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  • 101.
    Myrberg, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Different approaches in aphasia assessments: a comparison between test and everyday conversations2018In: Aphasiology, ISSN 0268-7038, E-ISSN 1464-5041, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 417-435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: When it comes to aphasia assessments, many speech and language pathologists (SLPs) rely heavily on norm-referenced language tests, even though they are aware that certain important language skills can only be evaluated by analysis of conversational discourse. The formalized aphasia test situation is a typical example of institutional interaction, which differs in systematic ways from everyday conversations. This article examines conversations between persons with aphasia (PWAs) and SLPs in the two different contexts, a topic where previous research is limited. Aims: The aim is to compare the interactions between PWAs and SLPs in test conversations and in more everyday-like conversations and to relate the interactional data to the participants performance on the aphasia test battery. Methods amp; Procedures: Ten PWAs and three SLPs participated in the study. Each PWA participated in two conversations with an SLP, a test conversation, while performing tasks targeting the ability to produce sentences and narratives from an aphasia test battery, and a more everyday-like conversation. The conversations were audio and video recorded and thereafter transcribed. Three main observations considered to be important mechanisms for interaction organization were identified and calculated in the transcriptions. The test results were summarized and analyzed. Outcomes amp; results: The results demonstrated that there were a larger number of turns produced by the PWAs in the everyday conversations compared to the test conversations. Furthermore, there were more communicative initiatives and nonverbal contributions in the everyday conversations. The number of repairs initiated by the PWAs were equivalent, but looking at repair characteristics, it was found that repairs resolved within the same turn were found in the test conversations while repairs stretching over several turns were more frequent in the everyday conversations. Conclusions: The results of the present study demonstrated differences of the interaction between PWAs and SLPs in test conversations and in more everyday-like conversations. Furthermore, there seemed to be no obvious relationship between the participants actual test scores on the aphasia test battery and aspects of conversation that can be related to being a competent speaker.

  • 102.
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hyden, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Festin, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    People diagnosed with dementia in Sweden: What type of home care services and housing are they granted? A cross-sectional study2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 229-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: This study aims to examine what types of home care services and housing are granted to people with a dementia diagnosis and how these types are associated with socio-demographic factors (sex, age, marital status, native or foreign born, and regional area).

    METHODS: A cross-sectional study of all people diagnosed with dementia in three Swedish counties was conducted from the medical records in 2012. Logistic regression analysis was carried out to investigate associations between home care services and housing and socio-demographic variables.

    RESULTS: In total, 17,405 people had a dementia diagnosis, and the majority were women, aged 80+ years, and unmarried. Some 72% were living in ordinary housing and 28% lived in special housing. Of those who lived in ordinary housing, 50% did not receive any home care service. Not receiving any type of home care services was less common for older people and was also associated with being married and living in rural municipalities. The most common home care services granted were home help and personal care. Special housing was more common for older people, unmarried persons, and those living in rural municipalities.

    CONCLUSIONS: Most people with a dementia diagnosis were living in ordinary housing, and, surprisingly, half of those did not receive any type of home care service. This knowledge is essential for making the living conditions and needs of people living with dementia more visible and to provide good home care services for people with dementia and their families.

  • 103.
    Olin Lauritzen, Sonja
    et al.
    Institutionen för pedagogik och didaktik, Stockholms universitet.
    Hydén, Lars-ChristerLinköping University, Department of Thematic Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Medical Technologies and the Life World: The Social Construction of Normality2007Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the use of new health technologies in healthcare and medicine is generally seen as beneficial, there has been little analysis of the impact of such technologies on people’s lives and understandings of health and illness. This ground-breaking book explores how new technologies not only provide hope for cure and well-being, but also introduce new ethical dilemmas and raise questions about the 'natural' body.

    Focusing on the ways new health technologies intervene into our lives and affect our ideas about normalcy, the body and identity, Medical Technologies and the Life World explores:

    • how new health technologies are understood by lay people and patients
    • how the outcomes of these technologies are communicated in various clinical settings
    • how these technologies can alter our notions of health and illness and create ‘new illness’.

    Written by authors with differing backgrounds in phenomenology, social psychology, social anthropology, communication studies and the nursing sciences, this sensational text is essential reading for students and academics of medical sociology, health and allied studies, and anyone with an interest in new health technologies.

  • 104. Olin Lauritzen, Sonja
    et al.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute.
    Medical technologies, the life world and normality2007In: Medical Technologies and the Life World: The Social Construction of Normality, London: Routledge , 2007, p. -189Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the use of new health technologies in healthcare and medicine is generally seen as beneficial, there has been little analysis of the impact of such technologies on people’s lives and understandings of health and illness. This ground-breaking book explores how new technologies not only provide hope for cure and well-being, but also introduce new ethical dilemmas and raise questions about the 'natural' body.

    Focusing on the ways new health technologies intervene into our lives and affect our ideas about normalcy, the body and identity, Medical Technologies and the Life World explores:

    • how new health technologies are understood by lay people and patients
    • how the outcomes of these technologies are communicated in various clinical settings
    • how these technologies can alter our notions of health and illness and create ‘new illness’.

    Written by authors with differing backgrounds in phenomenology, social psychology, social anthropology, communication studies and the nursing sciences, this sensational text is essential reading for students and academics of medical sociology, health and allied studies, and anyone with an interest in new health technologies.

  • 105.
    Peolsson, Michael
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sätterlund-Larsson, U.
    Trollhättan | Uddevalla University, Vänersborg, Sweden.
    Living with chronic pain: A dynamic learning process2000In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 114-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on how patients describe and manage their pain in their everyday life. The data consist of interviews with 37 patients undergoing treatment for chronic pain. The study focuses on how experiences of pain are mediated and interpreted with the help of the individual's discursive resources. It is argued that this kind of resource is important in constituting a structure of relations between a suffering person, pain and context. In the analysis of the material a four-step procedure was used, including both formal and content-related aspects. It was found that the patients describe chronic pain as a dynamic phenomenon. Patients learn about their pain by actively constituting relations among themselves, the pain and their activities. For the patients, chronic pain is a structured phenomenon. Patients often describe how pain is initiated, worsens and is alleviated. Patients thereby learn to distinguish different figures in their pain, which they are able to relate to in their management of pain. This suggests that a life in pain could be seen as an apprenticeship process. The heart of the matter in this process is learning to become sensitive to and flexible towards variations in the pain and potential pain triggers in the environment. This knowledge is important, as mastering pain is a balancing act between inner resources and environmental circumstances.

  • 106.
    Pettersson, Monica E.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska University Hospital Sahlgrenska, Sweden.
    Ohlen, Joakim
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Ersta Skondal University of Coll, Sweden; Ersta Hospital, Sweden.
    Friberg, Febe
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden; University of Stavanger, Norway.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Carlsson, Eva
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Topics and structure in preoperative nursing consultations with patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 674-686Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundThe preoperative education, which occurs in preoperative patient consultations, is an important part of the surgical nurses profession. These consultations may be the building blocks of a partnership that facilitates communication between patient and nurse. AimThe aim of the study was to describe topics and structure and documentation in preoperative nursing consultations with patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer. MethodThe study was based on analysis of consultations between seven patients and nurses at a Swedish university hospital. The preplanned preoperative consultations were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The structure of the consultations was described in terms of phases and the text was analysed according to a manifest content analysis ResultsThe consultations were structured on an agenda that was used variously and communicating different topics in an equally varied manner. Seven main topics were found: Health status, Preparation before surgery, Discovery, Tumour, Operation, Symptoms and Recovery after surgery. The topic structure disclosed a high number of subtopics. The main topics Discovery, Tumour and Symptoms were only raised by patients and occupied only 11% of the discursive space. Documentation was sparse and included mainly task-oriented procedures rather than patients worries and concerns. ConclusionThere was no clear structure regarding preoperative consultation purpose and content. Using closed questions instead of open is a hindrance of developing a dialogue and thus patient participation. Preoperative consultation practice needs to be strengthened to include explicit communication of the consultations purpose and agenda, with nurses actively discussing and responding to patients concerns and sensitive issues. The results of the study facilitate the development of methods and structure to support person-centred communication where the patient is given space to get help with the difficult issues he/she may have when undergoing surgery.

  • 107.
    Pettersson, Monica E.
    et al.
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences and Centre for Person-Centred Care, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; The Vascular Department, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Öhlén, Joakim
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences and Centre for Person-Centred Care, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Friberg, Febe
    Department of Health studies, Faculty of Social sciences, University of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway; Centre for Person-Centred Care, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wallengren, Catarina
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences and Centre for Person-Centred Care, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sarenmalm, Elisabeth Kenne
    Research and Development, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde and Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Eva
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences and Centre for Person-Centred Care, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; The Colorectal Unit, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Prepared for surgery: Communication in nurses preoperative consultations with patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer after a person-centred intervention2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 13-14, p. 2904-2916Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives

    To describe preoperative communication after a person‐centred intervention in nurses' consultations with patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer.

    Background

    Patients all over the world scheduled for surgery are referred to preoperative consultations with healthcare professionals. The goal is to assess the risk of perioperative complications, improving quality of care and enabling patients to be prepared for surgery and recovery. A person‐centred intervention was developed, which consisted of an interactive written patient education material and person‐centred communication.

    Design

    An explorative quantitative and qualitative study based on 18 audio‐taped transcriptions.

    Methods

    Eighteen patients preoperative nursing consultations at three Swedish hospitals were analysed quantitatively regarding structure: words, time, phases, questions, discursive space, and qualitatively: topics and how the person‐centred communication appeared in the consultations.

    Results

    The median time for consultations was 27 min (range 13–64 min). The nurses used two‐thirds of the discursive space in the consultations with the patients. The patient education material was used as a support to structure the consultation and discuss sensitive and difficult issues. Seven topics were discussed during the consultation. Two different approaches to communication were identified: Talking with the patient versus Talking to the patient. Talking with the patient (seen as person‐centred communication) was defined as: listening to the narrative and confirming each other, raising difficult topics, seeing each other as persons, building on strengths and resources, preparing for surgery and asking open questions.

    Conclusion

    Ways of communicating influence how the preoperative consultation develops. Talking with the patient could be seen as person‐centred communication in the preoperative care, and when using this approach, the intervention purpose of person‐centred communication was met.

    Relevance to clinical practice

    Education in person‐centred communication is important for nurses to improve their skills in performing preoperative consultations.

  • 108.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Collaboration, trouble and repair in multiparty interactions involving couples with dementia or aphasia2017In: International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, ISSN 1754-9507, E-ISSN 1754-9515, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 454-464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to identify problems with communication with persons with aphasia and persons with dementia in a collaborative interview setting with their significant others. In particular, to compare interactional practices used in order to resolve problems caused by specific symptoms. Method: Five persons with aphasia and five persons with dementia and their spouses participated in the study. Interviews were carried out couple by couple, and the interviews had a task-oriented character. The interviews were video and audio recorded. All interviews were transcribed. From the transcriptions categorisations according to previous literature were made. Result: The results demonstrated that repair sequences were frequent in interaction involving people with aphasia (PWA), and even more so in interaction involving persons with dementia (PWD). In general, it was the PWA/PWD that initiated the repair sequence more often than the spouse, thus keeping the general rule of a preference for self-initiated repair compared to other-initiated repair. Conclusion: The active involvement of the conversational partners in trouble solving sequences in interaction with PWA/PWD demonstrated in the present study indicates that the interactional style of the conversational partner to PWA/PWD important. This implies that conversation partner training programmes would be useful both for PWA and for PWD.

  • 109.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Intonational Patterns of Nonverbal Vocalizations in People With Dementia2011In: American Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementia, ISSN 1533-3175, E-ISSN 1938-2731, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 563-572Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nonverbal vocalizations in dementia are important clinically since they generally have been regarded as disruptive behavior that is disturbing. The aim of the present study is to describe the interactional pattern, including the prosodic package, of nonverbal vocalizations in a participant in a late stage of dementia. The acoustic analysis shows that the vocalizations do not differ significantly from the verbal utterances regarding mean fundamental frequency or pitch range. The mean fundamental frequency, F(0), of the utterances from Anna was significantly higher than the mean F(0) from the other elderly participants. The analysis demonstrates that there is a singing-like type of vocalizations that does not resemble the previously described patterns of nonverbal vocalizations. This pattern of the nonverbal vocalization does not resemble the intonation of Annas verbal utterances. The other participants perceive Annas vocalizations as potentially meaningful turns. Nonverbal vocalizations in clinical settings should be taken as communicative contributions.

  • 110.
    Sandin, Bengt
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute.
    Lind, Judith
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute.
    Inledning2006In: Normalitetens förhandling och förvandling.: En antologi om barn, skola och föräldraskap / [ed] Judith Lind, Stockholm: Brutus Östlings Bokförlag Symposion , 2006, p. -279Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vad innebär det egentligen att vara ett alldeles vanligt barn? Är det detsamma som att vara normal eller att ha önskvärda egenskaper? Vilka är i så fall önskvärda egenskaper och vem definierar dem?

    Detta är några av frågorna som angrips i antologin Normalitetens förhandling och förvandling där bidragen utgår från såväl vetenskapliga diskussioner som vardagliga sammanhang. Det handlar om allt från den dagliga verksamheten i en högstadieklass, barn med läs- och skrivsvårigheter, specialklasser för begåvade barn till gymnasieklasser för ungdomar med diagnosen Aspergers syndrom. Författarna spårar på olika sätt de processer som bidrar till att skapa och upprätthålla, men även ifrågasätta, förhandla och förändra normalitet.

  • 111.
    Sandén, Inger
    et al.
    Department of Nursing, Trollhättan-Uddevalla University.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    How everyday life is affected: An interview study of relatives of men suffering from testicular cancer2002In: Journal of psychosocial oncology, ISSN 0734-7332, E-ISSN 1540-7586, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 27-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe, by means of explorative interviews, the experiences of relatives of male family members suffering from testicular cancer. The central questions concerned how the disease and its treatment affected the life of the family, how its daily routines were affected, the form of relationships and closeness during the period of the disease, and how the future was given shape. The results revealed four main themes presented by the relatives during the interviews: the disease and its course, normalization, the long-term consequences of the disease, and the social network. The results showed that relatives of men suffering from cancer live in a vulnerable situation characterized by social isolation.

  • 112.
    Squire, Corinne
    et al.
    University of East London, UK.
    Davis, Mark
    Monash University, Australia.
    Esin, Cigdem
    University of East London, UK.
    Andrews, Molly
    University of East London, UK.
    Harrison, Barbara
    University of East London, UK.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life.
    Hydén, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    What is Narrative Research?2014Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Narrative research has become a catchword in the social sciences today, promising new fields of inquiry and creative solutions to persistent problems.

    This book brings together ideas about narrative from a variety of contexts across the social sciences and synthesizes understandings of the field. Rather than focusing on theory, it examines how narrative research is conducted and applied. It operates as a practical introductory guide, basic enough for first-time researchers, but also as a window onto the more complex questions and difficulties that all researchers in this area face.

    The authors guide readers through current debates about how to obtain and analyse narrative data, about the nature of narrative, the place of the researcher, the limits of researcher interpretations, and the significance of narrative work in applied and in broader political contexts.

  • 113.
    Sävenstedt, Stefan
    et al.
    Umeå Universitet.
    Zingmark, Karin
    Umeå universitet.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute.
    Brulin, Christine
    Umeå universitet.
    Establishing joint attention in remote talks with the elderly about health: A study of nurses' conversation with elderly persons in teleconsultations2005In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 317-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is a contribution to the sparsely studied field of nurses' teleconsultations with frail elderly people. The aim was to describe how talk and interaction are accomplished and by what means problems are handled that emerge from the fact that the communication is conducted via videoconferencing techniques. Recordings were made of 22 sessions of teleconsultation between nurses and elderly nursing home residents aided by enrolled nurses. The data were analysed with a qualitative method inspired by conversation and discourse analysis. The findings indicate that in order to create a joint attention the participants often had to verbally confirm and reconfirm that contact had been established. The triad of participants played a special part in maintaining the joint attention through compensating for the contextual aspect of the medium's limitations and the demented elderly person's communication problems. 'Talks about the communication' and passages of social talk took place when the nurse or the staff member wanted to re-establish and maintain joint attention. The joint attention seemed connected to a special sort of eye contact and gaze and to the type of camera projection that was used. One conclusion was that to create joint attention in nurses' teleconsultations with frail elderly people, the limitations in transferring communication cues and the limitations of what the camera can reveal of the general context could, to some extent, be made up for by verbal communication within the triad of participants. Another conclusion was that these limitations in the context of interaction in some situations also seemed to be an advantage for the demented elderly and contributed to increased attention. © 2005 Nordic College of Caring Sciences.

  • 114.
    Veetnisha Gunnarsson, Nina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Borell, Lena
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Managing Family Relations and Controlling Information While Supporting an Allergic Child2013In: Qualitative Sociology Review, ISSN 1733-8077, E-ISSN 1733-8077, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 205-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores parental (particularly mothers’) support in the daily lives of children with allergies in a Swedish context. An ordinary life is established by making comparisons to what other children without allergies presumably can do (and eat). Although the parents’ goal is to support their child in managing allergies, neither their practical nor their interactional strategies work in a clear-cut direction to promote the child’s ordinary life and identity. On the contrary, parents’ accounts convey that they function just as much against an everyday life and the child’s identity. When managing family relations, parents expect immediate family members (specifically grandparents)to understand and accommodate the child’s needs.

    However, claims of family responsibility are made through moral tales about lack of support from “generalized others.” Family responsibility is also downplayed in parents’ accounts as demands of support may put parents’ moral self at risk. The strategy of information control in certain situations and (non-family) relations used to keep the child safe may risk stigmatizing the child, alternatively, making the child into a social threat. One of the conclusions that could be drawn from this study is that claims of family support may be contradictory to other cultural principles that ascribe responsibilities between families and individuals, as the principles of individual freedom and autonomy.

  • 115.
    Xu, Wenqian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Taghizadeh Larsson, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Motel, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Media Representation of Life Stages: Analysis of Photographs Posted on Norrköping Municipal Facebook Accounts2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: It has been found by researchers that older adults are statistically underrepresented and associated with negative stereotypes in the mass media. Older adults are generally viewed as incompetent from stereotyped media content, which may make them socially excluded from a set of opportunities and resources. The media portrayals are conceived as value-expressive and constructing the image of older adults and ageing. The purpose of this study is to investigate how Norrköping municipality portrays citizens at different life stages in social media with a special emphasis on the use of age stereotypes in the photos used.

    Method: The material consists of the photos collected from 32 Facebook accounts produced by municipal bodies during the entire year of 2018. The analysis is based on a categorization of various features of the photos in order to statistically describe the relation between signs, activities and contexts associated with distinct life stages. Further, the meaning of frequently-used symbols in the photographs is analysed.

    Result: The study concludes that old age persons are numerically underrepresented in the material. A number of signs and activities in the photographs, and contexts beyond the photographs, that stereotypically corresponded to five distinct life stages (infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and old age) are identified. Old age is repetitively portrayed in the context of coffee drinking and foot bathing on Norrköping municipality’s Facebook page, while adolescence is depicted with practical training at high schools to an excessive degree. Besides, the result suggests that certain minorities of citizens did not show up in the municipal social media: people with disabilities, migrants, people with dementia and on forth.

    Conclusion: The municipality communicates stereotypical images of life stages through associating with specific contexts in the photographic coverage. Therefore, communication professionals need to be aware of the stereotypical construction of life stages in the media.

  • 116.
    Öhlén, J.
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Carling Elofsson, L.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute.
    Friberg, F.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Exploration of communicative patterns of consultations in palliative cancer care2008In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 44-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Building on the research conducted on institutional communication, and the analysis of actual communication taking place in clinical settings, this study describes and highlights features of palliative care consultations and focuses on the distribution of discursive space (i.e., share of words, lengths of turns), occurring topics and conversational frames. Six consultations between physicians, patients and significant others were videotaped and all participants took part in audio-taped interviews. The recordings were transcribed and analysed in regard to expectations of, the discursive space of, and topics addressed in the consultations. The distribution of the discursive space was unequal, the physicians had the greatest share of words and length of turns in all six consultations, and they mostly initiated discussion of medical issues connected to examinations and treatment, while only patients initiated the topic of the patient's future. During the consultations, institutional framing tended to dominate over client framing. There was found to be room for further study of the structure and content of palliative care consultations with emphasis on how the voice of the patient can manifest itself within the framework of the medical agenda of the consultation and its significance for palliative cancer team work. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 117.
    Örulv, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Confabulation: sense-making, self-making and world-making in dementia2006In: Discourse Studies, ISSN 1461-4456, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 647-673Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is concerned with the productive aspects of confabulation as it occurs spontaneously in dementia care, in its context, and in interaction with other care recipients. Confabulation is approached as a social and discursive event with distinct narrative features; plots and formerly established genres of plots, storylines, are used by confabulators in order to understand, manage and interact socially in the present situation. Three main functions of confabulation are discerned: 1) making sense of the current situation (sense-making); 2) maintaining a personal identity in interaction with others (self-making); and 3) organizing and legitimizing joint action in the world (world-making). The resources used by confabulating subjects are sparse and not well adjusted to changing conditions, as the number of accessible storylines is limited. This makes it difficult to apply storylines that explain the current situation satisfactorily, provide useful guidelines for how to act, as well as preserve a positive self-identity. Helping with this constitutes a major challenge in dementia care.

  • 118.
    Österholm, Johannes H
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Autobiographical occasions in assessment meetings involving persons with dementia2018In: Qualitative Social Work, ISSN 1473-3250, E-ISSN 1741-3117, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 41-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has often been argued that identities have a strong connection to stories and storytelling and thus that life stories should be used to individualize care for people with dementia. A problem with this view is that storytellers are seen as individuals, freely reflecting on, composing, and telling life stories. This view becomes especially problematic when persons with dementia tell stories in institutional contexts where certain information is requested and necessary for decision-making. The aim of this study is to investigate how autobiographical stories are used and what functions they have in assessment meetings involving persons with dementia. Fifteen assessment meetings were audio-recorded and transcribed. Narratives were extracted and analyzed by coding who the narrator or narrators were, what the narrator(s) accomplished by telling this story, and what the consequences were for the ongoing meeting. It was found that all interlocutors told stories about the person with dementia. These stories were found to have three functions: (1) to justify why care services were needed; (2) to describe experiences about previous care; and (3) to provide a good working climate. Thus, not all autobiographical stories are the persons story. For care managers in their everyday work it is important to be aware of this and not only be satisfied with a story that suits the organizations needs. Furthermore, stories told in assessment meetings often positioned the person as dependent on others, which could undermine the identity and sense of self of the person with dementia.

  • 119.
    Österholm, Johannes H
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life.
    Citizenship as practice: Handling communication problems in encounters between persons with dementia and social workers2016In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 1457-1473Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of the study was to investigate if and how persons with dementia were able to take part in negotiations for formal support, as cases of citizenship as practice. The transcripts used for analysis were from 11 assessment meetings conducted in Sweden, in which the formal applicant was a person with dementia. The findings suggest that the actual participation of persons with dementia in assessment meetings varies. Communication problems were found in the meetings to different degrees and were dealt with differently and with various consequences. For those persons with dementia contributing at the same levels as the other participants, there was an attempt at mutual understanding. For those making fewer contributions, the other interlocutors took over the initiative and thus affected the practice of citizenship by persons with dementia in a negative way. The practice of citizenship is situation based and varies depending on all participants. When the person with dementia is able to participate in the conversation, social workers can facilitate for them to overcome communication problems by giving them more time and signaling acceptance. If the person with dementia has great problems in participating, the other participants can find different strategies to at least involve her or him in the conversation

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