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  • 101.
    Montalescot, Gilles
    et al.
    University of Paris 06, France.
    van t Hof, Arnoud W.
    Isala Clin, Netherlands.
    Lapostolle, Frederic
    Hop Avicenne, France.
    Silvain, Johanne
    University of Paris 06, France.
    Flensted Lassen, Jens
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Bolognese, Leonardo
    Azienda Osped Arezzo, Italy.
    Cantor, Warren J.
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Cequier, Angel
    University of Barcelona, Spain.
    Chettibi, Mohamed
    Centre Hospital University of Franz Fanon, Algeria.
    Goodman, Shaun G.
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Hammett, Christopher J.
    Royal Brisbane and Womens Hospital, Australia.
    Huber, Kurt
    Wilhelminenspital Stadt Wien, Austria.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Merkely, Bela
    Semmelweis University, Hungary.
    Storey, Robert F.
    University of Sheffield, England.
    Zeymer, Uwe
    Klinikum Stadt Ludwigshafen, Germany; Institute Herzinfarktforsch Ludwigshafen, Germany.
    Stibbe, Olivier
    Brigade Sapeurs Pompiers Paris, France.
    Ecollan, Patrick
    CHU Pitie Salpetriere, France.
    Heutz, Wim M. J. M.
    Regionale Ambulance Voorziening, Netherlands.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Collet, Jean-Philippe
    University of Paris 06, France.
    Willems, Frank F.
    Rijnstate Ziekenhuis, Netherlands.
    Baradat, Caroline
    AstraZeneca, France.
    Licour, Muriel
    AstraZeneca, France.
    Tsatsaris, Anne
    AstraZeneca, France.
    Vicaut, Eric
    Hop Lariboisiere, France.
    Hamm, Christian W.
    Kerckhoff Heart Centre, Germany.
    Prehospital Ticagrelor in ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction2014In: New England Journal of Medicine, ISSN 0028-4793, E-ISSN 1533-4406, Vol. 371, no 11, p. 1016-1027Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND The direct-acting platelet P2Y(12) receptor antagonist ticagrelor can reduce the incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events when administered at hospital admission to patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Whether prehospital administration of ticagrelor can improve coronary reperfusion and the clinical outcome is unknown. METHODS We conducted an international, multicenter, randomized, double-blind study involving 1862 patients with ongoing STEMI of less than 6 hours duration, comparing prehospital (in the ambulance) versus in-hospital (in the catheterization laboratory) treatment with ticagrelor. The coprimary end points were the proportion of patients who did not have a 70% or greater resolution of ST-segment elevation before percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and the proportion of patients who did not have Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction flow grade 3 in the infarct-related artery at initial angiography. Secondary end points included the rates of major adverse cardiovascular events and definite stent thrombosis at 30 days. RESULTS The median time from randomization to angiography was 48 minutes, and the median time difference between the two treatment strategies was 31 minutes. The two coprimary end points did not differ significantly between the prehospital and in-hospital groups. The absence of ST-segment elevation resolution of 70% or greater after PCI (a secondary end point) was reported for 42.5% and 47.5% of the patients, respectively. The rates of major adverse cardiovascular events did not differ significantly between the two study groups. The rates of definite stent thrombosis were lower in the prehospital group than in the in-hospital group (0% vs. 0.8% in the first 24 hours; 0.2% vs. 1.2% at 30 days). Rates of major bleeding events were low and virtually identical in the two groups, regardless of the bleeding definition used. CONCLUSIONS Prehospital administration of ticagrelor in patients with acute STEMI appeared to be safe but did not improve pre-PCI coronary reperfusion.

  • 102. Muhr, T
    et al.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Markers for myocardial injury during percutaneous coronary intervention2003In: American Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0002-9149, E-ISSN 1879-1913, Vol. 92, no 6A, p. 145L-145LConference paper (Other academic)
  • 103.
    Nielsen, Niels Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ahlner, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Malmstedt, J
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öhman, K. P.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Endocrinology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Plasma levels of cyclic GMP and endothelin in postmenopausal women with unstable coronary artery disease1999In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 59, no 5, p. 325-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many women with typical anginal chest pain have normal coronary angiograms, which may be due to altered endothelial function. We evaluated the endothelial markers cyclic GMP (cGMP) and immunoreactive endothelin (ir-ET) regarding presence of coronary atherosclerosis in women with clinical signs of unstable coronary artery disease (CAD). Plasma levels of cGMP and ir-ET were determined in 118 patients and 84 controls. Ischaemia was evaluated at an exercise test. Of the patients 20% had normal vessels, 14% insignificant CAD and 66% significant stenosis at coronary angiography. Mean (95% CI) concentration of cGMP (nmol/l) was higher in patients than in controls (5.05 (4.53; 5.58) vs. 3.79 (3.34; 4.23)). Separating patients according to daily intake of nitroglycerin, only patients with this medication had significantly higher cGMP level (5.73 (4.88; 6.58)), whereas the difference between those without (4.35 (3.76; 4.94)) and controls disappeared. Patients with ischaemia at exercise test had higher cGMP level than those without (6.01 (5.13; 6.88) vs. 4.30 (3.66; 4.94)), even after adjusting for nitroglycerin treatment. ir-ET (pmol/l) was lower in patients with normal vessels than patients with coronary atherosclerosis (0.83 (0.78; 0.88) vs. 0.98 (0.92; 1.04)) and than the control group (0.91 (0.87; 0.94)). The difference between the control group and patients with atherosclerosis was also significant. Patients with unstable CAD and long-term nitroglycerin treatment have increased cGMP level. Patients with exercise-induced ischaemia have higher cGMP level than those without, irrespective of nitroglycerin treatment, which may reflect a general compensatory mechanism. Patients with normal vessels have low level of ir-ET, indicating different mechanisms for ischaemia/angina in these patients compared with patients with atherosclerosis.

  • 104.
    Nielsen, Niels Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brattström, Lars
    Department of Medicine, County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Hultberg, Björn
    Department of Clinical Chemistry, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Landgren, Finn
    Department of Medicine, County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Plasma total homocysteine levels in postmenopausal women with unstable coronary artery disease2000In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 151, no 2, p. 423-431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An elevated plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) level is considered a risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD), but the relationship between plasma tHcy and well-defined CAD in women is still unclear. Plasma tHcy concentrations and the covariates serum folate, vitamin B12, and creatinine were analysed in 157 angiographically examined postmenopausal women with unstable CAD and in 101 healthy controls. At coronary angiography, 16% had normal vessels and 84% had coronary atherosclerosis. Mean plasma tHcy concentration (μmol/l, 95% confidence interval) did not differ in patients compared to controls (13.1 (12.3–13.8) vs. 12.5 (11.6–13.5)) or in patients with or without coronary atherosclerosis (13.3 (12.4–14.1) vs. 12.0 (10.8–13.2)). A trend to an increasing plasma tHcy with increasing degree of coronary atherosclerosis was attenuated after adjustment for age and the previous mentioned covariates. Odds ratio for the risk of coronary artery disease and coronary atherosclerosis in hyperhomocysteinemic patients (≥90th percentile in controls) was approximately 3. However, the confidence interval included unity in half of the groups and the significance was therefore difficult to judge. Receiver operating characteristics showed age to be the only variable with a significant discriminatory ability regarding the presence of coronary atherosclerosis (area 0.77). Mild hyperhomocysteinemia seems not to be related to the risk of unstable CAD in postmenopausal women. The trend towards higher plasma tHcy with increasing degree of coronary atherosclerosis may be a marker of the disease. In future studies adjustment for age and the other three covariates should be considered.

  • 105.
    Nielsen, Niels Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Siegbahn, Agneta
    Department of Clinical Chemistry, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Markers of hypercoagulation, von Willebrand factor and anticardiolipin antibodies in postmenopausal women with unstable coronary artery disease: Discriminatory Ability Regarding Unstable Coronary Artery Disease and Coronary Atherosclerosis Using Receiver Operating CharactersticsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims - Many women with typical anginal chest pain have normal coronary angiograms. The pathogenetic mechanisms behind the chest pain in these patients are unknown but may be due to increased thrombogenecity. We evaluated markers of hypercoagulation and thrombosis in women with clinical signs of unstable coronary artery disease (CAD).

    Methods and results - 158 patients with unstable CAD and 101 controls were examined. 16% of the patients had nonnal vessels and 84% had coronary atherosclerosis at coronary angiography. Mean plasma concentrations of von Willebrand factor-antigen, soluble fibrin (SF), thrombin-antithrombin complex and Ddimer were significantly higher, whereas there was no difference regarding prothrombin fragment 1 +2 between patients and controls. Patients with coronary atherosclerosis had higher mean plasma levels for most variables compared to those with normal coronary vessels, but the only significant difference was for SF. D-dimer was significantly higher in patients with nonnal coronary vessels compared to the control group. Anticardiolipin antibody (ACA) levels were significantly lower in the patient group compared to the control group. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) showed that none of the variables represented high diagnostic accuracy in distinguishing patients with unstable CAD from healthy controls, or patients with from those without coronary atherosclerosis.

    Conclusion - Our results are in favour of a hypercoagulable state in postmenopausal women with unstable CAD and coronary atherosclerosis, even in the absence of myocardial marker elevation, whereas this does not seem to be the case in patients with nonnal vessels. ROC revealed no variable to be particularly clinical useful in separating patients and control or patients with and without coronary atherosclerosis.

  • 106.
    Nielsen, Niels Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Logander, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Fibrinolytic Variables in Postmenopausal Women with Unstable Coronary Artery Disease2001In: Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis, ISSN 0929-5305, E-ISSN 1573-742X, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 217-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Many women with typical anginal chest pain have normal coronary angiograms. The pathogenetic mechanisms behind the chest pain in these patients is unknown but may be due to altered fibrinolytic function enhancing thrombosis formation. We evaluated the two key components of the fibrinolytic system, tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in women with clinical signs of unstable coronary artery disease (CAD).

    Methods and results: 158 patients with unstable CAD and 101 controls were examined. Of the patients 16% had normal vessels and 84% coronary atherosclerosis at coronary angiography. Mean plasma concentration of t-PA-ag, but not of PAI-1-act was higher in patients than in controls (t-PA-ag: 2.12 (2.05;2.19) vs. 1.98 (1.89;2.07), p<0.05; PAI-1-act: 1.55 (1.35;1.74) vs. 1.49 (1.24;1.73), p¼n.s.). Patients with coronary atherosclerosis had significantly higher mean plasma levels of both t-PA-ag and PAI-1-act than patients with normal coronary vessels (t-PA-ag: 2.16 (2.08;2.33) vs. 1.94 (1.78;2.10), p<0.05; PAI-1-act: 1.68 (1.47;1.90) vs. 0.82 (0.43;1.21), p<0.01), and these differences were seen whether markers of myocardial damage were elevated or not. Mean plasma levels of PAI-1-act in patients with normal coronary vessels were even lower than in the control group (p<0.05). Almost all significant differences in mean plasma t-PA-ag and PAI-1-act disappeared after adjustments for known covariates.

    Conclusion: Our results indicate, regardless of myocardial marker elevation or not, an activated fibrinolytic system in postmenopausal women with unstable CAD and coronary atherosclerosis, but not in the same group of patients with normal coronary vessels. This argues against reduced fibrinolytic capacity in the latter patients and therefore against thrombosis formation as the cause of chest pain in these women. However, we cannot exclude that the differences can be an effect of inequality among some common risk factors between the groups.

  • 107.
    Nielsen, Niels Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Anders
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Gastroenterology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Endocrinology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Plasma lipoprotein particle concentrations in postmenopausal women with unstable coronary artery disease: Analysis of diagnostic accuracy using receiver operating characteristics2000In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 247, no 1, p. 43-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background.The contribution of plasma lipids to cardiovascular risk is usually evaluated by measuring plasma concentrations of total cholesterol, triglycerides and HDL cholesterol, and calculating LDL cholesterol concentration. We investigated plasma concentrations of apolipoproteins and lipoprotein particles in women with unstable coronary artery disease (CAD) to evaluate whether these, better than the routine lipid status, could differentiate women with and without coronary atherosclerosis.

    Methods. Blood samples for lipid analyses were collected from 119 angiographically examined postmenopausal 49–79-year-old women with unstable CAD, and from 101 age-matched controls. Mean plasma concentrations were compared and the discriminatory ability of the different variables were tested using receiver operating characteristics (ROC).

    Results. At coronary angiography 19% had normal vessels and 81% had coronary atherosclerosis. A disturbed triglyceride metabolism was the most pronounced lipid abnormality in women with unstable CAD and coronary atherosclerosis. ROC showed that none of the evaluated variables had a particularly high discriminatory power regarding unstable CAD or coronary atherosclerosis. The ratio cholesterol/HDL cholesterol was best with an ROC area of 0.79. Furthermore, the newer lipid variables, i.e. lipoprotein particles and apolipoproteins, were no better than the traditional variables.

    Conclusion. Lipoprotein changes reflecting a disturbed triglyceride metabolism are most pronounced in women with unstable CAD and coronary atherosclerosis. Lipoprotein particles and apolipoproteins alone were no better than lipids and lipoproteins in separating women with from those without coronary atherosclerosis. Our study does not support the measurement of apolipoproteins and lipoprotein particles on the basis of diagnostic accuracy alone.

  • 108.
    Nielsen, Niels Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Siegbahn, Agneta
    Department of Clinical Chemistry, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Markers of hypercoagulation and von Willebrand factor in postmenopausal women with unstable coronary artery disease. Discriminatory ability regarding unstable coronary artery disease and coronary atherosclerosis using receiver operating characteristics2000In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 248, no 2, p. 151-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. Many women with typical anginal chest pain have normal coronary angiograms. The pathogenetic mechanisms behind the chest pain in these patients are unknown but may be due to increased thrombogenicity. We evaluated markers of hypercoagulation and thrombosis in women with clinical signs of unstable coronary artery disease (CAD).

    Methods and results. A total of 158 patients with unstable CAD and 101 controls were examined: 16% of the patients had normal vessels and 84% had coronary atherosclerosis at coronary angiography. Mean plasma concentrations of von Willebrand factor antigen, soluble fibrin (SF), thrombin–antithrombin complex and d-dimer were significantly higher, whereas there was no difference regarding prothrombin fragment 1+2 between patients and controls. Patients with coronary atherosclerosis had higher mean plasma levels for most variables compared with those with normal coronary vessels, although only significantly higher for SF. d-Dimer was significantly higher in patients with normal coronary vessels compared with the control group. Although multivariate analyses showed strong significant correlations of the haemostatic variables to the diagnosis of unstable CAD, receiver operating characteristics (ROC) revealed that none of the variables represented high diagnostic accuracy in separating patients with unstable CAD. Likewise, none of the variables was particularly good at identifying coronary atherosclerosis.

    Conclusion. Our results are in favour of a hypercoagulable state in postmenopausal women with unstable CAD and coronary atherosclerosis, whereas this does not seem to be the case in patients with normal vessels. ROC revealed no variable to be particularly clinically useful in separating patients from controls or patients from those without coronary atherosclerosis.

  • 109.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Hallen, Jonas
    Oslo University Hospital Ulleval.
    Atar, Dan
    Oslo University Hospital Ulleval.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Early measurements of plasma matrix metalloproteinase-2 predict infarct size and ventricular dysfunction in ST-elevation myocardial infarction2012In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, E-ISSN 1468-201X, Vol. 98, no 1, p. 31-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Immediate reopening of the acutely occluded infarct-related artery via primary PCI is the preferred treatment in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). However, the sudden reinitiation of blood flow can lead to a local acute inflammatory response with further endothelial and myocardial damage, so-called reperfusion injury. The activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) is suggested to be a key event in this process. Objectives To investigate circulating MMPs, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) in relation to infarct size, left ventricular dysfunction and remodelling in a STEMI population undergoing PCI. Methods 58 Patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI were included. Blood samples were collected at baseline before PCI and at 12, 24 and 48 h for later analysis of MMPs, TIMPs and MPO by ELISA. Infarct size, left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and remodelling were assessed by cardiac MRI at 5 days and 4 month after STEMI. Results Plasma MMP-2 at 0 and 12 h showed a consistent and significant correlation with infarct size and LV dysfunction measured both at 5 days and at 4 months and correlated well with troponin I measurements. For TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 some support was found for associations with infarct size and LV dysfunction, but these were not as consistent as for MMP-2. MMP-8, MMP-9 and MPO did not overall correlate with measures of infarct size, LV dysfunction or remodelling. Conclusions In patients with STEMI, circulating levels of MMP-2, measured early and even before reperfusion therapy, are strongly associated with infarct size and LV dysfunction. This provides further evidence for the role of MMP-2 in ischaemia-reperfusion injury.

  • 110.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Szymanowski, Aleksander
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Soluble TNF Receptors Are Associated with Infarct Size and Ventricular Dysfunction in ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    The aim of the study was to investigate circulating markers of apoptosis in relation to infarct size, left ventricular dysfunction and remodeling in an ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) population undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).

    Background

    Immediate re-opening of the acutely occluded infarct-related artery via primary PCI is the treatment of choice in STEMI to limit ischemia injury. However, the sudden re-initiation of blood flow can lead to a local acute inflammatory response with further endothelial and myocardial damage, so-called reperfusion injury. Apoptosis is suggested to be a key event in ischemia-reperfusion injury, resulting in LV-dysfunction, remodeling and heart failure.

    Methods

    The present study is a prespecified substudy of the F.I.R.E. trial. We included 48 patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI. Blood samples were collected prior to PCI and after 24 hours. Plasma was separated for later analysis of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor (sTNFR) 1, sTNFR2, sFas and sFas ligand (sFasL) by ELISA. Infarct size, left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and remodeling were assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging at five days and four months after STEMI.

    Results

    The levels of sTNFR1 at 24 h as well as the relative increases in sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 over 24 h showed consistent and significant correlations with infarct size and LV-dysfunction at four months. Moreover, both sTNFRs correlated strongly with Troponin I and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 measurements. Soluble Fas and sFasL did not overall correlate with measures of infarct size or LV-dysfunction. None of the apoptosis markers correlated significantly with measures of remodeling.

    Conclusions

    In STEMI patients, circulating levels of sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 are associated with infarct size and LV dysfunction. This provides further evidence for the role of apoptosis in ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  • 111.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Wieringa, Wouter G.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Pundziute, Gabija
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Gjerde, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Neutrophil/Lymphocyte Ratio Is Associated with Non-Calcified Plaque Burden in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 9, p. e108183-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Elevations in soluble markers of inflammation and changes in leukocyte subset distribution are frequently reported in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Lately, the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio has emerged as a potenti al marker of both CAD severity and cardiovascular prognosis. Objectives: The aim of the study was to investigate whether neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio and other immune-inflammatory markers were related to plaque burden, as assessed by coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), in patients with CAD. Methods: Twenty patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) and 30 patients with stable angina (SA) underwent CCTA at two occasions, immediately prior to coronary angiography and after three months. Atherosclerotic plaques were classified as calcified, mixed and non-calcified. Blood samples were drawn at both occasions. Leukocyte subsets were analyzed by white blood cell differential counts and flow cytometry. Levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin(IL)-6 were measured in plasma. Blood analyses were also performed in 37 healthy controls. Results: Plaque variables did not change over 3 months, total plaque burden being similar in NSTE-ACS and SA. However, non-calcified/total plaque ratio was higher in NSTE-ACS, 0.25(0.09-0.44) vs 0.11(0.00-0.25), pless than0.05. At admission, levels of monocytes, neutrophils, neutrophil/lymphocyte ratios, CD4+ T cells, CRP and IL-6 were significantly elevated, while levels of NK cells were reduced, in both patient groups as compared to controls. After 3 months, levels of monocytes, neutrophils, neutrophil/lymphocyte ratios and CD4+ T cells remained elevated in patients. Neutrophil/lymphocyte ratios and neutrophil counts correlated significantly with numbers of non-calcified plaques and also with non-calcified/total plaque ratio (r = 0.403, p = 0.010 and r = 0.382, p = 0.024, respectively), but not with total plaque burden. Conclusions: Among immune-inflammatory markers in NSTE-ACS and SA patients, neutrophil counts and neutrophil/lymphocyte ratios were significantly correlated with non-calcified plaques. Data suggest that these easily measured biomarkers reflect the burden of vulnerable plaques in CAD.

  • 112.
    Nilsson, Tage
    et al.
    Centralsjukhuset, Karlstad.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Arheden, Håkan
    Universitetssjukhuset i Lund.
    Tornvall, Per
    Karolinska universitetssjukhuset, Solna .
    Datortomografi av kranskärlen - dags för eftertanke. En genomgång av det aktuella kunskapsläget: Coronary computer tomography - time for reflection. A survey of the current knowledge2009In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 106, no 6, p. 366-368Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Avbildning av kranskärlen med datortomografisk teknik har blivit en allt vanligare metod de senaste tio åren.

    Metoden har av förespråkarna föreslagits som ett alternativ till konventionell invasiv koronarangiografi.

    Det finns dock en risk för att metoden införs i svensk sjukvård på bristande eller ibland direkt felaktiga grunder

  • 113. ODonoghue, M
    et al.
    Boden, WE
    Braunwald, E
    Cannon, CP
    Clayton, TC
    de Winter, RJ
    Fox, KA
    Lagerqvist, B
    McCullough, PA
    Murphy, SA
    Spacek, R
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Wallentin, L
    Windhausen, F
    Sabatine, MS
    Early invasive vs conservative treatment strategies in women and men with unstable angina and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: A meta-analysis2008In: Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), ISSN 0098-7484, E-ISSN 1538-3598, Vol. 300, no 1, p. 71-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Although an invasive strategy is frequently used in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE ACS), data from some trials suggest that this strategy may not benefit women. Objective: To conduct a meta-analysis of randomized trials to compare the effects of an invasive vs conservative strategy in women and men with NSTE ACS. Data Sources: Trials were identified through a computerized literature search of the MEDLINE and Cochrane databases (1970-April 2008) using the search terms invasive strategy, conservative strategy, selective invasive strategy, acute coronary syndromes, non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction, and unstable angina. Study Selection: Randomized clinical trials comparing an invasive vs conservative treatment strategy in patients with NSTE ACS. Data Extraction: The principal investigators for each trial provided the sex-specific incidences of death, myocardial infarction (MI), and rehospitalization with ACS through 12 months of follow-up. Data Synthesis: Data were combined across 8 trials (3075 women and 7075 men). The odds ratio (OR) for the composite of death, MI, or ACS for invasive vs conservative strategy in women was 0.81 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.65-1.01, 21.1% vs 25.0%) and in men was 0.73 (95% CI, 0.55-0.98, 21.2% vs 26.3%) without significant heterogeneity between sexes (P for interaction = .26). Among biomarker-positive women, an invasive strategy was associated with a 33% lower odds of death, MI, or ACS (OR, 0.67, 95% CI, 0.50-0.88) and a nonsignificant 23% lower odds of death or MI (OR, 0.77, 95% CI, 0.47-1.25). In contrast, an invasive strategy was not associated with a significant reduction in the triple composite end point in biomarker-negative women (OR, 0.94, 95% CI, 0.61-1.44, P for interaction = .36) and was associated with a nonsignificant35%higher odds of death or MI (OR, 1.35, 95% CI, 0.78-2.35, P for interaction = .08). Among men, the OR for death, MI, or ACS was 0.56 (95% CI, 0.46-0.67) if biomarker-positive and 0.72 (95% CI, 0.51-1.01) if biomarker-negative (P for interaction = .09). Conclusions: In NSTE ACS, an invasive strategy has a comparable benefit in men and high-risk women for reducing the composite end point of death, MI, or rehospitalization with ACS. In contrast, our data provide evidence supporting the new guideline recommendation for a conservative strategy in low-risk women. ©2008 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.

  • 114.
    ODonoghue, Michelle L.
    et al.
    Brigham and Womens Hospital, USA .
    Vaidya, Ajay
    University of Calif San Francisco, USA .
    Afsal, Rizwan
    McMaster University, Canada .
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Boden, William E.
    Albany Stratton VA Medical Centre, USA .
    Braunwald, Eugene
    Brigham and Womens Hospital, USA .
    Cannon, Christopher P.
    Brigham and Womens Hospital, USA .
    Clayton, Tim C.
    London School Hyg and Trop Med, England .
    de Winter, Robbert J.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Fox, Keith A. A.
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland Royal Infirm Edinburgh NHS Trust, Scotland .
    Lagerqvist, Bo
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden .
    McCullough, Peter A.
    St John Providence Health Syst Providence Pk Heart, MI USA .
    Murphy, Sabina A.
    Brigham and Womens Hospital, USA .
    Spacek, Rudolf
    3rd Medical Fac Prague, Czech Republic .
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Windhausen, Fons
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Sabatine, Marc S.
    Brigham and Womens Hospital, USA .
    An Invasive or Conservative Strategy in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus and Non-ST-Segment Elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes A Collaborative Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials2012In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, ISSN 0735-1097, E-ISSN 1558-3597, Vol. 60, no 2, p. 106-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to conduct a meta-analysis to examine an invasive or conservative strategy in diabetic versus nondiabetic patients. Background Diabetic patients are at increased risk of cardiovascular events after an acute coronary syndrome, yet it remains unknown whether they derive enhanced benefit from an invasive strategy. Methods Randomized trials comparing an invasive versus conservative treatment strategy were identified. The prevalence of cardiovascular events through 12 months was reported for each trial, stratified by diabetes mellitus status and randomized treatment strategy. Relative risk (RR) ratios and absolute risk reductions were combined using random-effects models. Results Data were combined across 9 trials comprising 9,904 subjects of whom 1,789 (18.1%) had diabetes mellitus. The RRs for death, nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI), or rehospitalization with an acute coronary syndrome for an invasive versus conservative strategy were similar between diabetic patients (RR: 0.87; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.73 to 1.03) and nondiabetic patients (RR: 0.86; 95% CI: 0.70 to 1.06; p interaction = 0.83). An invasive strategy reduced nonfatal MI in diabetic patients (RR: 0.71; 95% CI: 0.55 to 0.92), but not in nondiabetic patients (RR: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.74 to 1.29; p interaction = 0.09). The absolute risk reduction in MI with an invasive strategy was greater in diabetic than nondiabetic patients (absolute risk reduction: 3.7% vs. 0.1%; p interaction = 0.02). There were no differences in death or stroke between groups (p interactions 0.68 and 0.20, respectively). Conclusions An early invasive strategy yielded similar RR reductions in overall cardiovascular events in diabetic and nondiabetic patients. However, an invasive strategy appeared to reduce recurrent nonfatal MI to a greater extent in diabetic patients. These data support the updated guidelines that recommend an invasive strategy for patients with diabetes mellitus and non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes.

  • 115.
    Oscarsson Tibblin, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Anskär, S
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engdahl, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fagerström, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Blomqvist, Per
    Anestesikliniken, Ryhov.
    Fredriksson, M
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Troponin T-values provide long-term prognosis in elderly patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery.2004In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 48, no 9, p. 1071-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of elevated postoperative Troponin T (TnT) levels in an elderly population undergoing non-cardiac surgery. METHODS: Five hundred and forty-six consecutive patients aged 70 years or older undergoing non-cardiac surgery of >30-min duration were enrolled in this prospective, observational study. A postoperative TnT measurement was obtained on the 5th to 7th postoperative day. Troponin T values greater than 0.02 ng ml(-1) were considered positive. Patients were followed over a 1-year period, and mortality and non-fatal cardiac events (acute myocardial infarction and coronary interventions) were recorded. RESULTS: Troponin T concentrations greater than 0.02 ng ml(-1) were detected in 53 of the study subjects (9.7%). Eleven per cent of the patients with elevated TnT had electrocardiographic or clinical signs of myocardial ischemia. One year after surgery, 17 (32%) of the patients with abnormal TnT concentrations had died. In a multivariate Cox regression analysis adjusting for baseline and perioperative data, a TnT value >0.02 ng ml(-1) was an independent correlate of the mortality adjusted hazard ratio (HR): 14.9 (95% CI 3.7-60.3). Other independent predictors of death were tachycardia (HR, 14.9 95% CI 3.45-64.8), ASA 4 (HR, 8.1 95% CI 1.3-50.0), reoperation (HR, 6.4 95% CI 1.1-36.9), and use of diuretics (HR, 4.2 95% CI 1.3-13.8). CONCLUSION: We conclude that elevated TnT levels in the postoperative period confer a 15-fold increase in mortality during the first year after surgery. Our findings also provide evidence that silent myocardial ischemia is common in an elderly population. Routine perioperative surveillance for TnT might therefore be of use in detecting patients at an increased risk of mortality during the first postoperative year.

  • 116.
    Oscarsson Tibblin, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sorliden, M
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Anskär, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gupta, Anil
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Predictors of cardiac events in high-risk patients undergoing emergency surgery2009In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 53, no 8, p. 986-994Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of myocardial damage and left ventricular myocardial dysfunction and their influence on outcome in high-risk patients undergoing non-elective surgery.

    Methods: In this prospective observational study, 211 patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists classification III or IV undergoing emergent or urgent surgery were included. Troponin I (TnI) was measured pre-operatively, 12 and 48 h post-operatively. Pre-operative N-terminal fragment of B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), as a marker for left ventricular systolic dysfunction, was analyzed. The diagnostic thresholds were set to TnI andgt; 0.06 mu g/l and NT-proBNP andgt; 1800 pg/ml, respectively. Post-operative major adverse cardiac events (MACE), 30-day and 3-months mortality were recorded.

    Results: Elevated TnI levels were detected in 33% of the patients post-operatively. A TnI elevation increased the risk of MACE (35% vs. 3% in patients with normal TnI levels, P andlt; 0.001) and 30-day mortality (23% vs. 7%, P=0.003). Increased concentrations of NT-proBNP were seen in 59% of the patients. Elevated NT-proBNP was an independent predictor of myocardial damage post-operatively, odds ratio, 6.2 [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.1-18.0] and resulted in an increased risk of MACE (21% vs. 2.5% in patients with NT-proBNP andlt; 1800 pg/ml, P andlt; 0.001).

    Conclusion: Myocardial damage is common in a high-risk population undergoing unscheduled surgery. These results suggest a close correlation between myocardial damage in the post-operative period and increased concentration of NT-proBNP before surgery. The combinations of TnI and NT-proBNP are reliable markers for monitoring patients at risk in the peri-operative period as well as useful tools in our risk assessment pre-operatively in emergency surgery.

  • 117.
    Oscarsson Tibblin, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Gupta, Anil
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Järhult, Johannes
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Matti
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Pettersson, Eva
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Darvish, Bijan
    Department of Anaesthesia & Intensive Care University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Krook, Helena
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    To continue or discontinue aspirin in the perioperative period: a randomized, controlled clinical trial2010In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 104, no 3, p. 305-312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) are a common cause of deathafter non-cardiac surgery. Despite evidence for the benefitof aspirin for secondary prevention, it is often discontinuedin the perioperative period due to the risk of bleeding.

    Methods: We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlledtrial in order to compare the effect of low-dose aspirin withthat of placebo on myocardial damage, cardiovascular, and bleedingcomplications in high-risk patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery.Aspirin (75 mg) or placebo was given 7 days before surgery andcontinued until the third postoperative day. Patients were followedup for 30 days after surgery.

    Results: A total of 220 patients were enrolled, 109 patients receivedaspirin and 111 received placebo. Four patients (3.7%) in theaspirin group and 10 patients (9.0%) in the placebo group hadelevated troponin T levels in the postoperative period (P=0.10).Twelve patients (5.4%) had an MACE during the first 30 postoperativedays. Two of these patients (1.8%) were in the aspirin groupand 10 patients (9.0%) were in the placebo group (P=0.02). Treatmentwith aspirin resulted in a 7.2% absolute risk reduction [95%confidence interval (CI), 1.3–13%] for postoperative MACE.The relative risk reduction was 80% (95% CI, 9.2–95%).Numbers needed to treat were 14 (95% CI, 7.6–78). No significantdifferences in bleeding complications were seen between thetwo groups.

    Conclusions: In high-risk patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery, perioperativeaspirin reduced the risk of MACE without increasing bleedingcomplications. However, the study was not powered to evaluatebleeding complications.

     

  • 118.
    Panayi, Georgios
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wieringa, Wouter G.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Carlsson, Jorg
    Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden; Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Pundziute, Gabija
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Computed tomography coronary angiography in patients with acute myocardial infarction and normal invasive coronary angiography2016In: BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, ISSN 1471-2261, E-ISSN 1471-2261, Vol. 16, no 78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Three to five percent of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) have normal coronary arteries on invasive coronary angiography (ICA). The aim of this study was to assess the presence and characteristics of atherosclerotic plaques on computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) and describe the clinical characteristics of this group of patients. Methods: This was a multicentre, prospective, descriptive study on CTCA evaluation in thirty patients fulfilling criteria for AMI and without visible coronary plaques on ICA. CTCA evaluation was performed head to head in consensus by two experienced observers blinded to baseline patient characteristics and ICA results. Analysis of plaque characteristics and plaque effect on the arterial lumen was performed. Coronary segments were visually scored for the presence of plaque. Seventeen segments were differentiated, according to a modified American Heart Association classification. Echocardiography performed according to routine during the initial hospitalisation was retrieved for analysis of wall motion abnormalities and left ventricular systolic function in most patients. Results: Twenty-five patients presented with non ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and five with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Mean age was 60.2 years and 23/30 were women. The prevalence of risk factors of coronary artery disease (CAD) was low. In total, 452 coronary segments were analysed. Eighty percent (24/30) had completely normal coronary arteries and twenty percent (6/30) had coronary atherosclerosis on CTCA. In patients with atherosclerotic plaques, the median number of segments with plaque per patient was one. Echocardiography was normal in 4/22 patients based on normal global longitudinal strain (GLS) and normal wall motion score index (WMSI); 4/22 patients had normal GLS with pathological WMSI; 3/22 patients had pathological GLS and normal WMSI; 11/22 patients had pathological GLS and WMSI and among them we could identify 5 patients with a Takotsubo pattern on echo. Conclusions: Despite a diagnosis of AMI, 80 % of patients with normal ICA showed no coronary plaques on CTCA. The remaining 20 % had only minimal non-obstructive atherosclerosis. Patients fulfilling clinical criteria for AMI but with completely normal ICA need further evaluation, suggestively with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

  • 119. Quintana, M
    et al.
    Hjelmdal, P
    Sollevi, A
    Kahan, T
    Edner, M
    Rehnqvist, N
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Kjerr, A-C
    Näsman, P
    Left ventricular function and cardiovascular events following adjuvant therapy with adenosine in acute myocardial infarction treated with thrombolysis.2003In: European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, ISSN 0031-6970, E-ISSN 1432-1041, Vol. 59Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 120.
    Quintana, M
    et al.
    Huddinge Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Anaesthesiol, Stockholm, Sweden Natl Board Hlth & Welf, Stockholm, Sweden Danderyd Hosp, Dept Internal Med, Stockholm, Sweden Linkoping Univ Hosp, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Royal Inst Technol, Stockholm, Sweden Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sollevi, A
    Huddinge Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Anaesthesiol, Stockholm, Sweden Natl Board Hlth & Welf, Stockholm, Sweden Danderyd Hosp, Dept Internal Med, Stockholm, Sweden Linkoping Univ Hosp, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Royal Inst Technol, Stockholm, Sweden Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rehnqvist, N
    Huddinge Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Anaesthesiol, Stockholm, Sweden Natl Board Hlth & Welf, Stockholm, Sweden Danderyd Hosp, Dept Internal Med, Stockholm, Sweden Linkoping Univ Hosp, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Royal Inst Technol, Stockholm, Sweden Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kahan, T
    Huddinge Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Anaesthesiol, Stockholm, Sweden Natl Board Hlth & Welf, Stockholm, Sweden Danderyd Hosp, Dept Internal Med, Stockholm, Sweden Linkoping Univ Hosp, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Royal Inst Technol, Stockholm, Sweden Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Edner, M
    Huddinge Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Anaesthesiol, Stockholm, Sweden Natl Board Hlth & Welf, Stockholm, Sweden Danderyd Hosp, Dept Internal Med, Stockholm, Sweden Linkoping Univ Hosp, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Royal Inst Technol, Stockholm, Sweden Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Nasman, P
    Huddinge Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Anaesthesiol, Stockholm, Sweden Natl Board Hlth & Welf, Stockholm, Sweden Danderyd Hosp, Dept Internal Med, Stockholm, Sweden Linkoping Univ Hosp, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Royal Inst Technol, Stockholm, Sweden Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kjerr, AC
    Huddinge Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Anaesthesiol, Stockholm, Sweden Natl Board Hlth & Welf, Stockholm, Sweden Danderyd Hosp, Dept Internal Med, Stockholm, Sweden Linkoping Univ Hosp, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Royal Inst Technol, Stockholm, Sweden Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hjemdahl, P
    Huddinge Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Anaesthesiol, Stockholm, Sweden Natl Board Hlth & Welf, Stockholm, Sweden Danderyd Hosp, Dept Internal Med, Stockholm, Sweden Linkoping Univ Hosp, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Royal Inst Technol, Stockholm, Sweden Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The effects of adenosine as adjuvant therapy in acute myocardial infarction on cardiovascular events. Results of the ATTenuation by Adenosine of Cardiac Complications (ATTACC) study2001In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 22, p. 287-287Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 121. Reynolds, Harmony
    et al.
    Farkouh, Michael
    Lincoff, Michael
    Hsu, Amy
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sadowski, Zygmunt
    White, Jennifer
    Topol, Eric
    Hochman, Judith
    Impact of female sex on death and bleeding after fibrinolytic treatment of myocardial infarction in GUSTO V2007In: Archives of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0003-9926, E-ISSN 1538-3679, Vol. 167, no 19, p. 2054-2060Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Women with acute myocardial infarction are more likely than men to experience reinfarction, bleeding, or death. This difference has been hypothesized to be due to older age, treatment delay, and comorbidities in women. Use of diagnostic and therapeutic modalities may also differ. There is controversy regarding whether female sex is an independent risk factor for death and/or bleeding. Methods: The GUSTO (Global Use of Strategies to Open Occluded Arteries in Acute Coronary Syndromes) V Investigators studied standard-dose reteplase vs standard-dose abciximab plus half-dose reteplase in patients with myocardial infarction. Results: Women were older and more often had diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention were less frequent in women. Death (9.8% vs 4.4% at 30 days, odds ratio [OR], 2.00, 95% confidence interval, 1.59-2.53,P < .001) and bleeding (6.4% vs 2.5%, OR, 1.31, 95% confidence interval, 1.18-1.45, P < .01) were more common in women. There was no association between treatment assignment and death in either sex, bleeding was more common in both sexes receiving combination therapy. Female sex was independently associated with mortality. After Killip class greater than 1 (OR, 4.7), female sex (OR, 2.0) was the strongest correlate of death. Female sex was independently associated with bleeding for both treatments. Conclusions: Female sex is independently associated with death and bleeding complications among fibrinolytic-treated patients with myocardial infarction. There remains a sex differential in the use of angiography and, therefore, percutaneous coronary intervention after fibrinolysis. Further research will determine what mediates excess risk in women. Trial Registration: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00245648. ©2007 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.

  • 122. Rosano, G
    et al.
    Simon, T
    Mercuro, G
    Sans, S
    Schenck-Gustafsson, K
    Stevenson, JC
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Jaillon, P
    Hormone treatment - misconceptions and agreements - Reply2002Other (Other academic)
  • 123.
    Rubboli, A.
    et al.
    Division of Cardiology, Maggiore Hospital, Bologna, Italy, Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, Division of Cardiology, Maggiore Hospital, Largo Nigrisoli 2, IT-40133 Bologna, Italy.
    Ottani, F.
    Division of Cardiology, 'G.B. Morgagni' Hospital, Forlì, Italy.
    Capecchi, A.
    Division of Cardiology, Maggiore Hospital, Bologna, Italy.
    Brancaleoni, R.
    Division of Cardiology, Maggiore Hospital, Bologna, Italy.
    Galvani, M.
    Division of Cardiology, 'G.B. Morgagni' Hospital, Forlì, Italy.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Low-molecular-weight heparins in conjunction with thrombolysis for ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction: A critical review of the literature2007In: Cardiology, ISSN 0008-6312, E-ISSN 1421-9751, Vol. 107, no 2, p. 132-139Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Intravenous unfractionated heparin (UFH) is recommended in ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction (STEMI), following thrombolysis with fibrin-specific agents. Subcutaneous low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWH), previously proven effective in non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes, have been recently investigated in the setting of STEMI. We aimed at evaluating the current level of evidence supporting the use of LMWH in STEMI. Methods: A Medline search of the English language literature between January 1995 and December 2005 was performed and randomized clinical trials comparing LMWH to either placebo or UFH in conjunction with thrombolysis were selected. Results: About 26,800 patients treated with various thrombolytic regimens were included in 12 randomized clinical trials. Dalteparin was superior to placebo on left ventricular thrombosis/arterial thromboembolism, with no significant effect on the early patency rate of the infarct-related artery (IRA). Compared to UFH, dalteparin had no significant effect on clinical events and on the IRA late patency, although less thrombus was present. Enoxaparin was superior to placebo on the medium-term death/reinfarction/angina rate and late IRA patency, and superior also to UFH on in-hospital and medium-term occurrence of death/reinfarction/angina. The effect of enoxaparin on IRA patency rate was not univocal. Compared to placebo, reviparin significantly reduced early and medium-term mortality and reinfarction rates, without a substantial increase in overall stroke rate. As regards safety, bleedings were more frequent than placebo and comparable to UFH in LMWH groups, with the exception of the pre-hospital ASSENT-3 PLUS trial, where in elderly patients, enoxaparin had an incidence of intracranial hemorrhage twice higher than UFH. Conclusions: In-hospital subcutaneous administration of dalteparin, enoxaparin or reviparin, as an adjunct to various thrombolytics in STEMI, appears feasible and at least as effective and safe as intravenous UFH. Before LMWH might be recommended, however, some yet unresolved issues (i.e. use in elderly patients, in severe renal insufficiency, in association with glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors and during interventional procedures), need to be addressed. Copyright © 2007 S. Karger AG.

  • 124.
    Rönning, H
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nielsen, N-E
    Swahn, E
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, A
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Follow up of adults with congenitally malformed hearts with focus on computer-based education and psychosocial support improves knowledge, results from a randomised intervention study.2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 125.
    Rönning, Helén
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Nielsen, Niels Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Thilen, Ulf
    Lund University Hospital, Sweden.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Development and evaluation of a computer-based educational program for adults with congenitally malformed hearts2013In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 78-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: There is a lack of educational material for adults with congenitally malformed hearts. Computer-based education has shown to have significant effects on knowledge and management of chronic diseases. AIM: The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a computer-based educational program for adults with congenitally malformed hearts. METHODS: The program was developed by a multidisciplinary team. Data were collected by questionnaires, observations, and structured interviews. RESULTS: The final product was a computer-based educational program consisting of ten separate modules, one for each particular malformation. The program was experienced as stimulating and easy to use. The appearance and quantity of the text was graded as good and the content as relevant and very useful. CONCLUSION: This is the first computer-based program developed for adults with congenitally malformed hearts. The evaluation found the program to have great potential as an important tool for improving care. Further studies are needed to test the outcomes of the program on knowledge, perceived control over the heart condition, anxiety/depression. and health-related quality of life. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: The program may be used as a complement to verbal information and every adult with a congenitally malformed hearts can receive individualized information from a personal CD.

  • 126.
    Rönning, Helén
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nielsen, Niels Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Description and initial evaluation of an educational and psychosocial support model for adults with congenitally malformed hearts2011In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, Vol. 83, no 2, p. 247-251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Various programmes for adults with congenitally malformed hearts have been developed, but detailed descriptions of content, rationale and goals are often missing. The aim of this study was to describe and make an initial evaluation of a follow-up model for adults with congenitally malformed hearts, focusing on education and psychosocial support by a multidisciplinary team (EPS).

    METHODS: The model is described in steps and evaluated with regards to perceptions of knowledge, anxiety and satisfaction.

    RESULTS: The EPS model included a policlinic visit to the physician/nurse (medical consultation, computer-based and individual education face-to-face as well as psychosocial support) and a 1-month telephone follow-up. Fifty-five adults (mean age 34, 29 women) with the nine most common forms of congenitally malformed hearts participated in the EPS model as well as the 3-months follow-up. Knowledge about congenital heart malformation had increased in 40% of the participants at the 3-months follow-up.

    CONCLUSION: This study describes and evaluates a model that combines a multidisciplinary approach and computer-based education for follow-up of adults with congenitally malformed hearts. The EPS model was found to increase self-estimated knowledge, but further evaluations need to be conducted to prove patient-centred outcomes over time.

    PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: The model is now ready to be implemented in adults with congenitally malformed hearts.

  • 127.
    Rönning, Helén
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Nielsen, Niels Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Educational needs in adults with congenitally malformed hearts2008In: Cardiology in the Young, ISSN 1047-9511, E-ISSN 1467-1107, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 473-479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aim: The number of adults with congenitally malformed hearts is growing, and there is an increasing demand for their continuous follow-up. At present, different programmes have been established for adults with congenital cardiac disease, but there is a lack of knowledge regarding how education and psychosocial support should be given to achieve effects. Before developing educational programmes, it is necessary to be aware of the perspective of the patients. The aim of our study, therefore, was to describe how adults with congenitally malformed hearts experience their educational needs.

    Methods: The study had a qualitative design. We interviewed 16 adults, aged from 19 to 55 years, with congenitally malformed hearts.

    Results: Two-way communication emerged as crucial to individualising education. Without good communication, those with congenitally malformed hearts, receiving information from providers of healthcare, are unable to transfer the information received. Thus, individualised education gives access to knowledge and the tools required to manage important areas in life, such as the congenital cardiac malformation, physical activity, the situation of life, treatment, and resources available for healthcare. The information given should provide easy access to knowledge through proper educational materials and methods, and be given with respect for the individual. This is facilitated if the education is tailored to the requirements of the individual in a holistic approach, and is provided through good communication.

    Conclusion: Our investigation shows that a structured educational programme needs to start from the perspective of the individual patient, and that two-way Communication needs to be taken into consideration to enhance knowledge.

  • 128.
    Rönning, Helén
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nielsen, Niels Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Evaluation of knowledge, perceived control, symptoms of anxiety and depression related to a model for follow-up in adults with congenitally malformed hearts: a randomised control trial2011Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of a model including computer-based and individualised education and psychosocial support for adults with congenitally malformed hearts.

    Design: Prospective randomised controlled multicentre trial.

    Setting: Four hospital outpatient clinics in Sweden.

    Participants: Adults with congenitally malformed hearts.

    Interventions: Comparing usual care twith education and psychosocial support by a multidisciplinary team.

    Main Outcome Measures: Knowledge and perceived control regarding the heart condition, and symptoms of anxiety and depression at baseline, 3 and 12-months follow-up.

    Results: Out of 114 included participants, 58 were randomised to the control group, and 56 to the intervention group. The average age was 34 (SD 13.5) years. Results showed a significant between-group treatment effect in general knowledge after 3 months (effect size 0.63, p=<0.01), and 12-month (effect size 0.53, p= 0.02). Knowledge regarding endocarditis also increased significantly between-group after 3 months (effect size 0.87, p= <0.01), and over time between baseline and 3 months (effect size 1.43, p=<0.001), and between baseline and 12-months (effect size 0.58, p= 0.02). There were no changes in knowledge in domains regarding self-management of medical treatment and contraceptives and pregnancy in any of the groups. Further, the intervention did neither increase nor decrease the perceived control over the heart condition or symptoms of anxiety and depression.

    Conclusion: Education and psychosocial support by a multidisciplinary team was effective in improving and maintaining knowledge about self-management in adults with heart malformation. Future research is needed to determine the long-time effects on selfmanagement behaviours and perceived control.

  • 129.
    Rönning, Helén
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nielsen, Niels Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Follow up of adults with congenitally malformed hearts with focus on computer-based education and psychosocial support improves knowledge, results from a randomised intervention study in EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL, vol 31, issue , pp 229-2292010In: EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL, Oxford University Press , 2010, Vol. 31, p. 229-229Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 130.
    Rönning, Helén
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nielsen, Niels Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Development and psychometric evaluation of the knowledge scale for adults with congenitally malformed hearts2013In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 228-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Research Objective: Adults with congenitally malformed hearts have knowledge gaps regarding their heart condition, and their level of knowledge is not routinely assessed during follow-up. One reason for this is that there are few validated, user-friendly questionnaires to assess knowledge about congenital heart disease and its effects on daily life. Failure to identify low levels of knowledge could lead to less motivated and insecure individuals not actively involved in treatment and care of their heart condition. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop and test a knowledge scale for adults with congenitally malformed hearts.

    Participants and Methods: The development and psychometric evaluation of the Knowledge Scale for Adults With Congenitally Malformed Hearts (KnoCoMH) followed 2 phases: (1) development and evaluation of the initial version, with face validity and content validity assessed by experts and adults with congenitally malformed hearts, and (2) evaluation and refinement of the KnoCoMH in adults with congenitally malformed hearts, including item difficulty level, internal consistency, and test-retest reliability.

    Results: The development and evaluation of a knowledge scale for adults with congenitally malformed hearts resulted in the KnoCoMH including 46 items in 4 domains: General Knowledge, with a Kuder-Richardson formula 20 (KR-20) value of 0.68; Medical Treatment, with a KR-20 value of 0.74; Endocarditis Prophylaxis, with a KR-20 value of 0.90; and Contraceptives and Pregnancy, with a KR-20 value of 0.65. Test-retest evaluation showed significant correlations between 0.50 and 0.67 (P < .01) in all 4 domains. There was good variation in item difficulty, with a mean value of 0.56 in General Knowledge, 0.62 in Medical Treatment, 0.33 in Endocarditis Prophylaxis, and 0.48 in Contraceptives and Pregnancy.

    Conclusions: The KnoCoMH has acceptable psychometric properties for most of the knowledge domains included. It can be used for evaluating knowledge among adults with congenitally malformed hearts and its associations with other outcomes. However, further studies are advisable to test construct validity, predictive validity, and responsiveness.

  • 131.
    Schenck-Gustafsson, K
    et al.
    Karolinska Hosp, Dept Cardiol, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden Linkoping Univ Hosp, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Guidelines for the European cardiologist concerning hormone replacement therapy in postmenopausal women2000In: European Heart Journal, Supplement, ISSN 1520-765X, E-ISSN 1554-2815, Vol. 2, no G, p. G15-G16Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 132.
    Schiele, Francois
    et al.
    University Hospital of Besancon, University of Franche-Comté, Besançon, France .
    Gale, Chris P
    Leeds Institute of Cardiovascular and Metabolic Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds; York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, York, UK.
    Bonnefoy, Eric
    Unité de soins intensifs cardiologiques, Hôpital Cardiologique Louis-Pradel, Bron, France.
    Capuano, Frederic
    Haute Autorité de Santé, Saint Denis La Plaine, France.
    Claeys, Marc J
    Cardiology Department, University Hospital Antwerp, Edegem, Belgium.
    Danchin, Nicolas
    Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP); Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou (HEGP), Department of Cardiology, Paris, France; Université Paris-Descartes, Paris, France.
    Fox, Keith Aa
    Centre for Cardiovascular Science, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
    Huber, Kurt
    3rd Medical Department, Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Wilhelminenhospital, Vienna, Austria.
    Iakobishvili, Zaza
    Department of Cardiology, Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tikva, Israel.
    Lettino, Maddalena
    Humanitas Research Hospital, Rozzano (Milan), Italy.
    Quinn, Tom
    Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, UK.
    Rubini Gimenez, Maria
    Department of Cardiology and Cardiovascular Research Institute Basel (CRIB), University Hospital Basel, Basel.
    Bøtker, Hans E
    Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Timmis, Adam
    National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Unit, Barts Heart Centre, London, UK.
    Tubaro, Marco
    Ospedale San Filippo Neri, Rome, Italy.
    Vrints, Christiaan
    East Sussex Healthcare, Conquest Hospital, Hastings, UK.
    Walker, David
    Department of Cardiology, Soroka University Medical Center, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel.
    Zahger, Doron
    Klinikum Ludwigshafen and Institut für Herzinfarktforschung Ludwigshafen, Ludwigshafen, Germany.
    Zeymer, Uwe
    Centro Nacional de InvestigacionesCardiovasculares (CNIC), Cardiology Department, Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, and Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Bueno, Hector
    Centro Nacional de InvestigacionesCardiovasculares (CNIC), Cardiology Department, Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, and Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Quality indicators for acute myocardial infarction: A position paper of the Acute Cardiovascular Care Association.2017In: European heart journal. Acute cardiovascular care, ISSN 2048-8734, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 34-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evaluation of quality of care is an integral part of modern healthcare, and has become an indispensable tool for health authorities, the public, the press and patients. However, measuring quality of care is difficult, because it is a multifactorial and multidimensional concept that cannot be estimated solely on the basis of patients' clinical outcomes. Thus, measuring the process of care through quality indicators (QIs) has become a widely used practice in this context. Other professional societies have published QIs for the evaluation of quality of care in the context of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), but no such indicators exist in Europe. In this context, the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Acute Cardiovascular Care Association (ACCA) has reflected on the measurement of quality of care in the context of AMI (ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI)) and created a set of QIs, with a view to developing programmes to improve quality of care for the management of AMI across Europe. We present here the list of QIs defined by the ACCA, with explanations of the methodology used, scientific justification and reasons for the choice for each measure.

  • 133.
    Sederholm Lawesson, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    A gender perspective on short- and long term mortality in ST-elevation myocardial infarction: a report from the SWEDEHEART register2013In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 1041-1047Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous studies of patients admitted for ST-elevation myocardial infarction [STEMI] have indicated that women have a higher risk of early mortality than do men. These studies have presented limited information on gender related differences in the short term and almost no information on the long term. Methods and results: We analysed a prospective, consecutively included STEMI population consisting of 54,146 patients (35% women). This population consists of almost all patients hospitalised in Sweden between January 1, 1995 and December 31, 2006 as recorded in the SWEDEHEART register (formerly RIKS-HIA). Follow-up time ranged from one to 13 years (mean 4.6). Women had a lower probability of being given reperfusion therapy, odds ratio [OR] 0.83 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.79-0.88). During the time these STEMI patients were in the hospital, 13% of the women and 7% of men died, multivariable adjusted OR 1.21 (95% CI 1.11-1.32). During the follow up period, 46% of the women died as compared with 32% of the men. There was, however, no gender difference in age-adjusted risk of long term mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 0.98, 95% CI 0.95-1.01) whereas the multivariable adjusted risk was lower in women (HR 0.92, 95% CI 0.89-0.96). The long term risk of re-infarction was the same in men and women (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.93-1.03) whereas men in the youngest group had a higher risk than women in that age group (HR 0.82, 95% CI 0.72-0.94). Conclusion: In STEMI, women had a higher risk of in-hospital mortality but the long-term risk of death was higher in men. More studies are needed in the primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI) era that are designed to determine why women fare worse than men after STEMI during the first phase when they are in hospital

  • 134.
    Sederholm Lawesson, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Time trends in STEMI—improved treatment and outcome but still a gender gap: a prospective observational cohort study from the SWEDEHEART register2012In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 2, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective In ST elevation myocardial infarction women received less evidence-based medicine and had worse outcome during the fibrinolytic era. With the shift to primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI) as preferred reperfusion strategy, the authors aimed to investigate whether these gender differences has diminished.

    Design, setting and participants Cohort study including consecutive ST elevation myocardial infarction patients registered 1998–2000 (n=15 697) and 2004–2006 (n=14 380) in the Register of Information and Knowledge about Swedish Heart Intensive care Admissions.

    Outcome measures 1. Use of evidence-based medicine such as reperfusion therapy (pPCI or fibrinolysis) and evidence-based drugs at discharge. 2. Inhospital and 1-year mortality.

    Results Of those who got reperfusion therapy, pPCI was the choice in 9% in the early period compared with 68% in the late period. In the early period, reperfusion therapy was given to 63% of women versus 71% of men, p<0.001. Corresponding figures in the late period were 64% vs 75%, p<0.001. After multivariable adjustments, the ORs (women vs men) were 0.86 (95% CI 0.78 to 0.94) in the early and 0.80 (95% CI 0.73 to 0.89) in the late period. As regards evidence-based secondary preventive drugs at discharge in hospital survivors (platelet inhibitors, statins, ACE inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers and β-blockers), there were small gender differences in the early period. In the late period, women had 14%–25% less chance of receiving these drugs, OR 0.75 (95% CI 0.68 to 0.81) through 0.86 (95% CI 0.73 to 1.00). In both periods, multivariable-adjusted inhospital mortality was higher in women, OR 1.18 (95% CI 1.02 to 1.36) and 1.21 (1.00 to 1.46). One-year mortality was gender equal, HR 0.95 (95% CI 0.87 to 1.05) and 0.96 (0.86 to 1.08), after adding evidence-based medicine to the multivariable adjustments.

    Conclusion In spite of an intense gender debate, focus on guideline adherence and the change in reperfusion strategy, the last decade gender differences in use of reperfusion therapy and evidence-based therapy at discharge did not decline during the study period, rather the opposite. Moreover, higher mortality in women persisted.

  • 135.
    Sederholm Lawesson, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Szummer, Karolina
    Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, KI, Stockholm.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Prevalence and prognostic impact of chronic kidney disease in STEMI from a gender perspective: data from the SWEDEHEART register, a large Swedish prospective cohort.2015In: BMJ open, ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 5, no 6, p. e008188-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Gender differences in prevalence and prognostic impact of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) have been poorly evaluated. In STEMI, female gender has been independently associated with an increased risk of mortality. CKD has been found to be an important prognostic marker in myocardial infarction. The aim of this study was to evaluate gender differences in prevalence and prognostic impact of CKD on short-term and long-term mortality.

    DESIGN: Prospective observational cohort study.

    SETTING: The national quality register SWEDEHEART was used. In the beginning of the study period, 94% of the Swedish coronary care units contributed data to the register, which subsequently increased to 100%. The glomerular filtration rate was estimated (eGFR) according to Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study (MDRD) and Cockcroft-Gault (CG).

    PARTICIPANTS: All patients with STEMI registered in SWEDEHEART from the years 2003-2009 were included (37,991 patients, 66% men).

    MAIN RESULTS: Women had 1.6 (MDRD) to 2.2 (CG) times higher multivariable adjusted risk of CKD. Half of the women had CKD according to CG. CKD was associated with 2-2.5 times higher risk of in-hospital mortality and approximately 1.5 times higher risk of long-term mortality in both genders. Each 10 mL/min decline of eGFR was associated with an increased risk of in-hospital and long-term mortality (22-33% and 9-16%, respectively) and this did not vary significantly by gender. Both in-hospital and long-term mortality were doubled in women. After multivariable adjustment including eGFR, there was no longer any gender difference in early outcome and the long-term outcome was better in women.

    CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with STEMI, female gender was independently associated with CKD. Reduced eGFR was a strong independent risk factor for short-term and long-term mortality without a significant gender difference in prognostic impact and seems to be an important reason why women have higher mortality than men with STEMI.

  • 136.
    Sederholm Lawesson, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Szummer, Karolina
    Department of Cardiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Institution of Medicine (H7), Karolinska Institutet, SE-141 86 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Prevalence and prognostic impact of renal insufficiency in STEMI from a gender perspective: data from a large prospective cohortManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Data indicate that female gender may be associated with increased risk of RI in MI but also that presence of RI has higher prognostic impact in women. In case of ST-elevation MI [STEMI], women have higher adjusted mortality compared to men but RI has seldom been taken into account.

    Methods and Results: All STEMI patients registered in the Swedish national quality register SWEDEHEART between 2003 and 2009 were included (37991 patients, 66% men). Based on s-creatinine on admission, glomerular filtration rate [GFR] was estimated according to MDRD and Cockcroft-Gault [CG]. RI was defined as eGFR below 60 mL/min. Women had 1.6-2.2 times higher multivariable adjusted risk of RI and half of all women had RI according to CG. RI was associated with 2-2.5 times higher risk of in-hospital and approximately 1.5 times higher risk of long-term mortality in both genders. Each 10 mL/min decline of eGFR was associated with 22-33% and 9-16% increased risk of in-hospital and. long-term mortality, respectively. There was no significant interaction between gender and eGFR regarding outcome. Both in-hospital and long-term mortality was twice as high in women but after adjusting for eGFR according to CG, there was no longer any gender difference in early outcome and long term outcome was better in women.

    Conclusions: Among STEMI patients

    1) Female sex was independently associated with RI

    2) Reduced eGFR regardless of used formula was a strong independent risk factor for mortality without a significant gender difference in prognostic impact.

    3) Reduced eGFR (according to CG) appeared to be a main explanatory variable to the higher mortality in women.

  • 137.
    Sederholm Lawesson, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Ericsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Hellström Ängerud, K
    Isaksson, R-M
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Gender differences in first medical contact and pre-hospital delay times in ST-elevation myocardial infarction - a prospective multicenter report from the SymTime study group.2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 138.
    Sederholm Lawesson, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Isaksson, RM
    Hellström Ängerud, K
    Ericsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Logander, Elisabeth
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Symptoms and pre-hospital delay times in relation to infarct related artery in ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients - a survey report from the SymTime study group.2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 139.
    Sederholm Lawesson, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Isaksson, Rose-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Norrbotten Cty Council, Sweden.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Ericsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Angerud, Karin
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Gender differences in symptom presentation of ST-elevation myocardial infarction - An observational multicenter survey study2018In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Symptom presentation has been sparsely studied from a gender perspective restricting the inclusion to ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients. Correct symptom recognition is vital in order to promptly seek care in STEMI where fast reperfusion therapy is of utmost importance. Female gender has been found associated with atypical presentation in studies on mixed MI populations but it is unclear whether this is valid also in STEMI. Objectives: We assessed whether there are gender differences in symptoms and interpretation of these in STEMI, and if this is attributable to sociodemographic and clinical factors. Methods: SymTime was a multicenter observational study including a validated questionnaire and data from medical records. Eligible STEMI patients (n = 532) were enrolled within 24 h after admittance at five Swedish hospitals. Results: Women were older, more often single and had lower educational level. Chest pain was less prevalent in women (74 vs 93%, p amp;lt; 0.001), whereas shoulder (33 vs 15%, p amp;lt; 0.001), throat/neck (34 vs 18%, p amp;lt; 0.001), back pain (29 versus 12%, p amp;lt; 0.001) and nausea (49 vs 29%, p amp;lt; 0.001) were more prevalent. Women less often interpreted their symptoms as of cardiac origin (60 vs 69%, p = 0.04). Female gender was the strongest independent predictor of non-chest pain presentation, odds ratio 5.29, 95% confidence interval 2.85-9.80. Conclusions: A striking gender difference in STEMI symptoms was found. As women significantly misinterpreted their symptoms more often, it is vital when informing about MI to the society or to high risk individuals, to highlight also other symptoms than just chest pain. (C) 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 140.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    A view from Sweden2006In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 113, no 4, p. F13-F14Other (Other academic)
  • 141.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Bleeding complications in women2007In: Bleeding complications in the treatment of Acute Coronary Syndrome,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 142.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Editorial Material: Stable or not, woman or man: is there a difference?2012In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 33, no 22, p. 2769-2770Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 143.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Imaging more and more important for diagnosis of heart diseases2008In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 105, p. 3021-3021Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 144.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Könsperspektivet i klinisk forskning.2001In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 98, p. 654-654Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 145.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. European Society of Cardiology.
    Relations between professional medical associations and the healthcare industry, concerning scientific communication and continuing medical education – a Policy Statement from the European Society of Cardiology Executive Summary, December 20112012In: Acta Cardiologica, ISSN 0001-5385, E-ISSN 1784-973X, Vol. 67, no 2, p. 265-271Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 146.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. European Society of Cardiology.
    Relations between professional medical associations and the health-care industry, concerning scientific communication and continuing medical education: a policy statement from the European Society of Cardiology2012In: Acta Cardiologica, ISSN 0001-5385, E-ISSN 1784-973X, Vol. 67, no 3, p. 379-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physicians have an ethical duty to keep up-to-date with current knowledge. Professional medical associations such as the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) support these obligations. In Europe, the costs of continuing medical education (CME) are insufficiently supported from governments and employers; however, medical associations have been criticized for accepting alternative financial support from industry. Medical education and training in research include learning how to assess the quality and reliability of any information. There is some risk of bias in any form of scientific communication including intellectual, professional, and financial and it is essential that in particular, the latter must be acknowledged by full disclosure. It is essential that there is strong collaboration between basic and clinical researchers from academic institutions on the one hand, with engineers and scientists from the research divisions of device and pharmaceutical companies on the other. This is vital so that new diagnostic methods and treatments are developed. Promotion of advances by industry may accelerate their implementation into clinical practice. Universities now frequently exhort their academic staff to protect their intellectual property or commercialize their research. Thus, it is not commercial activity or links per se that have become the target for criticism but the perceived influence of commercial enterprises on clinical decision-making or on messages conveyed by professional medical organizations. This document offers the perspective of the ESC on the current debate, and it recommends how to minimize bias in scientific communications and CME and how to ensure proper ethical standards and transparency in relations between the medical profession and industry.

  • 147.
    Swahn, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Invasive Treatment of Non-ST-segment Elevation Acute Coronary Syndrome: Cardiac Catheterization/Revascularization for All?: [Tratamiento invasivo del síndrome coronario agudo sin elevación del segmento ST: ¿cateterismo cardiaco/ revascularización en todos los casos?]2014In: Revista Española de Cardiología, ISSN 0300-8932, E-ISSN 1579-2242, Vol. 67, no 3, p. 218-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients admitted to hospital with symptoms and signs of non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes have different risk profiles and are in need of an individualized approach that takes into consideration not only age and sex but also comorbidities such as diabetes, renal failure, hypertension, heart failure, peripheral artery disease, earlier revascularization, etc. According to evidence-based medicine and as documented in current guidelines, there is currently evidence for early catheterization and, if feasible, revascularization in high-risk patients, especially in men. Nevertheless, because of a lack of definitive evidence, there is uncertainty about treating women in the same way. Because women are usually older and have more comorbidities, they are frailer and revascularization should be indicated with greater caution. There is no evidence that catheterization as such is worse for women than for men; however, for both men and women with low risk, a less invasive approach, such as coronary computed tomography angiography, could be considered as a first diagnostic tool. 

  • 148.
    Swahn, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Afzal, Rizwan
    Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.
    Budaj, Andrzej
    Postgraduate Medical School, Grochowski Hospital, Warsaw, Poland.
    Chrolavicius, Susan
    Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.
    Fox, Keith
    Centre for Cardiovascular Science, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
    Jolly, Sanjit
    Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.
    Mehta, Shamir R
    Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.
    de Winter, Robbert
    Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Yusuf, Salim
    Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.
    Early invasive compared with a selective invasive strategy in women with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes: a substudy of the OASIS 5 trial and a meta-analysis of previous randomized trials2012In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 51-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims The aim of this study was to compare benefits and risks of a routine invasive compared with a selective invasive strategy in women with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes. Methods and results We randomly assigned 184 women, either to a routine or to a selective invasive strategy as a substudy to the OASIS 5 trial, who were followed for 2 years. Meta-analysis of data from previous randomized trials was also done. There were no significant differences between the two treatment strategies in the primary outcome death/myocardial infarction (MI)/stroke [21.0 vs. 15.4%, HR = 1.46, 95% CI (0.73-2.94)], in the secondary outcome death/MI [18.8 vs. 14.3%, HR = 1.39, 95% CI (0.67-2.88)], or separately analysed outcomes MI [12.9 vs. 13.3%, HR = 0.95, 95% CI (0.42-2.19)] or stroke [2.3 vs. 4.4%, HR = 0.67, 95% CI (0.12-3.70)]. However, there were significantly more deaths after 1 year (8.8 vs. 1.1%, HR = 9.01, 95% CI (1.11-72.90) and a higher rate of major bleeding at 30 days [8.8 vs. 1.1%, HR = 11.45, 95% CI (1.43-91.96)] in the routine invasive strategy group. A meta-analysis including 2692 women in previous randomized trials, with a gender perspective, showed no significant difference in the composite outcome death/MI, OR = 1.18, 95% CI (0.92-1.53) but a higher mortality with a routine invasive strategy for women, OR = 1.51, 95% CI (1.00-2.29). Conclusion The rate of death, MI, or stroke in women was not different in patients treated with a routine invasive strategy compared with a selective invasive strategy, but there was a concerning trend towards higher mortality. When combined with data from previous trials, there does not appear to be a benefit of an early invasive strategy in women with ACS, which differs from the results in men. These data emphasize the lack of clear evidence in favour of an invasive strategy in women and suggest caution in extrapolating the results from men to women.

  • 149.
    Swahn, Eva
    et al.
    Department of Cardiology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Karlsson, J.-E.
    Department of Cardiology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Fransson, Sven-Göran
    Radiology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lindström, F.
    Internal Medicine, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Nylander, Eva
    Clinical Physiology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ståhl, E.
    Department of Thoracic Surgery, University Hospital, Lund.
    Coronary ostial stenosis operated on by patch technique in a young woman with Takayasu's arteritis and angina pectoris1993In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 14, no 8, p. 1150-1151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 150.
    Swahn, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Lockowandt, U
    Karolinska universitetssjukhuset, Stockholm.
    Carlsson, M
    Skånes universitetssjukhus, Lund.
    Teknikgenombrott för byte av aortaklaffar via kateter: Men »vetenskap och beprövad erfarenhet« har inte hängt med2011In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 107, no 29, p. 1762-1763Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kateterimplantation av aortaklaffproteser är stadd i en mycket snabb utveckling, som inte alltid grundar sig på vetenskap och beprövad erfarenhet.

    Det är viktigt att den preoperativa bedömningen och ingreppet utförs av en multidisciplinär grupp.

    Det är också angeläget att ett nationellt register inrättas och att en riksomfattande studie påbörjas.

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