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  • 101.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Elisabeth, Sundewall-Thorén
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Karlsson Foo, Catharina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Exceeding individual working memory capacity restrains aided speech recognition performance - effects in complex listening situations and effects of acclimatization.2007In: Aging and speech communication: An International and Interdisciplinary research conference.,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 102.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Grube Sorgenfrei, Maria
    Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Vatti, Marianna
    Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Hietkamp, Renskje
    Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Gusatovic, Dragan
    Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Naylor, Graham
    Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Beyond speech intelligibility testing: A memory test for assessment of signal processing interventions in ecologically valid listening situations2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 103.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Grube Sorgenfrei, Maria
    Vatti, Marianna
    Hietkamp, Renskje
    Gusatovic, Dragan
    Naylor, Graham
    Ngt, Elaine
    Beyond speech intelligibility testing: A memory test for assessment of signal processing interventions in ecologically valid listening situations2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 104.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Hellgren, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Elberling, Claus
    A digital filterbank hearing aid: Predicting user preference and performance for two signal processing algorithms1997In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 18, p. 12-25Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 105.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Hellgren, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Elberling, Claus
    A digital filterbank hearing aid: Three digital signal processing algorithms-User preference and performance1997In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 18, p. 373-387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

        

  • 106.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Hietkamp, Renskje
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Andersen, Martin R
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Hopkins, Kathryn
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EB, United Kingdom.
    Moore, Brian C
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EB, United Kingdom.
    Effect of speech material on the benefit of temporal fine structure information in speech for young normal-hearing and older hearing-impaired participants2012In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 377-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of the type of speech material on the benefit obtained from temporal fine structure (TFS) information in speech for young normal-hearing (YNH) and older hearing-impaired (OHI) participants.

    DESIGN:

    The design was based on the work of . They measured the speech reception thresholds for a target talker in a background talker as a function of the frequency range over which TFS information was available. The signal was split into 32 channels, each with a bandwidth equal to the equivalent rectangular bandwidth of the "normal" auditory filter at the same center frequency. Above a cutoff (CO) channel, channels were vocoded and contained only temporal envelope information. Channels up to and including CO were not processed. Hopkins et al. found that, as CO was increased, speech reception thresholds decreased more for normal-hearing participants than for participants with cochlear hearing loss, suggesting that the latter were less able to use TFS information. We used the same design, but compared results when the target speech materials were open-set sentences, as used by Hopkins et al., and when they were more predictable sentences with a closed word set (Danish Dantale 2).

    RESULTS:

    With the open-set material, YNH listeners benefited more from TFS information than OHI listeners, replicating . For the YNH participants, the benefit of adding TFS was greater for the open-set material than for the closed-set material, while no difference in TFS benefit across speech materials was found for the OHI participants.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The choice of speech material is important when assessing the benefit of TFS. Several factors may facilitate recognition in the absence of TFS cues, including small set size, predictable temporal structure of the target speech, and contextual effects. We speculate that TFS information is useful for reducing informational masking, by providing cues for the perceptual segregation of the target and background. When the target speech is highly predictable, informational masking may be minimal, rendering TFS cues unnecessary.

  • 107.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Hietkamp, Renskje
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Andersen, Martin R.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Hopkins, Kathryn
    University of Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Moore, Brian C. J.
    University of Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Effect of speech material on the benefit of temporal fine structure information in speech for normal-hearing and hearing-impaired subjects2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of the type of speech material on the benefit obtained from temporal fine structure (TFS) information in speech for young normal-hearing (YNH) and older hearing-impaired (OHI) participants.

    DESIGN:

    The design was based on the work of . They measured the speech reception thresholds for a target talker in a background talker as a function of the frequency range over which TFS information was available. The signal was split into 32 channels, each with a bandwidth equal to the equivalent rectangular bandwidth of the "normal" auditory filter at the same center frequency. Above a cutoff (CO) channel, channels were vocoded and contained only temporal envelope information. Channels up to and including CO were not processed. Hopkins et al. found that, as CO was increased, speech reception thresholds decreased more for normal-hearing participants than for participants with cochlear hearing loss, suggesting that the latter were less able to use TFS information. We used the same design, but compared results when the target speech materials were open-set sentences, as used by Hopkins et al., and when they were more predictable sentences with a closed word set (Danish Dantale 2).

    RESULTS:

    With the open-set material, YNH listeners benefited more from TFS information than OHI listeners, replicating . For the YNH participants, the benefit of adding TFS was greater for the open-set material than for the closed-set material, while no difference in TFS benefit across speech materials was found for the OHI participants.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The choice of speech material is important when assessing the benefit of TFS. Several factors may facilitate recognition in the absence of TFS cues, including small set size, predictable temporal structure of the target speech, and contextual effects. We speculate that TFS information is useful for reducing informational masking, by providing cues for the perceptual segregation of the target and background. When the target speech is highly predictable, informational masking may be minimal, rendering TFS cues unnecessary.

  • 108.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Hietkamp, Renskje K.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Andersen, Martin R.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Hopkins, Kathryn
    University of Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Moore, Brian C. J.
    University of Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Effect of Speech Material on the Benefit of Temporal Fine Structure Information in Speech for Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Participants2012In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 377-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of the type of speech material on the benefit obtained from temporal fine structure (TFS) information in speech for young normal-hearing (YNH) and older hearing-impaired (OHI) participants.

    DESIGN:

    The design was based on the work of . They measured the speech reception thresholds for a target talker in a background talker as a function of the frequency range over which TFS information was available. The signal was split into 32 channels, each with a bandwidth equal to the equivalent rectangular bandwidth of the "normal" auditory filter at the same center frequency. Above a cutoff (CO) channel, channels were vocoded and contained only temporal envelope information. Channels up to and including CO were not processed. Hopkins et al. found that, as CO was increased, speech reception thresholds decreased more for normal-hearing participants than for participants with cochlear hearing loss, suggesting that the latter were less able to use TFS information. We used the same design, but compared results when the target speech materials were open-set sentences, as used by Hopkins et al., and when they were more predictable sentences with a closed word set (Danish Dantale 2).

    RESULTS:

    With the open-set material, YNH listeners benefited more from TFS information than OHI listeners, replicating . For the YNH participants, the benefit of adding TFS was greater for the open-set material than for the closed-set material, while no difference in TFS benefit across speech materials was found for the OHI participants.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The choice of speech material is important when assessing the benefit of TFS. Several factors may facilitate recognition in the absence of TFS cues, including small set size, predictable temporal structure of the target speech, and contextual effects. We speculate that TFS information is useful for reducing informational masking, by providing cues for the perceptual segregation of the target and background. When the target speech is highly predictable, informational masking may be minimal, rendering TFS cues unnecessary.

  • 109.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Lunner, Stephen
    System for acquiring and processing data pertaining to a shot of an object, such as a puck or a ball, on a goal ona playing field.2012Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    According to the present inventive concept there is provided a system for acquiring and processing data pertaining to a shot of an object, such as a puck or a ball, on a goal on a playing field, the goal being guarded by a goalkeeper, the system comprising: an acquisition device configured to acquire position data of the object during a time interval ΔTP preceding the shot on goal, and a processing device configured to process the acquired position data of the object to estimate if an unobstructed path between the goalkeeper and the object is maintained throughout said time interval ΔTP, and configured to register the shot on goal as a first type of shot at least on a condition that an unobstructed path between the goalkeeper and the object not was maintained throughout said time interval ΔTP.

  • 110.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Neher, Tobias
    Medizinische Physik and Cluster of Excellence Hearing4all, Oldenburg University, Oldenburg, Germany.
    Automatic Real-Time Hearing Aid Fitting Based on Auditory Evoked Potentials.2013Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    A hearing aid includes at least one electrode located at a surface of a housing of the hearing aid to allow the electrodes to contact the skin of a user during use of the hearing aid, at least one electrode being adapted to pick up a low voltage signal from the user's brain, an amplifier unit operationally connected to the electrode(s) and adapted for amplifying the low voltage signal(s) to provide amplified brain signal(s), and a signal processing unit adapted to process the amplified brain signal(s) to provide a processed brain signal as well as to apply a time and frequency dependent gain to an input audio signal and to provide a processed audio output signal. Also a method of operating a hearing aid and a hearing aid system.

  • 111.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Neher, Tobias
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Hopkins, Kathryn
    University of Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Moore, Brian C. J.
    University of Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Sensitivity to low-frequency temporal fine structure is correlated with aided spatial release from masking2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    • Binaural hearing is necessary for localizing sounds accurately, and for making sense of complex listeningenvironments with many sound sources.• It is important to understand which binaural cues are beneficial for spatial hearing in hearing aid users toinform hearing aid design.• Temporal fine structure, TFS, is thought to be important for voice recognition, segregation of competingtalkers, and listening in the dips of a fluctuating background (Hopkins et al., 2008; Zeng et al., 2005; Lorenzi etal., 2006). Hearing-impaired listeners have a reduced ability to use TFS information (Moore et al., 2006;Hopkins and Moore, 2007; Hopkins and Moore, 2010).• Hopkins and Moore (2010) developed a fast method for measuring sensitivity to binaural TFS (the ability to detectinteraural phase differences, IPD, of pure tones) at low frequencies: the TFS-LF test.• To investigate possible correlations between binaural TFS abilities and spatial hearing, the opportunity wastaken to make use of some earlier data on aided spatial release from masking (Neher et al., 2009). In thatstudy, large inter-subject variation in spatial release from masking was observed, and it was hypothesized thatthis variation could be related to binaural TFS abilities. The TFS-LF test was used with the same subjects as tested byNeher et al.

  • 112.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    NG, Elaine
    How cognition influences hearing aid use2014In: ENT & Audiology News, ISSN 2042-2156, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 90-91Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 113.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    Ng, Elaine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Memory test at ecological SNRs2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 114.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten.
    Ng, Elaine
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Beyond speech intelligibility testing: A memory test for assessment of signal processing interventions in ecologically valid listening situations2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Performance of hearing aid signal processing is often assessed by speech intelligibility in noisetests, such as the HINT, CRM, or SPIN sentences presented in a background of noise or babble.Usually these tests are most sensitive at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) below 0 dB. However, in arecent study by Smeds et al. (2012) it was shown that the SNRs in ecological listening situations(e.g. kitchen, babble, and car) were typically well above 0 dB SNR. That is, SNRs where the speechintelligibility in noise tests are insensitive.Cognitive Spare Capacity (CSC) refers to the residual capacity after successful speech perception.In a recent study by Ng et al. (2010), we dened the residual capacity to be number of words recalledafter successful listening to a number of HINT sentences, inspired by Sarampalis et al. (2009).In a recent test with 26 hearing impaired test subjects we showed that close to 100% correctspeech intelligibility in a four talker babble noise required around + 7 dB SNR. At that SNR it wasshown that a hearing aid noise reduction scheme improved memory recall by about 10-15%. Thus,this kind of memory recall test is a possible candidate for assessment of hearing aid functionality inecologically relevant (positive) SNRs

  • 115.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    Ng, Elaine
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Beyond speech intelligibility testing: A memory test for assessment of signal processing interventions in ecologically valid listening situations2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Performance of hearing aid signal processing is often assessed by speech intelligibility in noise tests, such as the HINT, CRM, or SPIN sentences presented in a background of noise or babble. Usually these tests are most sensitive at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) below 0 dB. However, in a recent study by Smeds et al. (2012) it was shown that the SNRs in ecological listening situations (e.g. kitchen, babble, and car) were typically well above 0 dB SNR. That is, SNRs where the speech intelligibility in noise tests are insensitive.Cognitive Spare Capacity (CSC) refers to the residual capacity after successful speech perception. In a recent study by Ng et al. (2010), we defined the residual capacity to be number of words recalled after successful listening to a number of HINT sentences, inspired by Sarampalis et al. (2009).In a recent test with 26 hearing impaired test subjects we showed that close to 100% correct speech intelligibility in a four talker babble noise required around + 7 dB SNR. At that SNR it was shown that a hearing aid noise reduction scheme improved memory recall by about 10-15%. Thus, this kind of memory recall test is a possible candidate for assessment of hearing aid functionality in ecologically relevant (positive) SNRs.

  • 116.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ng, Hoi Ning, Elaine
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Immediate effects of signal processing on memory systems2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditionally, hearing instrument signal processing schemes are evaluated where the speech recognition tests in noise are most sensitive, i.e. around 50 percent correct. However, such testing typically leads to ecologically unrealistic negative signal-to-noise ratios. Therefore, memory performance has been suggested as a more ecologically valid outcome measure in conditions with interfering background noises, and where participants perform closer to 100 percent correct. In a recent study by Sarampalis et al. (2009) they used an Ephraim-Mallah noise reduction algorithm and found beneficial effects for normal hearing participants on memory function. However, such memory effects have not been shown for hearing impaired participants. The current study on hearing-impaired subjects evaluated ‘aggressive’ ideal binary masking (IBM, see Wang, et al., 2009), as a proof-of-concept not only for improving speech comprehension but also for its potential effects of masking on memory systems. Furthermore, binary masks estimated from directional microphones (Boldt et al., 2008) were used as a realistic version of binary mask processing. Results show significant main effects of noise type and noise reduction. Noise reduction techniques improved the memory performance in the four-talker babble background, while no such improvement was observed in the steady-state noise background. Participants with higher reading span scores performed significantly better in the memory task, but only in the four-talker babble background.The study demonstrates the binary-masking noise reduction technique helps freeing up cognitive resources and hence enhances memory task performance in the four-talker babble background for hearing-impaired listeners with high reading span performance. The findings suggest that there is a cognitive challenge for the hearing aid industry to improve signal processing options for individuals to improve immediate perception and encoding into memory.

  • 117.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Pontoppidan, Niels Henrik
    N band FM demodulation to aid cochlear hearing impaired persons.2013Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The invention relates to: A signal processing device comprising a signal processing unit for processing an electrical SPU-input signal comprising frequencies in the audible frequency range between a minimum frequency and a maximum frequency, and providing a processed SPU output signal. The invention further relates to its use and to a method of operating an audio processing device. The object of the present invention is to provide a scheme for improving a user's perception of an acoustic signal. The problem is solved in that an FM to AM transformation unit for transforming an FM2AM input signal originating from the SPU-input signal and comprising at least a part of the frequency range of the SPU-input signal from a frequency modulated signal to an amplitude modulated signal to provide an FM2AM output signal, which is used in the generation of the processed SPU output signal. This has the advantage of providing an improved perception by a hearing impaired user of an input sound.

  • 118.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Individualization of hearing aid signal processing based on cognitive measures.2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hearing instruments use complex processing anticipatedto improve speech understanding. While many listenersbenefit from such processing, others do not and thesedifferences are potentiated by adverse listening conditions.Unwanted artefacts of hearing aid signal processing maycontribute to adverse listening conditions (Mattys et al.,2012). Under such conditions cognitive processingresources are allocated to the recovery of degradedinformation at the auditory periphery, leaving fewerresources for understanding the message.Working memory refers to the capacity to hold andmanipulate a set of items in mind, such as speechfragments. A number of recent studies indicate thatindividual working memory capacity influences theindividual benefit of hearing aid signal processing. Ng etal., (under revision) examined the effects of binarymasking noise reduction (Wang et al., 2009) in hearingaids on memory processing of speech perceived in acompeting speech background, using a sentence-finalword identification and recall test. The reading span testwas also administered. The reading span test assessesthe simultaneous processing and memory aspects ofworking memory. Noise reduction lowered the negativeeffect of noise on memory performance. Participants withgood working memory capacity obtained a further benefit.Lunner and Sundewall-Thorén (2007), among others,showed that the individual benefit of fast wide dynamicrange compression was associated with individual workingmemory capacity. Persons with high working memorycapacity benefited most from fast acting compression whilethe persons with low working memory capacity benefitedmost from slow acting compression. Arehart, Souza, Bacaand Kates (in press) showed that elderly individuals withlow working memory capacity were more disadvantagedby frequency compression processing during speechrecognition in noise than elderly individuals with highworking memory capacity. It is possible that the negativeeffects of fast acting wide dynamic compression andfrequency compression for persons with low workingmemory are due to unwanted artefacts of signalprocessing.In conclusion, the benefits of certain givenimplementations of complex processing in hearing aidshave to be weighed against the extra cognitive load thatsuch processing seems to engender, possibly as a resultof unwanted artefacts. Although complex processing mayaid speech understanding in noise for individuals withhearing impairment and especially those with goodworking memory capacity, it seems that for someindividuals with lower working memory capacity, thedrawbacks may outweigh the benefits. This should betaken into account when hearing aids are fitted.

  • 119.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rosenbom, Tove
    Oticon Medical, Göteborg.
    Ågren, Jessica
    Oticon Medical, Göteborg.
    Ng, Elaine
    Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Using speech recall in hearing aid fitting and outcome evaluation under ecological listening conditions2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 120.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rosenbom, Tove
    Oticon Medical, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Ågren, Jessica
    Oticon Medical, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Ning Ng, Elaine Hoi
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Using Speech Recall in Hearing Aid Fitting and Outcome Evaluation Under Ecological Test Conditions2016In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 145S-154SArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In adaptive Speech Reception Threshold (SRT) tests used in the audiological clinic, speech is presented at signal to noise ratios (SNRs) that are lower than those generally encountered in real-life communication situations. At higher, ecologically valid SNRs, however, SRTs are insensitive to changes in hearing aid signal processing that may be of benefit to listeners who are hard of hearing. Previous studies conducted in Swedish using the Sentence-final Word Identification and Recall test (SWIR) have indicated that at such SNRs, the ability to recall spoken words may be a more informative measure. In the present study, a Danish version of SWIR, known as the Sentence-final Word Identification and Recall Test in a New Language (SWIRL) was introduced and evaluated in two experiments. The objective of experiment 1 was to determine if the Swedish results demonstrating benefit from noise reduction signal processing for hearing aid wearers could be replicated in 25 Danish participants with mild to moderate symmetrical sensorineural hearing loss. The objective of experiment 2 was to compare direct-drive and skin-drive transmission in 16 Danish users of bone-anchored hearing aids with conductive hearing loss or mixed sensorineural and conductive hearing loss. In experiment 1, performance on SWIRL improved when hearing aid noise reduction was used, replicating the Swedish results and generalizing them across languages. In experiment 2, performance on SWIRL was better for direct-drive compared with skin-drive transmission conditions. These findings indicate that spoken word recall can be used to identify benefits from hearing aid signal processing at ecologically valid, positive SNRs where SRTs are insensitive.

  • 121.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Oticon A/S, Research Centre Eriksholm, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cognition and hearing aids.2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 395-403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The perceptual information transmitted from a damaged cochlea to the brain is more poorly specified than information from an intact cochlea and requires more processing in working memory before language content can be decoded. In addition to making sounds audible, current hearing aids include several technologies that are intended to facilitate language understanding for persons with hearing impairment in challenging listening situations. These include directional microphones, noise reduction, and fast-acting amplitude compression systems. However, the processed signal itself may challenge listening to the extent that with specific types of technology, and in certain listening situations, individual differences in cognitive processing resources may determine listening success. Here, current and developing digital hearing aid signal processing schemes are reviewed in the light of individual working memory (WM) differences. It is argued that signal processing designed to improve speech understanding may have both positive and negative consequences, and that these may depend on individual WM capacity.

  • 122.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Cognition and Hearing Aids2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 123.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    On cognitive functioning and effective use of a hearing aid or cochlear implant2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 124.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    The Ease of Language Understanding (ELU) model: Theoretical, empirical, and clinical advances2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 125.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Sundewall-Thorén,, E.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Karlsson Foo, Catharina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    Exceeding individual working memory capacity restrains aided speech recognition performance - effects in complex listening situations and effects of acclimatization2008In: Auditory Signal Processing in Hearing Impaired Listeners. International Symposium on Auditory and Audiological Research, 2008, p. 551-558Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 126.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Sundewall-Thorén, Elisabeth
    Interactions between cognition, compression, and listening conditions: Effects on speech-in-noise performance in a two-channel hearing aid2007In: Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, ISSN 1050-0545, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 604-617Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study which included 23 experienced hearing aid users replicated several of the experiments reported in Gatehouse et al (2003, 2006) with new speech test material, language, and test procedure. The performance measure used was SNR required for 80% correct words in a sentence test. Consistent with Gatehouse et al, this study indicated that subjects showing a low score in a cognitive test (visual letter monitoring) performed better in the speech recognition test with slow time constants than with fast time constants, and performed better in unmodulated noise than in modulated noise, while subjects with high scores on the cognitive test showed the opposite pattern. Furthermore, cognitive test scores were significantly correlated with the differential advantage of fast-acting versus slow-acting compression in conditions of modulated noise. The pure tone average threshold explained 30% of the variance in aided speech recognition in noise under relatively simple listening conditions, while cognitive test scores explained about 40% of the variance under more complex, fluctuating listening conditions, where the pure tone average explained less than 5% of the variance. This suggests that speech recognition under steady-state noise conditions may underestimate the role of cognition in real-life listening.

  • 127.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Sundewall-Thorén, Elisabeth
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Karlsson Foo, Catharina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Aided listening performance in complex conditions correlates with performance on cognitive tests rather than with simple tests of audibility.2007In: International Symposium on Auditory and Audiological Reserach,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 128.
    Malmberg, Milijana
    et al.
    Boras Hospital, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Kahari, Kim
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jansson, Gunilla
    Boras Hospital, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Implementing Internet-Based Aural Rehabilitation in a General Clinical Practice2015In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 325-328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to share the lessons that were learned about the process of implementing an Internet-based, randomized controlled trial (RCT) in general clinical practice (GCP) and to address some of the advantages of using the Internet as a tool to implement a RCT in GCP. The RCT implemented focused on investigating Internet-based aural rehabilitation (AR) in addition to hearing aid (HA)-fitting supplemented with telephone support, and it was applied in a clinical setting. The results of this RCT and the questionnaires chosen will be presented in an article elsewhere. Procedure: Here, the procedure of the implemented trial is presented, and the implementation challenges are presented and discussed. Specifically, we describe the trial research question, recruitment strategy, patient eligibility criteria, the questionnaires, clinician participation, funding and time (for the clinicians), and risks and benefits (for the participants). Discussion: The trial implementation showed that AR in addition to HA-fitting can be carried out in GCP using the Internet. Using an Internet-based RCT overcomes some of the challenges of implementing a trial in GCP.

  • 129.
    Malmberg, Milijana
    et al.
    Habilitation and Health, Region Västra Götaland, Sweden; Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden .
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S Snekkersten, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Kähäri, Kim
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Evaluating the short-term and long-term effects of an internet-based aural rehabilitation programme for hearing aid users in general clinical practice: a randomised controlled trial.2017In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 7, no 5, article id e013047Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Guided internet-based intervention beyond hearing aid (HA) fitting has been shown to be efficacious in randomised controlled trials (RCTs). However, internet interventions have rarely been applied clinically as a part of regular aural rehabilitation (AR). Our aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of internet-based AR for HA users from a clinical population.

    OUTCOME MEASURES: The Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (HHIE) was used as the primary outcome measure, and the Communication Strategies Scale (CSS) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were used as secondary outcome measures. All questionnaires were administered before and directly after the intervention and at 6 months postintervention.

    METHODS: We used a parallel group design (RCT). The data were collected in 2013-2014 at three different clinics. Seventy-four HA users were randomly assigned to receive either full internet-based AR (intervention group, n=37) or one element of the internet-based AR (control group, n=37).

    RESULTS: Data were analysed following the intention-to-treat principle. Each group showed improved HHIE scores over time and did not differ significantly from each other. The intervention group showed significantly greater improvement compared with the control group for the CSS total and the non-verbal subscale scores. The intervention group and control group were also subdivided into two age groups: 20-59 years and 60-80 years. Significantly better improvement on the CSS total and non-verbal subscale scores was found in the older group compared with the younger participants.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates that participants in an internet-based intervention applied in general clinical practice showed improved self-reported communication skills compared with a control group. Receiving a full intervention was not more effective in improving self-reported hearing problems than receiving just one element of the internet-based intervention.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: This trial is registered at ClinicalTrals.gov, NCT01837550; results.

  • 130.
    Malmberg, Milijana
    et al.
    Borås Hospital, Hearing Clinic.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Kähäri, Kim
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Audiology.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience.
    The effects of complementing an educational program for hearing aid users with internet support: A randomized, controlled trial implemented in a general clinical practice2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 131.
    Malmberg, Milijana
    et al.
    Hearing Org, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Thoren, Elisabet Sundewall
    Malmo Univ, Sweden.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kahari, Kim
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Experiences of an Internet-based aural rehabilitation (IAR) program for hearing aid users: a qualitative study2018In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 57, no 8, p. 570-576Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Internet interventions for hearing aid (HA) users have been shown to be effective in helping persons with hearing problems. As earlier research refers to objective data on these effects, little is known about how participants experience the Internet interventions subjectively. The aim of the present study was to explore participants experiences of an Internet-based aural rehabilitation (IAR) program for HA-users, and to explore the possible subjective benefits of such a program. Design: A qualitative exploratory design was implemented involving semi-structured telephone interviews. The interviews were transcribed and analysed using content analysis. Study sample: Interviews were conducted with 20 participants (9 men and 11 women) who had completed an IAR program for HA-users. The participants were 57-81 years old and had used HAs for 2-25 years. Results: The results are organised in three main categories: general experiences associated with participating in the program, knowledge obtained from the program and perceived impact of taking part in the program. Conclusions: The overall results indicate positive experiences of the IAR program, and an overreaching theme of increased self-esteem was identified. The findings provide some valuable information for developers of future IAR programs.

  • 132.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya K C
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Vision and Hearing Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK .
    Molander, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    The acceptance of hearing disability among adults experiencing hearing difficulties: a cross-sectional study2014In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 4, no e004066Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective This study developed the Hearing Disability Acceptance Questionnaire (HDAQ) and tested its construct and concurrent validities.

    Design Cross-sectional.

    Participants A total of 90 participants who were experiencing hearing difficulties were recruited in the UK.

    Outcome measures The HDAQ was developed based on the Tinnitus Acceptance Questionnaire (TAQ). Participants completed self-report measures regarding hearing disability acceptance, hearing disability, symptoms of anxiety and depression and a measure of stages of change.

    Results The HDAQ has a two-factor structure that explains 75.69% of its variance. The factors identified were activity engagement and avoidance and suppression. The scale showed a sufficient internal consistency (Cronbach's α=0.86). The HDAQ also had acceptable concurrent validity with regard to self-reported hearing disability, self-reported anxiety and depression and readiness to change measures.

    Conclusions Acceptance is likely an important aspect of coping with chronic health conditions. To our knowledge, no previously published and validated scale measures the acceptance of hearing disability; therefore, the HDAQ might be useful in future research. However, the role of acceptance in adjusting to hearing disability must be further investigated

  • 133.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya K. C.
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stephens, Dafydd
    Cardiff University, UK.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Use of the ‘patient journey’ model in the internet-based pre-fitting counseling of a person with hearing disability: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial2013In: Trials, ISSN 1745-6215, E-ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 14, no 25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Hearing impairment is one of the most frequent chronic conditions. Persons with a hearing impairment (PHI) have various experiences during their ‘journey’ through hearing loss. In our previous studies we have developed a ‘patient journey’ model of PHI and their communication partners (CPs). We suggest this model could be useful in internet-based pre-fitting counseling of a person with hearing disability (PHD).

    Methods/Design

    A randomized controlled trial (RCT) with waiting list control (WLC) design will be used in this study. One hundred and fifty eight participants with self-reported hearing disability (that is, score >20 in the Hearing Handicap Questionnaire (HHQ)) will be recruited to participate in this study. They will be assigned to one of two groups (79 participants in each group): (1) Information and counseling provision using the ‘patient journey’ model; and (2) WLC. They will participate in a 30 day (4 weeks) internet-based counseling program based on the ‘patient journey’ model. Various outcome measures which focuses on hearing disability, depression and anxiety, readiness to change and acceptance of hearing disability will be administered pre (one week before) and post (one week and six months after) intervention to evaluate the effectiveness of counseling.

    Discussion

    Internet-based counseling is being introduced as a viable option for audiological rehabilitation. We predict that the ‘patient journey’ model will have several advantages during counseling of a PHD. Such a program, if proven effective, could yield cost and time-efficient ways of managing hearing disability.

  • 134.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya K. C.
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stephens, Dafydd
    Cardiff University, UK.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Communication partners’ journey through their partner’s hearing impairment2013In: International Journal of Otolaryngology, ISSN 1687-9201, E-ISSN 1687-921X, Vol. 2013, no 707910, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of the study was to further the Ida Institute model on communication partner’s (CPs) journey through experiences of person with hearing impairment (PHI), based on the perspectives of CPs. Qualitative approach using thematic analysis and process mapping. Nine CPs of hearing aid users participated in the study, recruited through the Swansea hearing impaired support group. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and the data were used to develop a CP journey template. The Ida Institute model (based on professionals’ perspective) was compared with the new template developed (based on CPs perspectives). Seven main phases were identified which include: (1) contemplation; (2) awareness; (3) persuasion; (4) validation; (5) rehabilitation; (6) adaptation; and (7) resolution. The results suggest some commonalities and differences between the views of professionals and CPs. A new phase ‘adaptation’ was identified from CPs’ reported experiences, which was not identified by professionals in the Ida Institute model. The CP journey model could be a useful tool during audiological enablement/rehabilitation sessions to promote discussion between the PHI and the CP. In addition, it can be used in the training of hearing healthcare professionals.

  • 135.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya Kumar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar University, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Stages of Change Profiles among Adults Experiencing Hearing Difficulties Who Have Not Taken Any Action: A Cross-Sectional Study2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the current study was to test the hypothesis that adults experiencing hearing difficulties who are aware of their difficulties but have not taken any action would fall under contemplation and preparation stages based on the transtheoretical stages-of-change model. The study employed a cross-sectional design. The study was conducted in United Kingdom and 90 participants completed University of Rhode Island Change Assessment (URICA) scale as well as measures of self-reported hearing disability, self-reported anxiety and depression, self-reported hearing disability acceptance, and provided additional demographic details online. As predicted, the results indicate that a high percentage of participants (over 90%) were in the contemplation and preparation stages. No statistically significant differences were observed among groups of stage with highest URICA scores and factors such as: years since hearing disability, self-reported hearing disability, self-reported anxiety and depression, and self-reported hearing disability acceptance. Cluster analysis identified three stages-of-change clusters, which were named as: decision making (53% of sample), participation (28% of sample), and disinterest (19% of sample). Study results support the stages-of-change model. In addition, implications of the current study and areas for future research are discussed.

  • 136.
    Mishra, Sachin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Updating ability modulates the negative effect of noise on memory of speech for persons with age-related hearing loss but not for young adults with normal hearingArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 137.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Seeing the talker’s face supports executive processing of speech in steady state noise2013In: Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5137, Vol. 7, no 96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Listening to speech in noise depletes cognitive resources, affecting speech processing. The present study investigated how remaining resources or cognitive spare capacity (CSC) can be deployed by young adults with normal hearing. We administered a test of CSC (CSCT; Mishra et al., 2013) along with a battery of established cognitive tests to 20 participants with normal hearing. In the CSCT, lists of two-digit numbers were presented with and without visual cues in quiet, as well as in steady-state and speech-like noise at a high intelligibility level. In low load conditions, two numbers were recalled according to instructions inducing executive processing (updating, inhibition) and in high load conditions the participants were additionally instructed to recall one extra number, which was the always the first item in the list. In line with previous findings, results showed that CSC was sensitive to memory load and executive function but generally not related to working memory capacity (WMC). Furthermore, CSCT scores in quiet were lowered by visual cues, probably due to distraction. In steady-state noise, the presence of visual cues improved CSCT scores, probably by enabling better encoding. Contrary to our expectation, CSCT performance was disrupted more in steady-state than speech-like noise, although only without visual cues, possibly because selective attention could be used to ignore the speech-like background and provide an enriched representation of target items in working memory similar to that obtained in quiet. This interpretation is supported by a consistent association between CSCT scores and updating skills.

  • 138.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark .
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Visual Information Can Hinder Working Memory Processing of Speech2013In: Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, ISSN 1092-4388, E-ISSN 1558-9102, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 1120-1132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the new Cognitive Spare Capacity Test (CSCT), which measures aspects of working memory capacity for heard speech in the audiovisual and auditory-only modalities of presentation.

    METHOD:

    In Experiment 1, 20 young adults with normal hearing performed the CSCT and an independent battery of cognitive tests. In the CSCT, they listened to and recalled 2-digit numbers according to instructions inducing executive processing at 2 different memory loads. In Experiment 2, 10 participants performed a less executively demanding free recall task using the same stimuli.

    RESULTS:

    CSCT performance demonstrated an effect of memory load and was associated with independent measures of executive function and inference making but not with general working memory capacity. Audiovisual presentation was associated with lower CSCT scores but higher free recall performance scores.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    CSCT is an executively challenging test of the ability to process heard speech. It captures cognitive aspects of listening related to sentence comprehension that are quantitatively and qualitatively different from working memory capacity. Visual information provided in the audiovisual modality of presentation can hinder executive processing in working memory of nondegraded speech material.

  • 139.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Aided speech understanding and cognitive spare capacity2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 140.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Audiovisual presentation supports cognitive processing of information heard in modulated noise2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cognitive spare capacity test (CSCT) assesses the ability to process heardinformation stored in working memory. This is important because listening that iseffortful, due to noise or hearing impairment, consumes cognitive resources leavingless capacity available for further processing. The CSCT pinpoints the effectsof modality of presentation (Audiovisual, Audio-only); memory load (High, Low)and different kinds of executive processing demands (Updating, Inhibition). Inthe present study, 24 participants with mild to moderate hearing loss performedCSCT with amplification in quiet, in steady-state noise at an individually adaptedsignal to noise ratio (SNR) rendering intelligibility of ~95% and in modulatednoise (International Speech Test Signal; ISTS) at the same SNR. An independentbattery of cognitive tests was also administered. Analysis of variance showedmain effects of all factors, including better performance with Audiovisual thanAudio-only modality. However, a significant interaction revealed that the Audiovisualbenefit was most prominent in ISTS. The benefit of Audiovisual presentationover Audio-only presentation correlated with the independent measure of workingmemory capacity. The pattern of results suggests that for the hearing impairedpopulation, Audiovisual presentation supports cognitive processing of informationheard in modulated noise and that the magnitude of this benefit is related toworking memory capacity.

  • 141.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cognitive Spare Capacity Test2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 142.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cognitive spare capacity test: Preliminary findings2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 143.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cognitive spare capacity test: Some preliminary findings2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 144.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sick and tired of listening.2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 145.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Speech understanding and cognitive spare capacity2009In: Binaural Processing and Spatial Hearing, ISBN 87-990013-2-2 / [ed] Buchholz, J.M., Dau T., Dalsgaard, J.C., Poulsen, T., Ballerup: The Danavox Jubilee Foundation , 2009, p. 305-313Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 146.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Speech understanding and cognitive spare capacity2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 147.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Age-related sensory and cognitive decline make it harder to remember speech in noise across serial positions2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 148.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. 3Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Cognitive spare capacity in older adults with hearing loss2014In: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, ISSN 1663-4365, E-ISSN 1663-4365, Vol. 6, no 96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Individual differences in working memory capacity (WMC) are associated with speech recognition in adverse conditions, reflecting the need to maintain and process speech fragments until lexical access can be achieved. When working memory resources are engaged in unlocking the lexicon, there is less Cognitive Spare Capacity (CSC) available for higher level processing of speech. CSC is essential for interpreting the linguistic content of speech input and preparing an appropriate response, that is, engaging in conversation. Previously, we showed, using a Cognitive Spare Capacity Test (CSCT) that in young adults with normal hearing, CSC was not generally related to WMC and that when CSC decreased in noise it could be restored by visual cues. In the present study, we investigated CSC in 24 older adults with age-related hearing loss, by administering the CSCT and a battery of cognitive tests. We found generally reduced CSC in older adults with hearing loss compared to the younger group in our previous study, probably because they had poorer cognitive skills and deployed them differently. Importantly, CSC was not reduced in the older group when listening conditions were optimal. Visual cues improved CSC more for this group than for the younger group in our previous study. CSC of older adults with hearing loss was not generally related to WMC but it was consistently related to episodic long term memory, suggesting that the efficiency of this processing bottleneck is important for executive processing of speech in this group.

  • 149.
    Molander, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Weineland, Sandra
    Linköping University.
    Bergwall, Kajsa
    Linköping University.
    Buck, Sonia
    Linköping University.
    Hansson-Malmlof, Johan
    Linköping University.
    Lantz, Henning
    Linköping University.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Internet-Based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Psychological Distress Experienced by People With Hearing Problems: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial2015In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 307-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Psychological distress and psychiatric symptoms are prevalent among people with hearing loss or other audiological conditions, but psychological interventions for these groups are rare. This article describes the study protocol for a randomized controlled trial for evaluating the effect of a psychological treatment delivered over the Internet for individuals with hearing problems and concurrent psychological distress. Method: Participants who are significantly distressed will be randomized to either an 8-week Internet-delivered acceptance-based cognitive behavioral therapy (i.e., acceptance and commitment therapy [ACT]), or wait-list control. We aim to include measures of distress associated with hearing difficulties, anxiety, and depression. In addition, we aim to measure acceptance associated with hearing difficulties as well as quality of life. Conclusion: The results of the trial may further our understanding of how to best treat people who present problems with both psychological distress and hearing in using the Internet.

  • 150.
    Molander, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Weineland, Sandra
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Narhalsan, Sweden.
    Bergwall, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Buck, Sonia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Jäder Malmlöf, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lantz, Henning
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Internet-based acceptance and commitment therapy for psychological distress experienced by people with hearing problems: a pilot randomized controlled trial2018In: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, ISSN 1650-6073, E-ISSN 1651-2316, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 169-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychological distress is common among people with hearing problems, but treatments that specifically target this aspect have been almost non-existent. In this pilot randomized controlled trial, an eight-week long Internet-based treatment, informed by Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, was administered to explore the feasibility and efficacy of such a treatment. Included participants were randomized to either treatment (n=31) or wait-list control (n=30) condition. All participants were measured prior to randomization and immediately after treatment ended using standardized self-report instruments measuring hearing-related emotional and social adjustment (Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly - S, HHIE-S), quality of life (Quality of Life Inventory, QOLI), and symptoms of depression and anxiety (Patient health Questionnaire, PHQ-9 and Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale, GAD-7). Linear mixed effects regression analysis using the full intention-to-treat sample demonstrated that the treatment had superior outcomes on the main outcome measure as compared with the control group, Cohens d=0.93, 95% CI [0.24, 1.63]. The benefits of treatment over control were also evident in scores of depression, Cohens d=0.61, 95% CI [0.04, 1.19], and quality of life, Cohens d=0.88, 95% CI [0.14, 1.61]. The results provide preliminary support for Internet-delivered acceptance and commitment therapy as a potentially effective treatment of psychological symptoms associated with hearing problems.

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