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  • 101801.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Co-ordinating for Creativity2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 101802.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Customer relationship dissolution following mergers and acquisitions – Reasons, counterforces and consequences2009In: Joint Ventures, Mergers and Acquisitions, and Capital Flow / [ed] J. B. Tobin & L. R. Parker, New York, USA: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2009, 1, p. 207-237Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book deals with 3 interrelated activities in business and finance: joint ventures, mergers and acquisitions, and capital flow.

  • 101803.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Customer roles in innovations2010In: The Dynamics of Innovation: Proceedings / [ed] K R E Huizingh; et al, Bilbao, Spain: International Society for Professional Innovation Management (ISPIM) , 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss and classify the roles of customers in innovations. In literature on innovations, customers have been increasingly emphasised as a source for innovations and also in how they help developing ideas in their early phases. This paper exemplifies various customer roles in innovations through three case studies. These describe the customer as initiator, as co-producer and as central party for business development. Through using role theory to discuss customers in innovations, it becomes explicit how customers may act their traditional roles, add roles or transfer to new roles beyond the scope of being a customer. Furthermore, the paper shows that customer roles change during the innovation process, from added or transferred roles in early phases to more traditional ones i later phases of the innovation process

  • 101804.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Customer roles in innovations2010In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 989-1011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss and classify the roles of customers in innovations. In literature on innovations, customers have been increasingly emphasised as a source for innovations and also in how they help develop ideas in their early phases. This paper exemplifies various customer roles in innovations through three case studies. These describe the customer as initiator, as co-producer and as inspiration for business development. Through using role theory to discuss customers in innovations, it becomes explicit how customers may play their traditional roles, add roles or transfer to new roles beyond the scope of being a customer. Furthermore, the paper shows that customer roles change during the innovation process from added or transferred towards more traditional ones.

  • 101805.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Customers affecting M&A integration2010In: Proceedings from EURAM, Rome, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 101806.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics .
    Hårda fakta och mjuka värden - Om årsredovisningar som underutnyttjad källa vid studier av affärsrelationer2008In: Workshop i kreativ metod,2008, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 101807.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hårda fakta och mjuka värden: Årsredovisningar som underutnyttjad källa för studier av dynamik i affärsrelationer2009In: Nordiske organisasjonsstudier, ISSN 1501-8237, Vol. 4, p. 71-93Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 101808.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Identity in collaboration2010In: Abstracts from 26th Annual IMP Conference, Industrial Marketing and Purchasing Group , 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This paper targets the issue of multi-identities of companies in collaboration. Companies may participate in collaboration for various reasons and may also perceive the collaboration in different ways. What is more; companies in collaboration may to various extents regard themselves as, and be regarded as, individual companies or as part of the collaboration. Their views may in turn be reflected in how business partners of the collaborating companies perceive the collaboration. This paper builds on various actors’ perception of companies in collaboration. The paper uses the identity concept to capture the multi-identities of companies in collaboration. The purpose of the paper is to describe and discuss various actors’ perception in multi-identity settings.

    Research method: The paper is built on a case study describing three levels of identity: a company level, the level of a collaboration taking the form of a joint venture, and a contractual collaboration. These are in turn described from involved parties’ and their business partners’ perspectives.

    Research findings: The paper shows that pre-collaboration history greatly reflects the identity ascribed to the companies. This was the case both for the companies in the collaboration and their business partners’ perceptions. The more structured the collaboration, the more probable that a separate collaboration identity was established. A collaboration based on contracts merely meant that the company’s identity was affected by connections to collaboration parties, while a separate identity was not established.

    Main contribution: The paper contributes to literature on corporate identity through discussing them in relation to collaboration. It also contributes to research on perception in business relationships through pointing at differences in perception between parties, where this paper connects this to actor and relationship history along with the collaboration structure.

  • 101809.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mergers and acquisitions: A network approach2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 101810.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    On customers in mergers and acquisitions2004Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis focuses on how customers are perceived in mergers and acquisitions. Mergers and acquisitions (M&As) are frequent, yet complex, phenomena in business life. One dimension making M&As complex is that they can affect (the merging companies' relationships to) other companies. With an M&A being a potential source of, for example, customer losses, one must ask how, and indeed whether, customers are taken into account in the M&A process, and what are the merging parties' notions concerning customers in relation to an M&A.

    This thesis takes a triangulation approach to the subject, including a literature and press release review and two case studies. The following is concluded: Customers are seldom focused on in the M&A literature, though they are commonly referred to indirectly, in an unproblematised way. By not considering customers as part of an M&A, the literature is neglecting an important aspect - one that has been emphatically recognised in business experience. In actual M&A practice, customers figure prominently in the underlying motives of M&As, and also when determining the degree of integration. Notions concerning customers are malleable, shifting during the course of tl1e M&A process, and also differ between the official view articulated in press releases, and in intra-company discussions regarding reasons for merging or acquiring. The official discourse commonly refers to customers indirectly and as targets, whereas they are treated as actors in intra-company discussions. Once M&A intentions are realised, the focus shifts from creating value to keeping value, and at this stage, customer considerations constrain the degree of integration. While there is no clear-cutline between the integration itself and a possible post-M&A phase, when evaluating an M&A the evaluation tools correspond to how customers are defined in official M&A motives.

  • 101811.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ownership transfer or integration: When is competition challenged in an M&A?2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 101812.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pros and Cons of Long-Term Customer Relationships2010In: Customer relations / [ed] Victoria J. Farkas, Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2010, p. 158-Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Customer relations is a broadly recognised, widely-implemented strategy for managing and nurturing a companys interactions with clients and sales prospects. It involves using technology to organise, automate, and synchronise business processes -- principally sales activities, but also those for marketing, customer service, and technical support. This book presents topical research data in the study of customer relations, including how consumers use Alan P Fiske's relational models framework to construct their relationships with service organisations; measuring corporate Customer Relationship Management (CRM) strategy; and identifying the relational benefits influencing customer loyalty.

  • 101813.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    På jakt efter alternativa handledningsformer2007In: Pedagogiska utmaningar i tiden: 10:e universitetspedagogiska konferensen vid Linköpings universitet 8-9 november 2006 / [ed] H. Hård av Segerstad, Linköpings universitet , 2007, p. 61-72Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vad är det vi vill att studenterna utvecklar under våra kurser? Hur formulerar vi mål för dessa avsedda kunskaper och förmågor? Hur kontrollerar vi om studenterna uppfyller målen? I samband med Bolognaprocessen har formuleringar av mål för kunskap, förståelse, färdigheter och förmågor kommit i förgrunden och tvingat kursansvariga till en nyttig eftertanke om vad vi avser att studenterna ska nå för resultat i sitt lärande. Men hur mäter vi på ett någorlunda meningsfullt sätt om de gör det? I anvisningarna för Bolognaprocessen framhålls den s.k. SOLO-taxonomin som det kriterium med vilket studenternas kunskaper ska mätas.  1 Det finns därför anledning att närmare studera SOLO-taxonomin, dess innebörd´samt dess för- och nackdelar. Syftet med detta papper är att bidra till en ökad förståelse för och möjliggöra tillämpning av SOLO-taxonomin som betygskriterium. Det ska ske för det första genom att förklara taxonomin i relation till alternativa metoder, för det andra genom att exemplifiera hur taxonomin använts i praktiken på en kurs samt kritiskt diskutera dess förtjänster och tillkortakommanden. Det visar sig att även om taxonomin rätt använd kan fungera som ett instrument att värdera nivån i studenternas kunskaper, så är metoden ofullständig.

  • 101814.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    På jakt efter alternativa handledningsformer2006In: Pedagogiska utmaningar i tiden / [ed] Helene Hård af Segerstad, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press , 2006, p. 61-69Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Handledning kan ofta uppfattas som en fokuserad, men också resurskrävande undervisningsform. Förväntningar ställs inte bara på lärarens förmåga att stimulera till egentänkande, men också på att ofta kunna fatta snabba beslut och föra ett projekt framåt. Från studenter kan handledning uppfattas som ett tillfälle att få idéer bekräftade, en möjlighet att ställa specifika frågor och driva den egna lärprocessen framåt, eller som något nödvändigt ont där läraren förväntas vara den som tar initiativ.

    En kritik som därtill ofta riktas mot projekt härrör från grupprocesser och individens syn på sin roll i en gemensam uppgift. Ur lärarperspektivet ställs krav på att stimulera hela gruppen att känna ett gemensamt ansvar, bemöta eventuella gruppinterna konflikter, o s v.

    För att om möjligt komma förbi några av handledningens tillkortakommanden har en projektförberedande seminarieuppgift införts på grundläggande ekonomikurser (industriell ekonomi på ingenjörsutbildningar). Mer specifikt är avsikten med uppgiften att ge studenterna en första orientering och breddad förståelse för det ämne de senare ska fördjupa sig inom. Genom att besvara ett antal frågor och sedan diskutera dessa i tvärgrupper med andra studenter, där varje student individuellt får representera sin grupp, är avsikten att studenterna ska öka sin förmåga att självständigt reflektera och samtidigt lära sig genom att diskutera seminariesvaren med andra studenter.

    Arbetet baseras på studenters utvärdering av projektarbetet och intervjuer med handledare på kurserna. Avsikten med detta papper är att utvärdera om denna seminarieuppgift påverkat det slutliga projektet och kursen som helhet. En avslutande diskussion förs om huruvida denna typ av uppgifter utgör ett komplement till, eller en ersättning för, den traditionella handledningsformen, samt övriga lärdomar från införandet av uppgiften.

  • 101815.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The core customer concept2011In: Service Industries Journal, ISSN 0264-2069, E-ISSN 1743-9507, Vol. 31, no 16, p. 2677-2692Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to define and discuss the core-customer concept. This concept examines how a company develops its operations around a single or only a few customers. The customer steers what products and services the supplier develops, which means that it is the customer that dictates the supplier's operations. The core-customer concept may be one method for designing a company's operations, but the paper also aims to challenge companies to consider how they think about customers. The paper contributes to research on customer value and extended service offerings by indicating a business-development strategy based on the customer rather than the supplier's operations. Building a company around a single customer, requires flexibility and competences in finding collaboration partners or in adjusting the organisation to new requirements. The paper refers to these as secondary/supporting competences, while the core competence upon which the company builds its operation is the customer.

  • 101816.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The Importance of Customers in Mergers and Acquisitions2008Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the thesis is to identify categories and patterns of how customers impact and are impacted by an M&A. In M&A (merger and acquisition) research the focus is traditionally on the M&A parties alone, and while customers are important elements of the motives behind M&As, they are rarely seen as actors affecting and being affected by an M&A.

    This thesis researches M&As from M&A parties’ and customers’ perspectives. It categorises and connects M&A parties’ activities related to expectations and activities of customers, with customers’ activities at the acquisition point and at integration.

    Based on findings from eight M&As, the thesis concludes that customers may be the reasons why companies merge or acquire. Customers may react to the M&A announcement if it involves companies the customers do not want to have relationships with, or based on the fact that customers perceive the M&A as turbulent, for instance. Customer actions, and M&A parties reconsidering their initial intentions, affect integration strategies. The realisation of integration is in turn impacted by customers’ resistance to buy according to M&A parties’ intentions and by customers actively objecting to integration.

    In short, customers impact M&As through: (i) being a reason to merge or acquire, where the M&A aims at acquirer’s or acquired party’s customers, or markets/positions, and where the M&A is a responsive activity to customers’ previous activities or is based on expectations on customers; (ii) customer reactions or changed buying behaviour; (iii) M&A parties’ pre-integration reconsideration; and (iv) post-integration difficulties, whereby customers impact integration realisation through not seeing the benefit of the M&A and thereby continue to buy as previously, through objecting to integration or through dissolving relationships.

    Customers are impacted by M&As through: (i) the M&A as possibility for change; (ii) ownership changes, which may lead to changes in competition structures; and (iii) forced integration.

    This means that the impact that customers have on M&As are both results of their own actions, and also of the expectations that the M&A parties have on customers.

    Important findings from this thesis concern adjustments of initial M&A intentions, how integration may be resisted so as not to challenge ongoing relationships, and how customers (often) make it difficult to achieve initial M&A goals and integration as the customers do not act in accordance with the integration intentions of the parties involved in the M&A.

  • 101817.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics .
    The roles of customers in M&A integration2008In: IMP Conference,2008, Uppsala: Uppsala University , 2008, p. 99-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 101818.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics .
    The roles of customers in M&A integration2008In: IMP Seminar,2008, Lancaster: Lancaster University , 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 101819.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    What happened with the grandiose plans? Strategic plans and network realities in B2B interaction2010In: INDUSTRIAL MARKETING MANAGEMENT, ISSN 0019-8501, Vol. 39, no 6, p. 963-974Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research concerned with business relationships and organizational levels, respectively, has addressed companies difficulties in realizing their strategies. Studies of business relationships explain this through actions and reactions among business partners. Organizational studies note gaps between strategic and operational organizational levels in perceptions and goals. This paper combines these perspectives to obtain new insights into why company strategies may not materialize. The purpose of this paper is to describe and discuss how actor bonds on various organizational levels in business relationships affect strategy realization. The paper shows that actors on similar organizational levels representing different companies may actually share more understandings and activities than actors within the same company. The paper contributes to research on dyadic business relationships by highlighting differences in perspectives on various organizational levels, adds insights into research studying organizations by including a business-relationship aspect, and increases understanding of why strategic plans sometimes fail to succeed.

  • 101820.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Who owns a customer relationship following a merger or acquisition?2008In: Corporate Ownership and Control, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 212-221Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 101821.
    Öberg, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    Anderson, Helén
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics.
    Do customers matter in mergers and acquisitions (literature)?2002In: Nordic Workshop onf Interorganisational Research,2002, 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 101822.
    Öberg, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Brege, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    What happened with the grandiose plans?: Strategic plans and network realities in B2B interaction2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 101823.
    Öberg, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Grundström, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Challenges and opportunities in innovative firms' network development2009In: The Future of Innovation, Lappeenranta, Finland: Lappeenranta University of Technology Press , 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to describe and discuss challenges and opportunities related to the development of innovative firms' networks. The paper utilises four case studies based on interviews with representatives of young innovative firms and their present and previous network partners. The findings show that while early network partners often play several roles simultaneously, the roles of both the innovative firm and its network partners become increasingly distinct as the innovative firm develops. Such clarification of roles highlights competition between parties. For the innovative firm, the early phases are marked by innovativeness and problems related to growth and financial issues; later phases may include challenges of dependence, competition, exclusion of actors, decreased innovativeness and less innovative freedom.

  • 101824.
    Öberg, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Grundström, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Challenges and opportunities in innovative firms' network development2009In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 593-613Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to describe and discuss challenges and opportunities related to the development of innovative firms' networks. The paper utilises four case studies based on interviews with representatives of young innovative firms and their present and previous network partners. The findings show that while early network partners often play several roles simultaneously, the roles of both the innovative firm and its network partners become increasingly distinct as the innovative firm develops. Such clarification of roles highlights competition between parties. For the innovative firm, the early phases are marked by innovativeness and problems related to growth and financial issues; later phases may include challenges of dependence, competition, exclusion of actors, decreased innovativeness and less innovative freedom.

  • 101825.
    Öberg, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    Grundström, Christina
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    Commercialisation via Acquistion? - A Literature Review2007In: 16th IPSERA Conference,2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 101826.
    Öberg, Christina
    et al.
    Lunds universitet/University of Exeter.
    Grundström, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Using relationship distance to maintain innovation capability for university spin-offs2013In: The XXIV ISPIM Conference - Innovating in Global Markets: Challenges for Sustainable Growth, Lappeenranta, Finland: Lappeenranta University of Technology Press , 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    University spin-offs are often treated as key to establishing new high-tech ventures. The importance of relationships for such ventures has been extensively emphasised, particularly concerning innovation co-creation commercialisation. But do such establishments really produce value to the spin-off and foster its further development of innovations? This paper argues that distance in relationship is important for the continuous innovativeness of the spin-off, and discusses how such distance impacts the innovation capabilities and co-creation of a university spin-off. The paper presents a longitudinal case study of a Swedish university high-tech spin-off. It points to how horizontal proximity in the supply chain facilitates the development of the core technology but that relationship distance, in the form of geographic and vertical supply-chain distance, positively impacts the innovation capabilities of the spin-off. Supply-chain distance results in knowledge distance (or fit) which facilitates this freedom, yet moderates the co-creative capability between various parties.

  • 101827.
    Öberg, Christina
    et al.
    Lunds Tekniska Högskola.
    Grundström, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jönsson, Petter
    Inflight Service AB.
    Acquisition and network identity change2011In: European Journal of Marketing, ISSN 0309-0566, E-ISSN 1758-7123, Vol. 45, no 9/10, p. 1470-1500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of the paper is to discuss whether or not an acquisition changes the network identity of an acquired firm and, if so, how. This study aims to bring new insights to the corporate marketing field, as it examines corporate identity in the context of how a company is perceived because of its relationships with other firms. The focus of this research is acquired innovative firms. Design/methodology/approach - This paper adopts a multiple case study approach. Data on four acquisitions of innovative firms were collected using 41 interviews, which were supplemented with secondary data. Findings - Based on the case studies, it can be concluded that the network identity of the acquired firms does change following an acquisition. The acquired firms inherited the acquirers identity, regardless of whether or not the companies were integrated. Previous, present and potential business partners regarded the innovative firms as being more solvent, but distanced themselves. In addition, some of them regarded the innovative firms as competitors. Practical implications - Changes in the way a firm is perceived by its business partners, following an acquisition, will influence the future business operations of the firm. Expected changes to business relationships should ideally be considered part of due diligence. Acquirers need to consider how they can minimise the risks associated with business partners changed perceptions of acquired firms. Originality/value - This paper contributes to the research on identity, through discussion of the consequences of an acquisition for the identity and relationships of a firm. It also contributes to the existing corporate marketing literature, through consideration of perceptions at a network level. Furthermore, this paper contributes to merger and acquisition literature, by highlighting the influence of ownership on relationships with external parties.

  • 101828.
    Öberg, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Grundström, Christina
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    Jönsson, Petter
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics.
    Acquisitions of innovative firms and their impact on customer access2005In: Proceedings (online) of the 21st IMP Conference 2005, 1-3 September 2005, Rotterdam, The Netherlands., Rotterdam: RSM Erasmus University , 2005, p. 49-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditionally, the literature depicts acquisitions of technology or innovative firms as a means for the acquirer to obtain resources or knowledge. This paper challenges the traditional view. We take the perspective of an innovative firm ro ask the question: In what ways does the acquirer affect the cusromer access for the target company? This question is addressed where the acquirer is a company within a mature industry, the target is an innovative firm, and when the target's customers at the same time are competitors to the acquirer. The discussion takes its point of departure in a literature review and a case study which highlight issues of customer access in dimensions of ownership and integration. Three hypotheses targeting different aspects of customer access are developed. As this paper considers the situation from the target's perspective it contributes to the literature on acquisitions of innovative firms. Furthermore, it contributes to the innovation literature through highlighting the influence of ownership on an innovative company in the process of getting customer access.

  • 101829.
    Öberg, Christina
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Grundström, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rosenfall, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The role of identity for open-source software innovations2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes and discusses the role of identity in open source software (OSS) innovations. It illustrates identities through four case studies that include the perspectives of OSS communities, OSS companies, and users. The paper concludes that the community may either have its primary function to provide an OSS aura to the OSS company, or it may have its focus on attracting developers and thereby contributing to innovativeness of the OSS community. OSS community identitie sare mainly self-reflective on its contributors, but also help to create rules of the community. Since it is the OSS company that communicates identities to external parties, the coherence and closeness between the OSS company and the community are important.

  • 101830.
    Öberg, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics .
    Henneberg, S.C.
    Manchester Business School, The University of Manchester, Booth Street West, Manchester, M15 6PB, United Kingdom.
    Mouzas, S.
    Lancaster University, Management School, Lancaster, LA1 4YW, United Kingdom.
    Changing network pictures: Evidence from mergers and acquisitions2007In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 36, no 7 SPEC. ISS., p. 926-940Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A merger or acquisition may cause dramatic changes in a business network, which in turn affect managerial cognition as well as managerial activities. We use the concepts of 'network pictures' and 'networking' to illustrate and analyse changes in managerial sense-making and networking activities following a merger or acquisition. The paper focuses on acquiring, acquired or merging parties and those companies with which they have direct customer relationships. Based on three case studies comprising seven acquisitions and one merger, we show that following a merger or acquisition managers may need to adapt their previous network pictures in a radical way, these adaptations are, however, not always realized as shifts in network pictures and adjustments in networking activities by all the managers involved. Whereas the merging parties' network pictures and networking activities are largely driven by their perception of customers' needs and developments, it is not certain that the merger or acquisition is enacted accordingly. The paper contributes to a clearer view on the conceptual interdependence of the constructs of network pictures and networking in multi-actor situations and thus it develops a network perspective on mergers and acquisitions. © 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 101831.
    Öberg, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    Henneberg, Stefan
    University of Bath.
    Mouzas, Stefanos
    Lancaster University.
    Changing Network Pictures: The evidence from Mergers and Acquisitions2006In: IMP Journal Seminar,2006, Göteborg: Chalmers Tekniska Högskola , 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 101832.
    Öberg, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    Henneberg, Stephan C.
    School of Management University of Bath.
    Mouzas, Stefanos
    School of Management University of Bath.
    Changing Network Pictures: The evidence from Mergers & Acquisitions2006In: Annual IMP Conference,2006, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mergers and acquisitions (M&As) may cause dramatic changes in a business network which in turn affect managerial cognition as well as managerial activities. We use the concepts of 'network pictures' and 'networking' to illustrate and analyse changes in managerial sensemaking and networking activities following an M&A. The paper focuses on the merging parties and those companies with which they have direct customer relationships. Based on three case studies comprising eight M&As, we show that managers may need to adapt their previous network pictures in a radical way following an M&A, but that these adaptations are not always realised as shifts in network pictures and adjustments in networking activities by all managers involved. Furthermore, whereas the merging parties' network pictures and networking activities are largely driven by their perception of customers' needs and developments, it is not certain that the M&As are enacted accordingly. The paper contributes to the understanding of M&As from a network perspective and to the conceptual interdependence of the constructs of network pictures and networking in a multi-actor situation.

  • 101833.
    Öberg, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    Henneberg, Stephan C
    Manchester Business School The University of Manchester.
    Mouzas, Stefanos
    Management School Lancaster University.
    Organisational Manifestations Of Network Pictures2007In: 23rd IMP Conference 2007,2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 101834.
    Öberg, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    Henneberg, Stephan C.
    Manchester Business School The University of Manchester.
    Mouzas, Stefanos
    Management School Lancaster University.
    Organisational Manifestations Of Network Pictures - Concept and case evidence2007In: 3rd IMP Journal Seminar,2007, Manchester Business School , 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 101835.
    Öberg, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Henneberg, Stephan
    Manchester Business School.
    Mouzas, Stefanos
    Lancaster University.
    Organizational inscriptions of network pictures:: A meso-level analysis2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 101836.
    Öberg, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics .
    Holtström, Johan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics .
    Are mergers and acquisitions contagious?2006In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 59, no 12, p. 1267-1275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In traditional literature on mergers and acquisitions (M&As), the reasons to merge or acquire are largely described as strategies of the merging or acquiring parties. This article suggests that M&As are contextually driven. Based on six case studies, the article pinpoints how M&As among customers lead to M&As among suppliers, and vice versa. The article launches the concept of parallel M&As to describe this phenomenon, and asks the following question: in what ways are M&As among customers and suppliers a driving force for M&As by the other party? Matching, dependence and keeping a power balance are found as key explanations for parallel M&As. © 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 101837.
    Öberg, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    Holtström, Johan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    Are Mergers and Acquisitions Contagious? Conceptualising parallel M&A: s among customers and suppliers2005In: IMP Conference,2005, Rotterdam: RSM Erasmus University , 2005, p. 49-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 101838.
    Öberg, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Holtström, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hur nås höga kursutvärderingar?: En studie av korrelationen mellan kursutvärderingar, nedlagd tid och studenters resultat på kurser2009In: Ingår i rapporten: Ett år med Bologna - vad har hänt vid LiU? / [ed] E. Edvardsson Stiwne, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press , 2009, 1, p. 91-103Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kursutvärderingar har blivit allt viktigare. De fyller idag inte enbart en funktion av att utgöra underlag för förbättringar inom utbildningen, utan används även för att utvärdera lärarens insatser. I och med detta skulle det också kunna uppkomma intressen att försöka styra undervisningen för att uppnå höga kursutvärderingar. Diskussioner har bland annat handlat om att höga krav på studenterna påverkar kursutvärderingar negativt (se exempelvis Bjuremark, 2008) samt om det går att få bättre kursutvärderingar genom att ge studenter höga betyg. Syftet med detta papper är att undersöka sambanden mellan det betyg studenterna ger en kurs, deras studiearbetstid och det slutbetyg studenterna erhållit från kursen. Inom Linköpings universitet används det elektroniska kursutvärderingssystemet KURT där man bland annat frågar efter hur studenterna bedömer kursen som helhet på en femgradig skala och där studenterna ska ange genomsnittlig studiearbetstid under kursen. Genom att jämföra dessa värden med studenternas studieresultat avser pappret att besvara följande frågor: Finns det något samband mellan studenternas slutbetyg och det betyg de ger kursen?, Finns det något samband mellan nedlagd studietid och studenternas slutbetyg? Och, finns det något samband mellan nedlagd tid och det betyg studenterna ger kursen? Som underlag för undersökningen använder vi data från 230 kurser inom ekonomi på teknisk fakultet vid Linköpings Universitet. Vi drar slutsatsen att medan det inte finns någon signifikant korrelation mellan nedlagd tid och studieresultat eller mellan kursutvärdering och studieresultat, så finns positiv korrelation mellan nedlagd tid och kursutvärdering. Dessa slutsatser är intressanta att lyfta fram kopplat till diskussioner om kursutvärderingar och studieprestationer, då de indikerar att (i) det inte lönar sig att ge enkla kurser för att få en bra kursutvärdering, (ii) en hög arbetsinsats primärt premierar kursen, medan studenten faktiskt inte når en bättre prestation, och (iii) att ge höga betyg till studenter inte premierar kursutvärderingen.

  • 101839.
    Öberg, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björklund, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Allocating environmental effects: A company vis-à-vis a network perspective2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 101840.
    Öberg, Christina
    et al.
    Lunds Tekniska Högskola.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björklund, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Applying a network level in environmental impact assessments2012In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 65, no 2, p. 247-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers and society devote increasing interest to environmental impact assessments. The study here discusses and questions current assessment models by relating them to inter-organizational network analyses, and demonstrates that single entities as the basis for environmental impact assessments may not be in the best interests of society. Three case studies focusing on logistical solutions illustrate environmental effects on a single-entity and a network level. The paper concludes that considering environmental impacts on a single-entity level disregards indirect effects, which in turn has consequences for the environment. The paper points to the importance of identifying the appropriate level for analysis of environmental impacts since the single entity as the basis for assessments may undermine environmentally friendly intentions.

  • 101841.
    Öberg, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The extended organization: A network approach2009In: Creating business out of industrial offerings - Findings from market-leading B2B companies / [ed] D. Kindström, 2009, 1, p. 63-70Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Two and a half years ago, a number of leading companies decided to participate in a new project, ‘Developing Industrial Offerings – DInO’. They all had the objective to better understand drivers, methods, and implications for the successful management of the transition from being a mainly product oriented company, towards becoming increasingly service oriented.

    Not until long ago the focus for almost all participating companies was on producing and delivering products rather then implementing services and industrial offerings. Today, with a sharp and unexpected economic downturn, the situation is very different, and services and industrial offerings are by most companies seen as potential orders winners and carriers of revenue and profitability in the coming years. New business objectives are often set to include 30–50 percent of revenues generated by these new services and offerings.

    A transition, though, from a product-orientated to a service-orientated firm is generally not an easy task or a quick fix. It takes top management commitment and requires dedicated efforts since there are several hurdles to overcome. All these embedded hurdles and new requirements are highlighted in this report based on the DInO-project. It is written for management, business developers and other staff responsible for services and industrial offerings.

    Through this report we share learning and experiences from the project, with references to the participating companies. We hope that it will bring new insights to use in your own transition. The timing for most companies could not be more right.

    Participating companies were AGA Gas, ESAB, Husqvarna, ITT Water & Wastewater, Metso, SAAB, TeliaSonera, Tranås United and Volvo. Managing the project was Marketing Technology Center, MTC, together with the Institute of Technology at Linköping University, with co-financing from VINNOVA.

  • 101842.
    Öberg, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Appelqvist, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Non-fused Phospholes as Fluorescent Probes for Imaging of Lipid Droplets in Living Cells2017In: Frontiers in Chemistry, E-ISSN 2296-2646, Vol. 5, article id 28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Molecular tools for fluorescent imaging of specific compartments in cells are essential for understanding the function and activity of cells. Here, we report the synthesis of a series of pyridyl- and thienyl-substituted phospholes and the evaluation of these dyes for fluorescent imaging of cells. The thienyl-substituted phospholes proved to be successful for staining of cultured normal and malignant cells due to their fluorescent properties and low toxicity. Co-staining experiments demonstrated that these probes target lipid droplets, which are, lipid-storage organelles found in the cytosol of nearly all cell types. Our findings confirm that thienyl-substituted phospholes can be utilized as fluorescent tools for vital staining of cells, and we foresee that these fluorescent dyes might be used in studies to unravel the roles that lipid droplets play in cellular physiology and in diseases.

  • 101843.
    Öberg, Eric
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Integrated Circuits and Systems.
    Kindeskog, Gustav
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Integrated Circuits and Systems.
    16 GS/s Continuous-Time ΣΔ Modulator in a 22 nm SOI Process: a Simulation and Feasibility Study2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    With a reference specification model in terms of 8 GS/s Sigma Delta Modulator in a 28 nm CMOS process consuming 890 mW, the purpose with this thesis is to construct a similar and simpler model but with higher specification demands. In a 22 nm SOI process with an input signal bandwidth of 500 MHz sampled at 16 GS/s with a power consumption below 2 W, the objective is to design a Continuous-Time Sigma Delta Modulator with verified simulated functionality on a transistor level basis. This specification is accomplished - with a power consumption in total of 75 mW.

    The design methodology is divided into an integrator part along with a quantizer and feedback DAC part. A top-down strategy is carried out starting with an ideal high level Verilog-A model for the complete system, followed by a hardware implementation on transistor level.

  • 101844.
    Öberg, Eric
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Integrated Circuits and Systems.
    Stapar, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Integrated Circuits and Systems.
    Termistor för väderforskning2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10,5 credits / 16 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Genom att fästa elektronik i en heliumballong som stiger och kommunicerar med en mottagare på marknivå är det möjligt att utföra mätningar högre upp i höjd på temperatur, luftfuktighet och vindar. På detta sätt kan det förutses väderprognoser som kan användas i flygbranschen eller vid känsliga världsdelar för att varna inför miljökatastrofer. Utveckling av en produkt som mäter på temperaturer och som kan användas professionellt i olika arbetsområden och sammanhang kräver en temperatursensor med hög noggrannhet och känslighet samt låg effektkonsumtion. För det här syftet är en termistor en lämplig sensor med högkänsliga egenskaper. Optimering av produkten kräver en integrering av termistorn med elektronik på ett kretskort där fokus ligger på noggrannhet, snabb responstid, lågt pris, minimal storlek och vikt.

    En termistor fungerar på så sätt att den ändrar resistans beroende på vilken yttre/inre temperatur den utsätts för. Vid låga temperaturer är resistansen hög och vid höga temperaturer blir resistansen låg. Kretskort som designas på olika sätt med termistorer och tillhörande nödvändig elektronik behöver utvärderas för att avgöra vilken prototyp som är bäst lämpad för temperaturmätningar i atmosfären. Problem som uppstår med termistorn som sådan är självuppvärmning, och sker när för stor ström går igenom termistorn vilket resulterar i intern uppvärmning hos komponenten som i sin tur påverkar mätningar på temperaturer. Förebyggning av denna felfaktor kräver att termistorn kombineras med komponenter för att få en linjär kalibrerad utspänning för vidare signalbehandling.

    Processen vid framställning av kretskort består av utvärdering för val av komponenter, simuleringar, beräkningar och slutligen hårdvarulayouts. Med färdiga designer kan tester utföras på kretskortsmodeller med hjälp av en spänningskälla som matar kortet med spänning och en multimeter som mäter utsignalen. För att utsätta termistorn för temperaturer används en apparat som värmer upp den, alternativt t.ex. is som kyler ner den. För referensvärden på temperaturmätningar används en värmekamera pekandes mot komponenten. Utsignalen från mätningarna består av analoga spänningsvärden, och de skickas vidare till en mikrokontroller som är synkroniserad med en dator. I mikrokontrollern kan signalen digitaliseras och sedan läsas av på en dataskärm.

  • 101845.
    Öberg (fd Asplund), Gunilla
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    On the origin of organohalogens found in the environment1992Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The natural production of halogenated organic compounds in the environment is often assumed to be negligible compared to the anthropogenic production of such compounds. A change in this general view is advocated in the present thesis.

    Amounts of halogenated organic compounds were measured by detennination of AOX (adsorbable organic halogen) or TOX (total organic halogen), and it was found that these compounds are more widespread than previously assumed. A national organohalogen budget was established by calculating chlorine-to-carbon ratios for different types of samples and then combining these values with studies of organic carbon pools in Sweden. The obtained budget showed that the major fraction of organohalogens is stored in soil and freshwater sediments (approx. 5000 x J03 and 2000 x J03 tonnes, respectively).

    It was also found that soil extracts obtained by using an enzyme extraction procedure were able to catalyze chlorination of organic compounds. The reaction did not proceed in the absence of hydrogen peroxide or after the soil extract had been heated; furthermore the catalyst had a molecular weight that was greater than 10,000, exhibited decreasing activity with time and rising temperature, and was inhibited by phloroglucinol, resorcinol, orcinol and ethanol. In all these respects the soil derived catalyst resembled a commercial chlorperoxidase. Based on these findings, it was concluded that a chloroperoxidase-like catalyst is present in soil. In this context it is also noteworthy that a net production of organohalogens ~as found in soil stored under controlled conditions.

    The soil-extract-catalyzed chlorination, the detected net production in soil, and the background concentration of organohalogens in surface water were all found to increase with decreasing pH. This implies that the natural production of halogenated organic compounds may increase with acidification of soil and surface water.

  • 101846.
    Öberg, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Chloride and Organic Chlorine in Soil1998In: Acta Hydrochimica et Hydrobiologica, ISSN 0323-4320, E-ISSN 1521-401X, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 137-144Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 101847.
    Öberg, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Environmental Science.
    The biogeochemistry of chlorine in soil2003In: The handbook of environmental chemistry: Vol. 3. P. P, Anthropogenic compounds. Natural production of organohalogen compounds / [ed] Gordon W. Gribble, Springer Verlag , 2003, p. 43-62Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Summarizes the knowledge on naturally occurring organohalogens, of which more than 3700 are documented. This book features chapters that cover various aspects of this field, including the structural diversity and sources of organohalogens, the mechanisms for their formation and biodegradation, the clinical use of dichloroacetate, and more

  • 101848.
    Öberg, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Environmental Science.
    The natural chlorine cycle - fitting the scattered pieces2002In: Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, ISSN 0175-7598, E-ISSN 1432-0614, Vol. 58, no 5, p. 565-581Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chlorine is one of the most abundant elements on the surface of the earth. Until recently, it was widely believed that all chlorinated organic compounds were xenobiotic, that chlorine does not participate in biological processes and that it is present in the environment only as chloride. However, over the years, research has revealed that chlorine takes part in a complex biogeochemical cycle, that it is one of the major elements of soil organic matter and that the amount of naturally formed organic chlorine present in the environment can be counted in tons per km(2). Interestingly enough, some of the pieces of the chlorine puzzle have actually been known for decades, but the information has been scattered among a number of different disciplines with little or no exchange of information. The lack of communication appears to be due to the fact that the points of departure in the various fields have not corresponded, a number of paradoxes are actually revealed when the known pieces of the chlorine puzzle are fit together. It appears as if a number of generally agreed statements or tacit understandings have guided perceptions, and that these have obstructed the understanding of the chlorine-cycle as a whole. The present review enlightens four paradoxes that spring up when some persistent tacit understandings are viewed in the light of recent work as well as earlier findings in other areas. The paradoxes illuminated in this paper are that it is generally agreed that: (1) chlorinated organic compounds are xenobiotic even though more than 1,000 naturally produced chlorinated compounds have been identified, (2) only a few, rather specialised, organisms are able to convert chloride to organic chlorine even though it appears as if the ability among organisms to transform chloride to organic chlorine is more the rule than the exception,, (3) all chlorinated organic compounds are persistent and toxic even though the vast majority of naturally produced organic chlorine is neither persistent nor toxic, (4) chlorine is mainly found in its ionic form in the environment even though organic chlorine is as abundant or even more abundant than chloride in soil. Furthermore, the contours of the terrestrial chlorine cycle are outlined and put in a concrete form by constructing a rough chlorine budget over a small forested catchment. Finally, possible ecological roles of the turnover of chlorine are discussed.

  • 101849.
    Öberg, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Grøn, C.
    Sources of Organic Halogens in Spruce Forest Soil1998In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 1086-931X, E-ISSN 1520-6912, Vol. 32, no 11, p. 1573-1579Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 101850.
    Öberg, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Environmental Science.
    Holm, Mats
    Skogsvårdsstyrelsen Norrköpings distrikt.
    Sandén, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Environmental Science.
    Svensson, Teresia
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute.
    Parikka, Matti
    Institutionen för bioenergi Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet.
    Chlorine budget of a small catchment2004In: European Geosciences Union 1st Assembly,2004, 2004, p. 180-180Conference paper (Other academic)
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