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  • 101.
    Phillips, P.J.
    et al.
    Departments of Chemical Engineering, University of Sydney, Australia.
    Barford, J.P.
    Departments of Chemical Engineering, University of Sydney, Australia.
    Harbour, C.
    Departments of Infectious Diseases, University of Sydney, Australia.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Departments of Biochemistry, University of Sydney, Australia .
    Intracellular analysis of a lymphoblastoid cell line using H-NMR1994In: Animal Cell Technology: Basic & Applied Aspects / [ed] T. Kobayashi, Y. Kitagawa & K. Okumura, Springer Verlag (Kluwer) , 1994, p. 351-358Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A complete analysis of growth and protein production characteristics of a commercially relevant animal cell line has been undertaken. The model cell line was a human lymphoblastoid which produces an IgG antibody against anti-D in blood. The batch growth characteristics of this cell line under different conditions was monitored and analysis of major nutrients and products as well as amino acids in the medium was undertaken. The internal (i.e. intracellular) concentrations of a variety of species in the cell were investigated using H-NMR of cellular extracts. This analysis enabled the quantitative determination of many amino acids, biosynthetic intermediates, secreted products and energetically important intermediates.

  • 102.
    Quast, Ulrich
    et al.
    Ex University Hospital, Germany.
    Kaulich, Theodor W.
    University Hospital, Germany.
    Alvarez-Romero, Jose T.
    ININ, Mexico.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Enger, Shirin A.
    McGill University, Canada.
    Medich, David C.
    Worcester Polytech Institute, MA 01609 USA.
    Mourtada, Firas
    Helen F Graham Cancer Centre and Research Institute, DE 19713 USA.
    Perez-Calatayud, Jose
    University Hospital La Fe, Spain; Clin Benidorm, Spain.
    Rivard, Mark J.
    Tufts University, MA 02111 USA.
    Abu Zakaria, G.
    University of Cologne, Germany; Gono University, Bangladesh.
    A brachytherapy photon radiation quality index Q(BT) for probe-type dosimetry2016In: Physica medica (Testo stampato), ISSN 1120-1797, E-ISSN 1724-191X, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 741-748Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: In photon brachytherapy (BT), experimental dosimetry is needed to verify treatment plans if planning algorithms neglect varying attenuation, absorption or scattering conditions. The detectors response is energy dependent, including the detector material to water dose ratio and the intrinsic mechanisms. The local mean photon energy E(r) must be known or another equivalent energy quality parameter used. We propose the brachytherapy photon radiation quality index Q(BT) ((E) over bar), to characterize the photon radiation quality in view of measurements of distributions of the absorbed dose to water, D-w, around BT sources. Materials and methods: While the external photon beam radiotherapy (EBRT) radiation quality index Q(EBRT) ((E) over bar) = TPR1020((E) over bar) is not applicable to BT, the authors have applied a novel energy dependent parameter, called brachytherapy photon radiation quality index, defined as Q(BT) ((E) over bar) = D-prim(r = 2 cm; theta(0) = 90 degrees)/D-prim(r(0) = 1 cm; theta(0) = 90 degrees), utilizing precise primary absorbed dose data, D-prim, from source reference databases, without additional MC-calculations. Results and discussion: For BT photon sources used clinically, Q(BT) ((E) over bar) enables to determine the effective mean linear attenuation coefficient (mu) over bar (E) and thus the effective energy of the primary photons E-prim(eff)(r(0), theta(0)) at the TG-43 reference position P-ref (r(0) = 1 cm; theta(0) = 90 degrees) being close to the mean total photon energy (E) over bar (tot)(r(0), theta(0)). If one has calibrated detectors, published (E) over bar (tot)(r) and the BT radiation quality correction factor k(Q, Q0)(BT) ((E) over bar, r, theta) for different BT radiation qualities Q and Q(0), the detectors response can be determined and D-w(r, theta) measured in the vicinity of BT photon sources. Conclusions: This novel brachytherapy photon radiation quality index Q(BT) characterizes sufficiently accurate and precise the primary photon` s penetration probability and scattering potential. (C) 2016 Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica.

  • 103.
    Romu, Thobias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Robust Water Fat Separated Dual-Echo MRI by Phase-Sensitive Reconstruction2017In: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, ISSN 0740-3194, E-ISSN 1522-2594, Vol. 78, no 3, p. 1208-1216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a robust water-fat separation method for T1-weighted symmetric two-point Dixon data.

    Methods: A method for water-fat separation by phase unwrapping of the opposite-phase images by phase-sensitive reconstruction (PSR) is introduced. PSR consists of three steps; 1, identification of clusters of tissue voxels; 2, unwrapping of the phase in each cluster by solving Poisson’s equation; 3, find the correct sign of each unwrapped opposite-phase cluster, so that the water-fat images are assigned the correct identities. The robustness was evaluated by counting the number of water-fat swap artifacts in a total of 733 image volumes. The method was also compared to commercial software.

    Results: In the water-fat separated image volumes, the PSR method failed to unwrap the phase of one cluster and misclassified 10. One swap was observed in areas affected by motion and was constricted to the affected area. Twenty swaps were observed surrounding susceptibility artifacts, none of which spread outside the artifact affected regions. The PSR method had fewer swaps when compared to commercial software.

    Conclusion: The PSR method can robustly produce water-fat separated whole-body images based on symmetric two-echo spoiled gradient echo images, under both ideal conditions and in the presence of common artifacts.

  • 104.
    Romu, Thobias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Elander, Louise
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Lidell, Martin
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Betz, Matthias
    Klinikum der Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Enerbäck, Sven
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Characterization of Brown Adipose Tissue by water-fat separated Magnetic Resonance Imaging2015In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 42, no 6, p. 1639-1645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To evaluate the possibility of quantifying brown adipose tissue (BAT) volume and fat concentration with a high resolution, long TE, dual-echo Dixon imaging protocol.

    Materials and methods: A 0.42 mm isotropic resolution water-fat separated MRI protocol was implemented by utilizing the second opposite-phase echo and third in-phase echo. Fat images were calibrated with regard to the intensity of nearby white adipose tissue (WAT) to form relative fat content (RFC) images. To evaluate the ability to measure BAT volume and RFC contrast dynamics, rats were divided into two groups that were kept at 4° or 22° C for five days. The rats were then scanned in a 70 cm bore 3.0 T MRI scanner and a human dual energy CT. Interscapular, paraaortal and perirenal BAT (i/pa/pr-BAT) depots as well as WAT and muscle were segmented in the MRI and CT images. Biopsies were collected from the identified BAT depots.

    Results: The biopsies confirmed that the three depots identified with the RFC images consisted of BAT. There was a significant linear correlation (p <0.001) between the measured RFC and the Hounsfield units from DECT. Significantly lower iBAT RFC (p = 0.0064) and significantly larger iBAT and prBAT volumes (p=0.0017) were observed in the cold stimulated rats.

    Conclusions: The calibrated Dixon images with RFC scaling can depict BAT and be used to measure differences in volume, and fat concentration, induced by cold stimulation. The high correlation between RFC and HU suggests that the fat concentration is the main RFC image contrast mechanism.

  • 105.
    Romu, Thobias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Linge, Jennifer
    Advanced MR Analytics AB, Linköping, Sweden.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    West, Janne
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bell, Jimmy
    Westminster University, London, UK.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Hepatic Steatosis is Associated with Lower Prior Health Care Burden in Visceral Obesity2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 106.
    Romu, Thobias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    West, Janne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Spetz, Anna-Clara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lindblom, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindh Åstrand, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    The effect of flip-angle on body composition using calibrated water-fat MRI.2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study tested how the flip angle affects body composition analysis by MRI, if adipose tissue is used as an internal intensity reference. Whole-body water-fat images with flip angle 5° and 10° were collected from 29 women in an ongoing study. The images were calibrated based on the adipose tissue signal and whole-body total adipose, lean and soft tissue volumes were measured. A mean difference of 0.29 L, or 0.90 % of the average volume, and a coefficient of variation of 0.40 % was observed for adipose tissue.

  • 107.
    Sanchez, Jose Carlos Gonzalez
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Magnusson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Computer Vision. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Sandborg, Michael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Malusek, Alexandr
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Segmentation of bones in medical dual-energy computed tomography volumes using the 3D U-Net2020In: Physica medica (Testo stampato), ISSN 1120-1797, E-ISSN 1724-191X, Vol. 69, p. 241-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deep learning algorithms have improved the speed and quality of segmentation for certain tasks in medical imaging. The aim of this work is to design and evaluate an algorithm capable of segmenting bones in dual-energy CT data sets. A convolutional neural network based on the 3D U-Net architecture was implemented and evaluated using high tube voltage images, mixed images and dual-energy images from 30 patients. The network performed well on all the data sets; the mean Dice coefficient for the test data was larger than 0.963. Of special interest is that it performed better on dual-energy CT volumes compared to mixed images that mimicked images taken at 120 kV. The corresponding increase in the Dice coefficient from 0.965 to 0.966 was small since the enhancements were mainly at the edges of the bones. The method can easily be extended to the segmentation of multi-energy CT data.

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  • 108.
    Tapper, Sofie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Tisell, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    How does motion affect GABA-measurements? Order statistic filtering compared to conventional analysis of MEGA-PRESS MRS2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 5, article id e0177795Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate two post-processing techniques applied to MRS MEGA-PRESS data influenced by motion-induced artifacts. In contrast to the conventional averaging technique, order statistic filtering (OSF) is a known method for artifact reduction. Therefore, this method may be suitable to incorporate in the GABA quantification. Methods Twelve healthy volunteers were scanned three times using a 3 T MR system. One measurement protocol consisted of two MEGA-PRESS measurements, one reference measurement and one measurement including head motions. The resulting datasets were analyzed with the standard averaging technique and with the OSF-technique in two schemes; filtering phase cycles RAW PC and filtering dynamics RAW Dyn. Results The datasets containing artifacts resulted in an underestimation of the concentrations. There was a trend for the OSF-technique to compensate for this reduction when quantifying SNR-intense signals. However, there was no indication that OSF improved the estimated GABA concentrations. Moreover, when only considering the reference measurements, the OSF technique was equally as effective as averaging, which suggests that the techniques are interchangeable. Conclusion OSF performed equally well as the conventional averaging technique for low-SNR signals. For high-SNR signals, OSF performed better and thus could be considered for routine usage.

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  • 109.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Sandborg, Michael
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    CLINICAL AUDIT OF IMAGE QUALITY IN RADIOLOGY USING VISUAL GRADING CHARACTERISTICS ANALYSIS2016In: Radiation Protection Dosimetry, ISSN 0144-8420, E-ISSN 1742-3406, Vol. 169, no 1-4, p. 340-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this work was to assess whether an audit of clinical image quality could be efficiently implemented within a limited time frame using visual grading characteristics (VGC) analysis. Lumbar spine radiography, bedside chest radiography and abdominal CT were selected. For each examination, images were acquired or reconstructed in two ways. Twenty images per examination were assessed by 40 radiology residents using visual grading of image criteria. The results were analysed using VGC. Inter-observer reliability was assessed. The results of the visual grading analysis were consistent with expected outcomes. The inter-observer reliability was moderate to good and correlated with perceived image quality (r2 5 0.47). The median observation time per image or image series was within 2 min. These results suggest that the use of visual grading of image criteria to assess the quality of radiographs provides a rapid method for performing an image quality audit in a clinical environment.

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  • 110.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Nezirevic Dernroth, Dzeneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Acute effects of coffee on skin blood flow and microvascular function2017In: Microvascular Research, ISSN 0026-2862, E-ISSN 1095-9319, Vol. 114, p. 58-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    Studies on the acute effects of coffee on the microcirculation have shown contradicting results. This study aimed to investigate if intake of caffeine-containing coffee changes blood flow and microvascular reactivity in the skin.

    Methods

    We measured acute changes in cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) in the forearm and the tip of the finger, the microvascular response to transdermaliontophoresis of acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and post-occlusive reactive hyperemia (PORH) in the skin, after intake of caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee.

    Results

    Vasodilatation during iontophoresis of ACh was significantly stronger after intake of caffeinated coffee compared to after intake of decaffeinated coffee (1.26 ± 0.20 PU/mm Hg vs. 1.13 ± 0.38 PU/mm Hg, P < 0.001). Forearm CVC before and after PORH were not affected by caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee. After intake of caffeinated coffee, a more pronounced decrease in CVC in the fingertip was observed compared to after intake of decaffeinated coffee (− 1.36 PU/mm Hg vs. − 0.52 PU/mm Hg, P = 0.002).

    Conclusions

    Caffeine, as ingested by drinking caffeinated coffee acutely improves endothelium-dependent microvascular responses in the forearm skin, while endothelium-independent responses to PORH and SNP iontophoresis are not affected. Blood flow in the fingertip decreases markedly during the first hour after drinking caffeinated coffee compared to decaffeinated coffee.

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  • 111.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sandborg, Michael
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    ASSESSING THE USEFULNESS OF THE QUASI-IDEAL OBSERVER FORQUALITY CONTROL IN FLUOROSCOPY2016In: Radiation Protection Dosimetry, ISSN 0144-8420, E-ISSN 1742-3406, Vol. 169, no 1-4, p. 360-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the reliability of the square of the signal-to-noise ratio rate, SNR2rate, as a precise measurement for quality control test in a digital fluoroscopy system. The quasi-ideal model observer was used to measure SNR2rate. The dose rate, pulse rate and field of view were varied, and their effect on dose efficiency, defined as SNR2rate=PKA;rate, was evaluated (where PKA;rate is the air kerma-area product rate). Measurements were repeated to assess reproducibility. The relative standard deviation in SNR2rate=PKA;rate over seven consecutive measurements was 5 %. No significant variation in SNR2rate=PKA;rate was observed across different pulse rates (10–30 pulses s-1). The low-dose-rate setting had a superior dose efficiency compared with the medium- and high-dose-rate settings. A smaller field of view resulted in higher dose efficiency. The results show that SNR2rate=PKA;rate measurements offer the high precision required in quality control constancy tests.

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  • 112.
    Todde, S.
    et al.
    University of Milano-Bicocca, Tecnomed Foundation, Italy.
    Peitl, P. Kolenc
    Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Elsinga, P.
    University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Koziorowski, Jacek
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ferrari, V.
    GE Healthcare, Amersham, UK.
    Ocak, E. M.
    Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Istanbul University, Istanbul Turkey.
    Hjelstuen, O.
    Institute for Energy Technology, Norway.
    Patt, M.
    Department for Nuclear Medicine, Radiochemistry, Leipzig, Germany.
    Mindt, T. L.
    Ludwig Boltzmann Institute Applied Diagnostics, General Hospital Vienna, Nuklearmedizin, Vienna, Austria; 10Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image Guided Therapy, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Behe, M.
    Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences ETH-PSI-USZ Paul-Scherrer-Institute, Switzerland.
    Guidance on validation and qualification of processes and operations involving radiopharmaceuticals2017In: EJNMMI radiopharmacy and chemistry, ISSN 2365-421X, Vol. 2, no 1Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Validation and qualification activities are nowadays an integral part of the day by day routine work in a radiopharmacy. This document is meant as an Appendix of Part B of the EANM "Guidelines on Good Radiopharmacy Practice (GRPP)" issued by the Radiopharmacy Committee of the EANM, covering the qualification and validation aspects related to the small-scale "in house" preparation of radiopharmaceuticals. The aim is to provide more detailed and practice-oriented guidance to those who are involved in the small-scale preparation of radiopharmaceuticals which are not intended for commercial purposes or distribution.

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  • 113.
    Ulbrich, Erika J.
    et al.
    University Hospital, Switzerland; University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Nanz, Daniel
    University Hospital, Switzerland; University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Adv MR Analyt AB, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Marcon, Magda
    University Hospital, Switzerland; University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Fischer, Michael A.
    University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Whole-body adipose tissue and lean muscle volumes and their distribution across gender and age: MR-derived normative values in a normal-weight Swiss population2018In: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, ISSN 0740-3194, E-ISSN 1522-2594, Vol. 79, no 1, p. 449-458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PurposeTo determine age- and gender-dependent whole-body adipose tissue and muscle volumes in healthy Swiss volunteers in Dixon MRI in comparison with anthropometric and bioelectrical impedance (BIA) measurements. MethodsFat-water-separated whole-body 3 Tesla MRI of 80 healthy volunteers (ages 20 to 62 years) with a body mass index (BMI) of 17.5 to 26.2kg/m(2) (10 men, 10 women per decade). Age and gender-dependent volumes of total adipose tissue (TAT), visceral adipose tissue (VAT), total abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (ASAT) and total abdominal adipose tissue (TAAT), and the total lean muscle tissue (TLMT) normalized for body height were determined by semi-automatic segmentation, and correlated with anthropometric and BIA measurements as well as lifestyle parameters. ResultsThe TAT, ASAT, VAT, and TLMT indexes (TATi, ASATi, VATi, and TLMTi, respectively) (L/m(2)standard deviation) for women/men were 6.4 +/- 1.8/5.3 +/- 1.7, 1.6 +/- 0.7/1.2 +/- 0.5, 0.4 +/- 0.2/0.8 +/- 0.5, and 5.6 +/- 0.6/7.1 +/- 0.7, respectively. The TATi correlated strongly with ASATi (ramp;gt;0.93), VATi, BMI and BIA (ramp;gt;0.70), and TAATi (ramp;gt;0.96), and weak with TLMTi for both genders (ramp;gt;-0.34). The VAT was the only parameter showing an age dependency (ramp;gt;0.32). The BMI and BIA showed strong correlation with all MR-derived adipose tissue volumes. The TAT mass was estimated significantly lower from BIA than from MRI (both genders Pamp;lt;.001; mean bias -5kg). ConclusionsThe reported gender-specific MRI-based adipose tissue and muscle volumes might serve as normative values. The estimation of adipose tissue volumes was significantly lower from anthropometric and BIA measurements than from MRI. Magn Reson Med 79:449-458, 2018. (c) 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  • 114.
    Van Ettinger-Veenstra, Helene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Mcallister, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Higher Language Ability is Related to Angular Gyrus Activation Increase During Semantic Processing, Independent of Sentence Incongruency2016In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5161, E-ISSN 1662-5161, Vol. 10, no 110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the relation between individual language ability and neural semantic processing abilities. Our aim was to explore whether high-level language ability would correlate to decreased activation in language-specific regions or rather increased activation in supporting language regions during processing of sentences. Moreover, we were interested if observed neural activation patterns are modulated by semantic incongruency similarly to previously observed changes upon syntactic congruency modulation. We investigated 27 healthy adults with a sentence reading task which tapped language comprehension and inference, and modulated sentence congruency employing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We assessed the relation between neural activation, congruency modulation, and test performance on a high-level language ability assessment with multiple regression analysis. Our results showed increased activation in the left-hemispheric angular gyrus extending to the temporal lobe related to high language ability. This effect was independent of semantic congruency, and no significant relation between language ability and incongruency modulation was observed. Furthermore, there was a significant increase of activation in the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) bilaterally when the sentences were incongruent, indicating that processing incongruent sentences was more demanding than processing congruent sentences and required increased activation in language regions. The correlation of high-level language ability with increased rather than decreased activation in the left angular gyrus, a region specific for language processing, is opposed to what the neural efficiency hypothesis would predict. We can conclude that no evidence is found for an interaction between semantic congruency related brain activation and highlevel language performance, even though the semantic incongruent condition shows to be more demanding and evoking more neural activation.

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  • 115.
    Vogel, Hans J
    et al.
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
    Uptake, metabolism, and storage of phosphate and nitrogen in plant cells; an NMR perspective1990In: NMR applications in biopolymers, Plenum Press, New York, USA , 1990, p. 329-348Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A number of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy techniques can be used to study pH regulation and various aspects of nutrient metabolism in plant material. In this study phosphorus-31 NMR has been used to determine the energy state (ATP) and the intracellular cytoplasmic and vacuolar pH of cultured plant cells and algae. For the algae it was found that the chemical shift of the terminal polyphosphate resonance provided a good monitor of the vacuolar pH which was estimated at pH 5.5. A cytoplasmic pH of 7.2 was determined from the chemical shifts of the Pi and glucose-6-phosphate resonances. Phosphate uptake could also be followed by 31P NMR and these studies showed that Pi was stored as polyphosphates in algae, but as vacuolar Pi in certain higher plants such as Catharanthus roseus and Nicotiana tabacum.

  • 116.
    Vogel, Hans J.
    et al.
    Department of Physical Chemistry 2, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Department of Physical Chemistry 2, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
    Fabiansson, Stefan
    Department of Physical Chemistry 2, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
    Ruderus, Håkan
    Department of Physical Chemistry 2, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
    Tornberg, Eva
    Department of Physical Chemistry 2, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
    Post-mortem energy metabolism in bovine muscles studied by non-invasive phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance1985In: Meat Science, ISSN 0309-1740, E-ISSN 1873-4138, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phosphorus-31 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((31)P-NMR) has been utilized to follow non-invasively the post-mortem metabolism of the major phosphorylated metabolites in muscles from beef slaughter carcasses. In addition to adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP), creatine phosphate (CP) and inorganic phosphate (P(i)) considerable amounts of glucose- and fructose-6-phosphate (G6P and F6P, respectively) as well as glycerol-3-phosphate (Glyc3P) were detected. ATP was mainly present as a Mg(2+)-ATP complex. Adenosine-5'-diphosphate (ADP) appeared to be mainly bound to muscle proteins. A good quantitative agreement was found for the levels of ATP, CP and sugar phosphates (SP) when estimated by NMR or enzymatic assays. Since the chemical shifts of the P(i) and sugar phosphate resonances are a function of the pH, the intracellular pH could be directly deduced from the NMR spectra. Values obtained in this manner were, within the errors of both methods, the same as those determined in iodoacetate/KCl homogenates. The pH gradients within the tissue never exceeded 0.3 pH units. In a final set of experiments we used (31)P-NMR 10 study the effects of electrical stimulation on the intracellular pH and post-mortem metabolism. It was concluded that (31)P-NMR, due to its non-invasive nature plus the fact that some of the NMR parameters are sensitive to the intracellular environment, provides a useful complement to existing methods for the study of post-mortem metabolism.

  • 117.
    Walter, Susanna A
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Lundengård, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Simon, Rozalyn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Torkildsen Nilsson, Maritha
    The National Board of Forensic Medicine and Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Söderfeldt, Birgitta
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Positive Allosteric Modulator of GABA Lowers BOLD Responses in the Cingulate Cortex2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge about the neural underpinnings of the negative blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) responses in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is still limited. We hypothesized that pharmacological GABAergic modulation attenuates BOLD responses, and that blood concentrations of a positive allosteric modulator of GABA correlate inversely with BOLD responses in the cingulate cortex. We investigated whether or not pure task-related negative BOLD responses were co-localized with pharmacologically modulated BOLD responses. Twenty healthy adults received either 5 mg diazepam or placebo in a double blind, randomized design. During fMRI the subjects performed a working memory task. Results showed that BOLD responses in the cingulate cortex were inversely correlated with diazepam blood concentrations; that is, the higher the blood diazepam concentration, the lower the BOLD response. This inverse correlation was most pronounced in the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex and the anterior mid-cingulate cortex. For subjects with diazepam plasma concentration > 0.1 mg/L we observed negative BOLD responses with respect to fixation baseline. There was minor overlap between cingulate regions with task-related negative BOLD responses and regions where the BOLD responses were inversely correlated with diazepam concentration. We interpret that the inverse correlation between the BOLD response and diazepam was caused by GABA-related neural inhibition. Thus, this study supports the hypothesis that GABA attenuates BOLD responses in fMRI. The minimal overlap between task-related negative BOLD responses and responses attenuated by diazepam suggests that these responses might be caused by different mechanisms.

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  • 118.
    Warntjes, Marcel Jan Bertus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Tisell, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Modeling the Presence of Myelin and Edema in the Brain Based on Multi-Parametric Quantitative MRI2016In: Frontiers in Neurology, ISSN 1664-2295, E-ISSN 1664-2295, Vol. 7, no 16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to present a model that uses multi-parametric quantitative MRI to estimate the presence of myelin and edema in the brain. The model relates simultaneous measurement of R-1 and R-2 relaxation rates and proton density to four partial volume compartments, consisting of myelin partial volume, cellular partial volume, free water partial volume, and excess parenchymal water partial volume. The model parameters were obtained using spatially normalized brain images of a group of 20 healthy controls. The pathological brain was modeled in terms of the reduction of myelin content and presence of excess parenchymal water, which indicates the degree of edema. The method was tested on spatially normalized brain images of a group of 20 age-matched multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Clear differences were observed with respect to the healthy controls: the MS group had a 79 mL smaller brain volume (1069 vs. 1148 mL), a 38 mL smaller myelin volume (119 vs. 157 mL), and a 21 mL larger excess parenchymal water volume (78 vs. 57 mL). Template regions of interest of various brain structures indicated that the myelin partial volume in the MS group was 1.6 +/- 1.5% lower for gray matter (GM) structures and 2.8 +/- 1.0% lower for white matter (WM) structures. The excess parenchymal water partial volume was 9 +/- 10% larger for GM and 5 +/- 2% larger for WM. Manually placed ROls indicated that the results using the template ROls may have suffered from loss of anatomical detail due to the spatial normalization process. Examples of the application of the method on high-resolution images are provided for three individual subjects: a 45-year-old healthy subject, a 72-year-old healthy subject, and a 45-year-old MS patient. The observed results agreed with the expected behavior considering both age and disease. In conclusion, the proposed model may provide clinically important parameters, such as the total brain volume, degree of myelination, and degree of edema, based on a single qMRI acquisition with a clinically acceptable scan time.

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  • 119.
    Weich, Rainer G.
    et al.
    Department of Plant Physiology, University of Lund, S-220 07 Lund, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Biological Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
    Vogel, Hans J.
    Biological Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
    Jensén, Paul
    Department of Plant Physiology, University of Lund, S-220 07 Lund, Sweden.
    Phosphorus-31 NMR studies of cell wall-associated calcium-phosphates in Ulva lactuca1989In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 90, no 1, p. 230-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phosphate concentrations in the range 0.1 to 2.0 millimolar induced the formation of extracellular amorphous calcium-phosphates in the cell wall of the marine macro algae Ulva lactuca when they were cultivated in light in seawater at 20°C. A broad resonance representing these compounds as well as resonances for extracellular orthophosphate and polyphosphates could be followed by 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The presence of the calcium-phosphate made the cells brittle and it inhibited the growth of the macro algae and caused mortality within 1 week. The formation of the calcium-phosphates was influenced by the external phosphate concentration, the extracellular pH and the nature and concentration of the external nitrogen source. Furthermore, no formation of these compounds was observed when Ulva lactuca was cultivated in the dark, at low temperatures (5°C) or in the presence of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea. The complex could be removed through washes with ethylenediaminetetraacetate; this treatment did not alter the intracellular pH or the orthophosphate and polyphosphate pools and it restored growth.

  • 120.
    West, Janne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Collins, Rory
    Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford.
    Garratt, Steve
    UK Biobank, Spectrum Way, Adswood, Stockport, UK.
    Bell, Jimmy
    Research Centre for Optimal Health, University of Westminster, London, UK.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Advanced MR Analytics AB, Linköping, Sweden.
    Thomas, E. Louise
    Research Centre for Optimal Health, University of Westminster, London, UK.
    Feasibility of MR-based Body Composition Analysis in Large Scale Population Studies2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 9, article id e0163332Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Quantitative and accurate measurements of fat and muscle in the body are important for prevention and diagnosis of diseases related to obesity and muscle degeneration. Manually segmenting muscle and fat compartments in MR body-images is laborious and time-consuming, hindering implementation in large cohorts. In the present study, the feasibility and success-rate of a Dixon-based MR scan followed by an intensity-normalised, non-rigid, multi-atlas based segmentation was investigated in a cohort of 3,000 subjects.

    Materials and Methods

    3,000 participants in the in-depth phenotyping arm of the UK Biobank imaging study underwent a comprehensive MR examination. All subjects were scanned using a 1.5 T MR-scanner with the dual-echo Dixon Vibe protocol, covering neck to knees. Subjects were scanned with six slabs in supine position, without localizer. Automated body composition analysis was performed using the AMRA Profiler™ system, to segment and quantify visceral adipose tissue (VAT), abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (ASAT) and thigh muscles. Technical quality assurance was performed and a standard set of acceptance/rejection criteria was established. Descriptive statistics were calculated for all volume measurements and quality assurance metrics.

    Results

    Of the 3,000 subjects, 2,995 (99.83 %) were analysable for fat, 2,828 (94.27 %) were analysable when fat and one thigh was included, and 2,775 (92.50 %) were fully analysable for fat and both thigh muscles. Reasons for not being able to analyse datasets were mainly due to missing slabs in the acquisition, or patient positioned so that large parts of the volume was outside of the field-of-view.

    Discussion and Conclusions

    In conclusion, this study showed that the rapid UK Biobank MR-protocol was well tolerated by most subjects and sufficiently robust to achieve very high success-rate for body composition analysis. This research has been conducted using the UK Biobank Resource.

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  • 121.
    West, Janne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Thomas, E. Louise
    Department of Life Sciences Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Westminster, London, UK.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Bell, Jimmy
    Department of Life Sciences Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Westminster, London, UK.
    Body Composition Analysis In Large Scale Population Studies using Dixon Water-Fat Separated Imaging2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Water-fat separated MRI, based on Dixon imaging techniques enables high soft-tissue contrast and the separation of fat and muscle compartments. This study investigate the feasibility and success-rate of one recently described method for MR data-acquisition and body composition analysis, in a large-scale population study. The first 1,000 subjects in the UK Biobank imaging cohort were scanned, quality assured and included for body composition analysis. Volumes of visceral adipose tissue, abdominal subcutaneous tissue, and thigh muscles were calculated. This study showed that the rapid MR-examination was sufficiently robust to achieve very high success-rate for body composition analysis. 

  • 122.
    West, Janne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Linge, Jennifer
    Advanced MR Analytics AB, Linköping, Sweden.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bell, Jimmy
    Westminster University, London, UK.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Distribution Matters – Body Composition Profiling Associated with Prior Health Care Burden2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 123.
    West, Janne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Spetz, Anna-Clara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lindblom, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindh Åstrand, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Automatic combined whole-body muscle and fat volume quantification using water-fat separated MRI in postmenopausal women2015In: International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Annual Meeting: Proceedings, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Quantitative and exact measurements of fat and muscle in the body are important when addressing some of the greatest health-challenges today. In this study whole-body combined regional muscle and fat volume quantification was validated in a group of postmenopausal women, where the body composition is changing. Twelve subjects were scanned with a 4-echo 3D gradient-echo sequence. Water and fat image volumes were calculated using IDEAL, and image intensity correction was performed. Subsequently, automatic tissue segmentation was established using non-rigid morphon based registration. Whole-body regional fat and muscle segmentation could be performed with excellent test-retest reliability, in a single 7-minutes MR-scan.

  • 124.
    West, Janne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Adv MR Analyt AB, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Thorell, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Sweden.
    Lindblom, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berin, Emilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Spetz Holm, Anna-Clara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lindh Åstrand, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Karlsson, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Adv MR Analyt AB, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Adv MR Analyt AB, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Precision of MRI-based body composition measurements of postmenopausal women2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 2, article id e0192495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To determine precision of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based fat and muscle quantification in a group of postmenopausal women. Furthermore, to extend the method to individual muscles relevant to upper-body exercise. Materials and methods This was a sub-study to a randomized control trial investigating effects of resistance training to decrease hot flushes in postmenopausal women. Thirty-six women were included, mean age 56 +/- 6 years. Each subject was scanned twice with a 3.0T MR-scanner using a whole-body Dixon protocol. Water and fat images were calculated using a 6-peak lipid model including R2*-correction. Body composition analyses were performed to measure visceral and subcutaneous fat volumes, lean volumes and muscle fat infiltration (MFI) of the muscle groups thigh muscles, lower leg muscles, and abdominal muscles, as well as the three individual muscles pectoralis, latissimus, and rhomboideus. Analysis was performed using a multi-atlas, calibrated water-fat separated quantification method. Liver-fat was measured as average proton density fat-fraction (PDFF) of three regions-of-interest. Precision was determined with Bland-Altman analysis, repeatability, and coefficient of variation. Results All of the 36 included women were successfully scanned and analysed. The coefficient of variation was 1.1% to 1.5% for abdominal fat compartments (visceral and subcutaneous), 0.8% to 1.9% for volumes of muscle groups (thigh, lower leg, and abdomen), and 2.3% to 7.0% for individual muscle volumes (pectoralis, latissimus, and rhomboideus). Limits of agreement for MFI was within +/- 2.06% for muscle groups and within +/- 5.13% for individual muscles. The limits of agreement for liver PDFF was within +/- 1.9%. Conclusion Whole-body Dixon MRI could characterize a range of different fat and muscle compartments with high precision, including individual muscles, in the study-group of postmenopausal women. The inclusion of individual muscles, calculated from the same scan, enables analysis for specific intervention programs and studies.

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  • 125.
    Wiik, Anna
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Tommy R.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Rullman, Eric
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Andersson, Daniel P.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Mats
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Mandic, Mirko
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Brismar, Torkel B.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. AMRA Med AB, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Chanpen, Setareh
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Flanagan, John N.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Arver, Stefan
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Thomas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Muscle Strength, Size, and Composition Following 12 Months of Gender-affirming Treatment in Transgender Individuals2020In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 105, no 3, p. E805-E813Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context. As many sports are divided in male/female categories, governing bodies have formed regulations on the eligibility for transgender individuals to compete in these categories. Yet, the magnitude of change in muscle mass and strength with gender-affirming treatment remains insufficiently explored. Objective. This study explored the effects of gender-affirming treatment on muscle function, size, and composition during 12 months of therapy. Design, settings, participants. In this single-center observational cohort study, untrained transgender women (TW, n = 11) and transgender men (TM, n = 12), approved to start gender-affirming medical interventions, underwent assessments at baseline, 4 weeks after gonadal suppression of endogenous hormones but before hormone replacement, and 4 and 12 months after treatment initiation. Main outcome measures. Knee extensor and flexor strength were assessed at all examination time points, and muscle size and radiological density (using magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography) at baseline and 12 months after treatment initiation. Results. Thigh muscle volume increased (15%) in TM, which was paralleled by increased quadriceps cross-sectional area (CSA) (15%) and radiological density (6%). In TW, the corresponding parameters decreased by -5% (muscle volume) and -4% (CSA), while density remained unaltered. The TM increased strength over the assessment period, while the TW generally maintained their strength levels. Conclusions. One year of gender-affirming treatment resulted in robust increases in muscle mass and strength in TM, but modest changes in TW. These findings add new knowledge on the magnitude of changes in muscle function, size, and composition with cross-hormone therapy, which could be relevant when evaluating the transgender eligibility rules for athletic competitions.

  • 126.
    Zötterman, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Mirdell, Robin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Horsten, Sandra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Methodological concerns with laser speckle contrast imaging in clinical evaluation of microcirculation2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 3, article id e0174703Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging (LSCI) is a non-invasive and fast technique for measuring microvascular blood flow that recently has found clinical use for burn assessment and evaluation of flaps. Tissue motion caused by for example breathing or patient movements may however affect the measurements in these clinical applications, as may distance between the camera and the skin and tissue curvature. Therefore, the aims of this study were to investigate the effect of frame rate, number of frames/image, movement of the tissue, measuring distance and tissue curvature on the measured perfusion. Methods Methyl nicotinate-induced vasodilation in the forearm skin was measured using LSCI during controlled motion at different speeds, using different combinations of frame rate and number of frames/image, and at varying camera angles and distances. Experiments were made on healthy volunteers and on a cloth soaked in a colloidal suspension of polystyrene microspheres. Results Measured perfusion increased with tissue motion speed. The relation was independent of the absolute perfusion in the skin and of frame rate and number of frames/image. The measured perfusion decreased with increasing angles (16% at 60, p = 0.01). Measured perfusion did not vary significantly between measurement distances from 15 to 40 cm (p = 0.77, %CV 0.9%). Conclusion Tissue motion increases and measurement angles beyond 45 decrease the measured perfusion in LSCI. These findings have to be taken into account when LSCI is used to assess moving or curved tissue surfaces, which is common in clinical applications.

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  • 127.
    Örtenberg, Alexander
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Computer Vision. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sandborg, Michael
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Alm Carlsson, Gudrun
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Malusek, Alexandr
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    PARALLELISATION OF THE MODEL-BASED ITERATIVE RECONSTRUCTION ALGORITHM DIRA2016In: Radiation Protection Dosimetry, ISSN 0144-8420, E-ISSN 1742-3406, Vol. 169, no 1-4, p. 405-409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New paradigms for parallel programming have been devised to simplify software development on multi-core processors and many-core graphical processing units (GPU). Despite their obvious benefits, the parallelisation of existing computer programs is not an easy task. In this work, the use of the Open Multiprocessing (OpenMP) and Open Computing Language (OpenCL) frameworks is considered for the parallelisation of the model-based iterative reconstruction algorithm DIRA with the aim to significantly shorten the code’s execution time. Selected routines were parallelised using OpenMP and OpenCL libraries; some routines were converted from MATLAB to C and optimised. Parallelisation of the code with the OpenMP was easy and resulted in an overall speedup of 15 on a 16-core computer. Parallelisation with OpenCL was more difficult owing to differences between the central processing unit and GPU architectures. The resulting speedup was substantially lower than the theoretical peak performance of the GPU; the cause was explained.

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