liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1234 101 - 150 of 195
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 101.
    Saremi, Amin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effect of metabolic presbyacusis on cochlear responses: A simulation approach using a physiologically-based model2013In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 134, no 4, p. 2833-2851Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the presented model, electrical, acoustical, and mechanical elements of the cochlea are explicitly integrated into a signal transmission line where these elements convey physiological interpretations of the human cochlear structures. As a result, this physiologically-motivated model enables simulation of specific cochlear lesions such as presbyacusis. The hypothesis is that high-frequency hearing loss in older adults may be due to metabolic presbyacusis whereby age-related cellular/chemical degenerations in the lateral wall of the cochlea cause a reduction in the endocochlear potential. The simulations quantitatively confirm this hypothesis and emphasize that even if the outer and inner hair cells are totally active and intact, metabolic presbyacusis alone can significantly deteriorate the cochlear functionality. Specifically, in the model, as the endocochlear potential decreases, the transduction mechanism produces less receptor current such that there is a reduction in the battery of the somatic motor. This leads to a drastic decrease in cochlear amplification and frequency sensitivity, as well as changes in position-frequency map (tuning pattern) of the cochlea. In addition, the simulations show that the age-related reduction of the endocochlear potential significantly inhibits the firing rate of the auditory nerve which might contribute to the decline of temporal resolution in the aging auditory system.

  • 102.
    Saremi, Amin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effects of Acoustic Overstimulation and the Associated Cellular Lesions on the Cochlear Amplifier: Simulation Results2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A physiologically-based electromechanical model of the human cochlea is used in this study to explicitly simulate the effects of acoustical overstimulation, and the associated cellular deficiencies, on the gain of the cochlear amplifier. The simulations demonstrate that as the micromechanics of the stereocillia transduction channels is altered due to the traumatic acoustical overstimulation, the compressive/nonlinear behavior of the cochlear amplifier is significantly modified. When the loudness growth is estimated by the integral of the cochlear amplification with respect to the sound intensity, these modifications lead to an impaired loudness function reminiscent of the recruitment phenomenon. Furthermore, when a severe noise-induced loss of outer hair cells is assumed at basal regions of the cochlea, the model predicts a mild loss at lower frequencies followed by a steeply sloping notch-like amplification loss of approximately 80 dB around 4.5 kHz. This prediction is reasonably in line with the threshold elevations observed clinically from the noise-damaged human ears. Moreover, the results quantitatively demonstrate that the center frequency, the width and the depth of the amplification loss are directly determined by the severity and the location of the outer hair cell loss along the cochlear duct.

  • 103.
    Saremi, Amin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    How differently noise exposure and metabolic presbyacusis affect the cochlear response. A simulation approach using a physiologically-based model of the human cochlea2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 104.
    Saremi, Amin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Simulation of presbyacusis by a physiological signal transmission model of the human cochlea2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 105.
    Saremi, Amin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The effect of aging on cochlear amplifier: A simulation approach using a physiologically-based electro-mechanical model of the cochlea2012In: Canadian Acoustics, ISSN 0711-6659, E-ISSN 2291-1391, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 128-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The electrical, acoustical, and mechanical elements of the cochlea are explicitly integrated into a transmission-line model to develop a physiological interpretation of the human cochlea insofar. The model enables fundamental simulation of specific cochlear lesions such as metabolic presbyacusis. A sound pressure field in the air is transmitted via the outer and middle ear to the inner ear. It causes the stapes to vibrate resulting in a traveling wave along the organ of Corti propagating from base towards apex. As the endocochlear potential (EP) decreases, the MET produces less receptor current which, eventually leading to a decline in the force/displacement generated by the somatic motor. The CFs of the curves tend to move backwards in a presbyacusis cochlea, this result is consistent with Robles and Ruggem where in a passive cochlea, the CFs are shifted backwards.

  • 106.
    Saremi, Amin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Changes in Temporal and Spectral Functions of the Auditory Periphery Due to Aging and Noise-induced Cochlear Pathologies: A Comparative Clinical Study2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study includes a battery of psychoacoustical and electrophysiological tests to quantitatively investigate the changes in the frequency and the temporal features of the human auditory periphery caused by aging (presbyacusis) and noise-induced lesions, two common types of sensorineural hearing impairments. The scores are comparatively analyzed.

    Design: These clinical experiments have been implemented in MATLAB software.

    Study sample: 20 normal hearing adults (aged 30-54), 20 older hearing-impaired subjects (aged 65-70) with no history of Ototoxic medication or noise exposure and 7 adult men with a traceable noise-induced hearing impairment.

    Results: The observed temporal and spectral declines are generally consistent with the high-frequency audiometric loss depicted by the audiogram, for each group. Moreover, the test battery provides valuable information on the frequency sensitivity, temporal resolution, loudness growth, compression and otoacoustic emissions.

    Conclusion: These scores are compared with the predictions of a physiologicallybased cochlear model to provide evidence about specific inner-ear pathologies, beyond what the audiogram can indicate. Among these 7 clinical experiments, the results from the forward temporal masking test, the categorical loudness discrimination test and the distortion product otoacoustic emission test provide the most differential information about the underlying cellular lesions. The results indicate that the reduction in the temporal resolution is substantially age-relate since the presbyacusis listeners, unlike the other groups, obtained almost no benefit from the temporal cues provided by the gap duration at any of the experiments. Moreover, the results suggest that the DPOAEs reflect the cellular lesions associated with the acoustic overstimulation rather than the age-related strial degenerations.

  • 107.
    Saremi, Amin
    et al.
    Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, Germany.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Verhulst, Sarah
    Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, Germany; Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, Germany.
    How Do the Medial Olivocochlear Efferents Influence the Biomechanics of the Outer Hair Cells and Thereby the Cochlear Amplifier? Simulation Results2015In: MECHANICS OF HEARING: PROTEIN TO PERCEPTION, AMER INST PHYSICS , 2015, Vol. 1703, no 090030Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The bottom-up signal pathway, which starts from the outer ear and leads to the brain cortices, gives the classic image of the human sound perception. However, there have been growing evidences in the last six decades for existence of a functional descending network whereby the central auditory system can modulate the early auditory processing, in a top-down manner. The medial olivocochlear efferent fibers project from the superior olivary complex at the brainstem into the inner ear. They are linked to the basal poles of the hair cells by forming synaptic cisterns. This descending network can activate nicotinic cholinergic receptors (nAChR) that increase the membrane conductance of the outer hair cells and thereby modify the magnitude of the active force generated inside the cochlea. The aim of the presented work is to quantitatively investigate how the changes in the biomechanics of the outer hair cells, caused by the efferent activation, manipulate the cochlear responses. This is done by means of a frequency-domain biophysical model of the cochlea [ 12] where the parameters of the model convey physiological interpretations of the human cochlear structures. The simulations manifest that a doubling of the outer hair cell conductance, due to efferent activation, leads to a frequency-dependent gain reduction along the cochlear duct with its highest effect at frequencies between 1 kHz and 3.5 kHz and a maximum of approximately 10 dB gain reduction at 2 kHz. This amount of the gain inhibition and its frequency dependence reasonably agrees with the experimental data recorded from guinea pig, cat and human cochleae where the medial olivococlear efferents had been elicited by broad-band stimuli. The simulations also indicate that the efferent-induced increase of the outer hair cell conductance increases the best frequency of the cochlear responses, in the basal region. The presented simulations quantitatively confirm that activation of the medial olivocochlear efferents can biomechanically manipulate the cochlear responses, in a top-down manner, by inhibiting the gain of the cochlear amplifier as well as altering the frequency-position map (tuning pattern) of the cochlea.

  • 108.
    Sim, J. H.
    et al.
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland; University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Dobrev, I.
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland; University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Gerig, R.
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland; University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Pfiffner, F.
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland; University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Huber, A. M.
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland; University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Roosli, C.
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland; University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Interaction between osseous and non-osseous vibratory stimulation of the human cadaveric head2016In: Hearing Research, ISSN 0378-5955, E-ISSN 1878-5891, Vol. 340, p. 153-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bone conduction (BC) stimulation can be applied by vibration to the bony or skin covered skull (osseous BC), or on soft tissue such as the neck (non-osseous BC). The interaction between osseous and non osseous bone conduction pathways is assessed in this study. The relation between bone vibrations measured at the cochlear promontory and the intracranial sound pressure for stimulation directly on the dura and for stimulation at the mastoid between 0.2 and 10 kHz was compared. First, for stimulation on the dura, varying the static coupling force of the BC transducer on the dura had only a small effect on promontory vibration. Second, the presence or absence of intracranial fluid did not affect promontory vibration for stimulation on the dura. Third, stimulation on the mastoid elicited both promontory vibration and intracranial sound pressure. Stimulation on the dura caused intracranial sound pressure to a similar extent above 0.5 kHz compared to stimulation on the mastoid, while promontory vibration was less by 20-40 dB. From these findings, we conclude that intracranial sound pressure (non-osseous BC) only marginally affects bone vibrations measured on the promontory (osseous BC), whereas skull vibrations affect intracranial sound pressure. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 109.
    Skagerstrand, Asa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wikstrom, Joel
    University of Örebro, Sweden .
    Sounds perceived as annoying by hearing-aid users in their daily soundscape2014In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 259-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The noises in modern soundscapes continue to increase and are a major origin for annoyance. For a hearing-impaired person, a hearing aid is often beneficial, but noise and annoying sounds can result in non-use of the hearing aid, temporary or permanently. Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify annoying sounds in a daily soundscape for hearing-aid users. Design: A diary was used to collect data where the participants answered four questions per day about annoying sounds in the daily soundscape over a two-week period. Study sample: Sixty adult hearing-aid users. Results: Of the 60 participants 91% experienced annoying sounds daily when using hearing aids. The annoying sound mentioned by most users, was verbal human sounds, followed by other daily sound sources categorized into 17 groups such as TV/radio, vehicles, and machine tools. When the hearing-aid users were grouped in relation to age, hearing loss, gender, hearing-aid experience, and type of signal processing used in their hearing aids, small and only few significant differences were found when comparing their experience of annoying sounds. Conclusions: The results indicate that hearing-aid users often experience annoying sounds and improved clinical fitting routines may reduce the problem.

  • 110.
    Skagerstrand, Åsa
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden; Örebro University, Sweden; Swedish Institute Disabil Research, Sweden.
    Kobler, Susanne
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden; Örebro University, Sweden; Swedish Institute Disabil Research, Sweden.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Swedish Institute Disabil Research, Sweden.
    Loudness and annoyance of disturbing sounds - perception by normal hearing subjects2017In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 56, no 10, p. 775-783Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Sounds in the daily environment may cause loudness and annoyance. The present study investigated the perception of loudness and annoyance for eight different sounds present in a daily sound environment and at nine different levels varying by +/- 20 dB around the recorded level. The outcomes were related to tests of participants auditory and cognitive abilities. Design: The participants undertook auditory and working memory (WM) tests prior to ratings of everyday sounds previously shown to be disturbing for persons with hearing impairment (hearing aid users). Study sample: Twenty-one participants aged between 24 and 71 years, with normal hearing threshold levels. Results: Both perceived loudness and annoyance were primarily driven by the sound level. Sounds emitted from paper were rated as having greater loudness and being more annoying than the other sound sources at the same sound level. Auditory and cognitive abilities did not influence the perception of loudness and annoyance. Conclusions: Loudness and annoyance ratings were mainly driven by sound level. Expectations of a sound seemed to influence the assessment of loudness and annoyance while auditory performance and WM capacity showed no influence on the ratings.

  • 111.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A model for prediction of own voice alteration with hearing aids2012In: Speech Perception and Auditory Disorders / [ed] T. Dau, M.L. Jepsen, T. Poulsen, J.C. Dalsgaard, Danavox Jubilee Foundation , 2012, p. 323-330Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 112.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Acoustic and physiologic aspects of bone conduction hearing2011In: Implantable Bone Conduction Hearing Aids / [ed] Kompis M, Karger , 2011, Vol. 71, p. 10-21Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bone conduction (BC) is the way sound energy is transmitted by the skull bones to the cochlea causing a sound perception. Even if the BC sound transmission involves several pathways including sound pressure induced in the ear canal, inertial forces acting on the middle ear ossicles and cochlear fluids, alteration of the cochlear space, and pressure transmission through the 3rd window of the cochlea, the BC sound ultimately produces a wave motion on the basilar membrane similar to that of air-conducted sound. The efficiency of the BC stimulation is largely dependent on the skull bone where the skull acts as a rigid body at low frequencies and incorporates different types of wave transmission at higher frequencies. The interaural stimulation difference is determined by the difference between contralateral and ipsilateral BC sound transmission: the transcranial BC sound transmission. To benefit from binaural processing, the transcranial transmission should be low, while the same should be high when using BC hearing aids for unilateral deaf subjects. By appropriately positioning the stimulation, high or low transcranial transmission can be achieved.

  • 113.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Advantage of using directional microphones in a BAHA device – the Divino2007In: 1st International Symposium – Bone Conduction Hearing and Osseointegration, Halifax, Canada, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 114.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Audiologiska mätningar för prediktion av nytta med CROS apparat för ensidgt döva2010In: Sveriges tekniska audiologers förening, 2010 Eskilstuna, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 115.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Benledningsforskning: Förståelsen ökar, men mycket forskning återstår2012In: Audio-Nytt, ISSN 0347-6308, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 10-11Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 116.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Bilateral fitting of BAHAs and BAHA (R) fitted in unilateral deaf persons: Acoustical aspects2005In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 178-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The benefit of a bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) to a patient fitted bilaterally; and the benefit of a BAHA(andREG;) to a unilaterally deaf person was estimated by four acoustical measurements: directional sensitivity of a BAHA(andREG;) placed at the skull, vibration transmission in the skull, gain, and estimated transcranial attenuation of bone conducted sound. Provided a patient has a similar bone conduction hearing ability at both cochlea, it was found that a patient should, theoretically, benefit from bilateral fitting of BAHAs in terms of better hearing thresholds from the front, and better overall hearing ability from the surround. The data indicates further, that bilateral fitting facilitates extraction of interaural cues, which should lead to greater ability to determine the direction of a sound source, as well as better hearing in noise. However, due to the cross-hearing of bone conducted sound, the binaural processing for the patient fitted bilaterally with BAHAs is less than for normal binaural air conduction hearing. Finally, the data showed that the benefit of fitting a BAHA(andREG;) in a unilaterally deaf person, depends on that persons transcranial attenuation.

  • 117.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Binaural hearing with bilateral bone conduction stimulation2006In: IX Biomaterials Club Meeting, Val Gardena, Italy, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 118.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Binaural hearing with bone conduction stimulation2011In: 3rd International Symposium on Bone Conduction Hearing – Craniofacial Osseointegration, Sarasota, Florida, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 119.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Binaural hearing with bone conduction stimulation – what is possible?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 120.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bone conduction and bone anchored hearing devices2004In: Middle Ear Mechanics in Research and Otology / [ed] K. Gyo, H. Wada, N. Hato, and T. Koike, Singapore: orld Scientific Publishing Co. , 2004, p. 394-401Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This work aims to facilitate the exchange of ideas between otosurgeons and engineers on common topics such as middle ear function, tympanoplasty, implantable hearing devices and ear prostheses. Due to recent advances in technology, gene-therapy and tissue-engineering procedures will also be important issues in the treatment of middle ear disease.

  • 121.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bone Conduction and the Middle Ear2012In: The Middle Ear: Science, Otosurgery, and Technology / [ed] Sunil Puria, Arthur N. Popper, Richard F. Fay, New York: Springer, 2012, p. 135-169Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With more than a century of research in the field of bone conduction (BC) hearing, the importance of the contributors for bone-conducted sound is not clarified and there is no consensus on the issues. However, the literature suggests that the inner ear fluid inertia is the most important mechanism for speech frequencies. But several other contributors are generally within 10 dB of the most important one, including inertial effect of the middle ear ossicles. Most pathology in the outer and middle ear that severely affects the air conduction sound transmission affects the bone conduction sensitivity only to a minor extent. So even if the changed bone conduction sensitivity in a middle ear lesion is helpful for understanding underlying bone conduction physiology, its clinical relevance is minor. Also, the use of BC thresholds for differential diagnosis of the specific middle ear lesion is risky; the Carhart notch is not always identifiable in cases of otosclerotic ears, and other lesions show BC depression similar to the Carhart notch. There are several pitfalls when conducting BC testing. The most common are occlusion of the ear canal, airborne sound radiation from the transducers, and unmasked or overmasked nontest ear.

  • 122.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bone conduction mechanisms and applications2007In: 32ND Annual National Hearing Conservation Conference – A Passion to Preserve, Savannah, Georgia, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 123.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bredbandsmätning av mellanörat2013In: Audio-Nytt, ISSN 0347-6308, Vol. 40, no 1-2, p. 24-25Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 124.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Cochlear Boundary Motion During Bone Conduction Stimulation: Implications for Inertial and Compressional Excitation of the Cochlea2015In: MECHANICS OF HEARING: PROTEIN TO PERCEPTION, AMER INST PHYSICS , 2015, Vol. 1703, no 060005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well accepted that the perception of bone conducted (BC) sound in the human relies on multiple pathways. Of these pathways, the inertial forces in the cochlear fluid and compression and expansion of the cochlear space have been suggested to be the most important. However, the frequency ranges where these two pathways dominate have not been clarified. This was investigated here using a box-model of the inner ear to estimate wall motion for a one-dimensional BC longitudinal skull vibration. Based on the dimensions of the inner ear and a BC wave speed of 400 m/s, the magnitude of the inertial motion of the cochlea was almost identical to the magnitude of the BC excitation except at the highest frequencies investigated (10 kHz). The compression (differential motion) was almost 100 times smaller than the inertial motion at 100 Hz but increased with frequency and at 5.9 kHz and above, the compression motion was greater than the inertial motion of the cochlea. This data was further analyzed in an impedance model of the cochlea and vestibule where the cochlear fluid, basilar membrane, oval window, round window, and cochlear and vestibular aqueducts were represented by acoustical impedances. That analysis showed that for a normal cochlea, the inertial excitation dominates the basilar membrane excitation for the whole frequency range investigated (0.1 to 10 kHz). However, when the oval window was immobilized simulating otosclerosis, the inertial effect diminished and the compressional excitation mode improved resulting in a dominant excitation from the compression of the cochlea at frequencies of 1.2 kHz and above. Also, the simulated BC hearing losses with otosclerosis according to this model were almost identical to the proposed Carharts notch seen clinically.

  • 125.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effect of the stapedius reflex on air conduction and bone conduction transmission in the human in HEARING RESEARCH, vol 263, issue 01-Feb, pp 243-2432010In: HEARING RESEARCH, Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. , 2010, Vol. 263, no 01-Feb, p. 243-243Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hypothesis

    Contraction of the stapedius muscle affects sound transmission by air conduction and bone conduction differently.

    Background

    A contraction of the stapedius muscle decreases the sound transmission through the middle ear in the order of 10 dB for frequencies below approximately 1.5 kHz. It is not very clear how a stapedius muscle contraction affect sound transmission to the inner ear by bone conduction, but it is generally assumed that it affect the sound transmission by bone conduction less than it does by air conduction.

    Materials and Methods

    Growth functions of Auditory Steady State Responses (ASSR) in the frequency range 0.5 to 4 kHz was measured in ten subjects. The ASSR stimuli were either supplied by air conduction or bone conduction. Simultaneously, a noise stimuli designed not to interfere with the ASSR stimuli was presented to elicit the stapedius reflex. By comparing ASSR growth functions at different eliciting levels, the influence from the stapedius reflex could be estimated.   

    Results

    It was found that the stapedius reflex decreases sound transmission by air conduction by 5 to 20 dB at frequencies below 2 kHz and 0 to 5 dB when the stimulation is by bone conduction.

    Conclusions

    The stapedius reflex attenuate air conducted sound at low frequencies more than it does bone conducted sound

  • 126.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    EU-projekt AHEAD-III: Hörselscreening av äldre2010In: Sveriges tekniska audiologers förening, 2010 Eskilstuna, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 127.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hearing Impairment and its affect on the Ascending Auditory stream2007In: CKV, Stockholm, Sweden, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 128.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Human hearing from a biomedical point of view2007In: JSMA, Sendai, Japan, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 129.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hörseldiagnostik med elektrofysiologi – ASSR2006In: TeMA Hörsel 2006, Göteborg, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 130.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hörselscreening bland äldre2009In: Ålder och Hörsel – Audiologisk Dag, Linköping, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 131.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hörseltekniken – så ser den ut om 20 år2009In: Audio-Nytt, ISSN 0347-6308, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 16-19Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 132.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Inner ear contribution to bone conduction hearing in the human2015In: Hearing Research, ISSN 0378-5955, E-ISSN 1878-5891, Vol. 329, p. 41-51Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bone conduction (BC) hearing relies on sound vibration transmission in the skull bone. Several clinical findings indicate that in the human, the skull vibration of the inner ear dominates the response for BC sound. Two phenomena transform the vibrations of the skull surrounding the inner ear to an excitation of the basilar membrane, (1) inertia of the inner ear fluid and (2) compression and expansion of the inner ear space. The relative importance of these two contributors were investigated using an impedance lumped element model. By dividing the motion of the inner ear boundary in common and differential motion it was found that the common motion dominated at frequencies below 7 kHz but above this frequency differential motion was greatest. When these motions were used to excite the model it was found that for the normal ear, the fluid inertia response was up to 20 dB greater than the compression response. This changed in the pathological ear where, for example, otosclerosis of the stapes depressed the fluid inertia response and improved the compression response so that inner ear compression dominated BC hearing at frequencies above 400 Hz. The model was also able to predict experimental and clinical findings of BC sensitivity in the literature, for example the so called Carhart notch in otosclerosis, increased BC sensitivity in superior semicircular canal dehiscence, and altered BC sensitivity following a vestibular fenestration and RW atresia. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 133.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mechanisms of bone conduction and its use for hearing impaired persons2008In: International Hearing Aid Conference (IHCON), Lake Tahoe, CA, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 134.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Middle ear ossicles motion at hearing thresholds with air conduction and bone conduction stimulation2006In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 119, no 5, p. 2848-2858Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hearing threshold data with bone conduction and air conduction stimulation are combined with physiological and mechanical measurements of the middle ear ossicles vibration to compute the vibration level of the ossicles at threshold stimulation. By comparing the displacements of the stapes footplate with the two stimulation modalities and assuming the vibration of the stapes footplate to be the input to the cochlea when stimulation is by air conduction, the importance of middle ear ossicles inertia with bone conduction stimulation is evaluated. Given the limitations of the analysis, the results indicate that the inertia of the middle ear is not an important contribution to the perception of BC sound for frequencies below 1.5 kHz, it seems to contribute to perception of bone conducted sound between the frequencies 1.5 and 3.5 kHz. At frequencies above 4 kHz, the analysis failed since the input to the cochlea is probably not through the oval window with bone conduction stimulation. Comparison of basilar membrane vibration data verified the calculations for frequencies between 0.8 and 3.5 kHz. It was also found that the fluid flow at the round window, rather than at the oval window, reflects the stimulation of the basilar membrane with bone conduction stimulation. © 2006 Acoustical Society of America.

  • 135.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Model predictions for bone conduction perception in the human2016In: Hearing Research, ISSN 0378-5955, E-ISSN 1878-5891, no 15, p. 30076-30079Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Five different pathways are often suggested as important for bone conducted (BC) sound: (1) sound pressure in the ear canal, (2) inertia of the middle ear ossicles, (3) inertia of the inner ear fluid, (4) compression of the inner ear space, and (5) pressure transmission from the skull interior. The relative importance of these pathways was investigated with an acoustic-impedance model of the inner ear. The model incorporated data of BC generated ear canal sound pressure, middle ear ossicle motion, cochlear promontory vibration, and intracranial sound pressure. With BC stimulation at the mastoid, the inner ear inertia dominated the excitation of the cochlea but inner ear compression and middle ear inertia were within 10 dB for almost the entire frequency range of 0.1-10 kHz. Ear canal sound pressure gave little contribution at the low and high frequencies, but was around 15 dB below the total contribution at the mid frequencies. Intracranial sound pressure gave responses similar to the others at low frequencies, but decreased with frequency to a level of 55 dB below the total contribution at 10 kHz. When the BC inner ear model was evaluated against AC stimulation at threshold levels, the results were close up to approximately 4 kHz but deviated significantly at higher frequencies.

  • 136.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nya trender i hörapparatteknologi2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 137.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Overview and recent advances in bone conduction physiology2007In: Middle Ear Mechanics in Research and Otology: Proceedings of the 4th International Symposium / [ed] A Huber and A Eiber, Singapore: World Scientific Publishing Co. , 2007, p. 1-9Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the summer of 2006, the 5th International Symposium on Middle Ear Mechanics in Research and Otology was held at the University of Zurich, Switzerland. More than 250 participants from 33 countries in all five continents came together to present their most current research results, exchange their knowledge in practical applications, to discuss open questions and discover new unsolved problems. This book includes representative, peer-reviewed articles of the lectures and papers presented during the symposium, and thereby gives an overview of the ongoing research and current knowledge in the function and mechanics of the normal, diseased and reconstructed middle ear. It covers basic research, engineering and clinical aspects of evaluation, diagnosis and surgery of the middle ear as well as implantable hearing devices in a very broad and interdisciplinary way. Following the tradition of the organizers of the previous conferences to collect the contributions of the symposium, this volume further initialized and promotes many fruitful discussions on middle ear mechanics with different points of view.

  • 138.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Overview and recent advances in bone conduction physiology2006In: 4th International Symposium on Middle Ear Mechanics in Research and Otology, Zurich, Switzerland, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 139.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Perception of one’s own voice with hearing aids2010In: International Hearing Aid Research Conference 2010, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 140.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Physiological aspects regarding bilateral fitting of BAHAs2005In: Cochlear Implants International, ISSN 1556-9152, Vol. 6, no S1, p. 83-86Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 141.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Physiology of Bone Conduction III2007In: 1st International Symposium – Bone Conduction Hearing and Osseointegration, Halifax, Canada, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 142.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Recent advances on direct bone conduction2009In: 2nd Int Symposium on Bone Conduction Hearing – Craniofacial Osseointegration, Göteborg, Sweden, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 143.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Screening strategies2009In: Deutsches Ärzteforum 2009, Berlin, Germany, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 144.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Simultaneous cancellation of air and bone conduction tones at two frequencies: Extension of the famous experiment by von Békésy2007In: Hearing Research, ISSN 0378-5955, E-ISSN 1878-5891, Vol. 225, no 1-2, p. 105-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cancellation experiments between air conduction (AC) and bone conduction (BC) tones were conducted at two frequencies (0.7 and 1.1 kHz) and three levels (40, 50, and 60 dB HL) in three subjects. The tests were divided into three categories: (1) single tone cancellation, (2) simultaneous cancellation of two tones, and (3) cancellation of one tone while a disturbing tone was present. In total, each subject performed twelve cancellation tasks. The hypothesis is that the AC and BC sound transmission behaves as linear systems and they both excite the basilar membrane in the cochlea similarly. The cancellation results are presented as the deviations from this hypothesis, except for a few larger deviations, the intrasubject deviations were generally less than 0.5 dB and 5°. The results from all three test categories indicate that the hypothesis of linear transmission systems and similarity of cochlear stimulation by AC and BC holds. However, due to the subjects' limited ability to conduct optimal cancellation and to imperfect methodology and equipment, the small deviations from perfectly linear cancellation that were observed do neither conclusively prove nor refute the possibility of small differences in the cochlear processing of AC and BC sound. Nonetheless, it is clear that if such differences in the processing of the two stimuli exist, they are small in magnitude. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 145.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skull vibration during bone conduction hearing2013In: 20th International Congress on Sound and Vibration, Bangkok, Thailand, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 146.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Specifics of inner ear hearing loss – a modelling approach2008In: International Congress of Audiology, Hong Kong, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 147.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Specifics of inner ear hearing loss – model and simulations2008In: NTAF-STAF 2008, Hudiksvall, Sweden, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 148.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Specifics of the hearing impairment and its affect on the ascending information stream2007In: From Signal to Dialogue, Linköping, Sweden, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 149.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stapediusreflexens påverkan på egna rösten2010In: Sveriges tekniska audiologers förening, 2010 Eskilstuna, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 150.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The demands on the cognitive system – what the audiogram does not tell you2013Conference paper (Refereed)
1234 101 - 150 of 195
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf