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  • 101.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. 3Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Cognitive spare capacity in older adults with hearing loss2014In: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, ISSN 1663-4365, E-ISSN 1663-4365, Vol. 6, no 96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Individual differences in working memory capacity (WMC) are associated with speech recognition in adverse conditions, reflecting the need to maintain and process speech fragments until lexical access can be achieved. When working memory resources are engaged in unlocking the lexicon, there is less Cognitive Spare Capacity (CSC) available for higher level processing of speech. CSC is essential for interpreting the linguistic content of speech input and preparing an appropriate response, that is, engaging in conversation. Previously, we showed, using a Cognitive Spare Capacity Test (CSCT) that in young adults with normal hearing, CSC was not generally related to WMC and that when CSC decreased in noise it could be restored by visual cues. In the present study, we investigated CSC in 24 older adults with age-related hearing loss, by administering the CSCT and a battery of cognitive tests. We found generally reduced CSC in older adults with hearing loss compared to the younger group in our previous study, probably because they had poorer cognitive skills and deployed them differently. Importantly, CSC was not reduced in the older group when listening conditions were optimal. Visual cues improved CSC more for this group than for the younger group in our previous study. CSC of older adults with hearing loss was not generally related to WMC but it was consistently related to episodic long term memory, suggesting that the efficiency of this processing bottleneck is important for executive processing of speech in this group.

  • 102. Nelson, K
    et al.
    Khan, Kirer
    Ohio State University.
    Arkenberg, Marnie
    Shaw University.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Tjust, Tomas
    Gothenburg University.
    Craven, Patrick
    Drexel University.
    Lessons for Educational Designs from Dynamic-Systems-Inspired Experimental Acceleration of Children's Learning in Diverse Domains2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 103.
    Nelson, Keith E
    et al.
    Pennsylvania State University, United States.
    Barlieb, Aran
    Pennsylvania State University, United States.
    Khan, Kiren
    Pennsylvania State University, United States.
    Vance Trup, Elisabeth M
    Pennsylvania State University, United States.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Tjus, Tomas
    Psykologiska institutionen, Göteborgs universitet.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Working Memory, Processing Speed, and Executive Memory. Contributions to Computer-Assisted Second Language Learning:  2012In: Contemporary Educational Technology, ISSN 1309-517X, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 184-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     How individual differences in information processing affect second language (L2) learning has been unclear in prior research.  Adults lacking prior skill in Swedish were Pretested for working memory, processing speed, and executive memory capacity.  Participants then received 6 computer-based instructional sessions with pictorial animations of Swedish sentences, with a built-in experimental contrast between some lessons at high and some at low rates of presentation.  The faster rate carried greater processing demands for the learners. Higher levels of Swedish performance during Instructional Sessions were associated with higher Working Memory levels, as expected from widely-used models of working memory (e.g., Baddeley & Hitch, 1994).  In contrast, results at demanding long-term retrieval on a Posttest were more complex and revealed several dynamic relationships between Processing Speed, Working Memory, and Swedish language learning.  Learners with low rather than high working memory showed higher L2 skills at long-term testing when instructional lessons had employed fast animations. This first-time demonstration that prior cognitive profiles strongly influence learners’ progress in second language requires refinements in existing theories.  Further, the results hold implications for tailoring second language teaching on-line or in other technology-based instruction to learner profiles on abilities in working memory, processing speed, and executive memory.

  • 104.
    Ng, Elaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Classon, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Relationships between working memory capacity and speech recognition threshold in first-time hearing aid usersArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 105.
    Ng, Elaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Cognitive test performance predicts self-reported hearing aid outcome2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In our previous study (Ng et al., 2013), a group of experienced hearing aid users performed a free recall test (Sentence-final Word Identification and Recall test; SWIR). High performers on the test reported more residual difficulty with hearing aids in challenging listening situations. In the present study, we continued to explore relations between recall performance using a modified SWIR test that was less cognitively demanding (Ng et al., 2015) and self-reported hearing aid outcome. The International Outcome Inventory – Hearing Aids (IOI-HA) and the Speech, Spatial and Qualities of Hearing Scale (SSQ) were administered. Results did not reveal any significant correlations between recall performance and self-reported residual difficulty with hearing aids, possibly because the recall performance of low performers on the modified SWIR test was comparable to that of the high performers on the original test. However, in the present study, SWIR performance was positively correlated with both Speech and Qualities domains of the SSQ. In other words, high performers reported better self-assessed speech understanding ability in various real-life situations. No significant correlations were found in the Spatial domain. High SWIR performers also reported less effort in aided listening. These results suggest that better cognitive performance under less demanding listening conditions indexing speech understanding and listening effort is associated with better self-rated aided listening experience. The modified SWIR test, which resembles real-life listening, can potentially be used to assess hearing aid outcome.

  • 106.
    Ng, Hoi Ning, Elaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Classon, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dynamic relation between working memory capacity and speech recognition in noise during the first six months of hearing aid use2014In: Trends in Hearing, ISSN 2331-2165, Vol. 18, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study aimed to investigate the changing relationship between aided speech recognition and cognitive function during the first six months of hearing aid use. Twentyseven first-time hearing aid users with symmetrical mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss were recruited. Aided speech recognition thresholds in noise (SRTs) were obtained in the hearing aid fitting session as well as at three and six months post-fitting. Cognitive abilities were assessed using a reading span test, which is a measure of working memory capacity, and a cognitive test battery. Results showed a significant correlation between reading span and SRT during the hearing aid fitting session. This relation was significantly weakened over the first six months of hearing aid use. Multiple regression analysis showed that reading span was the main predictor of SRT when hearing aids were first fitted, but that pure-tone average hearing threshold (PTA) was the main predictor six months later. This indicates that working memory capacity plays a more important role in speech recognition in noise before than after six months of use. We argue that new hearing aid users engage working memory capacity to recognize unfamiliar processed speech signals but that as familiarization proceeds, engagement of working memory capacity is reduced.

  • 107.
    Ng, Hoi Ning, Elaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Effects of hearing aid fitting strategy on cognitive outcome measurements.2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 108.
    Ng, Hoi Ning, Elaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Effects of hearing aid signal processing on cognitive outcome measurements2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 109.
    Ng, Hoi Ning, Elaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Effects of noise reduction and competing speech on memory2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 110.
    Ng, Hoi Ning, Elaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Effects of noise reduction and competing speech on memory2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 111.
    Ng, Hoi Ning, Elaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Improved cognitive processing of speech for hearing aid users with noise reduction2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 112.
    Ng, Hoi Ning, Elaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Noise reduction can enhance memory for heard sentences2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been demonstrated that the benefit of signal processing intended for hearingaids is not limited to improvement in speech perception. Sarampalis et al.(2009) showed that the Ephraim-Malah noise reduction algorithm improvedcognitive performance and reduced listening effort for people with normal hearing.However, similar effects for hearing-impaired listeners have not been reported.The present study examines the effect of noise reduction in hearing aidson memory processing of speech perceived in stationary noise and competingspeech background. Twenty-six experienced hearing aid users with symmetricalsensorineural hearing loss were tested. A dual task paradigm, which consists ofa perceptual speech recognition task and a free recall memory task, was used tomeasure the cognitive outcomes with the use of binary time-frequency maskingnoise reduction technique (Wang et al., 2009). Working memory capacity wasmeasured using a reading span test. Results showed that free recall performancein the competing speech background improved with noise reduction in listenerswith better working memory capacity. No such improvement was found in thestationary noise. Listeners with better working memory also performed better inthe stationary noise than in the competing speech background. No effect of backgroundnoises or noise reduction was observed in listeners with limited workingmemory capacity. The study demonstrates that binary masking noise reductiontechnique enhances memory performance in competing speech background forpersons with good working memory capacity. In other words, working memorycapacity also predicts benefit of noise reduction signal processing.

  • 113.
    Ng, Hoi Ning, Elaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Noise reduction improves memory for target language speech in competing native but not foreign language speech2015In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 82-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: A hearing aid noise reduction (NR) algorithm reduces the adverse effect of competing speech on memory for target speech for individuals with hearing impairment with high working memory capacity. In the present study, we investigated whether the positive effect of NR could be extended to individuals with low working memory capacity, as well as how NR influences recall performance for target native speech when the masker language is non-native.

    Design: A sentence-final word identification and recall (SWIR) test was administered to 26 experienced hearing aid users. In this test, target spoken native language (Swedish) sentence lists were presented in competing native (Swedish) or foreign (Cantonese) speech with or without binary masking NR algorithm. After each sentence list, free recall of sentence final words was prompted. Working memory capacity was measured using a reading span (RS) test.

    Results: Recall performance was associated with RS. However, the benefit obtained from NR was not associated with RS. Recall performance was more disrupted by native than foreign speech babble and NR improved recall performance in native but not foreign competing speech.

    Conclusions: Noise reduction improved memory for speech heard in competing speech for hearing aid users. Memory for native speech was more disrupted by native babble than foreign babble, but the disruptive effect of native speech babble was reduced to that of foreign babble when there was NR.

  • 114.
    Ng, Hoi Ning, Elaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Relationships between self-report and cognitive measures of hearing aid outcome2013In: Speech, Language and Hearing, ISSN 2050-571X, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 197-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This present study examined the relationship between cognitive measures and self-report hearing aid outcome. A sentence-final word identification and recall (SWIR) test was used to investigate how hearing aid use may relate to experienced explicit cognitive processing. A visually based cognitive test battery was also administered. To measure self-report hearing aid outcome, the International Outcome Inventory – Hearing Aids (IOI-HA) and the Speech, Spatial and Qualities of Hearing Scale (SSQ) were employed. Twenty-six experienced hearing aid users (mean age of 59 years) with symmetrical moderate-tomoderately severe sensorineural hearing loss were recruited. Free recall performance in the SWIR test correlated negatively with item 3 of IOI-HA, which measures residual difficulty in adverse listening situations. Cognitive abilities related to verbal information processing were correlated positively with selfreported hearing aid use and overall success. The present study showed that reported residual difficulty with hearing aid may relate to experienced explicit processing in difficult listening conditions, such that individuals with better cognitive capacity tended to report more remaining difficulty in challenging listening situations. The possibility of using cognitive measures to predict hearing aid outcome in real life should be explored in future research.

  • 115.
    Ng, Hoi Ning, Elaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Syskind Perdersen, Michael
    Oticon A/S, Smörum, Denmark.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Effects of noise and working memory capacity on memory processing of speech for hearing-aid users2013In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 52, no 7, p. 433-441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: It has been shown that noise reduction algorithms can reduce the negative effects of noise on memory processing in persons with normal hearing. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether a similar effect can be obtained for persons with hearing impairment and whether such an effect is dependent on individual differences in working memory capacity.

    Design: A sentence-final word identification and recall (SWIR) test was conducted in two noise backgrounds with and without noise reduction as well as in quiet. Working memory capacity was measured using a reading span (RS) test.

    Study sample: Twenty-six experienced hearing-aid users with moderate to moderately severe sensorineural hearing loss.

    Results: Noise impaired recall performance. Competing speech disrupted memory performance more than speech-shaped noise. For late list items the disruptive effect of the competing speech background was virtually cancelled out by noise reduction for persons with high working memory capacity.

    Conclusions: Noise reduction can reduce the adverse effect of noise on memory for speech for persons with good working memory capacity. We argue that the mechanism behind this is faster word identification that enhances encoding into working memory.

  • 116.
    Ng, Hoi-Ning (Elaine)
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Effects of hearing aid fitting strategy on cognitive outcome measurements2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 117.
    Ng, Hoi-Ning (Elaine)
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Effects of hearing aid signal processing on cognitive outcome measurements2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 118.
    Ng, Hoi-Ning (Elaine)
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Effects of hearing aid signal processing on cognitive outcome measurements2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 119.
    Ning Ng, Elaine Hoi
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Denmark.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Noise reduction improves memory for target speech in a competing speech2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 120.
    Ning Ng, Hoi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Cognition in hearing aid users2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cognitive abilities vary between individuals and have been shown to be related to hearing aidbenet. How individual dierences in cognitive abilities interact with signal processing to reducelistening eort will be discussed in this presentation. Two studies were performed to investigate theeect of a hearing aid signal processing algorithm on free recall of speech heard in noise in hearingaid users, and the role of cognition. The specic aims were to develop a free recall test to measurethis eect and to test whether the eect would interact with background noise and/or individualdierences in cognitive capacity. Results demonstrated that noise impairs the ability to recall intelligiblespeech heard in noise. Noise reduction freed up cognitive resources and alleviated the negativeimpact of noise on memory when speech stimuli were presented in background noise consisting ofspeech babble. The possible underlying mechanisms are that noise reduction facilitates segregationof the auditory stream into target and irrelevant speech and reduces the capture of attention bythe linguistic information in irrelevant speech. In both studies, the eect of noise reduction on freerecall performance was modulated by individual dierences in cognitive capacity, suggesting that themechanism by which noise reduction facilitates free recall on speech heard in noise is dependent onworking memory capacity.

  • 121.
    Nordqvist, Emelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Lundgren, Magnus
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Long-term declarative memory performance in 14-15 month infants predicts the strength of neural response during associative learning2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 122.
    Nordqvist, Emelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The relationship between deferred imitation, associative memory, and communication in 14-months-old children. Behavioral and electrophysiological indices2015In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 6, no 260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study combines behavioral observations of memory (deferred imitation, DI, after a brief delay of 30 min and after a long delay of 2-3 weeks) and electrophysiological (event-related potentials, ERPs) measures of associative memory, as well as parental reports of non-verbal and verbal communication in sixteen 14-months-old children. Results show that for DI, the children remembered the stimulus after the brief but not after the long delay. There was a clear electrophysiological response indicating associative memory. Furthermore, a correlation between DI and ERR suggests that both measures of memory (DI and associative memory) tap into similar mechanisms in 14months-old children. There was also a statistically significant relation between parental report of receptive (verbal) language and the ERP, showing an association between receptive language skills and associative memory.

  • 123.
    Nordqvist, Emelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Institutionen för psykologi, Lunds universitet.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Institutionen för psykologi, Lunds universitet.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Deferred imitation, associative memory and communication in 14-month-old children2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 124.
    Orfanidou, Eleni
    et al.
    University of Crete, Department of Psychology.
    Cardin, Velia
    University College London, Department of Cognitive, Perceptual and Brain Sciences.
    Hazimah, Haji Hamzah
    University College of London, U.K..
    Capek, Sheryl M
    University of Manchester.
    Woll, Benice
    University College London, Cognitive, Perceptual and Brain Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Working memory and visuospatial cognition in deaf signers and hearing non-signers2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 125.
    Orfanidou, Eleni
    et al.
    University of Crete.
    Kästner, Lena
    Ruhr-University, Bochum.
    Capek, Cheryl M
    University of Manchester.
    Cardin, Velia
    University College London.
    Woll, Benice
    University College London.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Semantic and phonological processing in the visuospatial domain: Evidence from Swedish Sign Language2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 126.
    Pichora-Fuller, Kathleen M.
    et al.
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre, Netherlands.
    Eckert, Mark A.
    Medical University of South Carolina, SC USA.
    Edwards, Brent
    EarLens Corp, CA USA.
    Hornsby, Benjamin W. Y.
    Vanderbilt University, TN 37212 USA.
    Humes, Larry E.
    Indiana University, IN 47405 USA.
    Lemke, Ulrike
    Phonak AG, Switzerland.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Matthen, Mohan
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Mackersie, Carol L.
    San Diego State University, CA 92182 USA.
    Naylor, Graham
    MRC CSO Institute Hearing Research, Scotland.
    Phillips, Natalie A.
    Concordia University, Canada.
    Richter, Michael
    Liverpool John Moores University, England.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Sommers, Mitchell S.
    Washington University, MO 63130 USA.
    Tremblay, Kelly L.
    University of Washington, WA 98195 USA.
    Wingfield, Arthur
    Brandeis University, MA USA.
    Hearing Impairment and Cognitive Energy: The Framework for Understanding Effortful Listening (FUEL)2016In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 37, p. 5S-27SArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Fifth Eriksholm Workshop on "Hearing Impairment and Cognitive Energy" was convened to develop a consensus among interdisciplinary experts about what is known on the topic, gaps in knowledge, the use of terminology, priorities for future research, and implications for practice. The general term cognitive energy was chosen to facilitate the broadest possible discussion of the topic. It goes back to Titchener (1908) who described the effects of attention on perception; he used the term psychic energy for the notion that limited mental resources can be flexibly allocated among perceptual and mental activities. The workshop focused on three main areas: (1) theories, models, concepts, definitions, and frameworks; (2) methods and measures; and (3) knowledge translation. We defined effort as the deliberate allocation of mental resources to overcome obstacles in goal pursuit when carrying out a task, with listening effort applying more specifically when tasks involve listening. We adapted Kahnemans seminal (1973) Capacity Model of Attention to listening and proposed a heuristically useful Framework for Understanding Effortful Listening (FUEL). Our FUEL incorporates the well-known relationship between cognitive demand and the supply of cognitive capacity that is the foundation of cognitive theories of attention. Our FUEL also incorporates a motivation dimension based on complementary theories of motivational intensity, adaptive gain control, and optimal performance, fatigue, and pleasure. Using a three-dimensional illustration, we highlight how listening effort depends not only on hearing difficulties and task demands but also on the listeners motivation to expend mental effort in the challenging situations of everyday life.

  • 127.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Ability to memorize heard speech and what it can tell us about hearing aids2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 128.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Adverse listening conditions: implications for cognition2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 129.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Aktuell forskning inom Kognitiv hörselvetenskap vid Linnécentrum HEAD forskarskola i Linköping2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 130.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Cognition for communication - hearing impairment and deafness2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 131.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Cognitive and auditory plasticity across the lifespan2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 132.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Cognitive aspects of auditory plasticity across the lifespan2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 133.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Cognitive spare capacity as a measure of listening effort2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 134.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Cognitive spare capacity as an index of listening effort2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 135.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Cognitive spare capacity as an index of listening effort2016In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 37, p. 69S-76SArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 136.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Cognitive spare capacity for communication2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 137.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Hörselnedsättning och Kognition2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 138.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Kognition och kommunikation2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 139.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Kognitiv reservkapacitet. Hur kan den maximeras?2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 140.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Listening effort: Ears and Brains. Invited Featured Session.2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 141.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Modalities of Mind: Modality-specific and nonmodality-specific aspects of working memory for sign and speech2005Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Language processing is underpinned by working memory and while working memory for signed languages has been shown to display some of the characteristics of working memory for speech-based languages, there are a range of anomalous effects related to the inherently visuospatial modality of signed languages. On the basis of these effects, four research questions were addressed in a series of studies:

    1. Are differences in working memory storage for sign and speech reflected in neural representation?

    2. Do the neural networks supporting speech-sign switching during a working memory task reflect executive or semantic processes?

    3. Is working memory for sign language enhanced by a spatial style of information presentation?

    4. Do the neural networks supporting word reversal indicate tongue-twisting or mind-twisting?

    The results of the studies showed that:

    1. Working memory for sign and speech is supported by a combination of modality-specific and nonmodality-specific neural networks.

    2. Switching between sign and speech during a working memory task is supported by semantic rather than executive processes.

    3. Working memory performance in educationally promoted native deaf signers is enhanced by a spatial style of presentation.

    4. Word reversal is a matter of mind-twisting, rather than tongue-twisting.

    These findings indicate that working memory for sign and speech has modality-specific components as well as nonmodality-specific components. Modality-specific aspects can be explained in terms of Wilson’s (2001) sensorimotor account, which is based on the component model (Baddeley, 2000), given that the functionality of the visuospatial sketchpad is extended to include language processing. Nonmodality-specific working memory processing is predicted by Rönnberg’s (2003) model of cognitive involvement in language processing. However, the modality-free, cross-modal and extra-modal aspects of working memory processing revealed in the present work can be explained in terms of the central executive and the episodic buffer, providing the functionality and neural representation of the episodic buffer are extended.

    A functional ontology is presented which ties cognitive processes to their neural representation, along with a model explaining modality-specific findings relating to sign language cognition. Predictions of the ontology and the model are discussed in relation to future work.

    List of papers
    1. Neural correlates of working memory for sign language
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neural correlates of working memory for sign language
    2004 (English)In: Cognitive Brain Research, ISSN 0926-6410, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 165-182Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Eight, early bilingual, sign language interpreters participated in a PET study, which compared working memory for Swedish Sign Language (SSL) with working memory for audiovisual Swedish speech. The interaction between language modality and memory task was manipulated in a within-subjects design. Overall, the results show a previously undocumented, language modality-specific working memory neural architecture for SSL, which relies on a network of bilateral temporal, bilateral parietal and left premotor activation. In addition, differential activation in the right cerebellum was found for the two language modalities. Similarities across language modality are found in Broca's area for all tasks and in the anterior left inferior frontal lobe for semantic retrieval. The bilateral parietal activation pattern for sign language bears similarity to neural activity during, e.g., nonverbal visuospatial tasks, and it is argued that this may reflect generation of a virtual spatial array. Aspects of the data suggesting an age of acquisition effect are also considered. Furthermore, it is discussed why the pattern of parietal activation cannot be explained by factors relating to perception, production or recoding of signs, or to task difficulty. The results are generally compatible with Wilson's [Psychon. Bull. Rev. 8 (2001) 44] account of working memory.

    Keywords
    Working memory, Sign language, Speech, Language modality, PET
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13354 (URN)10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2004.03.002 (DOI)
    Available from: 2005-09-21 Created: 2005-09-21 Last updated: 2017-11-06
    2. Neural representation of binding lexical signs and words in the episodic buffer of working memory
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neural representation of binding lexical signs and words in the episodic buffer of working memory
    Show others...
    2007 (English)In: Neuropsychologia, ISSN 0028-3932, E-ISSN 1873-3514, Vol. 45, no 10, p. 2258-2276Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The episodic buffer accommodates formation and maintenance of unitary multidimensional representations based on information in different codes from different sources. Formation, based on submorphemic units, engages posterior brain regions, while maintenance engages frontal regions. Using a hybrid fMRI design, that allows separate analysis of transient and sustained components, an n-back task and an experimental group of 13 hearing native signers, with experience of Swedish Sign Language and Swedish since birth, we investigated binding of lexical signs and words in working memory. Results show that the transient component of these functions is supported by a buffer-specific network of posterior regions including the right middle temporal lobe, possibly relating to binding of phonological loop representations with semantic representations in long-term memory, as well as a loop-specific network, in line with predictions of a functional relationship between loop and buffer. The left hippocampus was engaged in transient and sustained components of buffer processing, possibly reflecting the meaningful nature of the stimuli. Only a minor role was found for executive functions in line with other recent work. A novel representation of the sustained component of working memory for audiovisual language in the right inferior temporal lobe may be related to perception of speech-related facial gestures. Previous findings of sign and speech loop representation in working memory were replicated and extended. Together, these findings support the notion of a module that mediates between codes and sources, such as the episodic buffer, and further our understanding of its nature.

    Keywords
    Binding, Episodic buffer, Working memory, Sign language, fMRI
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13355 (URN)10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2007.02.017 (DOI)
    Note

    On the day of the defence date the title of this article was Speach-sign switching in working memory i supported by semantic networks.

    Available from: 2005-09-21 Created: 2005-09-21 Last updated: 2018-01-13
    3. Explicit processing demands reveal language modality specific organization of working memory
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Explicit processing demands reveal language modality specific organization of working memory
    2008 (English)In: Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, ISSN 1081-4159, E-ISSN 1465-7325, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 466-484Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The working memory model for Ease of Language Understanding(ELU) predicts that processing differences between languagemodalities emerge when cognitive demands are explicit. Thisprediction was tested in three working memory experiments withparticipants who were Deaf Signers (DS), Hearing Signers (HS),or Hearing Nonsigners (HN). Easily nameable pictures were usedas stimuli to avoid confounds relating to sensory modality.Performance was largely similar for DS, HS, and HN, suggestingthat previously identified intermodal differences may be dueto differences in retention of sensory information. When explicitprocessing demands were high, differences emerged between DSand HN, suggesting that although working memory storage in bothgroups is sensitive to temporal organization, retrieval is notsensitive to temporal organization in DS. A general effect ofsemantic similarity was also found. These findings are discussedin relation to the ELU model.

    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13356 (URN)10.1093/deafed/enn005 (DOI)
    Note

    On the day of the defence date the title of this article was Space for compensation: Further support for a visuospatial array for temporary storage in working memory for deaf native signers.

    Available from: 2005-09-21 Created: 2005-09-21 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    4. Perceptual saliency in the visual channel enhances explicit language processing
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceptual saliency in the visual channel enhances explicit language processing
    2004 (English)In: Iranian Audiology, ISSN 1735-045X, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 16-26Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13357 (URN)
    Available from: 2005-09-21 Created: 2005-09-21 Last updated: 2017-11-06
    5. Reversing spoken items: mind twisting not tongue twisting
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reversing spoken items: mind twisting not tongue twisting
    2005 (English)In: Brain and Language, ISSN 0093-934X, Vol. 92, no 1, p. 78-90Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Using 12 participants we conducted an fMRI study involving two tasks, word reversal and rhyme judgment, based on pairs of natural speech stimuli, to study the neural correlates of manipulating auditory imagery under taxing conditions. Both tasks engaged the left anterior superior temporal gyrus, reflecting previously established perceptual mechanisms. Engagement of the left inferior frontal gyrus in both tasks relative to baseline could only be revealed by applying small volume corrections to the region of interest, suggesting that phonological segmentation played only a minor role and providing further support for factorial dissociation of rhyming and segmentation in phonological awareness. Most importantly, subtraction of rhyme judgment from word reversal revealed activation of the parietal lobes bilaterally and the right inferior frontal cortex, suggesting that the dynamic manipulation of auditory imagery involved in mental reversal of words seems to engage mechanisms similar to those involved in visuospatial working memory and mental rotation. This suggests that reversing spoken items is a matter of mind twisting rather than tongue twisting and provides support for a link between language processing and manipulation of mental imagery.

    Keywords
    Speech; Auditory imagery; Word reversal; Parietal lobes; Spatial processing; Rhyme judgment; fMRI
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13358 (URN)10.1016/j.bandl.2004.05.010 (DOI)
    Available from: 2005-09-21 Created: 2005-09-21 Last updated: 2017-11-06
  • 142.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Remembering sign language: cognitive aging in deaf signers2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 143.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Sign Language as a tool for examining Ease of Language Understanding2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 144.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Starting a research group – or pursuing an idea to generate knowledge2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 145.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    The HEAD Graduate School2008In: 4th Annual Meeting of the Centre for Communication Science, Stockholm, October 15-17, 2008.,2008, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 146.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    The HEAD Graduate School2008In: Invited lecture. Cognitive Scientists at Work, Linköping, October 21, 2008.,2008, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 147.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Time and space in working memory for sign and speech2008In: Invited lecture. Research seminar within the project Better interpretation for people with deafblindness, Örebro, November 6, 2008.,2008, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 148.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Uppmärksamhet!2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 149.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Working memory and listening under adverse conditions2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 150.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Working Memory for Meaningless Manual Gestures2015In: Canadian journal of experimental psychology, ISSN 1196-1961, E-ISSN 1878-7290, Vol. 69, no 1, p. 72-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Effects on working memory performance relating to item similarity have been linked to prior categorisation of representations in long-term memory. However, there is evidence from gesture processing that this link may not be obligatory. The present study investigated whether working memory for incidentally generated meaningless manual gestures is influenced by formational similarity and whether this effect is modulated by working-memory load. Results showed that formational similarity did lower performance, demonstrating that similarity effects are not dependent on prior categorisation. However, this effect was only found when working-memory load was low, supporting a flexible resource allocation model according to which it is the quality rather than quantity of working memory representations that determines performance. This interpretation is in line with proposals suggesting language modality specific allocation of resources in working memory.

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