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  • 101.
    Vahlberg, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Linares, Mathieu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Computational Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Norman, Patrick
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Computational Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Phenylboronic Ester- and Phenylboronic Acid-Terminated Alkanethiols on Gold Surfaces2012In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 116, no 1, p. 796-806Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, it is shown that a well-organized monolayer of phenylboronic ester-terminated thiol (BOR-capped) on gold surfaces can be prepared. Our results also show that the BOR-capped molecular system can be cleaved directly on the surface, resulting in an unprotected BOR-uncapped monolayer with the boronic acid functional groups available for coordination to diol molecules in the ambient media. The monolayers of BOR-capped and BOR-uncapped were characterized using infrared spectroscopy, near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ellipsometry, and contact angle goniometry. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results showed that both BOR-capped and BOR-uncapped are chemically linked to the gold substrate. According to the infrared spectroscopy results, the main component of the CO vibrational mode present in the amide moiety is perpendicular oriented relative to the gold surface normal for the BOR-capped molecular system. The near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy resonance peak located at approximately 285 eV, assigned to pi(1)* transitions, was used to estimate the average tilt angle of the vector parallel to the pi* orbitals of the aromatic ring relative to the gold surface normal. The average tilt angle is estimated to be approximately 63 degrees for the BOR-capped monolayer on gold surfaces. The aromatic ring of the BOR-uncapped molecule has a more tilted orientation compared to the BOR-capped one. The experimental infrared spectroscopy and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy results were supported with theoretical modeling including calculations of vibrational modes and of excitation processes.

  • 102.
    Vahlberg, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Linares, Mathieu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Computational Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Villaume, Sebastien
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Computational Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Norman, Patrick
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Computational Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Noradrenaline and a Thiol Analogue on Gold Surfaces: An Infrared Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, and Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy Study2011In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 115, no 1, p. 165-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-assembled monolayers and multilayers of a noradrenaline analogue (Nor-Pt) on gold substrates as well as multilayers of noradrenaline have been investigated by means of the molecular orientation, the molecule surface interaction, the molecular composition and the functional group availability for further biointeraction processes, using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. A chemical shift (1.7 eV) of the S 2p peak to lower binding energies is observed, in the XPS spectrum, indicating that the Nor-Pt molecules are chemisorbed onto the gold substrate. The IR results show that Nor-Pt adsorbate has the C=O stretching vibration modes parallel oriented relative to the gold substrate. The average tilt angle of the aromatic ring relative to the gold surface normal is determined to be approximately 51 degrees, based on the NEXAFS measurements on Nor-Pt monolayers. The experimental results and assignments are supported with theoretical studies where we use the building block principle in the spectral analysis and compare with the measurements of noradrenaline and Nor-Pt. The theoretical calculations are shown to be useful; for angle dependence NEXAFS studies as resonances with fully pi* or sigma* character are preferred for correct analysis.

  • 103.
    Vahlberg, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Lindell, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Petoral, Rodrigo Jr
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Broo, Klas
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    An interaction study of G-protein and Alpha 2A-Adrenergic Receptor derived peptides using Surface Plasmon Resonance Technology2004In: Biological Physics,2004, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 104.
    Vahlberg, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Petoral, Rodrigo Jr
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Carlsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Broo, Klas
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Neurotransmitter Derivatives Adsorbed on Gold2007In: IVC-17/ICSS-13 ICNT,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 105.
    Vahlberg, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petoral, Rodrigo Jr
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lindell, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Broo, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    α2A-adrenergic receptor derived peptide adsorbates: a g-protein interaction study2006In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 22, no 17, p. 7260-7264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The affinity of α2A-adrenergic receptor (α2A-AR) derived peptide adsorbates for the functional bovine brain G-protein is studied in the search for the minimum sequence recognition. Three short peptides (GPR-i2c, GPR-i3n, and GPR-i3c) are designed to mimic the second and third intracellular loops of the receptor. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to study the chemical composition of the peptides and the binding strength to the surfaces. Chemisorption of the peptides to the gold substrates is observed. Infrared spectroscopy is used to study the characteristic absorption bands of the peptides. The presence of peptides on the surfaces is verified by prominent amide I and amide II bands. The interaction between the peptides and the G-protein is studied with surface plasmon resonance. It is shown that GPR-i3n has the highest affinity for the G-protein. Equilibrium analysis of the binding shows that the G-protein keeps its native conformation when interacting with GPR-i3c, but during the interaction with GPR-i2c and GPR-i3n the conformation of G-protein is changed, leading to the formation of aggregates and/or multilayers.

  • 106.
    Vahlberg, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Skoglund, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Linares, Mathieu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Computational Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Norman, Patrick
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Computational Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uvdal, Jahsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The Structure of Benzenesulfonamide-Terminated Thiol on Gold Surfaces and the Interaction with Carbonic AnhydraseManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A well-structured and robust biomolecular monolayer based upon a benzenesulfonamideterminated alkane thiol, to be used as a model system for molecular recognition processes, was prepared. The benzenesulfonamide-terminated thiol adsorbed onto gold substrates was characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, infrared-reflection absorption spectroscopy and ellipsometry. The results showed that the benzenesulfonamide-terminated alkane thiol forms a wellorganized molecular layer on the gold substrates. The orientation of the aromatic ring relative to the gold surface was investigated by means of the angle defined as the normal to the aromatic ring relative to the normal to the gold surface. It was shown that the average tilt angle is approximately 62º. In a second step, the  benzenesulfonamideterminated thiol monolayer was exposed to carbonic anhydrase, which is an enzyme and a therapeutic target. Benzenesulfonamides are used in biomedical applications as inhibitors for carbonic anhydrase. Our purpose in this study was to investigate the recognition capability of the benzenesulfonamide when designed as a thiol monolayer. The interaction between the benzenesulfonamide-terminated monolayer and carbonic anhydrase was studied using ellipsometry and surface plasmon resonance. The results show that the benzenesulfonamide-terminated thiol adsorbed onto the gold substrates is able to bind carbonic anhydrase. The results also indicate that the interaction is specific.

  • 107.
    Vahlberg, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Yazdi, G. R.
    Khranovsky, V.
    Syväjärvi, Mikael
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Materials Science .
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Lloyd-Spets, Anita
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Yakimova, Rositsa
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Materials Science .
    Surface engineering of functional materials for biosensors2005In: IEEE Sensors 2005,2005, 2005, p. 504-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 108.
    Vahlberg, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Yazdi, Gholam Reza
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Materials Science .
    Khranovskyy, V.
    Petoral, Rodrigo Jr
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Syväjärvi, Mikael
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Materials Science .
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Lloyd-Spets, Anita
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Yakimova, Rositsa
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Materials Science .
    Surface engineering of functional materials for biosensors2006In: IEEE SENSORS 2005,2005, Proceedings IEEE SENSORS: ieee.org , 2006, p. 504-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 109.
    Wang, Guannan
    et al.
    Liaoning Medical University, Peoples R China; Liaoning Medical University, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Xuanjun
    University of Macau, Peoples R China.
    Liu, Yaxu
    Liaoning Medical University, Peoples R China; Liaoning Medical University, Peoples R China.
    Hu, Zhang-Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mei, Xifan
    Liaoning Medical University, Peoples R China; Liaoning Medical University, Peoples R China.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Magneto-fluorescent nanoparticles with high-intensity NIR emission, T-1-and T-2-weighted MR for multimodal specific tumor imaging2015In: Journal of materials chemistry. B, ISSN 2050-750X, E-ISSN 2050-7518, Vol. 3, no 15, p. 3072-3080Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanoparticles exhibiting bright near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence, T-1-and T-2-weighted MR were synthesized for specific tumor imaging. Clinically used Fe3O4 nanoparticles exhibit an intrinsic dark signal (T-2-weighted MRI), which sometimes misleads clinical diagnosis. Here, for the first time we integrated ultrasmall Fe3O4 nanoparticles (2-3 nm) with an NIR emitting semiconducting polymer for both T-1-and T-2-weighted MRI as well as fluorescence imaging of tumors. Bio-functionalized multi-modality fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles (FMNPs) functionalized with folic acid exhibit bright fluorescence and high relaxation (r(1) = 7.008 mM(-1) s(-1), r(2) = 26.788 mM(-1) s(-1), r(2)/r(1) = 3.8). These FMNPs have a small average dynamic size of about 20 nm with low aggregation and long circulation time. In vitro studies revealed that FMNPs can serve as an effective fluorescent probe to achieve targeting images of human A549 lung cancer cells without obvious cytotoxicity. In vivo experimental results show that the FMNPs are able to preferentially accumulate in tumor tissues for specific fluorescence imaging, T-1-and T-2-weighted MRI.

  • 110.
    Wang, Guannan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Liaoning Medical University, Jinzhou, China .
    Zhang, Xuanjun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Skallberg, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liu, Yaxu
    Liaoning Medical University, Peoples R China Liaoning Medical University, Peoples R China .
    Hu, Zhang-Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mei, Xifan
    Liaoning Medical University, Peoples R China .
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    One-step synthesis of water-dispersible ultra-small Fe3O4 nanoparticles as contrast agents for T-1 and T-2 magnetic resonance imaging2014In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 6, no 5, p. 2953-2963Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Uniform, highly water-dispersible and ultra-small Fe3O4 nanoparticles were synthesized via a modified one-step coprecipitation approach. The prepared Fe3O4 nanoparticles not only show good magnetic properties, long-term stability in a biological environment, but also exhibit good biocompatibility in cell viability and hemolysis assay. Due to the ultra-small sized and highly water-dispersibility, they exhibit excellent relaxivity properties, the 1.7 nm sized Fe3O4 nanoparticles reveal a low r(2)/r(1) ratio of 2.03 (r(1) = 8.20 mM(-1) s(-1), r(2) = 16.67 mM(-1) s(-1)); and the 2.2 nm sized Fe3O4 nanoparticles also appear to have a low r2/r1 ratio of 4.65 (r(1) = 6.15 mM(-1) s(-1), r(2) = 28.62 mM(-1) s(-1)). This demonstrates that the proposed ultra-small Fe3O4 nanoparticles have great potential as a new type of T-1 magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents. Especially, the 2.2 nm sized Fe3O4 nanoparticles, have a competitive r(1) value and r(2) value compared to commercial contrasting agents such as Gd-DTPA (r(1) = 4.8 mM(-1) s(-1)), and SHU-555C (r(2) = 69 mM(-1) s(-1)). In vitro and in vivo imaging experiments, show that the 2.2 nm sized Fe3O4 nanoparticles exhibit great contrast enhancement, long-term circulation, and low toxicity, which enable these ultrasmall sized Fe3O4 nanoparticles to be promising as T-1 and T-2 dual contrast agents in clinical settings.

  • 111.
    Wang, Hui
    et al.
    Wannan Med Coll, Peoples R China.
    Cai, Fengze
    Wannan Med Coll, Peoples R China.
    Zhou, Le
    Wannan Med Coll, Peoples R China.
    He, Jing
    Wannan Med Coll, Peoples R China.
    Feng, Dexiang
    Wannan Med Coll, Peoples R China.
    Wei, Yan
    Wannan Med Coll, Peoples R China.
    Feng, Zhijun
    Wannan Med Coll, Peoples R China.
    Gu, Xiaoxia
    Wannan Med Coll, Peoples R China.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hu, Zhang-Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A red- emissive mitochondrial probe for imaging of the viscosity in living cells2019In: New Journal of Chemistry, ISSN 1144-0546, E-ISSN 1369-9261, Vol. 43, no 22, p. 8811-8815Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel water- soluble fluorescent probe L based on indole salts has been designed, synthesized and fully characterized. The systematic investigations demonstrated that probe L shows red emission and the fluorescence intensity is linear with the viscosity of the medium. Probe L is able to selectively accumulate in mitochondria within 1 min without any additional reagents for membrane permeabilization. It has been used to distinguish the viscosity differences between mitochondria in normal and nystatin- treated HeLa cells. In addition, due to the good photostability, probe L can be used to monitor the dynamics of mitochondria. These results support that probe L might provide a promising approach for the fluorescence detection of mitochondrial viscosity in living biological systems.

  • 112.
    Wang, Hui
    et al.
    Wannan Med Coll, Peoples R China.
    Fang, Bin
    Anhui Univ, Peoples R China.
    Kong, Lin
    Anhui Univ, Peoples R China.
    Li, Xiangzi
    Wannan Med Coll, Peoples R China.
    Feng, Zhijun
    Wannan Med Coll, Peoples R China.
    Wu, Yunjun
    Wannan Med Coll, Peoples R China.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hu, Zhang-Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A novel Schiff base derivative: Synthesis, two-photon absorption properties and application for bioimaging2018In: Spectrochimica Acta Part A - Molecular and Biomolecular Spectroscopy, ISSN 1386-1425, E-ISSN 1873-3557, Vol. 198, p. 304-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel donor-pi-acceptor-pi-donor type (D-pi-A-pi-D) Schiff base derivative (L) has been designed and synthesized. The structure of L is confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis as well. The photophysical properties of compound L were comprehensively investigated by using both experimental and theoretical methods. The results indicate that L exhibits large Stokes shift and moderate two-photon action (2PA) cross-section in the near infrared (NIR) region. Furthermore, the confocal microscopy imaging study demonstrates that compound L could penetrate into cells and target the cellular mitochondria compartment. Due to its low cytotoxicity, compound L provides a promising tool for directly lighting up the mitochondria compartment in living HepG2 cells. (C) 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 113.
    Wang, Hui
    et al.
    Wannan Med Coll, Peoples R China.
    Fang, Bin
    Anhui Univ, Peoples R China.
    Zhou, Le
    Wannan Med Coll, Peoples R China.
    Li, Di
    Wannan Med Coll, Peoples R China.
    Kong, Lin
    Anhui Univ, Peoples R China.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hu, Zhang-Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A reversible and highly selective two-photon fluorescent "on-off-on" probe for biological Cu2+ detection2018In: Organic and biomolecular chemistry, ISSN 1477-0520, E-ISSN 1477-0539, Vol. 16, no 13, p. 2264-2268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A two-photon active probe for physiological copper (Cu2+) detection is expected to play an important role in monitoring biological metabolism. Herein, a novel Schiff base derivative (E)-2,2-((4-((4-(diethylamino)-2-hydroxybenzylidene)amino)phenyl)azanediyl)bis(ethan-1-ol) (L) with remarkable two-photon activity was developed and synthetically investigated. L presents high selectivity and sensitivity for Cu2+ sensing in ethanol/HEPES buffer (v/v, 1:1), which is accompanied by the fluorescence switching off and subsequently on with the addition of EDTA. The mechanism for the detection of Cu2+ is further analyzed using H-1 NMR titration, mass spectra and theoretical calculations. Furthermore, since the probe L possesses good photophysical properties, excellent biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity, it is successfully applied to track Cu2+ in the cellular endoplasmic reticulum by two-photon fluorescence imaging, showing its potential value for practical applications in biological systems.

  • 114.
    Wang, Liulin
    et al.
    Nanjing Tech Univ, Peoples R China; Nanjing Tech Univ, Peoples R China.
    Du, Wei
    Northwestern Polytech Univ, Peoples R China.
    Hu, Zhang-Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Li, Lin
    Nanjing Tech Univ, Peoples R China; Nanjing Tech Univ, Peoples R China.
    Huang, Wei
    Nanjing Tech Univ, Peoples R China; Nanjing Tech Univ, Peoples R China; Northwestern Polytech Univ, Peoples R China.
    Hybrid Rhodamine Fluorophores in the Visible/NIR Region for Biological Imaging2019In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 58, no 40, p. 14026-14043Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fluorophores and probes are invaluable for the visualization of the location and dynamics of gene expression, protein expression, and molecular interactions in complex living systems. Rhodamine dyes are often used as scaffolds in biological labeling and turn-on fluorescence imaging. To date, their absorption and emission spectra have been expanded to cover the entire near-infrared region (650-950 nm), which provides a more suitable optical window for monitoring biomolecular production, trafficking, and localization in real time. This review summarizes the development of rhodamine fluorophores since their discovery and provides strategies for modulating their absorption and emission spectra to generate specific bathochromic-shifts. We also explain how larger Stokes shifts and dual-emissions can be obtained from hybrid rhodamine dyes. These hybrid fluorophores can be classified into various categories based on structural features including the alkylation of amidogens, the substitution of the O atom of xanthene, and hybridization with other fluorophores.

  • 115.
    Wang, Wenjing
    et al.
    Fujian Normal University.
    Chen, Qianhuo
    Fujian Normal University.
    Li, Qing
    Fujian Normal University.
    Sheng, Yu
    Fujian Normal University.
    Zhang, Xuanjun
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ligand-Structure Effect on the Formation of One-Dimensional Nanoscale Cu(II)-Schiff Base Complexes and Solvent-Mediated Shape Transformation2012In: Crystal Growth & Design, ISSN 1528-7483, E-ISSN 1528-7505, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 2707-2713Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report here a Cu(II)-Schiff base complex that can assemble into one-dimensional (1D) nanoscale fibers, belts, and rods under different synthetic conditions. The ligand-structure effect is investigated by modification of the ligand structure. The formation of a ID nanostructure was studied, and the formation of dimers was revealed as a key factor for 1D assembly. In dimethylformamide (DMF) medium, this complex represents one of the rare examples of low-molecular-weight "super-metallogelators" with a critical gelation concentration of 0.3 wt % for DMF. The ligand exhibits good selectivity toward different metal ions in terms of gel formation and only the Cu(II) complex forms gels. It is interesting that this metallogel is a kind of dynamic nanostructure, which can be transformed to rods with different aspect ratios via a solvent-mediated process under stimulation of ultrasound.

  • 116.
    Wang, Xin
    et al.
    Shanghai Univ, Peoples R China.
    Fei, Siming
    Shanghai Univ, Peoples R China.
    Huang, Shoushuang
    Shanghai Univ, Peoples R China.
    Wu, Chenghao
    Shanghai Univ, Peoples R China.
    Zhao, Junru
    Shanghai Univ, Peoples R China.
    Chen, Zhiwen
    Shanghai Univ, Peoples R China.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hu, Zhang-Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Shanghai Univ, Peoples R China.
    MoS2 nanosheets inlaid in 3D fibrous N-doped carbon spheres for lithium-ion batteries and electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction2019In: Carbon, ISSN 0008-6223, E-ISSN 1873-3891, Vol. 150, p. 363-370Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has received considerable interests in rechargeable lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). To overcome the instinct limitations of pristine MoS2, such as low conductivity, poor cyclic stability and rate performance, hybrid carbon-MoS2 composites are often practically applied to improve the electrochemical properties. Herein, a facile, scalable, and durable synthesis method is innovated to inlay MoS2 nanosheets into three-dimensional (3D) fibrous nitrogen-doped carbon spheres (FNCs) for achieving 3D FNC-MoS2 composites. The free-standing 3D FNC-MoS2 nanocomposites can be used as the anode for LIBs. It exhibits a high reversible capacity of similar to 700 mA h g(-1), and nearly no fading of the capacity nearly after 400 cycles at a current density of 1.2 A g(-1). Meanwhile, FNC-MoS2 exhibits superior HER activity accompanied by a small overpotential of around 194 mV in 0.5 M H2SO4. Tafel slopes are estimated to be 54 mV dec(-1), and the current density of FNC-MoS2 decreases very slightly compared to the initial one after 1000 cycles. We are convinced that the enhanced Li+ storage performance and HER activity are attributed to the synergistic effects and structural advantages, such as higher specific surface, larger pore volume, radical fibrous structure, and chemical/mechanical stability, achieved from the unique architectures of the title material. (C) 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 117.
    Xu, Weidong
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Key Laboratory of Flexible Electronics (KLOFE) and Institute of Advanced Materials (IAM), Jiangsu National Synergetic Innovation Center for Advanced Materials (SICAM), Nanjing Tech University (NanjingTech), Nanjing, China.
    Hu, Qi
    Key Laboratory of Flexible Electronics (KLOFE) and Institute of Advanced Materials (IAM), Jiangsu National Synergetic Innovation Center for Advanced Materials (SICAM), Nanjing Tech University (NanjingTech), Nanjing, China.
    Bai, Sai
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bao, Chunxiong
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. International Collaborative Laboratory of 2D Materials for Optoelectronics Science and Technology, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China.
    Miao, Yanfeng
    Key Laboratory of Flexible Electronics (KLOFE) and Institute of Advanced Materials (IAM), Jiangsu National Synergetic Innovation Center for Advanced Materials (SICAM), Nanjing Tech University (NanjingTech), Nanjing, China.
    Yuan, Zhongcheng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Borzda, Tetiana
    Center for Nano Science and Technology @Polimi, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Milan, Italy.
    Barker, Alex J.
    Center for Nano Science and Technology @Polimi, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Milan, Italy.
    Tyukalova, Elizaveta
    School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore, Singapore.
    Hu, Zhang-Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kawecki, Maciej
    Laboratory for Nanoscale Materials Science, Empa, Dubendorf, Switzerland / Department of Physics, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Wang, Heyong
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yan, Zhibo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing, P. R. China.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Shi, Xiaobo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fahlman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhang, Wenjing
    International Collaborative Laboratory of 2D Materials for Optoelectronics Science and Technology, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China.
    Duchamp, Martial
    School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore, Singapore.
    Liu, Jun-Ming
    Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing, P. R. China.
    Petrozza, Annamaria
    Center for Nano Science and Technology @Polimi, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Milan, Italy.
    Wang, Jianpu
    Key Laboratory of Flexible Electronics (KLOFE) and Institute of Advanced Materials (IAM), Jiangsu National Synergetic Innovation Center for Advanced Materials (SICAM), Nanjing Tech University (NanjingTech), Nanjing, China.
    Liu, Li-Min
    Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing, China / chool of Physics, Beihang University, Beijing, China .
    Huang, Wei
    ey Laboratory of Flexible Electronics (KLOFE) and Institute of Advanced Materials (IAM), Jiangsu National Synergetic Innovation Center for Advanced Materials (SICAM), Nanjing Tech University (NanjingTech), Nanjing, China / Shaanxi Institute of Flexible Electronics (SIFE), Northwestern Polytechnical University (NPU), Xi’an, China.
    Gao, Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rational molecular passivation for high-performance perovskite light-emitting diodes2019In: Nature Photonics, ISSN 1749-4885, E-ISSN 1749-4893, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 418-424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A major efficiency limit for solution-processed perovskite optoelectronic devices, for example light-emitting diodes, is trap-mediated non-radiative losses. Defect passivation using organic molecules has been identified as an attractive approach to tackle this issue. However, implementation of this approach has been hindered by a lack of deep understanding of how the molecular structures influence the effectiveness of passivation. We show that the so far largely ignored hydrogen bonds play a critical role in affecting the passivation. By weakening the hydrogen bonding between the passivating functional moieties and the organic cation featuring in the perovskite, we significantly enhance the interaction with defect sites and minimize non-radiative recombination losses. Consequently, we achieve exceptionally high-performance near-infrared perovskite light-emitting diodes with a record external quantum efficiency of 21.6%. In addition, our passivated perovskite light-emitting diodes maintain a high external quantum efficiency of 20.1% and a wall-plug efficiency of 11.0% at a high current density of 200 mA cm−2, making them more attractive than the most efficient organic and quantum-dot light-emitting diodes at high excitations.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-03-25 16:05
  • 118.
    Yakimova, Rositsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials.
    Petoral, Rodrigo Jr
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yazdi, Gholamreza
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials.
    Vahlberg, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Surface functionalization and biomedical applications based on SiC2007In: Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, ISSN 0022-3727, E-ISSN 1361-6463, Vol. 40, no 20, p. 6435-6442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The search for materials and systems, capable of operating long term under physiological conditions, has been a strategy for many research groups during the past years. Silicon carbide (SiC) is a material, which can meet the demands due to its high biocompatibility, high inertness to biological tissues and to aggressive environment, and the possibility to make all types of electronic devices. This paper reviews progress in biomedical and biosensor related research on SiC. For example, less biofouling and platelet aggregation when exposed to blood is taken advantage of in a variety of medical implantable materials while the robust semiconducting properties can be explored in surface functionalized bioelectronic devices. © 2007 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  • 119.
    Yakimova, Rositsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials.
    Steinhoff, Georg
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Petoral, Rodrigo Jr
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vahlberg, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Khranovskyy, Volodymyr
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials.
    Yazdi, Gholamreza
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics.
    Novel material concepts of transducers for chemical and biosensors2007In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 22, no 12, p. 2780-2785Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objectives of this work are to contribute to the knowledge about physical and chemical properties of WBG semiconductors, such as ZnO and GaN towards development of advanced bio- and chemical sensors. For the semiconductors, growth techniques typically yielding single crystal material are applied. Thin epitaxial quality films of ZnO and GaN are fabricated on SiC or sapphire substrates. An emphasis is given to ZnO due to the interesting combination of the semiconductor and oxide properties. Surface bio-functionalization of ZnO is performed by APTES, MPA or MP-TMS molecules. We have compared some of the results to (hydroxylated) GaN surfaces functionalized by MP-TMS. The covalent attachment of the self-assembled biomolecular layers has been proven by XPS analysis. For complementary electrical characterization impedance spectroscopy measurements were performed. The results are intended to serve the realization of bioelectronic transducer devices based on SiC or GaN transistors with a ZnO gate layer. To take advantage of the catalytic properties of ZnO, initial prototypes of chemical sensors for gas sensing are processed on ZnO deposited either on SiC or on sapphire and they are further tested for the response to reducing or oxidizing gas ambient. The sensor devices show sensitivity to oxygen in the surface resistivity mode while a Pt Schottky contact ZnO/SiC device responds to reducing gases. These results are compared to published results on Pt/GaN Schottky diodes. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 120.
    Yakimova, Rositza
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Selegård, Linnea
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Khranovskyy, Volodymyr
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pearce, Ruth
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    ZnO materials and surface tailoring for biosensing2012In: Frontiers in bioscience (Elite edition), ISSN 1945-0508, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 254-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ZnO nanostructured materials, such as films and nanoparticles, could provide a suitable platform for development of high performance biosensors due to their unique fundamental material properties. This paper reviews different preparation techniques of ZnO nanocrystals and material issues like wettability, biocompatibility and toxicity, which have an important relevance to biosensor functionality. Efforts are made to summarize and analyze existing results regarding surface modification and molecular attachments for successful biofunctionalization and understanding of the mechanisms involved. A section is devoted to implementations of tailored surfaces in biosensors. We end with conclusions on the feasibility of using ZnO nanocrystals for biosensing.

  • 121.
    Zhang, Qiong
    et al.
    Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Luo, Lei
    Southwest University, Peoples R China.
    Xu, Hong
    Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Hu, Zhang-Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Brommesson, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wu, Jieying
    Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Sun, Zhaoqi
    Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Tian, Yupeng
    Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Design, synthesis, linear and nonlinear photophysical properties of novel pyrimidine-based imidazole derivatives2016In: New Journal of Chemistry, ISSN 1144-0546, E-ISSN 1369-9261, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 3456-3463Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Novel donor-pi-acceptor (D-pi-A) and donor-pi-acceptor-pi-donor (D-pi-A-pi-D) type pyrimidine imidazole derivatives with flexible ether chains (L1 and L2) have been efficiently synthesized through improved Knoevenagel condensation and Ullmann reactions with high yields. Based on systematic photophysical investigations and theoretical calculations, the structure-property relationships can be described as follows: (1) the linear and nonlinear optical properties of the target chromophores change regularly with increasing the number of branches and the polarity of the solvents. (2) The single-substituted chromophore L2 exhibited a remarkable negative solvato-kinetic effect, while the double-substituted chromophore L1 showed a positive solvato-kinetic effect. Significant bathochromic shifting of the emission spectra and larger Stokes shifts were observed in polar solvents. (3) The two-photon absorption (TPA) cross-section results further demonstrated that their TPA cross section values (delta) increase notably with increasing branch number, and the presence of high pi-delocalization could induce large size-scalable TPA enhancements. (4) By comprehensively considering the optical performance, cytotoxicity and solubility, L1 was identified as the better candidate for living cell (HepG2) imaging.

  • 122.
    Zhang, Qiong
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Tian, Xiaohe
    UCL, England.
    Hu, Zhang-Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Brommesson, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wu, Jieying
    Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Zhou, Hongping
    Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Li, Shengli
    Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Yang, Jiaxiang
    Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Sun, Zhaoqi
    Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Tian, Yupeng
    Anhui University, Peoples R China; Nanjing University, Peoples R China.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A series of Zn(II) terpyridine complexes with enhanced two-photon-excited fluorescence for in vitro and in vivo bioimaging2015In: Journal of materials chemistry. B, ISSN 2050-750X, E-ISSN 2050-7518, Vol. 3, no 36, p. 7213-7221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is still a challenge to obtain two-photon excited fluorescent bioimaging probes with intense emission, high photo-stability and low cytotoxicity. In the present work, four Zn(II)-coordinated complexes (1-4) constructed from two novel D-A and D-p-A ligands (L-1 and L-2) are investigated both experimentally and theoretically, aiming to explore efficient two-photon probes for bioimaging. Molecular geometry optimization used for theoretical calculations is achieved using the crystallographic data. Notably, the results indicate that complexes 1 and 2 display enhanced two-photon absorption (2PA) cross sections compared to their corresponding D-A ligand (L1). Furthermore, it was found that complex 1 has the advantages of moderate 2PA cross section in the near-infrared region, longer fluorescence lifetime, higher quantum yield, good biocompatibility and enhanced two-photon excited fluorescence. Therefore, complex 1 is evaluated as a bioimaging probe for in vitro imaging of HepG2 cells, in which it is observed under a two-photon scanning microscope that complex 1 exhibits effective co-staining with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and nuclear membrane; as well as for in vivo imaging of zebrafish larva, in which it is observed that complex 1 exhibits specificity in the intestinal system.

  • 123.
    Zhang, Qiong
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Tian, Xiaohe
    UCL, England.
    Hu, Zhang-Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Brommesson, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wu, Jieying
    Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Zhou, Hongping
    Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Yang, Jiaxiang
    Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Sun, Zhaoqi
    Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Tian, Yupeng
    Anhui University, Peoples R China; Nanjing University, Peoples R China.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nonlinear optical response and two-photon biological applications of a new family of imidazole-pyrimidine derivatives2016In: Dyes and pigments, ISSN 0143-7208, E-ISSN 1873-3743, Vol. 126, p. 286-295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A series of novel D-pi-A type two-photon absorption (2PA) imidazole-pyrimidine derivatives (EX-1 similar to EX-4) have been synthesized and characterized, with EX-1 was crystallography confirmed. Based on systematic photophysical investigations, the structure property relationships can be drawn as follows: (1) Both theoretical and experimental studies indicated that the different donor groups have large influences on the optical properties. (2) The 2PA cross-section values (sigma) were obtained both by Z-Scan and two photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) measurements. 2PA cross sections show an increasing trend with increasing electron-donating strength and the number of branches. (3) Comprehensively considered the optical performance, molecular volume, cytotoxicity and solubility, EX-1 and EX-2 were identified to be the best candidates for living cells (HepG2) imaging. Moreover, the 2PA excitable features of EX-1 and EX-2 are capable of imaging in fresh mouses liver tissues with a depth of ca. 70 mu m. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 124.
    Zhang, Qiong
    et al.
    Anhui University, Peoples R China; Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Tian, Xiaohe
    UCL, England.
    Wang, Hui
    Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Hu, Zhang-Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wu, Jieying
    Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Zhou, Hongping
    Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Shengyi
    Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Yang, Jiaxiang
    Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Sun, Zhaoqi
    Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Tian, Yupeng
    Anhui University, Peoples R China; Nanjing University, Peoples R China.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    NIR-region two-photon fluorescent probes for Fe3+/Cu2+ ions based on pyrimidine derivatives with different flexible chain2016In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 222, p. 574-578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two novel NIR-region two-photon fluorescent probes CCP and COP, show strong fluorescence quenching and good ratiometric responses toward Fe3+ and Cu2+, respectively; and their two-photon fluorescence are reversible by the subsequent addition of EDTA. CCP and COP are valuable candidates for two-photon imaging in the biological transparency window. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 125.
    Zhang, Xuanjun
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ali Ballem, Mohamed
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ahrén, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Suska, Anke
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bergman, Peder
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nanoscale Ln(III)-carboxylate coordination polymers (Ln = Gd, Eu, Yb): temperature-controlled guest encapsulation and light harvesting2010In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 132, no 30, p. 10391-10397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the self-assembly of stable nanoscale coordination polymers (NCPs), which exhibit temperature-controlled guest encapsulation and release, as well as an efficient light-harvesting property. NCPs are obtained by coordination-directed organization of pi-conjugated dicarboxylate (L1) and lanthanide metal ions Gd(III), Eu(III), and Yb(III) in a DMF system. Guest molecules trans-4-styryl-1-methylpyridiniumiodide (D1) and methylene blue (D2) can be encapsulated into NCPs, and the loading amounts can be controlled by changing reaction temperatures. Small angle X-ray diffraction (SAXRD) results reveal that the self-assembled discus-like NCPs exhibit long-range ordered structures, which remain unchanged after guest encapsulations. Experimental results reveal that the negatively charged local environment around the metal connector is the driving force for the encapsulation of cationic guests. The D1 molecules encapsulated in NCPs at 140 degrees C can be released gradually at room temperature in DMF. Guest-loaded NCPs exhibit efficient light harvesting with energy transfer from the framework to the guest D1 molecule, which is studied by photoluminescence and fluorescence lifetime decays. This coordination-directed encapsulation approach is general and should be extended to the fabrication of a wide range of multifunctional nanomaterials.

  • 126.
    Zhang, Xuanjun
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ballem, Mohamed
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hu, Zhang-Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bergman, J Peder
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nanoscale Light-Harvesting Metal-Organic Frameworks2011In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 50, no 25, p. 5728-5732Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 127.
    Zhang, Xuanjun
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wang, Wenjing
    Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China.
    Hu, Zhangjun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wang, Guannan
    Liaoning Medical University, China.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Coordination polymers for energy transfer: Preparations, properties, sensing applications, and perspectives2015In: Coordination chemistry reviews, ISSN 0010-8545, E-ISSN 1873-3840, Vol. 284, p. 206-235Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This review highlights the recent progress of bulk and nanoscale coordination polymer (CP) materials forenergy transfer. Artificial light-harvesting materials with efficient energy transfer are practically usefulfor a variety of applications including photovoltaic, white emitting devices, and sensors. In the pastdecades CP (aka Metal-organic framework, MOF) has experienced rapid development due to a multitude of applications, including catalyst, gas storage and separations, non-linear optics, luminescence, and soon. Recent research has shown that CP is a very promising light-harvesting platform because the energytransfers can occur between different ligands, from ligand to metal centers, or from MOF skeleton to guestspecies. This review comprehensively surveyed synthetic approaches to light-harvesting CPs, and postfunctionalization. Sensing applications and achievements in energy-transfer CP nanoparticles and thinfilms were also discussed.

  • 128.
    Zhang, Xuanjun
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Yu, Jiangbo
    Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, USA.
    Rong, Yu
    Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, USA.
    Ye, Fangmao
    Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, USA.
    Chiu, Daniel T
    Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, USA.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    High-intensity near-IR fluorescence in semiconducting polymer dots achieved by cascade FRET strategy2013In: Chemical Science, ISSN 2041-6520, E-ISSN 2041-6539, Vol. 4, no 5, p. 2143-2151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Near-IR (NIR) emitting semiconducting polymer dots (Pdots) with ultrabright fluorescence have been prepared for specific cellular targeting. A series of π-conjugated polymers were synthesized to form water dispersible multicomponent Pdots by an ultrasonication-assisted co-precipitation method. By optimizing cascade energy transfer in Pdots, high-intensity NIR fluorescence (Φ = 0.32) with tunable excitations, large absorption–emission separation (up to 330 nm), and narrow emission bands (FWHM = 44 nm) have been achieved. Single-particle fluorescence imaging show that the as-prepared NIR Pdots were more than three times brighter than the commercially available Qdot705 with comparable sizes under identical conditions of excitation and detection. Because of the covalent introduction of carboxylic acid groups into polymer side chains, the bioconjugation between NIR-emitting Pdots and streptavidins can be readily completed via these functional groups on the surface of Pdots. Furthermore, through flow cytometry and confocal fluorescence microscopy the NIR-emitting Pdot–streptavidin conjugates proved that they could effectively label EpCAM receptors on the surface of MCF-7 cells, via specific binding between streptavidin and biotin.

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