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  • 101.
    Collste, Göran
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Religion and Culture, Center for Applied Ethics.
    Shahsavar, Nosrat
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Gill, Hans
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    A decision support system for diabetes care: Ethical aspects1999In: Methods of Information in Medicine, ISSN 0026-1270, Vol. 38, p. 313-316Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 102.
    Collste, Göran
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Centre for Applied Ethics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Verweij, Marcel
    Utrecht University.
    Editorial: Personal Health Monitoring and Human Interaction2012In: American Journal of Bioethics, ISSN 1526-5161, E-ISSN 1536-0075, Vol. 12, no 9, p. 47-48Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 103.
    Collste, Göran
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Religion and Culture, Center for Applied Ethics.
    Vikinge, L
    Samhällets normer, marknadens moral och den ekonomiska brottsligheten2001In: Ekonomisk brottslighet och nationalstatens kontrollmakt / [ed] Leif Appelgren & Hans Sjögren, Smedjebacken: Gidlund , 2001, p. 113-123Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 104.
    Palm, Elin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Centre for Applied Ethics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nordgren, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Centre for Applied Ethics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Verweij, Marcel
    Utrecht University, the Netherlands.
    Collste, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Centre for Applied Ethics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ethically Sound Technology? Guidelines for Interactive Ethical Assessment of Personal Health Monitoring2013In: Interdisciplinary Assessment of Personal Health Monitoring / [ed] Silke Schmidt and Otto Rienhof, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2013, p. 105-114Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Europe is facing a paradox: while governments try to curb public spending, the demands on our healthcare systems continue to rise. The use of smart technologies and innovation can help to address the challenges faced by healthcare systems today, such as an ageing population, a shortage of healthcare professionals and restrictions on financial resources. But despite increasing evidence of the benefits technology can bring, the healthcare sector has been slow to embrace the digital revolution, and has stuck to more traditional methods and models.

    This book presents selected contributions to the symposium on Personal Health Monitoring (PHM) and Ethics and future areas of PHM, which took place in advance of the 11th World Congress of Bioethics, held in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, in June 2012. Most of the papers present the outcomes of the European PHM-Ethics project, which conducted interdisciplinary analyses of emerging PHM applications. Additional invited contributions deal with important issues related to the project’s primary objectives and outcomes. The project is strongly associated with the new e-Health Action Plan, launched by the European Commission in December 2012, which is designed to bring the benefits of digital solutions into healthcare systems.

    The book covers a broad spectrum, ranging from the technical setup of PHM systems to ethical issues raised by PHM applications, and will be of interest to all those concerned with improving the provision of healthcare worldwide.

  • 105.
    Ridderstolpe, Lisa
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Biomedical Engineering in Östergötland. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Collste, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Religion and Culture, Center for Applied Ethics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rutberg, Hans
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre.
    Åhlfeldt, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Priority setting in cardiac surgery: A survey of decision making and ethical issues2003In: Journal of Medical Ethics, ISSN 0306-6800, E-ISSN 1473-4257, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 353-358Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine priority setting for coronary artery bypass surgery, and to provide an overview of decisions and rationales used in clinical practice.

    Method: Questionnaires were sent to all permanently employed cardiologists, cardiothoracic surgeons, and anaesthesiologists at nine Swedish hospitals performing adult cardiothoracic surgery.

    Results: A total of 208 physicians responded (a 44% return rate). There was considerable agreement concerning the criteria that should be used to set priorities for coronary artery bypass interventions (clusters of factors in synthesis). However, there was a lack of accord regarding the use of national guidelines for priority setting and risk indexes.

    Conclusions: Basic training and the strong support of ethical principles in priority setting are lacking. The respondents indicated a need for clearer guidelines and an open dialogue or discussion. The lack of generally acknowledged plans and guidelines for priority setting may result in unequal, conditional, and unfair treatment.

123 101 - 105 of 105
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