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  • 101.
    Rose, Ralph
    et al.
    Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan.
    Eklund, RobertLinköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Literature. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Proceedings of DiSS 2019, The 9th Workshop on Disfluency in Spontaneous Speech: ELTE Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary 12-13 September, 20192019Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following the successes of the Disfluency in Spontaneous Speech workshop in Berkeley (1999) and the DiSS workshops in Edinburgh (2001), Göteborg (2003), Aix-en-Provence (2005), Tokyo (2010), Stockholm (2013), Edinburgh (2015) and Stockholm (2017), we are proud to announce DiSS 2019, to be held at the ELTE Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary, in September 2019. The workshop is a satellite event of INTERSPEECH 2019.

    What is most often called disfluency– i.e. pauses, hesitations, prolongations, truncations, repetitions, self‑repairs and similar – in normal spontaneous speech presents challenges for researchers in many different fields, ranging from speech production and perception in psychology, to conversational analysis and automatic speech recognition in speech technology.

    DiSS 2019 will allow an opportunity for researchers from diverse backgrounds to present their research findings, to discuss common interests, to identify future directions and to establish new research collaborations. DiSS 2019 will be a two-day international workshop with an additional special day on (Dis)Fluency in Children’s Speech. All accepted papers will be published.

  • 102.
    Sautermeister, Per
    et al.
    Telia Research AB, Haninge, Sweden.
    Eklund, Robert
    Telia Research AB, Haninge, Sweden.
    Some Observations on the Influence of F0 and Duration to the Perception of Prominence by Swedish Listeners1997In: Proceedings of Fonetik ’97: PHONUM, Reports from the Department of Phonetics Umeå University, 1997, Vol. 4, p. 121-124Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Experiments have been conducted that deal with prosodic prominence in reiterant speech in order to determine the relative contribution of F0 and duration to the perception of prosodic prominence by Swedish listeners. F0 and duration were manipulated independently on different syllables in the stimuli. The results show that F0 is considered primary cue by most subjects. Furthermore, duration only does not seem to be a sufficient cue to the perception of prominence to many of the subjects.

  • 103.
    Schötz, Susanne
    et al.
    Humanities Lab, Centre for Languages and Literature, Lund, Sweden.
    Eklund, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, NLPLAB - Natural Language Processing Laboratory. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A comparative acoustic analysis of purring in four cats2011In: Proceedings from Fonetik 2011, Quarterly Progress and Status Report TMH-QPSR, Volume 51, 2011, Stockholm: Universitetsservice , 2011, p. 5-8Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports results from a comparative analysis of purring in four domesticcats. An acoustic analysis describes sound pressure level, duration, number ofcycles and fundamental frequency for egressive and ingressive phases. Significantindividual differences are found between the four cats in several respects.

  • 104.
    Schötz, Susanne
    et al.
    Lund University.
    van de Weijer, Joost
    Lund University.
    Eklund, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Literature. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Phonetic Characteristics of Domestic Cat Vocalisations2017In: Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Vocal Interactivity in-and-between Humans, Animals and Robots, VIHAR 2017 / [ed] Angela Dassow, Ricard Marxer & Roger K. Moore, 2017, p. 5-6Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cat (Felis catus, Linneaus 1758) has lived around or with humans for at least 10,000 years, and is now one of the most popular pets of the world with more than 600 millionindividuals. Domestic cats have developed a more extensive, variable and complex vocal repertoire than most other members of the Carnivora, which may be explained by their social organisation, their nocturnal activity and the long period of association between mother and young. Still, we know surprisingly little about the phonetic characteristics of these sounds, and about the interaction between cats and humans.

    Members of the research project Melody in human–cat communication (Meowsic) investigate the prosodic characteristics of cat vocalisations as well as the communication between human and cat. The first step includes a categorisation of cat vocalisations. In the next step it will be investigated how humans perceive the vocal signals of domestic cats. This paper presents an outline of the project which has only recently started.

  • 105.
    Schötz, Susanne
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    van de Weijer, Joost
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Eklund, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Literature. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Phonetic Methods in Cat Vocalisation Studies: A report from the Meowsic project2019In: Proceedings from Fonetik 2019 / [ed] Mattias Heldner, 2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the project Melody in Human–Cat Communication (Meowsic) we are using established phonetic methods to collect, annotate, pre-process and analyse domestic cat–human vocal communication. This article describes these methods, and also presents results of meow vocalisations in four different mental states showing variation in fundamental frequency (f0).

  • 106.
    Silber Varod, Vered
    et al.
    The Open University of Israel, Israel.
    Gósy, Mária
    Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary.
    Eklund, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Literature. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Segment prolongation in Hebrew2019In: Proceedings of DiSS 2019, The 9th Workshop on Disfluency in Spontaneous Speech: ELTE Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary, 12-13 September, 2019 / [ed] Ralph Rose & Robert Eklund, 2019, p. 47-50Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we study segment prolongations (PRs), a type of disfluency sometimes included under the term “hesitation disfluencies”, in Hebrew. PRs have previously been studied in a number of other languages within a comprehensive speech disfluency framework, which is applied to Hebrew in the current study. For the purpose of this study we defined Hebrew clitics, such as conjunctions, articles, prepositions and so on, as words. The most striking difference between Hebrew and the previously studies languages is how restricted PRs seem to be in Hebrew, occurring almost exclusively on wordfinal vowels. The most frequently prolonged vowel is [e]. The segment type does not affect PRs’ duration. We found significant differences between men and women regarding the frequency of PRs.

  • 107.
    Wirén, Mats
    et al.
    TeliaSonera, Farsta, Sweden.
    Eklund, Robert
    TeliaSonera, Farsta, Sweden.
    Engberg, Fredrik
    TeliaSonera, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Westermark, Johan
    TeliaSonera, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Experiences of an In-Service Wizard-of-Oz Data Collection for the Deployment of a Call-Routing Application2007In: Bridging the Gap: Academic and Industrial Research in Dialog Technologies Workshop Proceedings,, Madison, WI: Omnipress , 2007, p. 56-63Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes our experiences of collecting a corpus of 42,000 dialogues for a call-routing application using a Wizard-of-Oz approach. Contrary to common practice in the industry, we did not use the kind of automated application that elicits some speech from the customers and then sends all of them to the same destination, such as the existing touch-tone menu, without paying attention to what they have said. Contrary to the traditional Wizard-of-Oz paradigm,our data-collection application was fully integrated within an existing service, replacing the existing touch-tonenavigation system with a simulated callroutingsystem. Thus, the subjects were real customers calling about real tasks,and the wizards were service agents from our customer care. We provide a detailed exposition of the data collection as such and the application used, and compare our approach to methods previously used.

123 101 - 107 of 107
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