liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1234567 101 - 150 of 429
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 101.
    Kalli, K
    et al.
    University of Cyprus, Cyprus.
    Othonos, A
    University of Cyprus, Cyprus.
    Christofides, C
    University of Cyprus, Cyprus.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Temperature-induced reflectivity changes and activation of hydrogen sensitive optically thin palladium films on silicon oxide1998In: Review of Scientific Instruments, ISSN 0034-6748, E-ISSN 1089-7623, Vol. 69, no 9, p. 3331-3338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The optical properties of several thin metal film palladium-silicon oxide structures are examined at room temperature before and after annealing to 200 degrees C and also at 90 degrees C-in all cases in the presence of hydrogen gas. Multicycling sample activation is shown to occur iii the presence of hydrogen at room temperature with an increase in reflectivity on exposure to hydrogen, in contrast to thicker 80 Angstrom films. The reflectivity change increases with increasing film thickness (1-10 Angstrom). The surface activation at room temperature, before and after annealing to 200 degrees C, is compared with the performance at 90 degrees C, where it is shown that heat treatment strongly influences the behavior of the metal film.

  • 102.
    Karimian, N
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zavar, M H A
    Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran.
    Chamsaz, M
    Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    On/off-switchable electrochemical sensor for folicacid based on molecularly imprinted technology.2013In: Electrochemistry communications, ISSN 1388-2481, E-ISSN 1873-1902, Vol. 36, p. 92-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The combination of smart polymers with molecular imprinting offers a powerful tool to design more effective sensors and medical devices. In this study, a temperature sensitive amine-terminated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) block with (N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide) cross-linker along with o-phenylenediamine was electropolymerised on a gold electrode in the presence of folic acid (FA) as template to produce an on/off-switchable molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) affinity sensor for folic acid. Differential pulse voltammetry and cyclic voltammetry were used to characterise the FA-imprinted layer. Incubation of the MIP-modified electrode with FA resulted in a suppression of the ferro/ferricyanide redox process. The highest sensitivity of this temperature gated on/off-switchable folic acid sensor was achieved at 22 °C. Such switchable affinity materials offer considerable potential for the design of highly selective and controllable biosensors and immunoassays.

  • 103.
    Karimian, Najmeh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran.
    Hossein Arbab Zavar, Mohammad
    Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran.
    Chamsaz, Mahmoud
    Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran.
    Ashraf, Narges
    Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Tekidag AB, UCS, Linköping, Sweden.
    A potential-gated molecularly imprinted smart electrode for nicotinamide analysis2015In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 5, no 44, p. 35089-35096Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Triggered surface responsiveness paves the way for smart sensor technologies that not only have tunable retention, but also provide sensing through a built-in programming of electrode material. In this study, we report a potential-gated electrochemical sensor for determination of nicotinamide (NAM) based on a molecularly imprinted overoxidised polypyrrole electrode. The sensitive layer was prepared by electropolymerisation of pyrrole on a glassy carbon electrode in the presence of NAM as a template molecule, followed by alkali extraction. Electrochemical methods were used to monitor the processes of electropolymerisation, template removal and binding in the presence of a [Fe(CN)(6)](3-)/[Fe(CN)(6)](4-) redox couple as an electrochemical probe. Several factors affecting the performance of the MIP-modified electrode were investigated and optimized. The peak current of the ferro/ferricyanide couple decreased linearly with successive addition of NAM in the concentration range 0.9 x 10(-6) to 9.9 x 10(-3) M with a detection limit of 1.7 x 10(-7) M (S/N = 3). The molecularly-imprinted polymer (MIP) electrode had excellent recognition capability for NAM compared to structurally related molecules. Moreover, the reproducibility and repeatability of the NAM-imprinted electrode were all found to be satisfactory. The results from sample analysis confirmed the applicability of the NAM-imprinted electrode to reusable quantitative analysis in commercial pharmaceutical samples.

  • 104.
    Karimian, Najmeh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran.
    Turner, Anthony P.F.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Electrochemical evaluation of troponin T imprinted polymer receptor2014In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 59, p. 160-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The selective detection and quantification of macromolecular targets is a fundamental biological mechanism in nature. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) have been identified as one of the most promising synthetic alternatives to bioreceptors. However, expanding this methodology towards selective recognition of bulky templates such as proteins appears to be extremely challenging due to problems associated with removal of the template from the polymeric network. In this study, polymer imprinted with troponin T (TnT) was assessed using electrochemical methods and the influence of various extraction methods, including conventional immersion extraction, thermal annealing and ultrasonic-assisted extraction, on the binding characteristics of the troponin-to-imprinted polymer receptor was elucidated. Cyclic voltammetric deposition of o-phenylenediamine (o-PD) film in the presence of TnT as a template was performed in acetate buffer (0.5 M, pH 5.2) on a gold substrate. Solvent extraction of the target molecule was optimised and followed by subsequent washing with water. The electrochemistry of a ferro/ferricyanide probe was used to characterise the TnT MIP receptor film. The incubation of the TnT MIP receptor-modified electrode with respect to TnT concentration resulted in a suppression of the ferro/ferricyanide redox current. The dissociation constant (KD) was calculated using a two-site model of template affinity for the TnT MIP receptor. The synthetic TnT MIP receptor had high affinity for TnT with a KD of 2.3×10−13 M.

  • 105.
    Karimian, Najmeh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A smart potential-gated mimetic electrode for nicotinamide analysis2016In: Biosensors 2016 – The World Congress on Biosensors, Gothenburg, Sweden, 25-27 May 2016, Elsevier, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 106.
    Karimian, Najmeh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hossein Arbab Zavar, Mohammad
    Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran .
    Chamsaz, Mahmoud
    Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran .
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    An ultrasensitive molecularly-imprinted human cardiac troponin sensor2013In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 50, p. 492-498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiac troponin T (TnT) is a highly sensitive cardiac biomarker for myocardial infarction. In this study, the fabrication and characterisation of a novel sensor for human TnT based on a molecularly-imprinted electrosynthesised polymer is reported. A TnT sensitive layer was prepared by electropolymerisation of o-phenylenediamine (o-PD) on a gold electrode in the presence of TnT as a template. To develop the molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP), the template molecules were removed from the modified electrode surface by washing with alkaline ethanol. Electrochemical methods were used to monitor the processes of electropolymerisation, template removal and binding. The imprinted layer was characterised by cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The incubation of the MIP-modified electrode with respect to TnT concentration resulted in a suppression of the ferro/ferricyanide redox process. Experimental conditions were optimised and a linear relationship was observed between the peak current of [Fe(CN)(6)](3-)/[Fe (CN)(6)](4-) and the concentration of TnT in buffer over the range 0.009-0.8 ng/mL, with a detection limit of 9 pg/mL. The TnT MIP sensor was shown to have a high affinity to TnT in comparison with nonimprinted polymer (NIP) electrodes in both buffer and blood serum.

  • 107.
    Karimiana, Naymeh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zavarb, M H A
    Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran.
    Chamsazb, M
    Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    On/off-switchable folic acid sensor using molecularly imprinted smart polymer electrode2014In: 24thAnniversary World Congress on Biosensors – Biosensors 2014, Elsevier, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, much attention has been focused on the development of controlled switchable surfaces, also known as “smart surfaces”, which switch their physicochemical properties in response to external stimuli [1]. Switching of a surface based on temperature can be realised using thermo-sensitive polymers, which undergo a phase transition at the lower critical solution temperature (LCST), where their behavior switches between hydrophobic and hydrophilic [2]. LCST modulation can be achieved by copolymerisation with other monomers in order to produce a LCST close to physiological temperature. Thus, it could be useful in controllable, temperature-responsive bio-switches for biomedical and biotechnology applications [3]. The combination of smart polymers with molecular imprinting offers a powerful tool to design more effective sensors and medical devices. In this study, a temperature sensitive amine-terminated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) block with (N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide) cross-linker along with o-phenylenediamine was electropolymerised on a gold electrode in the presence of folic acid (FA) as template to produce an on/off-switchable molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) affinity sensor for folic acid. Differential pulse voltammetry and cyclic voltammetry were used to characterise the FA-imprinted layer. Incubation of the MIP-modified electrode with FA resulted in a suppression of the ferro/ferricyanide redox process. The highest sensitivity of this temperature gated on/off-switchable folic acid sensor was achieved at 22 ºC. Such switchable affinity materials offer considerable potential for the design of highly selective and controllable biosensors and immunoassays.

  • 108.
    Karlsson, Jan Olof G
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ignarro, Louis J
    Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, University of California, USA.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jynge, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Almén, Torsten
    Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Lund University.
    Calmangafodipir [Ca4Mn(DPDP)5], mangafodipir (MnDPDP) and MnPLED with special reference to their SOD mimetic and therapeutic properties2015In: Drug Discovery Today, ISSN 1359-6446, E-ISSN 1878-5832, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 411-421Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) participate in pathological tissue damage. Mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) normally keeps ROS and RNS in check. During development of mangafodipir (MnDPDP) as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent, it was discovered that MnDPDP and its metabolite manganese pyridoxyl ethyldiamine (MnPLED) possessed SOD mimetic activity. MnDPDP has been tested as a chemotherapy adjunct in cancer patients and as an adjunct to percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with myocardial infarctions, with promising results. Whereas MRI contrast depends on release of Mn2+, the SOD mimetic activity depends on Mn2+ that remains bound to DPDP or PLED. Calmangafodipir [Ca4Mn(DPDP)5] is stabilized with respect to Mn2+ and has superior therapeutic activity. Ca4Mn(DPDP)5 is presently being explored as a chemotherapy adjunct in a clinical multicenter Phase II study in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

  • 109.
    Kashefi-Kheyrabadi, Leila
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. University of Isfahan, Iran.
    Mehrgardi, Masoud
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. University of Isfahan, Iran.
    Wiechec, Emilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Turner, Anthony P.F.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ultrasensitive detection of human liver hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells using a label-free aptasensor2014In: Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0003-2700, E-ISSN 1520-6882, Vol. 86, no 10, p. 4956-4960Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Liver cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world and has no effective cure, especially in later stages. The development of a tangible protocol for early diagnosis of this disease remains a major challenge. In the present manuscript, an aptamer-based, label-free electrochemical biosensor for the sensitive detection of HepG2, a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line, is described. The target cells are captured in a sandwich architecture using TLS11a aptamer covalently attached to a gold surface and a secondary TLS11a aptamer. The application of TLS11a aptamer as a recognition layer resulted in a sensor with high affinity for HepG2 cancer cells in comparison with control cancer cells of human prostate, breast and colon tumours. The aptasensor delivered a wide linear dynamic range over 1 × 102 – 1 × 106 cell/mL, with a detection limit of 2 cell/mL. This protocol provides a precise method for sensitive detection of liver cancer with significant advantages in terms of simplicity, low cost, and stability.

  • 110.
    Kei Lai, Kwok
    et al.
    Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Peoples R China .
    Renneberg, Reinhard
    Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Peoples R China .
    Cheung Mak, Wing
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bioinspired protein microparticles fabrication by peptide mediated disulfide interchange2014In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 4, no 23, p. 11802-11810Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we report an innovative green chemistry approach for the fabrication of protein microparticles based on peptide mediated disulfide interchange reactions. The concept is based on using a redox reactive peptide, glutathione, as a natural crosslink reagent triggering the formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds between adjacent protein molecules leading to the assembly of protein molecules within a CaCO3 template into a microparticle structure. The CaCO3 template is highly biocompatible and is completely removed by simply adjusting the solution to pH 5.0, leaving behind the pure protein microparticles. Moreover, the GSH is only involved in the intermediate step without being incorporated into the resulting protein microparticles, therefore producing protein microparticles composed of purely protein molecules. This technology provides a simple and robust method to fabricate protein microparticles under physiological aqueous conditions, and more importantly avoiding the extensive use of synthetic chemical crosslinking reagents. We have further demonstrated that this method is versatile to fabricate microparticles with various proteins such as BSA, enzymes and antibodies. The biological functions such as catalytic properties and affinity interactions of the resulting protein microparticles are highly conserved which demonstrate the potential applications of the protein microparticles in the area of biocatalysis, bioseparation and targeted drug delivery.

  • 111.
    Khaldi, Alexandre
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Falk, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Maziz, Ali
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fabrication and adhesion of conjugated polymer trilayer structures for soft, flexible micromanipulators2016In: Proc. SPIE 9798, Electroactive Polymer Actuators and Devices (EAPAD) 2016, SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2016, Vol. 9797, p. 97980N-1-97980N-8Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We are developing soft, flexible micromanipulators such as micro- tweezers for the handling and manipulation of biological species including cells and surgical tools for minimal invasive surgery. Our aim is to produce tools with minimal dimensions of 100 μm to 1 mm in size, which is 1-2 orders of magnitude smaller than existing technology. However, the displacement of the current developed micromanipulator remains limited due to the low ionic conductivity of the materials. Here, we present developed methods for the fabrication of conjugated polymer trilayer structure which exhibit potential to high stretchability/flexibility as well as a good adhesion between the three different layers. The outcomes of this study contribute to the realisation of low-foot print devices articulated with electroactive polymer actuators for which the physical interface with the power source has been a significant challenge limiting their application. Here, we present a new flexible trilayer structure, which will allow the fabrication of metal-free soft microactuators.

  • 112.
    Khaldi, Alexandre
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Falk, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Maziz, Ali
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Soft lithography for conjugated polymer microactuators fabrication2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 113.
    Khaldi, Alexandre
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Maziz, Ali
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Alici, Gursel
    University of Wollongong, Australia.
    Spinks, Geoff
    University of Wollongong, Australia.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Soft, flexible micromanipulators comprising polypyrrole trilayer microactuators2015In: Proc. SPIE 9430, Electroactive Polymer Actuators and Devices (EAPAD) 2015 / [ed] Bar-Cohen, SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2015, Vol. 9430, p. 94301R-1-94301R-7Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the areas of cell biology, biomedicine and minimal invasive surgery, there is a need for soft, flexible and dextrous biocompatible manipulators for handling biological objects, such as single cells and tissues. Present day technologies are based on simple suction using micropipettes for grasping objects. The micropipettes lack the possibility of accurate force control, nor are they soft and compliant and may thus cause damage to the cells or tissue. Other micromanipulators use conventional electric motors however the further miniaturization of electrical motors and their associated gear boxes and/or push/pull wires has reached its limits. Therefore there is an urgent need for new technologies for micromanipulation of soft biological matter. We are developing soft, flexible micromanipulators such as micro- tweezers for the handling and manipulation of biological species including cells and surgical tools for minimal invasive surgery. Our aim is to produce tools with minimal dimensions of 100 μm to 1 mm in size, which is 1-2 orders of magnitude smaller than existing technology. We present newly developed patterning and microfabrication methods for polymer microactuators as well as the latest results to integrate these microactuators into easy to use manipulation tools. The outcomes of this study contribute to the realisation of low-foot print devices articulated with electroactive polymer actuators for which the physical interface with the power source has been a significant challenge limiting their application. Here, we present a new bottom-up microfabrication process. We show for the first time that such a bottom-up fabricated actuator performs a movement in air. This is a significant step towards widening the application areas of the soft microactuators.

  • 114.
    Khaldi, Alexandre
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    Maziz, Ali
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Alici, Gursel
    University of Wollongong, Australia.
    Spinks, Geoffrey M.
    University of Wollongong, Australia.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Wollongong, Australia.
    Bottom-up microfabrication process for individually controlled conjugated polymer actuators2016In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 230, p. 818-824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Handling of soft and fragile sub-millimeter sized samples such as cells and tissues requires new tools that allow delicate manipulation. Conducting polymer actuators show unique characteristics suitable to driving such manipulators, however despite their potential, the current fabrication method of the trilayer structures does not allow constructing advanced micromanipulators operating in air using this technology. Here we show a novel bottom-up microfabrication process for conjugated polymer trilayer actuators using various solid polymer electrolytes. In addition, the process design integrates contact pads, which has been an issue for small scale conducting polymer actuators. The microfabrication process starts with a patterned layer of conjugated polymer, followed by depositing a polymer electrolyte and a second patterning of the second conjugated polymer layer. The process resulted in successful fabrication of individually controllable conducting polymer trilayer actuators comprising polyvinylidenefluoride and poly( vinylidenefluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) membranes and showed good interfacial adhesion between the different layers in the final device. The polyvinylidenefluoride trilayer actuator showed good actuation capability. The developed bottom-up microfabrication method paves the way for the development of novel micromanipulation tools. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 115.
    Khun, Kimleang
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ibupoto, Z. H.
    University of Sindh Jamshoro, Pakistan.
    Liu, X.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The ethylene glycol template assisted hydrothermal synthesis of Co3O4 nanowires; structural characterization and their application as glucose non-enzymatic sensor2015In: Materials Science & Engineering: B. Solid-state Materials for Advanced Technology, ISSN 0921-5107, E-ISSN 1873-4944, Vol. 194, p. 94-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the work reported herein the ethylene glycol template assisted hydrothermal synthesis, onto Au substrate, of thin and highly dense cobalt oxide (Co3O4) nanowires and their characterization and their application for non-enzymatic glucose sensing are reported. The structure and composition of Co3O4 nanowires have been fully characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The synthesized Co3O4 nanowires resulted to have high purity and showed diameter of approximately 10 nm. The prepared Co3O4 nanowires coated gold electrodes were applied to the non-enzymatic detection of glucose. The developed sensor showed high sensitivity (4.58 x 10(1) mu A mM(-1) cm(-2)), a wide linear range of concentration (1.00 x 10(-4)-1.2 x 10(1) mM) and a detection limit of 2.65 x 10(-5) mM. The developed glucose sensor has also shown to be very stable and selective over interferents such as uric acid and ascorbic acid. Furthermore, the proposed fabrication process was shown to be highly reproducible response (over nine electrodes).

  • 116.
    Khun, Kimleang
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mansor, N. A.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    An Electrochemical Dopamine Sensor Based on the ZnO/CuO Nanohybrid Structures2014In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 14, no 9, p. 6646-6652Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The selective detection of dopamine (DA) is of great importance in the modern medicine because dopamine is one of the main regulators in human behaviour. In this study, ZnO/CuO nanohybrid structures, grown on the gold coated glass substrate, have been investigated as a novel electrode material for the electrochemical detection of dopamine. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques were used for the material characterization and the obtained results are in good agreement. The selective determination of dopamine was demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and amperometric experiments. The amperometric response was linear for dopamine concentrations between 1.0 x 10(-3) and 8.0 mM with a sensitivity of 90.9 mu A mM(-1) cm(-2). The proposed dopamine biosensor is very stable, selective over common interferents as glucose, uric acid and ascorbic acid, and also good reproducibility was observed for seven electrodes. Moreover, the dopamine sensor exhibited a fast response time of less than 10 s. The wide range and acceptable sensitivity of the presented dopamine sensor provide the possible application in analysing the dopamine from the real samples.

  • 117.
    Kiefer, Rudolf
    et al.
    University of Tartu, Estonia .
    Aydemir, Nihan
    University of Auckland, New Zealand .
    Torop, Janno
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. University of Tartu, Estonia .
    Tamm, Tarmo
    University of Tartu, Estonia .
    Temmer, Rauno
    University of Tartu, Estonia .
    Travas-Sejdic, Jadranka
    University of Auckland, New Zealand .
    Must, Indrek
    University of Tartu, Estonia .
    Kaasik, Friedrich
    University of Tartu, Estonia .
    Aabloo, Alvo
    University of Tartu, Estonia .
    Carbide-derived carbon as active interlayer of polypyrrole tri-layer linear actuator2014In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 201, p. 100-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electro-chemo-mechanical deformations (ECMD) of electrochemically prepared tri-layer polypyrrole (PPy) linear actuators with active nanoporous carbide-derived carbon (CDC) based actuating interlayers were studied under isotonic (constant length) and isometric (constant force) conditions and compared with those of single-layer CDC and PPy linear actuators. The goal of this study was to combine two active materials with different electroactive and mechanical properties for obtaining improved tri-layer PPy linear actuators. CDC linear actuators were used as electrode materials for the electrochemical deposition of PPy. SEM images showed the PPy and polymeric CDC layers could be clearly distinguished. The CDC, CDC-PPy and PPy linear actuators were cycled in aqueous electrolyte in the voltage range of +/- 0.8 V. The CDC-PPy actuators had improved mechanical and electro-chemo-mechanical properties, compared to the free-standing CDC and PPy linear actuators. The Raman spectra did not show any signs of degradation of either CDC or PPy layers during actuation.

  • 118.
    Klingvall, Roger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Robust gas detection at sub ppm concentrations2011In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 160, no 1, p. 571-579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gas sensors often suffer from signal drift and long response and recovery times, giving rise to problems to evaluate the steady state gas response. It is shown that these problems can be reduced by modulating the test gas concentration and utilizing the change in the slope of the sensor signal as the sensor response feature. The case of low hydrogen concentration detection is studied using a light pulse technique and a PdPt-MIS field-effect device. For the difference in slope method it was possible to reduce the measurement time from hours in the steady state measurements to 1 + 1 min (test gas + reference gas exposure time) and still achieve a detection limit of about 40 ppb for a step change in hydrogen concentration. Such measurements could be made in spite of a drifting baseline caused, e.g. by previous hydrogen exposures. A theoretical model of how a step change in the hydrogen partial pressure affects the difference in slope is given. The model also predicts a non-reactive hydrogen sticking probability (i.e. the probability that an incoming hydrogen molecule from the gas phase will contribute to the response) of about 1 x 10(-8) at 100 ppb H(2), which is about 2 orders of magnitude lower than the reactive sticking coefficient. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 119. Kor, Kamalodin
    et al.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zarei, K
    Atabati, M
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mak, Martin
    Combining structure responsive probes and lateral-flow test; a simple and rapid approach miRNA-21 detection2015In: 2nd International Congress on Biosensors – BiosensorTR2015, 10-12 June 2015, Izmir, Turkey., 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 120.
    Kor, Kamalodin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zarei, Kobra
    School of Chemistry, Damghan University, Damghan, Iran.
    Atabati, Morteza
    School of Chemistry, Damghan University, Damghan, Iran.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mak, Wing Cheung
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Structurally responsive oligonucleotide-based single-probe lateral-flow test for detection of miRNA-21 mimics2016In: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, ISSN 1618-2642, E-ISSN 1618-2650, Vol. 408, no 5, p. 1475-1485Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A single-probe strip test for the rapid and sensitive detection of miRNA-21 mimics is reported herein. Highly specific structurally responsive bi-functional, thiol and biotin, DNA/LNA oligonucleotide probes (molecular beacons-MB) were designed and conjugated with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) (i.e. biotin-MB-AuNPs). The proposed design had the ability to modulate the accessibility of the biotin group as a function of the presence of a miRNA target allowing the interaction of the boilable with the streptavidin test zone only in the presence of the miRNA-21 mimics. For quantitative evaluation, images of the strip tests were recorded using a flatbed scanner (Epson Perfection V370 Photo). The colour intensities of the test zones of the strip tests were analysed with the ImageJ software (Scion Corp., USA) and quantified as a function of pixel intensity. The response of the strip test was linear over the range 0.5 to 20 nM miRNA-21 (limit of detection of 115 pM) and showed good reproducibility (intra and inter CVs below 8 %); furthermore, the assay was shown to be highly selective, discriminating other interference miRNAs mimics (e.g. miRNA-221 and miRNA-205). Finally, the proposed strip test was used for detection of miRNA-21 mimics in spiked serum samples, demonstrating its potential for point-of-care clinical applications. Main advantages of the single-probe strip test design are its versatility, simplicity and robustness, which can be easily extended to other miRNA targets by tuning the sequence of the single probe. Furthermore, the use of the structurally responsive single probe is particularly relevant in the case of short-length targets, such as miRNA, whereas a conventional sandwich approach might require a careful control of assay conditions such as hybridization temperature and salt concentration

  • 121.
    Korpan, Yaroslav I.
    et al.
    Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics NAS of Ukraine, Ukraine.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    El'skaya, A.V.
    Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics NAS of Ukraine, Ukraine.
    Metabolomics on Electrodes – A New Evolutionary Step in Sensing and Sensitivity.2017In: European Advanced Materials Congress 2017, VBRI , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 122.
    Kumari, Poonam
    et al.
    School of Physics, Shoolini University, Solan, HP, India .
    Rai, Radheshyam
    School of Physics, Shoolini University, Solan, HP, India .
    Kholkin, Anderi L.
    Department of glass and ceramics, Aveiro University, Portugal.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Study of Ca doping on A- site on the structural and physical properties of BLTMNZ ceramics2014In: Advanced Materials Letters, ISSN 0976-3961, E-ISSN 0976-397X, Vol. 5, no 5, p. 255-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ferroelectric Ca doped (Ba0.9575La0.04X0.0025) (Ti0.815Mn0.0025Nb0.0025Zr0.18)0.99O3 was prepared by a high-temperature solid state reaction technique. For the understanding of the electrical and dielectric property, the relation between the crystal structures, electrical transition and ferroelectric transitions with increasing temperature (–160 to 35°C) have been analyzed. X-ray diffraction analysis of the powders suggests the formation of a single-phase material with monoclinic structure. Capacitance and tanδ of the specimens were measured in the temperature range from -160 to 35°Cat frequencies 1 kHz – 1 MHz. Detailed studies of dielectric and electrical properties indicate that the Curie temperature shifted to higher temperature with the increase in frequency. Moreover, the dielectric maxima dropped down rapidly initially and the dielectric peaks became extremely broad. The AC conductivity increases with increase in frequency. The low value of activation energy obtained for the ceramic samples could be attributed to the influence of electronic contribution to the conductivity.

  • 123.
    Lademann, J.
    et al.
    Charite University of Medical Berlin, Germany.
    Richter, H.
    Charite University of Medical Berlin, Germany.
    Knorr, F.
    Charite University of Medical Berlin, Germany.
    Patzelt, A.
    Charite University of Medical Berlin, Germany.
    Darvin, M. E.
    Charite University of Medical Berlin, Germany.
    Ruehl, E.
    Free University of Berlin, Germany.
    Cheung, Kwan Yee
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lai, K. K.
    Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Peoples R China.
    Renneberg, R.
    Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Peoples R China.
    Mak, Wing Cheung
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Triggered release of model drug from AuNP-doped BSA nanocarriers in hair follicles using IRA radiation2016In: Acta Biomaterialia, ISSN 1742-7061, E-ISSN 1878-7568, Vol. 30, p. 388-396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent advances in the field of dermatotherapy have resulted in research efforts focusing on the use of particle-based drug delivery systems for the stimuli-responsive release of drugs in the skin and skin appendages, i.e. hair follicles and sebaceous glands. However, effective and innocuous trigger mechanisms which result in the release of the drugs from the nanocarriers upon reaching the target structures are still lacking. For the first time, the present study demonstrated the photo-activated release of the model drug fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) from topically applied gold nanoparticle-doped bovine serum albumin (AuNPs-doped BSA) particles (approx. 545 nm) using water-filtered infrared A (IRA) radiation in the hair follicles of an ex vivo porcine skin model. The IRA radiation-induced plasmonic heating of the AuNPs results in the partial decomposition or opening of the albumin particles and release the model drug, while control particles without AuNPs show insignificant release. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using IRA radiation to induce release of encapsulated drugs from plasmonic nanocarriers for the targeting of follicular structures. However, the risk of radiation-induced skin damage subsequent to repeated applications of high infrared dosages may be significant. Future studies should aim at determining the suitability of lower infrared A dosages, such as for medical treatment regimens which may necessitate repeated exposure to therapeutics. Statement of significance Follicular targeting using nanocarriers is of increasing importance in the prophylaxis and treatment of dermatological or other diseases. For the first time, the present study demonstrated the photo activated release of the model drug fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) from topically applied gold nanoparticle-doped bovine serum albumin (AuNPs-doped BSA) particles using water-filtered infrared A (IRA) radiation in the hair follicles of an ex vivo porcine skin model. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using wIRA radiation to induce release of encapsulated drugs for the targeting of follicular structures, and provide a new vision on the development of optically addressable delivery systems for controlled release of drugs in the skin and skin appendages, i.e. hair follicles and sebaceous glands. (C) 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 124.
    Lai, Kwok Kei
    et al.
    Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, P. R. China .
    Renneberg, Reinhard
    Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, P. R. China .
    Mak, Wing Cheung
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    High efficiency single-step biomaterial-based microparticle fabrication via template-directed supramolecular coordination chemistry2016In: Green Chemistry, ISSN 1463-9262, E-ISSN 1463-9270, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 1715-1723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biomaterial-based microparticles have attracted much attention for medical and biological applications such as pharmaceutics, bioseparation and cosmetics. Emerging technologies enable versatile and facile fabrication of microparticles, with key features being purity, precise size control, mild preparation conditions and minimal processing. Here, an innovative approach combining template synthesis, biomolecule assembly and partial-purification within a single step for high efficiency fabrication of pure biomaterial-based microparticles is reported. This concept is based on facile co-precipitation of biomolecules within CaCO3 templates and simultaneous crosslinking of entrapped biomolecules via Ca2+ driven supramolecular coordination chemistry, followed by template removal. Carbohydrate (alginate) and proteins (casein and fresh milk) are used as models of biomolecules. The process driven by selective crosslinking automatically excludes non-specific materials from the template and thus provides the additional function of partial-purification, as demonstrated using highly complexed fresh milk. This green approach to fabrication of biomaterial-based microparticles offers three critical advantages (i) mild conditions to preserve the chemical and secondary structures of biomolecules; (ii) single processing step to facilitate scale-up production; and (iii) partial-purification without the need for upstream raw material purification. This innovative approach not only addresses fundamental issues in fabrication techniques, but also marks progress in energy and environmental conservation during manufacturing processes.

  • 125.
    Li, He
    et al.
    Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, China and University of Jinan, China.
    He, Jing
    University of Jinan, China.
    Li, Songjun
    Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, China.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Electrochemical immunosensor with N-doped graphene-modified electrode for label-free detection of the breast cancer biomarker CA 15-32013In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 43, p. 25-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Highly sensitive and label-free detection of the biomarker carbohydrate antigen 15-3 (CA 15-3) remains a challenge in the diagnosis of breast cancer. Here, a novel electrochemical immunosensor capable of sensitive and label-free detection of CA 15-3 is reported. This unique immunosensor, equipped with a highly conductive graphene (i.e., N-doped graphene sheets)-modified electrode, exhibited significantly increased electron transfer and high sensitivity toward CA 15-3. This novel immunosensor, with a low detection limit of 0.012U/mL, worked well over a broad linear range of 0.1-20U/mL. Unlike conventional immunosensors, which usually involve complicated label processing and time-consuming separations, the use of highly conductive graphene avoids the need for labels and is simple in nature. The strategy developed for this immunosensor provides a promising approach for clinical research and diagnostic applications.

  • 126.
    Li, Sogjun
    et al.
    School of Materials Science & Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, China.
    Cao, ShunshengCranfield University, UK / Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, China.Piletsky, SergeyBiotechnology Center, Cranfield University, UK.Turner, AnthonyLinköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Molecularly Imprinted Catalysts: principle, synthesis and applications2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Molecularly Imprinted Catalysts: Principle, Synthesis, and Applications is the first book of its kind to provide an in-depth overview of molecularly imprinted catalysts and selective catalysis, including technical details, principles of selective catalysis, preparation processes, the catalytically active polymers themselves, and important progress made in this field. It serves as an important reference for scientists, students, and researchers who are working in the areas of molecular imprinting, catalysis, molecular recognition, materials science, biotechnology, and nanotechnology.Comprising a diverse group of experts from prestigious universities and industries across the world, the contributors to this book provide access to the latest knowledge and eye-catching achievements in the field, and an understanding of what progress has been made and to what extent it is being advanced in industry.

  • 127.
    Li, Songjun
    et al.
    Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu, China.
    Cao, Shunsheng
    Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu, China.
    Piletsky, Sergey
    University of Leicester, UK.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Foreward2015In: Molecularly Imprinted Catalysts : Principle, Synthesis and Applications / [ed] Li, S., Cao, S., Piletsky, S.A. and Turner, A.P.F., Elsevier, 2015, p. xvii-xixChapter in book (Other academic)
  • 128.
    Li, Songjun
    et al.
    Central China Normal University.
    Ge, Yi
    Cranfield University.
    Piletsky, Sergey A
    Cranfield University.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A Zipper-Like On/Off-Switchable Molecularly Imprinted Polymer2011In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 21, no 17, p. 3344-3349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A zipper-like on/off-switchable molecularly imprinted polymer is reported. This unique imprinted polymer was composed of template-imprinted polymeric networks that incorporate zipper-like interactions between poly(acrylamide) (PAAm) and poly(2-acrylamide-2-methyl propanesulfonic acid) (PAMPS). This polymer showed marginal recognition ability towards the imprint species under low temperature conditions, due to the interpolymer interaction between PAAm and PAMPS, which inhibited access to the imprinted networks. In contrast, at relatively high temperatures (such as 40 degrees C), the polymer demonstrated significant molecular recognition ability towards the imprint species resulting from the dissociation of the interpolymer complexes of PAAm and PAMPS, which enabled access to the imprint networks. Unlike previously reported PNIPAm-based imprinted polymers, which demonstrate alterable molecular recognition simply because of the thermosensitive hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of PNIPAm, this polymer employed a zipper-like supramolecular architecture between PAAm and PAMPS, thereby enabling switchable molecular recognition.

  • 129.
    Li, Songjun
    et al.
    Central China Normal University.
    Ge, Yi
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A Catalytic and Positively Thermosensitive Molecularly Imprinted Polymer2011In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 1194-1200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A catalytic and positively thermosensitive molecularly imprinted polymer is reported. This unique imprinted polymer was composed of 4-nitrophenyl phosphate-imprinted networks that exhibited a thermosensitive interpolymer interaction between poly(2-trifluoromethylacrylic acid) (PTFMA) and poly(1-vinylimidazole) (PVI), which contains catalytically active sites. At a relatively low temperature (such as 20 degrees C), this imprinted polymer did not demonstrate significant catalytic activity for the hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenyl acetate due to the interpolymer complexation between PVI and PTFMA, which blocked access to the active sites of PVI and caused shrinking of the polymer. Conversely, at higher temperatures (such as 40 degrees C), this polymer showed significant catalytic activity resulting from the dissociation of the interpolymer complexes between PVI and PTFMA, which facilitated access to the active sites of PVI and inflated the polymer. Unlike previously reported poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-based molecularly imprinted polymers, which demonstrated decreased molecular recognition and catalytic activity with increased temperatures, i.e., negatively thermosensitive molecular recognition and catalysis abilities, this imprinted polymer exploits the unique interpolymer interaction between PVI and PTFMA, enabling the reversed thermal responsiveness.

  • 130.
    Li, Songjun
    et al.
    School of Materials Science & Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, China.
    Zhu, Maiyong
    School of Materials Science & Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, China.
    Whitcombe, Michael J.
    Department of Chemestry, Unversity of Leicester, UK.
    Piletsky, Sergey A.
    Department of Chemestry, Unversity of Leicester, UK.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Molecularly Imprinted Polymers for Enzyme-Like Catalysis: principle, design and applications2015In: Molecularly imprinted polymers for enzyme-like catalysis : principle, design and applications / [ed] Sogjun Li, Cao Shunsheng, Sergey Piletsky, Anthony Turner, Elsevier, 2015, p. 1-17Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Selective catalysis remains a significant challenge owing to the lack of a generic protocol suitable for the preparation of selective catalytic materials. A promising approach is to translate the principle of enzyme catalysis for the design of new catalytic materials. Known as a “key-to-lock” technology, molecular imprinting provides a promising perspective by helping create in a straightforward manner binding sites that possess enzyme-like catalytic ability with but higher stability. In this chapter, we focus on discussing some key issues involved in active molecularly imprinted polymers from catalytic applications. The similarity and difference between preparing conventional molecularly imprinted polymers and catalytic imprinted polymers are highlighted. Other aspects relating to the principle, design, and future outlook of catalytic molecularly imprinted polymers are also discussed.

  • 131.
    Liu, Yu
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Sichuan Agr Univ, Peoples R China.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhao, Maojun
    Sichuan Agr Univ, Peoples R China.
    Wing Cheung, Mak
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Facile synthesis of highly processable and water dispersible polypyrrole and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) microspheres for enhanced supercapacitive performance2018In: European Polymer Journal, ISSN 0014-3057, E-ISSN 1873-1945, Vol. 99, p. 332-339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much recent work has focused on improving the processibility and electrocapacitive performance of conducting polymer-based materials for energy related applications. The key mechanism of conducting polymers as supercapacitor materials is driven by the rapid charging and discharging processes that involve mass transport of the counter ions insertion/ejection within the polymer structure, where ion diffusion is usually the limiting step on the efficiency of the conducting polymer capacitor. Here, we report a facile method for the green fabrication of polypyrrole microspheres (PPy-MSs) and poly (3, 4-ethylenedioxythiophene) microspheres (PEDOT-MSs) with good processability, intact morphology and large active surface for enhanced ion interchange processes, without using surfactant and highly irritant or toxic organic solvents during the synthetic process. The structure and morphology of the PPy-MSs and PEDOT-MSs were characterized by means of SEM, EDX, TEM and FTIR. Both PPy-MSs and PEDOT-MSs showed intact microsphere structures with greatly improved water dispersity and processability. More importantly, facilated by the large active surface and inter-microsphere space for ions diffusion, both the PPy-MSs and PEDOT-MSs showed a signiciantly enhanced electrical capacitive performance of 242 F g(-1) and 91.2 F g(-1), repsectively (i.e. 10 and 1.51 times in specific capacitance than the randomly structured PPy and PEDOT). This innovative approach not only addresses fundamental issues in fabrication of high performance processable microstructured conducting polymers, but also makes progress in delivering water processable conducting polymers that could be potentially used for fabrication of printed electronic devices.

  • 132.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    From a Laboratory Exercise for Students to a Pioneering Biosensing Technology2014In: PLASMONICS, ISSN 1557-1955, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 741-751Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for biosensing was demonstrated 30 years ago. In the present contribution, its general background is described together with the necessary developments both in instrumentation and surface chemistry, leading to the final so-called BIAcore technology. The description is naturally colored by my personal opinion of the developments. SPR for the elucidation of organic mono- and multilayers introduced at the end of the 1970s formed the basis for the first biosensing demonstration of SPR in the beginning of the 1980s. It is pointed out how the need of an up-to-date laboratory exercise for the undergraduate students and the multidisciplinary environment at the Laboratory of Applied Physics at Linkoping University led to this demonstration. The initial experiments are touched upon and the further developments at Pharmacia, which led to the BIAcore technology, are described in some details. Some of the present activities in Linkoping related to optical biosensing with ubiquitous instrumentation are also described, including SPR detection with a computer screen and a web camera and most recently with a cellular phone.

  • 133.
    Lvova, Larisa
    et al.
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy St Petersburg State University, Russia.
    Galloni, Pierluca
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Floris, Barbara
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Paolesse, Roberto
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Di Natale, Corrado
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    A Ferrocene-Porphyrin Ligand for Multi-Transduction Chemical Sensor Development2013In: Sensors, ISSN 1424-8220, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 5841-5856Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    5,10,15,20-Tetraferrocenyl porphyrin, H2TFcP, a simple example of a donor-acceptor system, was tested as ligand for the development of a novel multi-transduction chemical sensors aimed at the determination of transition metal ions. The fluorescence energy transfer between ferrocene donor and porphyrin acceptor sub-units was considered. The simultaneously measured optical and potentiometric responses of solvent polymeric membranes based on H2TFcP permitted the detection of lead ions in sample solutions, in the concentration range from 2.7 × 10−7 to 3.0 × 10−3 M. The detection limit of lead determination was 0.27 μM, low enough to perform the direct analysis of Pb2+ in natural waters.

  • 134.
    Lvova, Larisa
    et al.
    University of Roma Tor Vergata.
    Mastroianni, Marco
    University of Roma Tor Vergata.
    Di Natale, Corrado
    University of Roma Tor Vergata.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Paolesse, Roberto
    University of Roma Tor Vergata.
    Towards Hyphenated Sensors Development: Design and Application of Porphyrin Electropolymer Materials2012In: Electroanalysis, ISSN 1040-0397, E-ISSN 1521-4109, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 776-789Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The peculiar properties of porphyrins allow their exploitation as sensing materials in chemical sensors having different transduction principles, or even the intriguing possibility to develop sensors where two different transduction mechanisms are hyphenated in the same substrate. This approach can allow a significant increase in the chemical information obtained from the device and it can boost the performances in terms of selectivity and sensitivity. Our recent achievements in the field of functionalized porphyrins application for the development of the hyphenated optoelectrochemical sensors will be discussed in this contribution.

  • 135.
    Lvova, Larisa
    et al.
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy; St Petersburg State University, Russia.
    Pudi, Rajesh
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Galloni, Pierluca
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Lippolis, Vito
    University of Cagliari, CA USA.
    Di Natale, Corrado
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Paolesse, Roberto
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Multi-transduction sensing films for Electronic Tongue applications2015In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 207, p. 1076-1086Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper the use of multi-transduction principle for sensing materials development is reviewed. In particular, the application of porphyrin-based films to a multi-transduction Electronic Tongue system for different analytical tasks is presented. The optical response of sensing films was registered by means of Computer Screen Photoassisted Technology (CSPT) that applies familiar devices, such as computer monitor screen and web-camera, as illumination light source and signal detectors. Simultaneously the electrochemical amperometric or potentiometric response of the same sensing material was measured. Data analysis combining both signals significantly improves the performance of the Electronic Tongue, thus opening new frontiers in application of such a system.

  • 136.
    Mak, Wing Cheung
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Biomedical Nanosensors, Joseph Irudayaraj, Pan Stanford Publishing, ISBN: 9789814303033 Taylor & Francis Group, UK, 2013, 384, 95 GBP2013In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 44, p. 136-137Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 137.
    Mak, Wing Cheung
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lateral-flow technology: from visual to instrumental.2016In: TrAC. Trends in analytical chemistry, ISSN 0165-9936, E-ISSN 1879-3142, Vol. 79, no SI, p. 297-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lateral-flow tests were first launched commercially in 1984, as a simple urine-based pregnancy test for home use. The simplicity of the visual readout delivered by the basic lateral-flow format proved to be a very popular. However, the recent apparently unstoppable trend towards portable and wearable technology is driving the lateral-flow strip towards an industrial interface that will enable it to interface with big data and expert systems, and where ready transmission of data is essential. In this review, we chart the inevitable evolution of the visually-read lateral-flow strip to more advanced instrumented versions and consider the future of this very flexible approach to delivering simple affinity assays. We examine recent labelling strategies, the relative merits of optical and electrochemical transducers and explore the evolution of recognition elements that are now being incorporated into these systems.

  • 138.
    Mak, Wing Cheung
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Cheung, K.Y.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Orban, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lee, C-J
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Theranostic Contact Lens for Modulation and Detection of Viral Infection2017In: 26th Anniversary World Congress on Biosensors (Biosensors), Elsevier, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 139.
    Mak, Wing Cheung
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Selegård, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Garbrecht, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Probing Zinc-Protein-Chelant Interactions using Gold Nanoparticles Functionalized with Zinc-Responsive Polypeptides2014In: Particle & particle systems characterization, ISSN 0934-0866, E-ISSN 1521-4117, Vol. 31, no 11, p. 1127-1133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The coordination of zinc by proteins and various other organic molecules is essential for numerous biological processes, such as in enzymatic catalysis, metabolism and signal transduction. Presence of small molecular chelants can have a profound effect on the bioavailability of zinc and affect critical Zn2+-protein interactions. Zn2+ chelators are also emerging therapeutics for Alzheimer’s diseases because of their preventive effect on zinc promoted amyloid formation. Despite the importance of zinc-protein-chelant interactions in biology and medicine, probing such interactions is  challenging. Here, we introduce an innovative approach for real-time characterization of zinc-protein-chelant interactions using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalized with a zinc-responsive protein mimetic polypeptide. The peptide functionalized AuNPs aggregate extensively in the presence of Zn2+, triggered by specific Zn2+-mediated polypeptide dimerization and folding, causing a massive red shift of the plasmon band. Chelants affects the Zn2+- polypeptide interaction and thus the aggregation differently depending on their concentrations, zincbinding affinities and coordination numbers, which affect the position of the plasmon band. This system is a simple and powerful tool that provides extensive information about the interactions of chelants in the formation of Zn2+ coordination complexes and is an interesting platform for development of bioanalytical techniques and characterization of chelation-based therapeutics.

  • 140.
    Mansor, Nur Azimah
    et al.
    Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam, Malaysia.
    Zain, Zainiharyati Mohd
    Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam, Malaysia.
    Hamzah, Hairul Hisham
    Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam, Malaysia.
    Noorden, Mohd Shihabuddin Ahmad
    Universiti Teknologi MARA, Puncak Alam, Malaysia.
    Jaapar, Siti Safura
    Universiti Teknologi MARA, Puncak Alam, Malaysia.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ibupoto, Zafar Husain
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Detection of Breast Cancer 1 (BRCA1) Gene Using an Electrochemical DNA Biosensor Based on Immobilized ZnO Nanowires2014In: Open Journal of Applied Biosensor, ISSN 2168-5401, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 9-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein we report an electrochemical DNA biosensor for the rapid detection of sequence (5’ AAT GGA TTT ATC TGC TCT TCG 3’) specific for the breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) gene. The proposed electrochemical genosensor is based on short oligonucleotide DNA probe immobilized onto zinc oxide nanowires (ZnONWs) chemically synthesized onto gold electrode via hydrothermal technique. The morphology studies of the ZnONWs, performed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), showed that the ZnO nanowires are uniform, highly dense and oriented perpendicularly to the substrate. Recognition event between the DNA probe and the target was investigated by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) in 0.1 M acetate buffer solution (ABS), pH 7.00; as a result of the hybridization, an oxidation signal was observed at +0.8 V. The influences of pH, target concentration, and non-complimentary DNA on biosensor performance were examined. The proposed DNA biosensor has the ability to detect the target sequence in the range of concentration between 10.0 and 100.0 µM with a detection limit of 3.32 µM. The experimental results demonstrated that the prepared ZnONWs/Au electrodes are suitable platform for the immobilization of DNA.

  • 141.
    Martinez, J. G.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Politecn Cartagena, Spain.
    Otero, T. F.
    University of Politecn Cartagena, Spain.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Electrochemo-dynamical characterization of polypyrrole actuators coated on gold electrodes2016In: Physical Chemistry, Chemical Physics - PCCP, ISSN 1463-9076, E-ISSN 1463-9084, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 827-836Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polypyrrole coated gold wires were subjected to consecutive square current waves in LiClO4 aqueous solutions using the same constant anodic and cathodic charge. Parallel in situ diameter variations were followed using a laser scan micrometer. The procedure was repeated by changing one experimental variable every time: applied current, electrolyte concentration or working temperature to perform electrochemodynamical characterization of the system. On average, the diameter follows a linear variation of the consumed charge, as expected for any faradaic system, although a high dispersion was attained in the data. Such deviations were attributed to the presence of irreversible hydrogen evolution at the gold/polypyrrole interface at cathodic potentials more than 0.0 V vs. Ag/AgCl, detected and quantified from separated coulovoltammetric responses. Despite this parallel hydrogen evolution the consumed energy during reactions is a robust sensor of the working conditions. In conclusion a gold support, the metal most used for technological applications of conducting polymers, should be avoided when a device is driven by current flow in the presence of aqueous solutions, water contamination or moisture: a fraction of the charge will be consumed by hydrogen generation with possible degradation of the device.

  • 142.
    Martinez, Jose Gabriel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Technical University of Cartagena. Spain.
    Otero, Toribio F.
    Technical University of Cartagena. Spain.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Effect of the Electrolyte Concentration and Substrate on Conducting Polymer Actuators2014In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 30, no 13, p. 3894-3904Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of the electrolyte concentration (NaCl aqueous electrolyte) on the dimensional variations of films of polypyrrole doped with dodecylbenzenesulfonate PPy(DBS) on Pt and Au wires was studied. Any parallel reaction that occurs during the redox polymeric reaction that drives the mechanical actuation, as detected from the coulovoltammetric responses, was avoided by using Pt wires as substrate and controlling the potential limits, thus significantly increasing the actuator lifetime. The NaCl concentration of the electrolyte, when studied by cyclic voltammetry or chronoamperometry, has a strong effect on the performance as well. A maximum expansion was achieved in 0.3 M aqueous solution. The consumed oxidation and reduction charges control the fully reversible dimensional variations: PPy(DBS) films are faradaic polymeric motors. Parallel to the faradaic exchange of the cations, osmotic, electrophoretic, and structural changes play an important role for the water exchange and volume change of PPy(DBS).

  • 143.
    Martinez, Jose
    et al.
    Universidad Politécnica de Cartagena.
    Otero, Toribio
    Universidad Politécnica de Cartagena.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A metallic substrate may reduce artificial muscles lifetimes2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 144.
    Martinez, Jose
    et al.
    Universidad Politécnica de Cartagena.
    Otero, Toribio
    Universidad Politécnica de Cartagena.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Effect of the electrolyte concentration on artificial muscles2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 145.
    Mashayekhimazar, Fariba
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Malek Ashtar Univ Technol, Iran.
    Martinez Gil, Jose Gabriel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tyagi, Manav
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Alijanianzadeh, Mahdi
    Kharazmi Univ, Iran.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Cranfield Univ, England.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Artificial Muscles Powered by Glucose2019In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 31, no 32, article id 1901677Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Untethered actuation is important for robotic devices to achieve autonomous motion, which is typically enabled by using batteries. Using enzymes to provide the required electrical charge is particularly interesting as it will enable direct harvesting of fuel components from a surrounding fluid. Here, a soft artificial muscle is presented, which uses the biofuel glucose in the presence of oxygen. Glucose oxidase and laccase enzymes integrated in the actuator catalytically convert glucose and oxygen into electrical power that in turn is converted into movement by the electroactive polymer polypyrrole causing the actuator to bend. The integrated bioelectrode pair shows a maximum open-circuit voltage of 0.70 +/- 0.04 V at room temperature and a maximum power density of 0.27 mu W cm(-2) at 0.50 V, sufficient to drive an external polypyrrole-based trilayer artificial muscle. Next, the enzymes are fully integrated into the artificial muscle, resulting in an autonomously powered actuator that can bend reversibly in both directions driven by glucose and O-2 only. This autonomously powered artificial muscle can be of great interest for soft (micro-)robotics and implantable or ingestible medical devices manoeuvring throughout the body, for devices in regenerative medicine, wearables, and environmental monitoring devices operating autonomously in aqueous environments.

  • 146.
    Maziz, Ali
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    Concas, Alexandre
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Khaldi, Alexandre
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Stålhand, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Persson, Nils-Krister
    Swedish School of Textiles (THS), SmartTextiles, University of Borås, 50190 Borås, Sweden.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Knitting and weaving artificial muscles2017In: Science Advances, ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 3, no 1, article id e1600327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A need exists for artificial muscles that are silent, soft, and compliant, with performance characteristics similar to those of skeletal muscle, enabling natural interaction of assistive devices with humans. By combining one of humankind’s oldest technologies, textile processing, with electroactive polymers, we demonstrate here the feasibility of wearable, soft artificial muscles made by weaving and knitting, with tunable force and strain. These textile actuators were produced from cellulose yarns assembled into fabrics and coated with conducting polymers using a metal-free deposition. To increase the output force, we assembled yarns in parallel by weaving. The force scaled linearly with the number of yarns in the woven fabric. To amplify the strain, we knitted a stretchable fabric, exhibiting a 53-fold increase in strain. In addition, the textile construction added mechanical stability to the actuators. Textile processing permits scalable and rational production of wearable artificial muscles, and enables novel ways to design assistive devices.

  • 147.
    Maziz, Ali
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Guan, Na
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Svennerstan, Karl
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hallen-Grufman, Katarina
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lab on chip microdevices for cellular mechanotransduction in urothelial cells2016In: Proc. SPIE 9798, Electroactive Polymer Actuators and Devices (EAPAD) 2016, SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2016, Vol. 9798, p. 97981R-1-97981R-9Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellular mechanotransduction is crucial for physiological function in the lower urinary tract. The bladder is highly dependent on the ability to sense and process mechanical inputs, illustrated by the regulated filling and voiding of the bladder. However, the mechanisms by which the bladder integrates mechanical inputs, such as intravesicular pressure, and controls the smooth muscles, remain unknown. To date no tools exist that satisfactorily mimic in vitro the dynamic micromechanical events initiated e.g. by an emerging inflammatory process or a growing tumour mass in the urinary tract. More specifically, there is a need for tools to study these events on a single cell level or in a small population of cells. We have developed a micromechanical stimulation chip that can apply physiologically relevant mechanical stimuli to single cells to study mechanosensitive cells in the urinary tract. The chips comprise arrays of microactuators based on the electroactive polymer polypyrrole (PPy). PPy offers unique possibilities and is a good candidate to provide such physiological mechanical stimulation, since it is driven at low voltages, is biocompatible, and can be microfabricated. The PPy microactuators can provide mechanical stimulation at different strains and/or strain rates to single cells or clusters of cells, including controls, all integrated on one single chip, without the need to preprepare the cells. This paper reports initial results on the mechano-response of urothelial cells using the micromechanical stimulation chips. We show that urothelial cells are viable on our microdevices and do respond with intracellular Ca2+ increase when subjected to a micro-mechanical stimulation.

  • 148.
    Maziz, Ali
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Khaldi, Alexandre
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Persson, Nils-Krister
    University of Borås.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    New textile-based electroactive polymer actuators2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 149.
    Maziz, Ali
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Khaldi, Alexandre
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Persson, Nils-Krister
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Soft linear electroactive polymer actuators based on polypyrrole2015In: Proc. SPIE 9430, Electroactive Polymer Actuators and Devices (EAPAD) 2015 / [ed] Bar-Cohen, SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2015, Vol. 9430, p. 943016-1-943016-6Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a growing demand for human-friendly robots that can interact and work closely with humans. Such robots need to be compliant, lightweight and equipped with silent and soft actuators. Electroactive polymers such as conducting polymers (CPs) are “smart” materials that deform in response to electrical simulation and are often addressed as artificial muscles due to their functional similarity with natural muscles. They offer unique possibilities and are perfect candidates for such actuators since they are lightweight, silent, and driven at low voltages. Most CP actuators are fabricated using electrochemical oxidative synthesis. We have developed new CP based fibres employing both vapour phase and liquid phase electrochemical synthesis. We will present the fabrication and characterisation of these fibres as well as their performance as linear actuators.

  • 150.
    Melling, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wilson, S. A.
    University of Dundee, Scotland.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Controlling the electro-mechanical performance of polypyrrole through 3- and 3,4-methyl substituted copolymers2015In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 5, no 102, p. 84153-84163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conducting polymers such as polypyrrole are biocompatible materials used in bioelectronic applications and microactuators for mechanobiology and soft microrobotics. The materials are commonly electrochemically synthesised from an electrolyte solution comprising pyrrole monomers and a salt, which is incorporated as the counter ion. This electrosynthesis results in polypyrrole forming a three-dimensional network with extensive cross-linking in both the alpha and beta positions, which impacts the electro-mechanical performance. In this study we adopt a blocking strategy to restrict and control cross-linking and chain branching through beta substitution of the monomer to investigate the effect of crosslinking on the electroactive properties. Methyl groups where used as blocking groups to minimise the impact on the pyrrole ring system. Pyrrole, 3- and 3,4-methyl substituted pyrrole monomers were electro-polymerised both as homo-polymers and as a series of co-polymer films. The electroactive performance of the films was characterised by measuring their electrochemical responses and their reversible and non-reversible film thickness changes. This showed that altering the degree of crosslinking through this blocking strategy had a large impact on the reversible and irreversible volume change. These results elaborate the importance of the polymer structure in the actuator performance, an aspect that has hitherto received little attention.

1234567 101 - 150 of 429
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf