liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
12345 101 - 150 of 230
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 101.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    Ng, Elaine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Memory test at ecological SNRs2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 102.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten.
    Ng, Elaine
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Beyond speech intelligibility testing: A memory test for assessment of signal processing interventions in ecologically valid listening situations2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Performance of hearing aid signal processing is often assessed by speech intelligibility in noisetests, such as the HINT, CRM, or SPIN sentences presented in a background of noise or babble.Usually these tests are most sensitive at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) below 0 dB. However, in arecent study by Smeds et al. (2012) it was shown that the SNRs in ecological listening situations(e.g. kitchen, babble, and car) were typically well above 0 dB SNR. That is, SNRs where the speechintelligibility in noise tests are insensitive.Cognitive Spare Capacity (CSC) refers to the residual capacity after successful speech perception.In a recent study by Ng et al. (2010), we dened the residual capacity to be number of words recalledafter successful listening to a number of HINT sentences, inspired by Sarampalis et al. (2009).In a recent test with 26 hearing impaired test subjects we showed that close to 100% correctspeech intelligibility in a four talker babble noise required around + 7 dB SNR. At that SNR it wasshown that a hearing aid noise reduction scheme improved memory recall by about 10-15%. Thus,this kind of memory recall test is a possible candidate for assessment of hearing aid functionality inecologically relevant (positive) SNRs

  • 103.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    Ng, Elaine
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Beyond speech intelligibility testing: A memory test for assessment of signal processing interventions in ecologically valid listening situations2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Performance of hearing aid signal processing is often assessed by speech intelligibility in noise tests, such as the HINT, CRM, or SPIN sentences presented in a background of noise or babble. Usually these tests are most sensitive at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) below 0 dB. However, in a recent study by Smeds et al. (2012) it was shown that the SNRs in ecological listening situations (e.g. kitchen, babble, and car) were typically well above 0 dB SNR. That is, SNRs where the speech intelligibility in noise tests are insensitive.Cognitive Spare Capacity (CSC) refers to the residual capacity after successful speech perception. In a recent study by Ng et al. (2010), we defined the residual capacity to be number of words recalled after successful listening to a number of HINT sentences, inspired by Sarampalis et al. (2009).In a recent test with 26 hearing impaired test subjects we showed that close to 100% correct speech intelligibility in a four talker babble noise required around + 7 dB SNR. At that SNR it was shown that a hearing aid noise reduction scheme improved memory recall by about 10-15%. Thus, this kind of memory recall test is a possible candidate for assessment of hearing aid functionality in ecologically relevant (positive) SNRs.

  • 104.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ng, Hoi Ning, Elaine
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Immediate effects of signal processing on memory systems2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditionally, hearing instrument signal processing schemes are evaluated where the speech recognition tests in noise are most sensitive, i.e. around 50 percent correct. However, such testing typically leads to ecologically unrealistic negative signal-to-noise ratios. Therefore, memory performance has been suggested as a more ecologically valid outcome measure in conditions with interfering background noises, and where participants perform closer to 100 percent correct. In a recent study by Sarampalis et al. (2009) they used an Ephraim-Mallah noise reduction algorithm and found beneficial effects for normal hearing participants on memory function. However, such memory effects have not been shown for hearing impaired participants. The current study on hearing-impaired subjects evaluated ‘aggressive’ ideal binary masking (IBM, see Wang, et al., 2009), as a proof-of-concept not only for improving speech comprehension but also for its potential effects of masking on memory systems. Furthermore, binary masks estimated from directional microphones (Boldt et al., 2008) were used as a realistic version of binary mask processing. Results show significant main effects of noise type and noise reduction. Noise reduction techniques improved the memory performance in the four-talker babble background, while no such improvement was observed in the steady-state noise background. Participants with higher reading span scores performed significantly better in the memory task, but only in the four-talker babble background.The study demonstrates the binary-masking noise reduction technique helps freeing up cognitive resources and hence enhances memory task performance in the four-talker babble background for hearing-impaired listeners with high reading span performance. The findings suggest that there is a cognitive challenge for the hearing aid industry to improve signal processing options for individuals to improve immediate perception and encoding into memory.

  • 105.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Pontoppidan, Niels Henrik
    N band FM demodulation to aid cochlear hearing impaired persons.2013Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The invention relates to: A signal processing device comprising a signal processing unit for processing an electrical SPU-input signal comprising frequencies in the audible frequency range between a minimum frequency and a maximum frequency, and providing a processed SPU output signal. The invention further relates to its use and to a method of operating an audio processing device. The object of the present invention is to provide a scheme for improving a user's perception of an acoustic signal. The problem is solved in that an FM to AM transformation unit for transforming an FM2AM input signal originating from the SPU-input signal and comprising at least a part of the frequency range of the SPU-input signal from a frequency modulated signal to an amplitude modulated signal to provide an FM2AM output signal, which is used in the generation of the processed SPU output signal. This has the advantage of providing an improved perception by a hearing impaired user of an input sound.

  • 106.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Individualization of hearing aid signal processing based on cognitive measures.2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hearing instruments use complex processing anticipatedto improve speech understanding. While many listenersbenefit from such processing, others do not and thesedifferences are potentiated by adverse listening conditions.Unwanted artefacts of hearing aid signal processing maycontribute to adverse listening conditions (Mattys et al.,2012). Under such conditions cognitive processingresources are allocated to the recovery of degradedinformation at the auditory periphery, leaving fewerresources for understanding the message.Working memory refers to the capacity to hold andmanipulate a set of items in mind, such as speechfragments. A number of recent studies indicate thatindividual working memory capacity influences theindividual benefit of hearing aid signal processing. Ng etal., (under revision) examined the effects of binarymasking noise reduction (Wang et al., 2009) in hearingaids on memory processing of speech perceived in acompeting speech background, using a sentence-finalword identification and recall test. The reading span testwas also administered. The reading span test assessesthe simultaneous processing and memory aspects ofworking memory. Noise reduction lowered the negativeeffect of noise on memory performance. Participants withgood working memory capacity obtained a further benefit.Lunner and Sundewall-Thorén (2007), among others,showed that the individual benefit of fast wide dynamicrange compression was associated with individual workingmemory capacity. Persons with high working memorycapacity benefited most from fast acting compression whilethe persons with low working memory capacity benefitedmost from slow acting compression. Arehart, Souza, Bacaand Kates (in press) showed that elderly individuals withlow working memory capacity were more disadvantagedby frequency compression processing during speechrecognition in noise than elderly individuals with highworking memory capacity. It is possible that the negativeeffects of fast acting wide dynamic compression andfrequency compression for persons with low workingmemory are due to unwanted artefacts of signalprocessing.In conclusion, the benefits of certain givenimplementations of complex processing in hearing aidshave to be weighed against the extra cognitive load thatsuch processing seems to engender, possibly as a resultof unwanted artefacts. Although complex processing mayaid speech understanding in noise for individuals withhearing impairment and especially those with goodworking memory capacity, it seems that for someindividuals with lower working memory capacity, thedrawbacks may outweigh the benefits. This should betaken into account when hearing aids are fitted.

  • 107.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rosenbom, Tove
    Oticon Medical, Göteborg.
    Ågren, Jessica
    Oticon Medical, Göteborg.
    Ng, Elaine
    Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Using speech recall in hearing aid fitting and outcome evaluation under ecological listening conditions2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 108.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rosenbom, Tove
    Oticon Medical, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Ågren, Jessica
    Oticon Medical, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Ning Ng, Elaine Hoi
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Using Speech Recall in Hearing Aid Fitting and Outcome Evaluation Under Ecological Test Conditions2016In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 145S-154SArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In adaptive Speech Reception Threshold (SRT) tests used in the audiological clinic, speech is presented at signal to noise ratios (SNRs) that are lower than those generally encountered in real-life communication situations. At higher, ecologically valid SNRs, however, SRTs are insensitive to changes in hearing aid signal processing that may be of benefit to listeners who are hard of hearing. Previous studies conducted in Swedish using the Sentence-final Word Identification and Recall test (SWIR) have indicated that at such SNRs, the ability to recall spoken words may be a more informative measure. In the present study, a Danish version of SWIR, known as the Sentence-final Word Identification and Recall Test in a New Language (SWIRL) was introduced and evaluated in two experiments. The objective of experiment 1 was to determine if the Swedish results demonstrating benefit from noise reduction signal processing for hearing aid wearers could be replicated in 25 Danish participants with mild to moderate symmetrical sensorineural hearing loss. The objective of experiment 2 was to compare direct-drive and skin-drive transmission in 16 Danish users of bone-anchored hearing aids with conductive hearing loss or mixed sensorineural and conductive hearing loss. In experiment 1, performance on SWIRL improved when hearing aid noise reduction was used, replicating the Swedish results and generalizing them across languages. In experiment 2, performance on SWIRL was better for direct-drive compared with skin-drive transmission conditions. These findings indicate that spoken word recall can be used to identify benefits from hearing aid signal processing at ecologically valid, positive SNRs where SRTs are insensitive.

  • 109.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Oticon A/S, Research Centre Eriksholm, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cognition and hearing aids.2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 395-403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The perceptual information transmitted from a damaged cochlea to the brain is more poorly specified than information from an intact cochlea and requires more processing in working memory before language content can be decoded. In addition to making sounds audible, current hearing aids include several technologies that are intended to facilitate language understanding for persons with hearing impairment in challenging listening situations. These include directional microphones, noise reduction, and fast-acting amplitude compression systems. However, the processed signal itself may challenge listening to the extent that with specific types of technology, and in certain listening situations, individual differences in cognitive processing resources may determine listening success. Here, current and developing digital hearing aid signal processing schemes are reviewed in the light of individual working memory (WM) differences. It is argued that signal processing designed to improve speech understanding may have both positive and negative consequences, and that these may depend on individual WM capacity.

  • 110.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Cognition and Hearing Aids2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 111.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    On cognitive functioning and effective use of a hearing aid or cochlear implant2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 112.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    The Ease of Language Understanding (ELU) model: Theoretical, empirical, and clinical advances2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 113.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Sundewall-Thorén,, E.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Karlsson Foo, Catharina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    Exceeding individual working memory capacity restrains aided speech recognition performance - effects in complex listening situations and effects of acclimatization2008In: Auditory Signal Processing in Hearing Impaired Listeners. International Symposium on Auditory and Audiological Research, 2008, p. 551-558Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 114.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Sundewall-Thorén, Elisabeth
    Interactions between cognition, compression, and listening conditions: Effects on speech-in-noise performance in a two-channel hearing aid2007In: Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, ISSN 1050-0545, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 604-617Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study which included 23 experienced hearing aid users replicated several of the experiments reported in Gatehouse et al (2003, 2006) with new speech test material, language, and test procedure. The performance measure used was SNR required for 80% correct words in a sentence test. Consistent with Gatehouse et al, this study indicated that subjects showing a low score in a cognitive test (visual letter monitoring) performed better in the speech recognition test with slow time constants than with fast time constants, and performed better in unmodulated noise than in modulated noise, while subjects with high scores on the cognitive test showed the opposite pattern. Furthermore, cognitive test scores were significantly correlated with the differential advantage of fast-acting versus slow-acting compression in conditions of modulated noise. The pure tone average threshold explained 30% of the variance in aided speech recognition in noise under relatively simple listening conditions, while cognitive test scores explained about 40% of the variance under more complex, fluctuating listening conditions, where the pure tone average explained less than 5% of the variance. This suggests that speech recognition under steady-state noise conditions may underestimate the role of cognition in real-life listening.

  • 115.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Sundewall-Thorén, Elisabeth
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Karlsson Foo, Catharina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Aided listening performance in complex conditions correlates with performance on cognitive tests rather than with simple tests of audibility.2007In: International Symposium on Auditory and Audiological Reserach,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 116.
    Malmberg, Milijana
    et al.
    Boras Hospital, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Kahari, Kim
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jansson, Gunilla
    Boras Hospital, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Implementing Internet-Based Aural Rehabilitation in a General Clinical Practice2015In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 325-328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to share the lessons that were learned about the process of implementing an Internet-based, randomized controlled trial (RCT) in general clinical practice (GCP) and to address some of the advantages of using the Internet as a tool to implement a RCT in GCP. The RCT implemented focused on investigating Internet-based aural rehabilitation (AR) in addition to hearing aid (HA)-fitting supplemented with telephone support, and it was applied in a clinical setting. The results of this RCT and the questionnaires chosen will be presented in an article elsewhere. Procedure: Here, the procedure of the implemented trial is presented, and the implementation challenges are presented and discussed. Specifically, we describe the trial research question, recruitment strategy, patient eligibility criteria, the questionnaires, clinician participation, funding and time (for the clinicians), and risks and benefits (for the participants). Discussion: The trial implementation showed that AR in addition to HA-fitting can be carried out in GCP using the Internet. Using an Internet-based RCT overcomes some of the challenges of implementing a trial in GCP.

  • 117.
    Malmberg, Milijana
    et al.
    Borås Hospital, Hearing Clinic.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Kähäri, Kim
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Audiology.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience.
    The effects of complementing an educational program for hearing aid users with internet support: A randomized, controlled trial implemented in a general clinical practice2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 118.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya K C
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Vision and Hearing Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK .
    Molander, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    The acceptance of hearing disability among adults experiencing hearing difficulties: a cross-sectional study2014In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 4, no e004066Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective This study developed the Hearing Disability Acceptance Questionnaire (HDAQ) and tested its construct and concurrent validities.

    Design Cross-sectional.

    Participants A total of 90 participants who were experiencing hearing difficulties were recruited in the UK.

    Outcome measures The HDAQ was developed based on the Tinnitus Acceptance Questionnaire (TAQ). Participants completed self-report measures regarding hearing disability acceptance, hearing disability, symptoms of anxiety and depression and a measure of stages of change.

    Results The HDAQ has a two-factor structure that explains 75.69% of its variance. The factors identified were activity engagement and avoidance and suppression. The scale showed a sufficient internal consistency (Cronbach's α=0.86). The HDAQ also had acceptable concurrent validity with regard to self-reported hearing disability, self-reported anxiety and depression and readiness to change measures.

    Conclusions Acceptance is likely an important aspect of coping with chronic health conditions. To our knowledge, no previously published and validated scale measures the acceptance of hearing disability; therefore, the HDAQ might be useful in future research. However, the role of acceptance in adjusting to hearing disability must be further investigated

  • 119.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya K. C.
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stephens, Dafydd
    Cardiff University, UK.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Use of the ‘patient journey’ model in the internet-based pre-fitting counseling of a person with hearing disability: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial2013In: Trials, ISSN 1745-6215, E-ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 14, no 25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Hearing impairment is one of the most frequent chronic conditions. Persons with a hearing impairment (PHI) have various experiences during their ‘journey’ through hearing loss. In our previous studies we have developed a ‘patient journey’ model of PHI and their communication partners (CPs). We suggest this model could be useful in internet-based pre-fitting counseling of a person with hearing disability (PHD).

    Methods/Design

    A randomized controlled trial (RCT) with waiting list control (WLC) design will be used in this study. One hundred and fifty eight participants with self-reported hearing disability (that is, score >20 in the Hearing Handicap Questionnaire (HHQ)) will be recruited to participate in this study. They will be assigned to one of two groups (79 participants in each group): (1) Information and counseling provision using the ‘patient journey’ model; and (2) WLC. They will participate in a 30 day (4 weeks) internet-based counseling program based on the ‘patient journey’ model. Various outcome measures which focuses on hearing disability, depression and anxiety, readiness to change and acceptance of hearing disability will be administered pre (one week before) and post (one week and six months after) intervention to evaluate the effectiveness of counseling.

    Discussion

    Internet-based counseling is being introduced as a viable option for audiological rehabilitation. We predict that the ‘patient journey’ model will have several advantages during counseling of a PHD. Such a program, if proven effective, could yield cost and time-efficient ways of managing hearing disability.

  • 120.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya K. C.
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stephens, Dafydd
    Cardiff University, UK.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Communication partners’ journey through their partner’s hearing impairment2013In: International Journal of Otolaryngology, ISSN 1687-9201, E-ISSN 1687-921X, Vol. 2013, no 707910, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of the study was to further the Ida Institute model on communication partner’s (CPs) journey through experiences of person with hearing impairment (PHI), based on the perspectives of CPs. Qualitative approach using thematic analysis and process mapping. Nine CPs of hearing aid users participated in the study, recruited through the Swansea hearing impaired support group. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and the data were used to develop a CP journey template. The Ida Institute model (based on professionals’ perspective) was compared with the new template developed (based on CPs perspectives). Seven main phases were identified which include: (1) contemplation; (2) awareness; (3) persuasion; (4) validation; (5) rehabilitation; (6) adaptation; and (7) resolution. The results suggest some commonalities and differences between the views of professionals and CPs. A new phase ‘adaptation’ was identified from CPs’ reported experiences, which was not identified by professionals in the Ida Institute model. The CP journey model could be a useful tool during audiological enablement/rehabilitation sessions to promote discussion between the PHI and the CP. In addition, it can be used in the training of hearing healthcare professionals.

  • 121.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya Kumar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar University, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Stages of Change Profiles among Adults Experiencing Hearing Difficulties Who Have Not Taken Any Action: A Cross-Sectional Study2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the current study was to test the hypothesis that adults experiencing hearing difficulties who are aware of their difficulties but have not taken any action would fall under contemplation and preparation stages based on the transtheoretical stages-of-change model. The study employed a cross-sectional design. The study was conducted in United Kingdom and 90 participants completed University of Rhode Island Change Assessment (URICA) scale as well as measures of self-reported hearing disability, self-reported anxiety and depression, self-reported hearing disability acceptance, and provided additional demographic details online. As predicted, the results indicate that a high percentage of participants (over 90%) were in the contemplation and preparation stages. No statistically significant differences were observed among groups of stage with highest URICA scores and factors such as: years since hearing disability, self-reported hearing disability, self-reported anxiety and depression, and self-reported hearing disability acceptance. Cluster analysis identified three stages-of-change clusters, which were named as: decision making (53% of sample), participation (28% of sample), and disinterest (19% of sample). Study results support the stages-of-change model. In addition, implications of the current study and areas for future research are discussed.

  • 122.
    Mishra, Sachin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Updating ability modulates the negative effect of noise on memory of speech for persons with age-related hearing loss but not for young adults with normal hearingArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 123.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Seeing the talker’s face supports executive processing of speech in steady state noise2013In: Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5137, Vol. 7, no 96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Listening to speech in noise depletes cognitive resources, affecting speech processing. The present study investigated how remaining resources or cognitive spare capacity (CSC) can be deployed by young adults with normal hearing. We administered a test of CSC (CSCT; Mishra et al., 2013) along with a battery of established cognitive tests to 20 participants with normal hearing. In the CSCT, lists of two-digit numbers were presented with and without visual cues in quiet, as well as in steady-state and speech-like noise at a high intelligibility level. In low load conditions, two numbers were recalled according to instructions inducing executive processing (updating, inhibition) and in high load conditions the participants were additionally instructed to recall one extra number, which was the always the first item in the list. In line with previous findings, results showed that CSC was sensitive to memory load and executive function but generally not related to working memory capacity (WMC). Furthermore, CSCT scores in quiet were lowered by visual cues, probably due to distraction. In steady-state noise, the presence of visual cues improved CSCT scores, probably by enabling better encoding. Contrary to our expectation, CSCT performance was disrupted more in steady-state than speech-like noise, although only without visual cues, possibly because selective attention could be used to ignore the speech-like background and provide an enriched representation of target items in working memory similar to that obtained in quiet. This interpretation is supported by a consistent association between CSCT scores and updating skills.

  • 124.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark .
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Visual Information Can Hinder Working Memory Processing of Speech2013In: Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, ISSN 1092-4388, E-ISSN 1558-9102, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 1120-1132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the new Cognitive Spare Capacity Test (CSCT), which measures aspects of working memory capacity for heard speech in the audiovisual and auditory-only modalities of presentation.

    METHOD:

    In Experiment 1, 20 young adults with normal hearing performed the CSCT and an independent battery of cognitive tests. In the CSCT, they listened to and recalled 2-digit numbers according to instructions inducing executive processing at 2 different memory loads. In Experiment 2, 10 participants performed a less executively demanding free recall task using the same stimuli.

    RESULTS:

    CSCT performance demonstrated an effect of memory load and was associated with independent measures of executive function and inference making but not with general working memory capacity. Audiovisual presentation was associated with lower CSCT scores but higher free recall performance scores.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    CSCT is an executively challenging test of the ability to process heard speech. It captures cognitive aspects of listening related to sentence comprehension that are quantitatively and qualitatively different from working memory capacity. Visual information provided in the audiovisual modality of presentation can hinder executive processing in working memory of nondegraded speech material.

  • 125.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Aided speech understanding and cognitive spare capacity2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 126.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Audiovisual presentation supports cognitive processing of information heard in modulated noise2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cognitive spare capacity test (CSCT) assesses the ability to process heardinformation stored in working memory. This is important because listening that iseffortful, due to noise or hearing impairment, consumes cognitive resources leavingless capacity available for further processing. The CSCT pinpoints the effectsof modality of presentation (Audiovisual, Audio-only); memory load (High, Low)and different kinds of executive processing demands (Updating, Inhibition). Inthe present study, 24 participants with mild to moderate hearing loss performedCSCT with amplification in quiet, in steady-state noise at an individually adaptedsignal to noise ratio (SNR) rendering intelligibility of ~95% and in modulatednoise (International Speech Test Signal; ISTS) at the same SNR. An independentbattery of cognitive tests was also administered. Analysis of variance showedmain effects of all factors, including better performance with Audiovisual thanAudio-only modality. However, a significant interaction revealed that the Audiovisualbenefit was most prominent in ISTS. The benefit of Audiovisual presentationover Audio-only presentation correlated with the independent measure of workingmemory capacity. The pattern of results suggests that for the hearing impairedpopulation, Audiovisual presentation supports cognitive processing of informationheard in modulated noise and that the magnitude of this benefit is related toworking memory capacity.

  • 127.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cognitive Spare Capacity Test2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 128.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cognitive spare capacity test: Preliminary findings2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 129.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cognitive spare capacity test: Some preliminary findings2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 130.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sick and tired of listening.2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 131.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Speech understanding and cognitive spare capacity2009In: Binaural Processing and Spatial Hearing, ISBN 87-990013-2-2 / [ed] Buchholz, J.M., Dau T., Dalsgaard, J.C., Poulsen, T., Ballerup: The Danavox Jubilee Foundation , 2009, p. 305-313Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 132.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Speech understanding and cognitive spare capacity2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 133.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Age-related sensory and cognitive decline make it harder to remember speech in noise across serial positions2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 134.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. 3Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Cognitive spare capacity in older adults with hearing loss2014In: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, ISSN 1663-4365, E-ISSN 1663-4365, Vol. 6, no 96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Individual differences in working memory capacity (WMC) are associated with speech recognition in adverse conditions, reflecting the need to maintain and process speech fragments until lexical access can be achieved. When working memory resources are engaged in unlocking the lexicon, there is less Cognitive Spare Capacity (CSC) available for higher level processing of speech. CSC is essential for interpreting the linguistic content of speech input and preparing an appropriate response, that is, engaging in conversation. Previously, we showed, using a Cognitive Spare Capacity Test (CSCT) that in young adults with normal hearing, CSC was not generally related to WMC and that when CSC decreased in noise it could be restored by visual cues. In the present study, we investigated CSC in 24 older adults with age-related hearing loss, by administering the CSCT and a battery of cognitive tests. We found generally reduced CSC in older adults with hearing loss compared to the younger group in our previous study, probably because they had poorer cognitive skills and deployed them differently. Importantly, CSC was not reduced in the older group when listening conditions were optimal. Visual cues improved CSC more for this group than for the younger group in our previous study. CSC of older adults with hearing loss was not generally related to WMC but it was consistently related to episodic long term memory, suggesting that the efficiency of this processing bottleneck is important for executive processing of speech in this group.

  • 135.
    Molander, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Weineland, Sandra
    Linköping University.
    Bergwall, Kajsa
    Linköping University.
    Buck, Sonia
    Linköping University.
    Hansson-Malmlof, Johan
    Linköping University.
    Lantz, Henning
    Linköping University.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Internet-Based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Psychological Distress Experienced by People With Hearing Problems: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial2015In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 307-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Psychological distress and psychiatric symptoms are prevalent among people with hearing loss or other audiological conditions, but psychological interventions for these groups are rare. This article describes the study protocol for a randomized controlled trial for evaluating the effect of a psychological treatment delivered over the Internet for individuals with hearing problems and concurrent psychological distress. Method: Participants who are significantly distressed will be randomized to either an 8-week Internet-delivered acceptance-based cognitive behavioral therapy (i.e., acceptance and commitment therapy [ACT]), or wait-list control. We aim to include measures of distress associated with hearing difficulties, anxiety, and depression. In addition, we aim to measure acceptance associated with hearing difficulties as well as quality of life. Conclusion: The results of the trial may further our understanding of how to best treat people who present problems with both psychological distress and hearing in using the Internet.

  • 136.
    Molander, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Nordqvist, Peter
    Royal institute of technology, Research Institute Hearing Bridge, KTH.
    Ellis, Rachel
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience.
    Online administration of a speech in noise test and its relationship to cognition, hearing problems and mental health2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hearing loss is common, but often both undetected and untreated. In this two-part study we evaluated an online hearing test and used this test to explore potential links between hearing status, cognitive abilities, psychological distress as well as quality of life.

    Out of a total of 1370 online recruited participants who completed the procedure, 16.2% failed the online hearing test. Hearing difficulties were more prevalent among the older participants. Poor self-rated hearing ability, as measured by the Amsterdam Inventory of Auditory Handicap, increased the odds ratio for failing the hearing test (OR 2.34, 95 % CI 1.74-3.15). The same was true for scoring above the cut-off score of 11 on the anxiety subscale on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (OR 2.55, 95 % CI 1.22-5.33). On the other hand, good performance on the cognitive tasks lowered the risk for a failed hearing test.

    We conclude that online hearing tests may have the potential to reduce the time lag between noticing hearing difficulties and beginning a process to address the problem. Moreover, online data collection facilitate large scale investigations on the links between hearing, cognition and perceived communication and mental health problems.

  • 137.
    Molander, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nordqvist, Peter
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Internet-based hearing screening using speech-in-noise: validation and comparisons of self-reported hearing problems, quality of life and phonological representation2013In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 3, no 9, p. 3223-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives For the last decade a host of different projects have been launched to allow persons who are concerned about their hearing status to quickly and at a low cost test their hearing ability. Most often, this is carried out without collecting complementary information that could be correlated with hearing impairment. In this two-part study we first, present the development and validation of a novel Internet-based hearing test, and second, report on the associations between this test and phonological representation, quality of life and self-reported hearing difficulties.

    Design Cross-sectional study.

    Setting An opportunity sample of participants was recruited at the Stockholm central station for the first study. All parts of the second study were conducted via the Internet, with testing and self-report forms adapted for online use.

    Participants The first part of the study was carried out in direct contact with the participants, and participants from the second study were recruited by means of advertisements in newspapers and on webpages. The only exclusion criterion was that participants had to be over 18 years old. Most participants were between 60 and 69 years old. There were almost an equal number of men and women (total n=316).

    Outcome measures 48 participants failed the Internet-based hearing screening test. The group failing the test reported more problems on the Amsterdam Inventory of Auditory Disability. In addition, they were found to have diminished phonological representational skills. However, no difference in quality of life was found.

    Conclusions Almost one in five participants was in need of contacting their local hearing clinic. This group had more complaints regarding tinnitus and hyperacusis, rated their own hearing as worse than those who passed, and had a poorer capability of generating accurate phonological representations. This study suggests that it is feasible to screen for hearing status online, and obtain valid data.

  • 138.
    Naylor, Graham
    et al.
    Eriksholms Research Centre, Denmark.
    Thorén, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    A randomized controlled trial of professional online rehabilitation for adult hearing-aid users2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 139.
    Naylor, Graham
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Wänström, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Exploring narrative effects in hearing aid fitting2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Exploring narrative effects

    The clinical meeting is a narrative (‘story’) in itself. To be able to study narrative effects in isolation, the narrative must be separated from the outcome of the hearing-aid fitting. In this study the test persons were given two hearing aids. These were accompanied by different narratives, but had identical amplification/acoustic signal processing.

     

     

    Testing narrative effects

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the power of the narrative in affecting the client’s perception of the dispensing process. The experimental approach was to implement alternative dispensing processes with divergent narratives but identical acoustical results. Then, in a balanced crossover design, to carry out fittings with these processes on a group of hearing-aid clients. The two carefully rehearsed dispensing processes were: a ‘Diagnostic’ process and an ‘Interactive’ process.

     

     

     

     

     

     Narrative 1: ‘Diagnostic’ process. The client is inactive and the dispenser makes a number of adjustments based on hearing assessments, during which the client is passive. Fitting is based on hearing thresholds only.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Narrative 2: ‘Interactive’ process. The client is led to believe that they have adjusted the HA settings to their own preferences. Fitting is based on hearing thresholds only (hearing-aid settings identical for Narratives 1 and 2.)

     

     

     

     

     Results

    20 of the 24 subjects had a clear fitting preference. This is surprising, since the two fittings were acoustically identical. We must suppose that it is the subjects’ perception of the fitting process which determined their preferences. However, all subjects except one gave exclusively sound-related reasons for their preferences (“Sounds more clear” etc.). Thus it seems that clinicians may not always hear the ‘true’ reasons for preferences from their clients.

  • 140.
    Naylor, Graham
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Wänström, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Exploring the Effects of the Narrative Embodied in the Hearing Aid Fitting Process on Treatment Outcomes2015In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 517-526Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: There is strong evidence from other fields of health, and growing evidence in audiology, that characteristics of the process of intervention as perceived by the client (embodied narratives) can have significant effects on treatment outcomes, independent of the technical properties of the intervention itself. This phenomenon deserves examination because studies of technical interventions that fail to take account of it may reach erroneous conclusions and because clinical practice can put such effects to therapeutic use. The aim of this study was to test the idea that embodied narratives might affect outcomes in hearing aid fitting. This was achieved by carrying out experiments in which technical (acoustic) differences between alternative hearing aid fittings were absent, while providing test subjects with a strong contrast between the processes apparently applied to derive the fittings being compared. Thus, any effects of contrasting narratives could be observed, free of acoustical confounds. The hypothesis was that narrative effects would be observed. Design: A balanced crossover design was used, in which subjects received and evaluated two bilateral hearing aid fittings in succession. Subjects were deceived as to the true identical content of the hearing aid fittings being compared, but encouraged to believe that one fitting process was interactive and the other was diagnostic in character. Two almost identical experiments were undertaken: one with 24 experienced adult hearing aid users and another with 16 adult first-time users. Each hearing aid fitting was worn at home for 2 weeks, after which self-report outcome measures (Hearing Aid Performance Questionnaire, Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly, and International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids) were administered. After the second test period, a short preference questionnaire was also completed. Results: Twenty of the 24 experienced users showed a clear preference for one or the other fitting, and their self-report scores reflected these preferences. Effect sizes were comparable with those typically observed for true acoustical contrasts. No order effect was seen in this group. In contrast, 13 of the 16 first-time users preferred the second fitting. Trends in the self-report measures were similar for this group but weaker than for the experienced users. In both groups, the reasons given for subjects preference were predominantly related to sound, despite there being no acoustical differences. Conclusions: This study suggests that the narrative embodied in a given fitting process can have a substantial effect on the perceived benefit of the treatment, independent of any acoustical differences, at least for experienced users. For first-time users, acclimatization seems to overshadow the purely narrative effect of any fitting process. In the future, research study designs should include steps to avoid narrative effects when technical parameters of hearing aids are the intended object of study. In clinical practice, the narrative is part of the therapeutic context, and one may design it for maximum beneficial effect.

  • 141.
    Neher, T
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Hopkins, K
    School of Psychological Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Moore, BC
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Binaural temporal fine structure sensitivity, cognitive function, and spatial speech recognition of hearing-impaired listeners (L).2012In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 131, no 4, p. 2561-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationships between spatial speech recognition (SSR; the ability to understand speech in complex spatial environments), binaural temporal fine structure (TFS) sensitivity, and three cognitive tasks were assessed for 17 hearing-impaired listeners. Correlations were observed between SSR, TFS sensitivity, and two of the three cognitive tasks, which became non-significant when age effects were controlled for, suggesting that reduced TFS sensitivity and certain cognitive deficits may share a common age-related cause. The third cognitive measure was also significantly correlated with SSR, but not with TFS sensitivity or age, suggesting an independent non-age-related cause.

  • 142.
    Neher, Tobias
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Hopkins, Kathryn
    University of Manchester, United Kingdom .
    Moore, Brian C. J.
    University of Cambridge, United Kingdom .
    Binaural temporal fine structure sensitivity, cognitive function, and spatial speech recognition of hearing-impaired listeners (L)a)2012In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 131, no 4, p. 2561-2564Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationships between spatial speech recognition (SSR; the ability to understand speech in complex spatial environments), binaural temporal fine structure (TFS) sensitivity, and three cognitive tasks were assessed for 17 hearing-impaired listeners. Correlations were observed between SSR, TFS sensitivity, and two of the three cognitive tasks, which became non-significant when age effects were controlled for, suggesting that reduced TFS sensitivity and certain cognitive deficits may share a common age-related cause. The third cognitive measure was also significantly correlated with SSR, but not with TFS sensitivity or age, suggesting an independent non-age-related cause.

  • 143.
    Ng, Elaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Classon, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Relationships between working memory capacity and speech recognition threshold in first-time hearing aid usersArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 144.
    Ng, Elaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Cognitive test performance predicts self-reported hearing aid outcome2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In our previous study (Ng et al., 2013), a group of experienced hearing aid users performed a free recall test (Sentence-final Word Identification and Recall test; SWIR). High performers on the test reported more residual difficulty with hearing aids in challenging listening situations. In the present study, we continued to explore relations between recall performance using a modified SWIR test that was less cognitively demanding (Ng et al., 2015) and self-reported hearing aid outcome. The International Outcome Inventory – Hearing Aids (IOI-HA) and the Speech, Spatial and Qualities of Hearing Scale (SSQ) were administered. Results did not reveal any significant correlations between recall performance and self-reported residual difficulty with hearing aids, possibly because the recall performance of low performers on the modified SWIR test was comparable to that of the high performers on the original test. However, in the present study, SWIR performance was positively correlated with both Speech and Qualities domains of the SSQ. In other words, high performers reported better self-assessed speech understanding ability in various real-life situations. No significant correlations were found in the Spatial domain. High SWIR performers also reported less effort in aided listening. These results suggest that better cognitive performance under less demanding listening conditions indexing speech understanding and listening effort is associated with better self-rated aided listening experience. The modified SWIR test, which resembles real-life listening, can potentially be used to assess hearing aid outcome.

  • 145.
    Ng, Hoi Ning, Elaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Classon, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dynamic relation between working memory capacity and speech recognition in noise during the first six months of hearing aid use2014In: Trends in Hearing, ISSN 2331-2165, Vol. 18, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study aimed to investigate the changing relationship between aided speech recognition and cognitive function during the first six months of hearing aid use. Twentyseven first-time hearing aid users with symmetrical mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss were recruited. Aided speech recognition thresholds in noise (SRTs) were obtained in the hearing aid fitting session as well as at three and six months post-fitting. Cognitive abilities were assessed using a reading span test, which is a measure of working memory capacity, and a cognitive test battery. Results showed a significant correlation between reading span and SRT during the hearing aid fitting session. This relation was significantly weakened over the first six months of hearing aid use. Multiple regression analysis showed that reading span was the main predictor of SRT when hearing aids were first fitted, but that pure-tone average hearing threshold (PTA) was the main predictor six months later. This indicates that working memory capacity plays a more important role in speech recognition in noise before than after six months of use. We argue that new hearing aid users engage working memory capacity to recognize unfamiliar processed speech signals but that as familiarization proceeds, engagement of working memory capacity is reduced.

  • 146.
    Ng, Hoi Ning, Elaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Effects of hearing aid fitting strategy on cognitive outcome measurements.2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 147.
    Ng, Hoi Ning, Elaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Effects of hearing aid signal processing on cognitive outcome measurements2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 148.
    Ng, Hoi Ning, Elaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Effects of noise reduction and competing speech on memory2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 149.
    Ng, Hoi Ning, Elaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Effects of noise reduction and competing speech on memory2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 150.
    Ng, Hoi Ning, Elaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Improved cognitive processing of speech for hearing aid users with noise reduction2011Conference paper (Other academic)
12345 101 - 150 of 230
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf