Akershus, 2017
    Keywords
    Documentation, Early childhood education, Posthumanism, Preschool quality
    National Category
    Pedagogical Work Pedagogy Didactics Learning Specific Languages
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-136693 (URN)10.7577/nbf.1756 (DOI)
    Available from: 2017-04-21 Created: 2017-04-21 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
  • 142.
    Elfström Pettersson, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Sticky Dots and Lion Adventures Playing a Part in Preschool Documentation Practices2015In: International Journal of Early Childhood, ISSN 0020-7187, E-ISSN 1878-4658, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 443-460Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is based on a study of Swedish preschool documentation practices. The 2010 revised version of the Swedish preschool curriculum emphasizes documentation as an important practice. The Swedish preschool curriculum also emphasizes children’s participation in documentation and evaluation. The main reason for this can be found in the very first words of the curriculum: ‘Democracy forms the foundation of the preschool’ (Swedish National Agency of Education, 2011, p. 3). This is connected to children’s right to make their voices heard in all matters affecting them according to UNCRC. However, the curriculum does not give any guidelines on how to carry out this practice. A quality audit by the Swedish Schools Inspectorate in 2011 found that preschool teachers were uncertain about how to document (Skolinspektionen, 2011). This, and a lack of knowledge about documentation, sometimes impedes teachers’ documentation practices in the preschools (Palmer, 2012). With the term documentation practices I refer to all events connected to making and using documentations in the preschool; these include, for example, taking photographs, writing captions, printing documents, looking at and talking about photos, and discussing events depicted in photos or drawings. In documentation practices different kinds of artefacts or devices are present and used (e.g., cameras, computers, printers, pencils, and paper) or produced (e.g, printed photos, texts, and drawings). Through methods that are shaped by an agential realist construct, the main objective of this article is to explore how different kinds of material agents, such as computers, photos, teachers and children, can intra-act (Barad, 2007) in the production of children’s participation in preschool documentation practices. The reason for using the term intra-act rather than interact is that, in Barad’s terms, the world is not seen as consisting of separate entities, which the word interaction implies. Instead entities (which could be human or non-human) are temporarily separated or produced through intra-action; ‘relations do not follow relata, but the other way around’ (Barad, 2007, pp. 136-137). This means that entities are not themselves agential, but become agential through intra-action, and that there is no way of determining, in advance, that any of them are active agents. Agency is also not situated within entities, but is rather produced through intra-action, suggesting that also material objects can become active.

    What is documented in Swedish preschools can vary considerably, from activities and/or achievements of individual children to activities that encompass the whole preschool. Documentation can be done for different reasons, such as showing parents what their children have been doing,  assessing individual children or evaluating preschool quality as a whole, and it can also be used as a tool for developing the preschool practice (Vallberg-Roth, 2012). There are thus different aims, from documenting in order to be able to remember and evaluate or assess to documenting in order to make way for and develop new activities (Swedish National Agency of Education, 2011).

  • 143.
    Elfström Pettersson, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Teachers’ actions and children’s interests: Quality becomings in preschool documentation2017In: Nordisk Barnehageforskning, ISSN 1890-9167, E-ISSN 1890-9167, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High quality is considered to be important for children’s development and learning in early childhood education. Swedish preschool teachers are required to systematically develop their practice and support children’s learning, using documentation and taking children’s interests into account. From a posthumanist perspective, preschool documentation, models and templates could be seen as actively producing certain elements of quality.  Reading  documentation from eight Swedish preschool groups diffractively through different texts, such as the national curriculum, supportive texts and research, this article discusses how teachers’ actions and children’s interests are produced as important quality aspects in one of these groups.

  • 144.
    Elvstrand, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Att göra delaktighet i skolan - elevers erfarenheter2015In: Utbildning och lärande, ISSN 1653-0594, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 102-115Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 145.
    Elvstrand, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Att göra delaktighet i skolan, elevers erfarenheter2015In: Utbildning och lärande, ISSN 1653-0594, Vol. 9, p. 102-114Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 146.
    Elvstrand, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Den villkorade delaktigheten2013In: Barns livsvillkor: i mötet med skola och fritidshem / [ed] Mikael Jensson och Anders Fjällhed, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2013, p. 105-119Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 147.
    Elvstrand, Helene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Forslund Frykedal, KarinLinköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.Samuelsson, MarcusLinköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.Thornberg, RobertLinköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Lärares etik och professionella arbete: skolan som moralisk praktik : en vänbok till Gunnel Colnerud2013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Gunnel Colnerud, professor vid Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, vid Linköpings universitet har under den största delen av sitt yrkesverksamma liv varit engagerad i skolfrågor av olika slag. Ofta har fokus för hennes intresse och uppdrag legat i att förstå skolans vardagsliv och det komplexa uppdrag som läraryrket innebär. Gunnel fyller 67 år i januari 2015 och denna vänbok är en hyllning till henne från kollegor, både nationellt och internationellt, samt tidigare doktorander. Bidragen i antologin, Lärares etik och professionella arbete - skolan som moralisk praktik, är tänkt att spegla de områden som Gunnel i sin forskning varit engagerad i.

    Innan Gunnel påbörjade sin forskarutbildning i pedagogik var hon verksam som psykolog inom skolhälsovården. Denna erfarenhet av att ha mött barn och elevers utsatthet samt lärares ständiga arbete med att möta olika typer av förändringar och hantera en komplex yrkesroll är något som Gunnel burit med sig in i sin forskning, vilket inte minst syns i hennes outtröttliga engagemang i att vara en forskare som bidrar till skolans praktik.

    I mitten av nittiotalet Jade Gunnel fram sin avhandling som byggde på intervjuer med yrkesverksamma lärare och handlade om etiska dilemman lärare ställs inför i sitt yrkesutövande. Gunnel har allt sedan avhandlingsarbetet varit mycket engagerad i etiska frågor i relation till läraruppdraget och var en av de pådrivande krafterna i att tillsammans med Sveriges båda lärarförbund formulera gemensamma yrkesetiska principer, som kom att benämnas Lärares yrkesetik. I detta arbete gjorde Gunnel betydande insatser genom att problematisera yrkesetik som fenomen, medverka i otaliga utbildningsinsatser för lärare och lärarstudenter inom området och sist men inte minst bidra till att etablera yrkesetik som forskningsfält.

    Ett kännetecknande drag för Gunnels forskning har varit den starka viljan och övertygelsen om att forskning om skola behöver ske i relation till och med skolans praktik. Tillsammans med sin make och kollega professor Kjell Granström etablerade Gunnel en forskarmiljö med fokus på praxisnära forskning. Vi som är redaktörer för denna vänbok har alla haft förmånen att vara doktorander till Gunnel eller Kjell och fått möjlighet att växa som forskare i en forskarmiljö som präglats av kreativitet, engagemang och spännande diskussioner.

    Norrköping och Linköping, oktober 2013

    Helene, Karin, Marcus & Robert

  • 148.
    Elvstrand, Helene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Hallström, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Hellberg, Kristina
    Institutionen för pedagogik och lärande, Linnéuniversitetet.
    Vad är teknik? Pedagogers uppfattningar om och erfarenheter av teknik och teknikundervisning i förskolan [What is technology? Preschool teachers' conceptions and experiences of technology and technology education in the preschool]2018In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 37-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years technology has become increasingly emphasized as educational content in the Swedish preschool, not the least with the introduction of the latest curriculum in 2010. Since preschool teachers have not had any formal technology education until just recently, it is of importance to investigate how they handle technology in the daily activities of the preschool. The purpose of this study is therefore to describe and analyze Swedish preschool teachers’ views and experiences of working with technology in the preschool, focusing on what opportunities and obstacles that they see. The data consists of transcripts from focus group interviews with sixteen teachers in two Swedish preschools, and the data was analyzed with open coding in a Grounded Theory tradition. The results show that when it comes to opportunities, the teachers consider technology to permeate all preschool activities, and the challenge here is rather to make technology visible. In terms of obstacles, the teachers are uncertain about what technology is and want to have more knowledge of technology themselves, for example, relevant concepts for various technologies or activities. They also need to know more about technology education in order to be able to educationally convey knowledge of technology to the children and to make the children conscious of the technology that surrounds them.

  • 149.
    Elvstrand, Helene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Hellberg, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Hallström, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Technology and Gender in Early Childhood Education: How Girls and Boys Explore and Learn Technology in Free Play in Swedish Preschools2012In: Technology Education in the 21st Century: Proceedings from the PATT 26 Conference, Technology Education in the 21st Century, Stockholm, Sweden, 26-30 June, 2012 / [ed] Thomas Ginner, Jonas Hallström, Magnus Hultén, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2012, p. 163-171Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The preschool is the first institutional context that Swedish children meet in their lives, and it therefore plays a very important role in the Swedish welfare state. As of 1998, preschools were part of the public school system and the first curriculum was then adopted. In the new curriculum for the preschool (2010) technology is emphasized as one of the most significant pedagogical areas to work with. In many countries the preschool age is seen as an important time for laying the foundations for interest in and knowledge about technology, since it is believed that the children’s curiosity comes naturally. It is thus seen as a crucial age to get both boys and girls interested in technology. Although research on technology education in the preschool is lacking to a great extent, existing research largely confirms these views. The aim of this paper is to investigate how girls and boys explore and learn technology in free play in two Swedish preschools. The empirical study is inspired by an ethnographic approach and is based on qualitative data collected through observations and informal talk with children and teachers. Two preschools with children one to five years old were chosen for the study.

    Today’s society places high demands on the individual in terms of ability to acquire understanding of and knowledge about technology. One of the visions of the 2010 Governmental committee Teknikdelegationen was a Swedish society that provides all its citizens with the competence needed to understand, profit by and influence the development of an increasingly complex and technologically advanced society. Hence the committee emphasized that knowledge about technology must be disseminated early on, already in the preschool, and technology should be an important feature throughout the education system (Teknikdelegationen, 2010, p. 26-27). A clear majority of Swedish children now attend the preschool, although it is not mandatory. The preschool is consequently the first institutional context that Swedish children meet in their lives, and it therefore plays a very important role in the Swedish welfare state. As of 1998, preschools were part of the public school system and the first curriculum was then adopted. In the new curriculum for the preschool (2010) technology is emphasized as one of the most significant pedagogical areas to work with. In many countries the preschool age is seen as an important time for laying the foundations for knowledge about and interest in technology, since it is believed that the children’s curiosity comes naturally (Axell, 2012). It is thus seen as a crucial age to get both boys and girls interested in technology. Although research on technology education in the preschool is lacking to a great extent, existing research largely confirms these views (see, for example, Parker-Rees, 1997).

    The aim of this paper is to investigate how girls and boys explore and learn technology in free play in two Swedish preschools. The empirical study is inspired by an ethnographic approach and is based on qualitative data collected through observations and informal talk with children and teachers. Two preschools with children one to five years old were chosen for the study.

  • 150.
    Elvstrand, Helene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Högberg, Ronny
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Nordvall, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Analysarbete inom fältforskning2015In: Handbok i kvalitativ analys / [ed] Andreas Fejes & Robert Thornberg, Stockholm: Liber, 2015, 2, p. 218-237Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta är en oumbärlig handbok för dig som ska skriva en akademisk uppsats baserad på kvalitativ datainsamling som exempelvis kvalitativa intervjuer, detaljerade observationer av samtal, textdokument eller fältstudier. Här får du konkreta råd och en gedigen genomgång av grundläggande aspekter av kvalitativ forskning samt redskap för att analysera data. Boken redogör för olika former av kvalitativ analys och går därutöver även igenom forskarens roll, forskningsprocessen, metoder för datainsamling samt vilken metodansats som kan vara lämplig att välja.

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