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  • 101.
    Stenberg, Pontus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sukkaew, Pitsiri
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Farkas, Ildiko
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kordina, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Janzén, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ojamäe, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Danielsson, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pedersen, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Silicon Chemistry in Fluorinated Chemical Vapor Deposition of Silicon Carbide2017In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 121, no 5, p. 2711-2720Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of chlorinated chemical vapor deposition (CVD) chemistry for growth of homoepitaxial layers of silicon carbide (SiC) has diminished the problem of homogenous gas phase nucleation, mainly the formation of Si droplets, in CVD of SiC by replacing Si-Si bonds with stronger Si-Cl bonds. Employing the even stronger Si-F bond could potentially lead to an even more efficient CVD chemistry, however, fluorinated chemistry is very poorly understood for SiC CVD. Here, we present studies of the poorly understood fluorinated CVD chemistry for homoepitaxial SiC layers using SiF4 as Si precursor. We use a combination of experimental growth studies, thermal equilibrium calculations of gas phase composition and quantum chemical computations (i.e. hybrid density functional theory) of the surface chemistry to probe the silicon chemistry in the CVD process. We show that while growth rates on the order of 35 µm/h can be achieved with a fluorinated chemistry, the deposition chemistry is very sensitive to the mass flows of the precursors and not as robust as the chlorinated CVD chemistry which routinely yields 100 µm/h over wide conditions. By using the position for the onset of epitaxial growth along the gas flow direction as a measurable, together with modeling, we conclude that SiF is the main Si growth species with SiHF as a minor Si species contributing to growth.

  • 102.
    Strand, M.
    et al.
    Växjö universitet.
    Salomonsson, Anette
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Einvall, J.
    Aulin, C.
    Kemi LiU.
    Ojamäe, Lars
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry .
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry .
    Lloyd-Spets, Anita
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Sanati, M.
    Växjö universitet.
    Nanoparticles as sensing material for selective and stable SiC-FET gas sensor2005In: European Aerosol Conference 2005,2005, 2005, p. 735-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 103.
    Sukkaew, Pitsiri
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Danielsson, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kordina, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Janzén, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ojamäe, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ab Initio Study of Growth Mechanism of 4H-SiC: Adsorption and Surface Reaction of C2H2, C2H4, CH4, and CH32017In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 121, no 2, p. 1249-1256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Silicon carbide is a semiconductor material with ideal properties for high-temperature and high-power applications. The epitaxial layer fabrication Is usually performed using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) under a hydrogen rich atmosphere and high temperature. At such conditions the surface of the growing layer is expected to be passivatecl,by the abundantly present hydrogen. In this work, we use quantum chemical density functional theory (B3LYP and M06-2X) and transition state theory to study surface reactions related to the deposition of carbon on the (0001) surface of 4H-SiC. We show that it is unlikely for an adsorption to occur on a passivated, site unless the hydrogen termination is removed. We propose that unterminated sites can be effectively created during the CVD by an abstraction process. We provide details of the adsorption process of active carbon species, namely CH3, CH4, C2H2, and C2H4 gases, and their subsequent surface reactions such as desorption, abstraction of neighboring surface, hydrogens and dinner formation. The reaction rates and sticking coefficients are provided for the temperature range of 298-2500 K. Finally, entire reaction paths from adsorptions to stable surface products are presented and discussed.

  • 104.
    Sukkaew, Pitsiri
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Danielsson, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ojamäe, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Growth Mechanism of SiC CVD: Surface Etching by H-2, H Atoms, and HCl2018In: Journal of Physical Chemistry A, ISSN 1089-5639, E-ISSN 1520-5215, Vol. 122, no 9, p. 2503-2512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Silicon carbide is a wide bandgap semiconductor with unique characteristics suitable for high temperature and high power applications. Fabrication of SiC epitaxial layers is usually performed using chemical vapor deposition (CVD). In this work, we use quantum chemical density functional theory (B3LYP and M06-2X) and transition state theory to study etching reactions occurring on the surface of SiC during CVD in order to combine etching effects to the surface kinetic model for SiC CVD. H-2, H atoms and HCl gases are chosen in the study as the most likely etchants responsible for surface etching. We consider etchings of four surface sites, namely CH3(ads), SiH3CH2(ads), SiH2(CH2)(2)(ads), and SiH(CH2)(3)(ads), which represent four subsequent snapshots of the surface as the growth proceeds. We find that H atoms are the most effective etchant on CH3(ads) and SiH3CH2(ads), which represent the first and second steps of the growth. HCl and H-2 are shown to be much less effective than H atoms and produce the etching rate constants which are, similar to 10(4) and similar to 10(7) times slower. In comparison to CH3(ads), SiH3CH2(ads) is shown to be less stable and more susceptible to etchings. Unlike the first and second steps of the growth, the third and fourth steps (i.e., SiH2(CH2)(2)(ads) and SiH(CH2)(3)(ads)) are stable and much less susceptible to any of the three etchants considered. This implies that the growth species become more stable via forming Si-C bonds with another surface species. The formation of a larger surface cluster thus helps stabilizing the growth against etchings.

  • 105.
    Sukkaew, Pitsiri
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kalered, Emil
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Janzén, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kordina, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Danielsson, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ojamäe, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Growth Mechanism of SiC Chemical Vapor Deposition: Adsorption and Surface Reactions of Active Si Species2018In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 122, no 1, p. 648-661Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Silicon carbide is a wide bandgap semiconductor ideally suitable for high temperature and high power applications. An active SiC layer is usually fabricated using halide-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD). In this work, we use quantum chemical density functional theory (B3LYP and M06-2X) and transition state theory to study adsorptions of active Si species in the CVD process on both the Si face and the C face of 4H-SiC. We show that adsorptions of SiCl, SiCl2, SiHCl, SiH, and SiH2 on the Si face likely occur on a methylene site, CH2(ads), but the processes are thermodynamically less favorable than their reverse or desorptions. Nevertheless, the adsorbed products become stabilized with the help of subsequent surface reactions to form a larger cluster. These cluster formation reactions happen with rates that are fast enough to compete with the desorption processes. On the C face, the adsorptions likely occur on a surface site terminated by a dangling bond, *(ads), and produce the products which are thermodynamically stable. Lastly, we present the Gibbs free energies of adsorptions of Si atoms, SiX, SiX2, and SiHX, for X being F and Br. Adsorptions of Si atoms are shown to be the most thermodynamically favorable among all the species in the study. Among the halide-containing species, the Gibbs free energies (ARG) from smallest to largest are observed in the adsorptions of SiX, SiHX, and SiX2, for X being the halides. The results in this study suggest that the major Si contributors in the SiC CVD process are Si atoms, SiX (for X being the halide) and SiH.

  • 106.
    Sukkaew, Pitsiri
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ojamäe, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Danielsson, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kordina, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Janzén, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Revisiting the Thermochemical Database of Si-C-H System Related to SiC CVD Modeling2014In: SILICON CARBIDE AND RELATED MATERIALS 2013, PTS 1 AND 2, Trans Tech Publications , 2014, Vol. 778-780, p. 175-178Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemical vapor deposition of silicon carbide (SiC-CVD) is a complex process involving a Si-C-H system wherein a large number of reaction steps occur. To simulate such a system requires knowledge of thermochemical and transport properties of all the species involved in the process. The accuracy of this information consequently becomes a crucial factor toward the correctness of the outcome prediction. In this work, the thermochemical data for several important growth species for SiC CVD using the SiH4/CxHy/H-2 system has been calculated. For the most part an excellent agreement is seen with previously reported data, however for the organosilicons a larger deviation is detected and in particular for the CH3SiH2SiH species which shows a stark deviation from the CHEMKIN database. Impacts of the improved database on SiC CVD modeling are presented in computational fluid dynamics calculations, manifesting the significance of an accurate database.

  • 107.
    Sukkaew, Pitsiri
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ojamäe, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kordina, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Janzén, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Danielsson, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Thermochemical Properties of Halides and Halohydrides of Silicon and Carbon2016In: ECS Journal of Solid State Science and Technology, ISSN 2162-8769, E-ISSN 2162-8777, Vol. 5, no 2, p. P27-P35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atomization energies, enthalpies of formation, entropies as well as heat capacities of the SiHnXm and CHnXm systems, with X being F, Cl and Br, have been studied using quantum chemical calculations. The Gaussian-4 theory (G4) and Weizman-1 theory as modified by Barnes et al. 2009 (W1RO) have been applied in the calculations of the electronic, zero point and thermal energies. The effects of low-lying electronically excited states due to spin orbit coupling were included for all atoms and diatomic species by mean of the electronic partition functions derived from the experimental or computational energy splittings. The atomization energies, enthalpies of formation, entropies and heat capacities derived from both methods were observed to be reliable. The thermochemical properties in the temperature range of 298-2500 K are provided in the form of 7-coefficient NASA polynomials. (C) The Author(s) 2015. Published by ECS. All rights reserved.

  • 108.
    Tegenfeldt, J
    et al.
    University of Uppsala.
    Ojamäe, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. University of Uppsala.
    Svensson, C
    University of Lund.
    Disorder dynamics in solid 9‐hydroxyphenalenone1991In: Journal of Chemical Physics, ISSN 0021-9606, E-ISSN 1089-7690, Vol. 95, p. 2696-2701Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1 H nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR)spectra and spin‐lattice relaxation data as well as 1 H decoupled 13C spectra have been utilized to study the dynamics of the molecular disorder in solid 9‐hydroxyphenalenone. In the room‐temperature phase—stable between 255 and 380 K—the protonspectrum is narrowed compared to the spectrum of a static structure. This is consistent with a dynamically disordered structure where one of the two nonequivalent molecules reorients rapidly between its two possible equilibrium orientations. The proton spin‐lattice relaxation has a maximum of 7.2 s−1 in the same phase at about 355 K, in close agreement with a value of 7.6 s−1 calculated from the dynamical disorder model. The 1 H decoupled 13C powderspectrum in the room‐temperature phase is also consistent with this picture. Above the 385 K phase transition, the 13C powderspectrum is approaching axial symmetry, proving that all molecules reorient rapidly in that phase.

  • 109.
    Wernet, Ph.
    et al.
    Stanford Synchrt. Radiat. Laboratory, Post Office Box 20450, Stanford, CA 94309, United States, BESSY, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, D-12489 Berlin, Germany.
    Nordlund, D.
    FYSIKUM, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bergmann, U.
    Stanford Synchrt. Radiat. Laboratory, Post Office Box 20450, Stanford, CA 94309, United States.
    Cavalleri, M.
    FYSIKUM, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Odelius, N.
    FYSIKUM, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ogasawara, H.
    Stanford Synchrt. Radiat. Laboratory, Post Office Box 20450, Stanford, CA 94309, United States, FYSIKUM, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Näslund, Lars-Åke
    Näslund, L.Å., Stanford Synchrt. Radiat. Laboratory, Post Office Box 20450, Stanford, CA 94309, United States, FYSIKUM, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hirsch, T.K.
    Department of Physical Chemistry, Stockholm University, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ojamäe, Lars
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry.
    Glatzel, P.
    Dept. of Inorg. Chem. and Catalysis, Debye Institute, Utrecht University, Sorbonnelaan 16, 3584 CA Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Pettersson, L.G.M.
    FYSIKUM, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nilsson, A.
    Stanford Synchrt. Radiat. Laboratory, Post Office Box 20450, Stanford, CA 94309, United States, FYSIKUM, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    The Structure of the First Coordination Shell in Liquid Water2004In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 304, no 5673, p. 995-999Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy and x-ray Raman scattering were used to probe the molecular arrangement in the first coordination shell of liquid water. The local structure is characterized by comparison with bulk and surface of ordinary hexagonal ice Ih and with calculated spectra. Most molecules in liquid water are in two hydrogen-bonded configurations with one strong donor and one strong acceptor hydrogen bond in contrast to the four hydrogen-bonded tetrahedral structure in ice. Upon heating from 25°C to 90°C, 5 to 10% of the molecules change from tetrahedral environments to two hydrogen-bonded configurations. Our findings are consistent with neutron and x-ray diffraction data, and combining the results sets a strong limit for possible local structure distributions in liquid water. Serious discrepancies with structures based on current molecular dynamics simulations are observed.

  • 110.
    Westermark, Karin
    et al.
    Department of Physics, University of Uppsala, Box 530, S-751 21 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rensmo, Håkan
    Department of Physics, University of Uppsala, Box 530, S-751 21 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Siegbahn, Hans
    Department of Physics, University of Uppsala, Box 530, S-751 21 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Keis, Karin
    Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Uppsala, Box 532, S-751 21 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hagfeldt, Anders
    Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Uppsala, Box 532, S-751 21 Uppsala.
    Ojamäe, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry .
    Persson, Petter
    Department of Quantum Chemistry, University of Uppsala, Box 518, S-751 21 Uppsala, Sweden.
    PES Studies of Ru(dcbpyH2)2(NCS)2 Adsorption on Nanostructured ZnO for Solar Cell Applications2002In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 106, no 39, p. 10102-10107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interaction between the dye cis-bis(4,4‘-dicarboxy-2,2‘-bipyridine)-bis(isothiocyanato)-ruthenium(II), Ru(dcbpyH2)2(NCS)2, and nanostructured ZnO was investigated by photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) using synchrotron radiation. The results are compared with those of nanostructured TiO2 sensitized with the same dye, which to date is the most efficient system for dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical solar cells. When comparing the two metal oxides, differences in the surface molecular structure were observed both for low and high dye coverages, as seen by comparing the oxygen, nitrogen and sulfur signals. The origin of these differences is discussed in terms of substrate-induced dye aggregation and in variations in surface bonding geometries. The measurements also provide information concerning the energy matching between the orbitals of the dye and the ZnO valence band, which is of importance in photoinduced charge transfer.

  • 111.
    WOJCIK, Mareck J.
    et al.
    Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University,.
    Hermansson, Kersti
    Institute of Chemistry, University of Uppsala.
    LINDGREN, Jan
    Institute of Chemistry, University of Uppsala.
    Ojamäe, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    THEORETICAL SIMULATION OF OH AND OD STRETCHING BANDS OF ISOTOPICALLY DILUTED HDO MOLECULES IN LITHIUM FORMATE SOLUTION1994In: HYDROGEN BOND NETWORKS, 1994, Vol. 435, p. 251-254Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 112. WOJCIK, MAREK J
    et al.
    HERMANSSON, KERSTI
    Uppsala universitet, Kemiska institutionen.
    LINDGREN, JAN
    OJAMAE, LARS
    THEORETICAL SIMULATION OF OH AND OD STRETCHING BANDS OF ISOTOPICALLY DILUTED HDO MOLECULES IN AQUEOUS-SOLUTION1993In: Chemical Physics, ISSN 0301-0104, E-ISSN 1873-4421, Vol. 171, no 1-2, p. 189-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Uncoupled OH and OD stretching bands of HDO molecules have been calculated for an ionic aqueous solution, based on the trajectories from a classical statistical-mechanical computer simulation and subsequent quantum-mechanical calculations of the vibrational energy levels. Each V(r(OH)) potential function has been constructed as a sum of intra- and intermolecular energies, where different intermolecular water-water potential functions from the literature (MCY, TIPS2, RWK2 and CF2) have been tested in conjunction with the experimentally derived HMS intramolecular potential. In this way, vibrational densities-of-states as well as infrared absorption bands have been calculated for HDO molecules in the bulk and in the ionic hydration shells (Li+, HCOO-). Calculated frequencies and band widths for the TIPS2 and MCY potentials are fairly close to experimental values. The calculated OH shift between the gas and liquid water phases is - 303 cm-1 with the TIPS2 potential, as compared to the experimental value of - 307 cm-1. The MCY potential gives - 260 cm-1, while RWK2 as well as the CF2 potentials give rise to a non-negligible number of spurious frequencies. Water molecules in the first hydration shell of Li+ exhibit only slightly lower stretching frequencies than bulk water. The frequencies of the OH and OD groups of HDO molecules bonded to the formate oxygen atoms are lower than in bulk water, while the frequency of the OH/OD group pointing away from the formate ion is higher compared to bulk water.

  • 113.
    Yazdanfar, Milan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kalered, Emil
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Danielsson, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kordina, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nilsson, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ivanov, Ivan Gueorguiev
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ojamäe, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Janzén, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pedersen, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Brominated chemistry for chemical vapor deposition of electronic grade SiC2015In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 793-801Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chlorinated chemical vapor deposition (CVD) chemistry for growth of homoepitaxial layers of silicon carbide (SiC) has paved the way for very thick epitaxial layers in short deposition time as well as novel crystal growth processes for SiC. Here, we explore the possibility to also use a brominated chemistry for SiC CVD by using HBr as additive to the standard SiC CVD precursors. We find that brominated chemistry leads to the same high material quality and control of material properties during deposition as chlorinated chemistry and that the growth rate is on average 10 % higher for a brominated chemistry compared to chlorinated chemistry. Brominated and chlorinated SiC CVD also show very similar gas phase chemistries in thermochemical modelling. This study thus argues that brominated chemistry is a strong alternative for SiC CVD since the deposition rate can be increased with preserved material quality. The thermochemical modelling also suggest that the currently used chemical mechanism for halogenated SiC CVD might need to be revised.

  • 114. Öhrwall, G
    et al.
    Flink, R.F.
    Tchaplyguine, M.
    Ojamäe, Lars
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry .
    Lundwall, M
    Marinbo, R.R.T.
    Naves de Brito, A
    Sorensen, S.L.
    Gisselbrecht, M
    Feifel, R
    Rander, T
    Lindblad, A
    Schulz, J
    Borve, K.J.
    Saethre, L.J.
    Mårtensson, N
    Svensson, S
    Björneholm, O
    The electronic structure of free water clusters probed by Auger electron spectroscopy2005In: Journal of Chemical Physics, ISSN 0021-9606, E-ISSN 1089-7690, Vol. 123, p. 054310-054310Article in journal (Refereed)
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