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  • 151.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Motsch, Johann
    Clinical Research, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.
    van der Meulen, Jan
    Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Health Services Research and Policy, Faculty of Public Health and Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London,UK.
    Clinical News: Body composition study reveals link between specific fat distributions and metabolic diseases2018In: British Journal of Hospital Medicine, ISSN 1750-8460, Vol. 79, no 6, p. 308-308Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 152.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Adami, Paolo Emilio
    Health and Science Department, International Association of Athletics Federations IAAF, Monaco / Department of Movement, Human and Health Sciences, University of Rome “Foro Italico”, Italy.
    Fagher, Kristina
    Rehabilitation Medicine Research Group, Lund University, Sweden.
    Jacobsson, Jenny
    Bargoria, Victor
    Gauffin, Håkan
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hansson, Per-Olof
    Andersson, Christer
    Bermon, Stéphane
    Health and Science Department, International Association of Athletics Federations IAAF, Monaco / LAMHESS, Université Côte d'Azur, France.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine.
    Efficacy of pre-participation cardiac evaluation recommendations among athletes participating in World Athletics Championships2019In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881, p. 1-11, article id UNSP 2047487319884385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Athletes competing in athletics (track and field) at international level may be participating with underlying undiagnosed life-threatening cardiovascular conditions. Our objective was to analyse variations in pre-participation cardiac evaluation prevalence among athletes participating in two International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) World Athletics Championships, with regard to the human developmental level and global region of their home countries, as well as athletes’ age category, gender, event group and medical insurance type.

    Design Cross-sectional web-based survey.MethodsA total of 1785 athletes competing in the IAAF World Under 18 Championships Nairobi 2017 and World Championships London 2017 were invited to complete a pre-participation health questionnaire investigating the experience of a pre-participation cardiac examination.

    Results A total of 704 (39%) of the athletes participated. Among these, 59% (60% of women; 58% of men) reported that they had been provided at least one type of pre-participation cardiac evaluation. Athletes from very high income countries, Europe and Asia, showed a higher prevalence of at least one pre-participation cardiac evaluation.

    Conclusions The prevalence of pre-participation cardiac evaluation in low to middle income countries, and the African continent in particular, needs urgent attention. Furthermore, increases in evaluation prevalence should be accompanied by the development of cost-effective methods that can be adopted in all global regions.

  • 153.
    Dahm-Kähler, Pernilla
    et al.
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Borgfeldt, Christer
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Skane University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Erik
    Regional Cancer Center Western Sweden, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Staf, Christian
    Regional Cancer Center Western Sweden, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Falconer, Henrik
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bjurberg, Maria
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Rosenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Stålberg, Karin
    Department of Women's and Children's health Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Högberg, Thomas
    Department of Cancer Epidemiology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Population-based study of survival for women with serous cancer of the ovary, fallopian tube, peritoneum or undesignated origin - on behalf of the Swedish gynecological cancer group (SweGCG).2017In: Gynecologic Oncology, ISSN 0090-8258, E-ISSN 1095-6859, Vol. 144, no 1, p. 167-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to determine survival outcome in patients with serous cancer in the ovary, fallopian tube, peritoneum and of undesignated origin.

    METHODS: Nation-wide population-based study of women≥18years with histologically verified non-uterine serous cancer, included in the Swedish Quality Registry for primary cancer of the ovary, fallopian tube and peritoneum diagnosed 2009-2013. Relative survival (RS) was estimated using the Ederer II method. Simple and multivariable analyses were estimated by Poisson regression models.

    RESULTS: Of 5627 women identified, 1246 (22%) had borderline tumors and 4381 had malignant tumors. In total, 2359 women had serous cancer; 71% originated in the ovary (OC), 9% in the fallopian tube (FTC), 9% in the peritoneum (PPC) and 11% at an undesignated primary site (UPS). Estimated RS at 5-years was 37%; for FTC 54%, 40% for OC, 34% for PPC and 13% for UPS. In multivariable regression analyses restricted to women who had undergone primary or interval debulking surgery for OC, FTC and PPC, site of origin was not independently associated with survival. Significant associations with worse survival were found for advanced stages (RR 2.63, P<0.001), moderate (RR 1.90, P<0.047) and poor differentiation (RR 2.20, P<0.009), neoadjuvant chemotherapy (RR1.33, P<0.022), residual tumor (RR 2.65, P<0.001) and platinum single (2.34, P<0.001) compared to platinum combination chemotherapy.

    CONCLUSION: Survival was poorer for serous cancer at UPS than for ovarian, fallopian tube and peritoneal cancer. Serous cancer at UPS needs to be addressed when reporting and comparing survival rates of ovarian cancer.

  • 154.
    Dam-Larsen, Sanne
    et al.
    Koege Hospital, Denmark.
    Darkahi, Bahman
    Enkoping Hospital, Sweden.
    Glad, Arne
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Denmark.
    Gleditsch, Dagfinn
    Drammen Hospital, Norway.
    Gustavsson, Lena
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Halttunen, Jorma
    University of Helsinki, Finland; University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Johansson, Karl-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Pischel, Andreas
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Reiertsen, Ola
    Akershus University Hospital, Norway.
    Tornqvist, Bjorn
    Karolinska University, Sweden.
    Zebski, Hubert
    Department Gastroenterol, Germany.
    Best practice in placement of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy with jejunal extension tube for continuous infusion of levodopa carbidopa intestinal gel in the treatment of selected patients with Parkinsons disease in the Nordic region2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 50, no 12, p. 1500-1507Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Continuous infusion of levodopa carbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG) is associated with a significant improvement in the symptoms and quality of life of selected patients with advanced Parkinsons disease. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy with jejunal extension (PEG/J) was first described in 1998 and has become the most common and standard technique for fixing the tubing in place for LCIG infusion. Material and methods. A workshop was held in Stockholm, Sweden, to discuss the PEG/J placement for the delivery of LCIG in Parkinsons disease patients with the primary goal of providing guidance on best practice for the Nordic countries. Results. Suggested procedures for preparation of patients for PEG/J placement, aftercare, troubleshooting and redo-procedures for use in the Nordic region are described and discussed. Conclusions. LCIG treatment administered through PEG/J-tubes gives a significant increase in quality of life for selected patients with advanced Parkinsons disease. Although minor complications are common, serious complications are infrequent, and the tube insertion procedures have a good safety record. Further development of delivery systems and evaluation of approaches designed to reduce the demand for redo endoscopy are required.

  • 155.
    Danielsson, Gun
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Malmstrom, Per-Uno
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Wijkstrom, Hans
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nyberg, Tommy
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Univ Cambridge, England.
    Thulin, Helena
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Bladder health in patients treated with BCG instillations for T1G2-G3 bladder cancer - a follow-up five years after the start of treatment2018In: Scandinavian journal of urology, ISSN 2168-1805, E-ISSN 2168-1813, Vol. 52, no 5-6, p. 377-384Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Investigate symptoms and how they affect daily life in patients with Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer (NMIBC) treated with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) instillations. Materials and methods: Patients treated with BCG were included. After an initial transurethral resection (TURB) followed by a second-look resection, the patients were given an induction course with BCG for 6 weeks followed by maintenance therapy for 2 years. The patients answered a questionnaire before, during and after the treatment. The questionnaire contained questions about specific symptoms combined with bother questions on how each symptom affected patients life. Results: In total, 113 of 116 patients responded to the first questionnaire. Thirty per cent of all patients were bothered by disease-specific symptoms before the start of BCG. Few patients reported fever, haematuria, illness or urinary tract symptoms. No difference in symptoms was found between patients with or without concomitant CIS (carcinoma in situ). Patients younger than 65 years of age reported a greater worry about the symptom burden in the future than those who were older. Patients younger than 65 years reported a decreased level of mental well-being. Conclusion: Patients with bladder cancer T1G2-G3 had disease-specific symptoms present already before the start of the BCG. The burden of symptoms was reduced over time and showed that the bladder might recover. BCG instillations had side-effects that negatively affected the patients well-being. It is important to record the patients baseline bladder and voiding status before as well as during the BCG-instillation period in order to understand symptoms caused by the treatment.

  • 156.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    et al.
    The Skandion Clinic, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Flejmer, Anna M.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. The Skandion Clinic, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Edvardsson, Anneli
    Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Witt Nyström, Petra
    The Skandion Clinic, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Normal tissue sparing potential of scanned proton beams with and without respiratory gating for the treatment of internal mammary nodes in breast cancer radiotherapy2018In: Physica medica (Testo stampato), ISSN 1120-1797, E-ISSN 1724-191X, Vol. 52, p. 81-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Proton therapy has shown potential for reducing doses to normal tissues in breast cancer radiotherapy. However data on the impact of protons when including internal mammary nodes (IMN) in the target for breast radiotherapy is comparatively scarce. This study aimed to evaluate normal tissue doses when including the IMN in regional RT with scanned proton beams, with and without respiratory gating. The study cohort was composed of ten left-sided breast patients CT-scanned during enhanced inspiration gating (EIG) and free-breathing (FB). Proton plans were designed for the target including or excluding the IMN. Targets and organs-at-risk were delineated according to RTOG guidelines. Comparison was performed between dosimetric parameters characterizing target coverage and OAR radiation burden. Statistical significance of differences was tested using a paired, two-tailed Student’s t-test. Inclusion of the IMN in the target volume led to a small increase of the cardiopulmonary burden. The largest differences were seen for the ipsilateral lung where the mean dose increased from 6.1 to 6.6 Gy (RBE) (P < 0.0001) in FB plans and from 6.9 to 7.4 Gy (RBE) (P = 0.003) in EIG plans. Target coverage parameters were very little affected by the inclusion of IMN into the treatment target. Radiotherapy with scanned proton beams has the potential of maintaining low cardiovascular burden when including the IMN into the target, irrespective of whether respiratory gating is used or not.

  • 157.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Toma-Dasu, Iuliana
    Stockholm University.
    Will intrafraction repair have negative consequences on extreme hypofractionation in prostate radiation therapy?2015In: British Journal of Radiology, ISSN 0007-1285, E-ISSN 1748-880X, Vol. 88, no 1056, p. Article ID 20150588-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of increasing fraction delivery time on the outcome of hypofractionated radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

    Methods: Monoexponential and biexponential repair models have been used for patients with prostate cancer to study the loss of biochemical control at 5 years for several clinically relevant irradiation times. The theoretical predictions were compared with newly reported clinical results from 4607 patients undergoing conventionally fractionated and hypofractionated prostate radiation therapy.

    Results: Time-demanding irradiation techniques appear to lead to biochemical control rates that sometimes are about 10–20 percentage points below predictions that neglect intrafraction repair. This difference appears to be of the same order of magnitude as that predicted by moderately slow to slow repair taking place during the irradiation time. The impact is largest for the patient risk groups receiving doses corresponding to the steepest part of the dose–response curve. By contrast, for treatment techniques requiring irradiation times shorter than about 20 min, the impact of intrafraction repair appears to be much smaller and probably difficult to be observed in the light of other sources of uncertainty in clinical data.

    Conclusion: Neglecting intrafraction repair might overestimate the effectiveness of some treatment schedules and could also influence any subsequent estimations of fractionation sensitivity for prostate tumours.

    Advances in knowledge: The effect of intrafraction repair for prostate cancer should be taken into account for long irradiation sessions as might be expected from scanned beams and/or from multiple intrafraction imaging sessions to check the positioning of the patient.

  • 158.
    Davidsson, Anette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Olsson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Norberg, Pernilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Myokardscintigrafi med ny hjärtkamera (D-SPECT): Hur mycket kan vi minska strålbelastningen till patienten utan att försämra diagnostisk bildkvalité?2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 159.
    Davidsson, Josef
    et al.
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Puschmann, Andreas
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Tedgard, Ulf
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Bryder, David
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lars
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Cammenga, Jörg
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    SAMD9 and SAMD9L in inherited predisposition to ataxia, pancytopenia, and myeloid malignancies2018In: Leukemia, ISSN 0887-6924, E-ISSN 1476-5551, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 1106-1115Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Germline mutations in the SAMD9 and SAMD9L genes, located in tandem on chromosome 7, are associated with a clinical spectrum of disorders including the MIRAGE syndrome, ataxia pancytopenia syndrome and myelodysplasia and leukemia syndrome with monosomy 7 syndrome. Germline gain-of-function mutations increase SAMD9 or SAMD9Ls normal antiproliferative effect. This causes pancytopenia and generally restricted growth and/or specific organ hypoplasia in non-hematopoietic tissues. In blood cells, additional somatic aberrations that reverse the germline mutations effect, and give rise to the clonal expansion of cells with reduced or no antiproliferative effect of SAMD9 or SAMD9L include complete or partial chromosome 7 loss or loss-of-function mutations in SAMD9 or SAMD9L. Furthermore, the complete or partial loss of chromosome 7q may cause myelodysplastic syndrome in these patients. SAMD9 mutations appear to associate with a more severe disease phenotype, including intrauterine growth restriction, developmental delay and hypoplasia of adrenal glands, testes, ovaries or thymus, and most reported patients died in infancy or early childhood due to infections, anemia and/or hemorrhages. SAMD9L mutations have been reported in a few families with balance problems and nystagmus due to cerebellar atrophy, and may lead to similar hematological disease as seen in SAMD9 mutation carriers, from early childhood to adult years. We review the clinical features of these syndromes, discuss the underlying biology, and interpret the genetic findings in some of the affected family members. We provide expert-based recommendations regarding diagnosis, follow-up, and treatment of mutation carriers.

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  • 160.
    De Kleuver, Marinus
    et al.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Faraj, Sayf S. A.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Holewijn, Roderick M.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Germscheid, Niccole M.
    AOSpine Int, Switzerland.
    Adobor, Raphael D.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Andersen, Mikkel
    Middelfart Hospital, Denmark.
    Tropp, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Spinal Surgery.
    Dahl, Benny
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark; Texas Childrens Hospital, TX 77030 USA; Baylor Coll Med, TX 77030 USA.
    Keskinen, Heli
    University of Turku, Finland; Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Olai, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Spinal Surgery.
    Polly, David W.
    University of Minnesota, MN 55455 USA.
    Van Hooff, Miranda L.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands; Sint Maartensklin, Netherlands.
    Haanstra, Tsjitske M.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands; Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Defining a core outcome set for adolescent and young adult patients with a spinal deformity A collaborative effort for the Nordic Spine Surgery Registries2017In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 88, no 6, p. 612-618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - Routine outcome measurement has been shown to improve performance in several fields of healthcare. National spine surgery registries have been initiated in 5 Nordic countries. However, there is no agreement on which outcomes are essential to measure for adolescent and young adult patients with a spinal deformity. The aim of this study was to develop a core outcome set (COS) that will facilitate benchmarking within and between the 5 countries of the Nordic Spinal Deformity Society (NSDS) and other registries worldwide. Material and methods - From August 2015 to September 2016, 7 representatives (panelists) of the national spinal surgery registries from each of the NSDS countries participated in a modified Delphi study. With a systematic literature review as a basis and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health framework as guidance, 4 consensus rounds were held. Consensus was defined as agreement between at least 5 of the 7 representatives. Data were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. Results - Consensus was reached on the inclusion of 13 core outcome domains: "satisfaction with overall outcome of surgery", "satisfaction with cosmetic result of surgery", "pain interference", physical functioning", "health-related quality of life", "recreation and leisure", "pulmonary fatigue", "change in deformity", "selfimage", "pain intensity", "physical function", "complications", and "re-operation". Panelists agreed that the SRS-22r, EQ-5D, and a pulmonary fatigue questionnaire (yet to be developed) are the most appropriate set of patient-reported measurement instruments that cover these outcome domains. Interpretation - We have identified a COS for a large subgroup of spinal deformity patients for implementation and validation in the NSDS countries. This is the first study to further develop a COS in a global perspective.

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  • 161.
    de las Heras Gala, Hugo
    et al.
    Helmholtz Zentrum München, Munich, Germany.
    Torresin, Alberto
    ASST Grande Ospedale Metropolitano Niguarda, Milano, Italy.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. The Skandion Clinic, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rampado, Osvaldo
    A.O.U. Città della Salute e della Scienza, Torino, Italy.
    Delis, Harry
    International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, Austria.
    Hernández Girón, Irene
    Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    Theodorakou, Chrysoula
    The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK.
    Andersson, Jonas
    University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
    Holroyd, John
    Dental X-ray Protection Services, PHE, UK.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Skane University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Edyvean, Sue
    Public Health England (PHE), Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, UK.
    Gershan, Vesna
    Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Skopje, Macedonia.
    Hadid-Beurrier, Lama
    Hôpital Jean-Verdier, Paris, France.
    Hoog, Christopher
    Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice, France.
    Delpon, Gregory
    Centre René Gauducheau, Nantes, France.
    Sancho Kolster, Ismael
    Institut Català d’Oncologia, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain.
    Peterlin, Primož
    Institute of Oncology Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Garayoa Roca, Julia
    Fundación Jiménez Díaz, Madrid, Spain.
    Caprile, Paola
    Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile.
    Zervides, Costas
    University of Nicosia, Medical School, Nicosia, Cyprus.
    Quality control in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT): EFOMP-ESTRO-IAEA protocol2017Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quality control of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems is an essential part of quality assurance to periodically check that quality requirements are met, reduce uncertainties and errors and reduce the likelihood of accidents and incidents. Radiation exposure levels must be measured to ensure that patient doses associated with CBCT examinations are kept as low as reasonably achievable consistent with the required diagnostic information. The main purpose of this document is to present procedures for quality control of CBCT systems used for dental, radiotherapy, interventional radiology and guided surgery applications.

    The ‘Quality control in cone-beam computed tomography’ is the second of the series on quality control protocols. The European Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics (EFOMP) published the first document on ‘Quality Controls in digital mammography’ in 2015. These books are freely available online at efomp.org and can be used as both, in-depth working guides to everyday practice and an up-to-date reference sources for medical physicists engaged in quality control of medical imaging systems.

    This book is the result of the experience and knowledge of an international group of leading medical physics experts and an excellent illustration of the synergy that can be achieved when every team member works at their best and collaboratively follows the whole process through its completion.

  • 162.
    de Leede, E. M.
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    Sibinga Mulder, B. G.
    Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    Bastiaannet, E.
    Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    Poston, G. J.
    Department of Surgery, University Hospital Aintree, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
    Sahora, K.
    Department of Surgery and Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Medical University of Vienna/ABCSG Pancreatic Cancer Registry, Austria.
    Van Eycken, E.
    Belgian Cancer Registry, Brussels, Belgium.
    Valerianova, Z.
    Bulgarian National Cancer Registry/National Oncological Hospital, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Mortensen, M. B.
    Department of Surgery, Odense University Hospital/Danish Pancreas Cancer Group, Denmark.
    Dralle, H.
    Department of Surgery, University of Halle-Wittenberg/Pancreatic Cancer Register, Halle, Germany.
    Primic-Zakelj, M.
    Epidemiology and Cancer Registry/Institute of Oncology, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Borras, J. M.
    Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ryzhov, A.
    National Cancer Registry of Ukraine/National Institute of Cancer, Kiev, Ukraine.
    Lemmens, V. E.
    Department of Research, Netherlands Cancer Registry/Comprehensive Cancer Centre The Netherlands (IKNL), Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    Mieog, J. S. D.
    Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    Boelens, P. G.
    Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    van de Velde, C. J. H.
    Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    Bonsing, B. A.
    Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    Common variables in European pancreatic cancer registries: The introduction of the EURECCA pancreatic cancer project2016In: European Journal of Surgical Oncology, ISSN 0748-7983, E-ISSN 1532-2157, Vol. 42, no 9, p. 1414-1419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Quality assurance of cancer care is of utmost importance to detect and avoid under and over treatment. Most cancer data are collected by different procedures in different countries, and are poorly comparable at an international level. EURECCA, acronym for European Registration of Cancer Care, is a platform aiming to harmonize cancer data collection and improve cancer care by feedback. After the prior launch of the projects on colorectal, breast and upper GI cancer, EURECCAs newest project is collecting data on pancreatic cancer in several European countries. Methods: National cancer registries, as well as specific pancreatic cancer audits/registries, were invited to participate in EURECCA Pancreas. Participating countries were requested to share an overview of their collected data items. Of the received datasets, a shared items list was made which creates insight in similarities between different national registries and will enable data comparison on a larger scale. Additionally, first data was requested from the participating countries. Results: Over 24 countries have been approached and 11 confirmed participation: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Denmark, Germany, The Netherlands, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Ukraine and United Kingdom. The number of collected data items varied between 16 and 285. This led to a shared items list of 25 variables divided into five categories: patient characteristics, preoperative diagnostics, treatment, staging and survival. Eight countries shared their first data. Conclusions: A list of 25 shared items on pancreatic cancer coming from eleven participating registries was created, providing a basis for future prospective data collection in pancreatic cancer treatment internationally.

  • 163.
    Deb, Suryyani
    et al.
    Maulana Abul Kazam Azad Univ Technol, India.
    Boknäs, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Sjöström, Clara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Tharmakulanathan, Anjana
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Lotfi, Kourosh
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Ramström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Varying effects of tyrosine kinase inhibitors on platelet function-A need for individualized CML treatment to minimize the risk for hemostatic and thrombotic complications?2020In: Cancer Medicine, ISSN 2045-7634, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 313-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since their introduction, tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs, eg, imatinib, nilotinib, dasatinib, bosutinib, ponatinib) have revolutionized the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, long-term treatment with TKIs is associated with serious adverse events including both bleeding and thromboembolism. Experimental studies have shown that TKIs can cause platelet dysfunction. Herein, we present the first side-by-side investigation comparing the effects of currently used TKIs on platelet function and thrombin generation when used in clinically relevant concentrations. A flow cytometry multiparameter protocol was used to study a range of significant platelet activation events (fibrinogen receptor activation, alpha granule, and lysosomal exocytosis, procoagulant membrane exposure, and mitochondrial permeability changes). In addition, thrombin generation was measured in the presence of TKIs to assess the effects on global hemostasis. Results show that dasatinib generally inhibited platelet function, while bosutinib, nilotinib, and ponatinib showed less consistent effects. In addition to these general trends for each TKI, we observed a large degree of interindividual variability in the effects of the different TKIs. Interindividual variation was also observed when blood from CML patients was studied ex vivo with whole blood platelet aggregometry, free oscillation rheometry (FOR), and flow cytometry. Based on the donor responses in the side-by-side TKI study, a TKI sensitivity map was developed. We propose that such a sensitivity map could potentially become a valuable tool to help in decision-making regarding the choice of suitable TKIs for a CML patient with a history of bleeding or atherothrombotic disease.

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  • 164.
    Dellgren, Linus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Claesson, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Högdahl, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Forsberg, Jon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Hanberger, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Nilsson, Lennart E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Phenotypic screening for quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli2019In: European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0934-9723, E-ISSN 1435-4373, Vol. 38, no 9, p. 1765-1771Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies show that rectal colonization with low-level ciprofloxacin-resistant Escherichia coli (ciprofloxacin minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) above the epidemiological cutoff point, but below the clinical breakpoint for resistance), i.e., in the range amp;gt; 0.06-0.5 mg/L is an independent risk factor for febrile urinary tract infection after transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy (TRUS-B) of the prostate, adding to the other risk posed by established ciprofloxacin resistance in E. coli (MIC amp;gt; 0.5 mg/L) as currently defined. We aimed to identify the quinolone that by disk diffusion best discriminates phenotypic wild-type isolates (ciprofloxacin MIC amp;lt;= 0.06 mg/L) of E. coli from isolates with acquired resistance, and to determine the resistance genotype of each isolate. The susceptibility of 108 E. coli isolates was evaluated by ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, nalidixic acid, and pefloxacin disk diffusion and correlated to ciprofloxacin MIC (broth microdilution) using EUCAST methodology. Genotypic resistance was identified by PCR and DNA sequencing. The specificity was 100% for all quinolone disks. Sensitivity varied substantially, as follows: ciprofloxacin 59%, levofloxacin 46%, moxifloxacin 59%, nalidixic acid 97%, and pefloxacin 97%. We suggest that in situations where low-level quinolone resistance might be of importance, such as when screening for quinolone resistance in fecal samples pre-TRUS-B, a pefloxacin (S amp;gt;= 24 mm) or nalidixic acid (S amp;gt;= 19 mm) disk, or a combination of the two, should be used. In a setting where plasmid-mediated resistance is prevalent, pefloxacin might perform better than nalidixic acid.

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  • 165.
    Dell'Isola, Andrea
    et al.
    Lunds University, Lund, Sweden.
    Vinblad, Johanna
    Centre of Registers Västra Götaland, The Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register, Goteborg, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lohmander, Stefan
    Lunds University, Lund, Sweden.
    Svensson, Ann-Marie
    National Diabetes Register, Centre of Registers in Region Västra Götaland, Goteborg, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Goteborg, Sweden.
    Turkiewicz, Aleksandra
    Lunds University, Lund, Sweden.
    Franzén, Stefan
    National Diabetes Register, Centre of Registers Västra Götaland, Gothenburg, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Goteborg, Sweden.
    Nauclér, Emma
    Centre of Registers Västra Götaland, The Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register, Goteborg, Sweden.
    W-Dahl, A
    Lund University, Lund, Sverige, Sweden; The Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Register, Lund, Sweden.
    Abbott, Allan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Dahlberg, L
    Lunds University, Lund, Sweden.
    Rolfson, Ola
    Centre of Registers Västra Götaland, The Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register, Goteborg, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Englund, Martin
    Lunds University, Lund, Sweden.
    Understanding the role of diabetes in the osteoarthritis disease and treatment process: A study protocol for the Swedish osteoarthitis and disease (SOAD) cohort2019In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, BMJ Open, Vol. 9, no 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis and a leading cause of disability worldwide. Metabolic comorbidities such as type II diabetes occur with a higher rate in people with OA than in the general population. Several factors including obesity, hyperglycaemia toxicity and physical inactivity have been suggested as potential links between diabetes and OA, and have been shown to negatively impact patients’ health and quality of life. However, little is known on the role of diabetes in determining the outcome of non-surgical and surgical management of OA, and at the same time, how different OA interventions may affect diabetes control. Thus, the overall aim of this project is to explore (1) the impact of diabetes on the outcome of non-surgical and surgical OA treatments and (2) the impact of non-surgical and surgical OA treatments on diabetes control.

    Methods and analysis The study cohort is based on prospectively ascertained register data on a national level in Sweden. Data from OA patients who received a first-line non-surgical intervention and are registered in the National Quality Register for Better Management of Patients with Osteoarthritis will be merged with data from the Swedish Knee and Hip Arthroplasty Registers and the National Diabetes Register. Additional variables regarding patients’ use of prescribed drugs, comorbidities, socioeconomic status and cause of death will be obtained through other national health and population data registers. The linkage will be performed on an individual level using unique personal identity numbers.

    Ethics and dissemination This study received ethical approval (2019-02570) from the Swedish Ethical Review Authority. Results from this cohort will be submitted to peer-reviewed scientific journals and reported at the leading national and international meetings in the field.

  • 166.
    Derolf, Asa
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Juliusson, Gunnar
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Benson, Lina
    Epidemiol and Reg Oncol Ctr Stockholm, Sweden.
    Floisand, Yngvar
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Lazarevic, Vladimir
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Antunovic, Petar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Mollgard, Lars
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Lehmann, Soren
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Uggla, Bertil
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Wahlin, Anders
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Hoglund, Martin
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Deneberg, Stefan
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Letter: Decreasing early mortality in acute myeloid leukaemia in Sweden 1997-2014: improving performance status is a major contributing factor in BRITISH JOURNAL OF HAEMATOLOGY, vol 188, issue 1, pp 187-1912020In: British Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0007-1048, E-ISSN 1365-2141, Vol. 188, no 1, p. 187-191Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 167.
    DHaese, J. G.
    et al.
    Hospital University of Munich, Germany.
    Neumann, J.
    University of Munich, Germany.
    Weniger, M.
    Hospital University of Munich, Germany.
    Pratschke, S.
    Hospital University of Munich, Germany.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ardiles, V.
    Italian Hospital Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Chapman, W.
    Washington University, MO 63110 USA.
    Hernandez-Alejandro, R.
    University of Western Ontario, Canada.
    Soubrane, O.
    Beaujon Hospital, France.
    Robles-Campos, R.
    Virgen de la Arrixaca University Hospital, Spain.
    Stojanovic, M.
    University of Clin Centre, Serbia.
    Dalla Valle, R.
    Parma University Hospital, Italy.
    Chan, A. C. Y.
    University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Coenen, M.
    University of Munich, Germany.
    Guba, M.
    Hospital University of Munich, Germany.
    Werner, J.
    Hospital University of Munich, Germany.
    Schadde, E.
    University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Angele, M. K.
    Hospital University of Munich, Germany.
    Should ALPPS be Used for Liver Resection in Intermediate-Stage HCC?2016In: Annals of Surgical Oncology, ISSN 1068-9265, E-ISSN 1534-4681, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 1335-1343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extended liver resections in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are problematic due to hepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. Associating liver partition with portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy (ALPPS) has been promoted as a novel method to induce hypertrophy for patients with extensive colorectal liver metastases, but outcomes in HCC have not been well investigated. All patients registered in the international ALPPS Registry (http://www.alpps.org) from 2010 to 2015 were studied. Hypertrophy of the future liver remnant, perioperative morbidity and mortality, age, overall survival, and other parameters were compared between patients with HCC and patients with colorectal liver metastases (CRLM). The study compared 35 patients with HCC and 225 patients with CRLM. The majority of patients undergoing ALPPS for HCC fall into the intermediate-stage category of the Barcelona clinic algorithm. In this study, hypertrophy was rapid and extensive for the HCC patients, albeit lower than for the CRLM patients (47 vs. 76 %; p &lt; 0.002). Hypertrophy showed a linear negative correlation with the degrees of fibrosis. The 90-day mortality for ALPPS used to treat HCC was almost fivefold higher than for CRLM (31 vs. 7 %; p &lt; 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that patients older than 61 years had a significantly reduced overall survival (p &lt; 0.004). The ALPPS approach induces a considerable hypertrophic response in HCC patients and allows resection of intermediate-stage HCC, albeit at the cost of a 31 % perioperative mortality rate. The use of ALPPS for HCC remains prohibitive for most patients and should be performed only for a highly selected patient population younger than 60 years with low-grade fibrosis.

  • 168.
    Dielenseger, Pascale
    et al.
    Gustave Roussy, France.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Vidall, Cheryl
    Alcura UK Ltd, England.
    Young, Annie
    Univ Hosp Coventry and Warwickshire, England.
    Jahn, Patrick
    Univ Hosp Halle Saale, Germany.
    Evaluation of antiemetic practices for prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV): results of a European oncology nurse survey2019In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 27, no 11, p. 4099-4106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Preventing CINV is possible when guideline-recommended antiemetics are used. Because oncology nurses play a critical role in risk assessment and management of CINV, a survey of European nurses was conducted to evaluate antiemetic practices, assess awareness of and adherence to current guideline recommendations, and explore barriers to adherence. Methods From March 2016 to Feb 2017, 212 oncology nurses in 16 European countries completed a 20-question online survey. Results Respondents had 15-year (median) oncology nursing experience, and most (75%) were able to suggest or prescribe antiemetics. Most (80%) worked in the public not-for-profit hospital setting. Guideline awareness was generally low with nurses most familiar with ASCO (46%) and MASCC/ESMO (40%) guidelines; individual institution guidelines were most commonly used (47%). Key discrepancies between reported antiemetic use and guideline recommendations in the highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC) setting were underutilization of the recommended NK(1)RA + 5-HT(3)RA + steroid combination on day 1 (55%) and high use of 5-HT3RAs (50%) on days 2-5 when a steroid (63% use) should be used. Metoclopramide use was high in both HEC and moderately emetogenic settings, with 30% and 50% reporting use on day 1 and days 2-5, respectively. The most common reported barrier to use of guideline-recommended agents was physician preference (40%). The most common challenges in managing CINV were "controlling nausea/vomiting in the delayed phase" (64%) and "reducing the impact of CINV on patients quality-of-life" (61%). Conclusions This survey highlights opportunities to improve utilization of guideline-recommended antiemetics, thereby optimizing prevention of CINV and QoL for patients receiving emetogenic chemotherapy.

  • 169.
    Dietrich, Franciele
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Minist Educ Brazil, Brazil; Pontificia University of Catolica Rio Grande Sul PUCRS, Brazil.
    Hammerman, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Blomgran, Parmis
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tätting, Love
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Faccin Bampi, Vinicius
    Pontificia University of Catolica Rio Grande Sul PUCRS, Brazil.
    Braga Silva, Jefferson
    Pontificia University of Catolica Rio Grande Sul PUCRS, Brazil.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Correction: Effect of platelet-rich plasma on rat Achilles tendon healing is related to microbiota (vol 15, pg 1, 2017)2017In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 88, no 4, p. 463-463Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

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  • 170.
    Dietrich, Franciele
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. CAPES Fdn, Brazil; Pontificia University of Catolica Rio Grande do Sul PUCRS, Brazil.
    Hammerman, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Blomgran, Parmis
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tätting, Love
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Faccin Bampi, Vinicius
    Pontificia University of Catolica Rio Grande do Sul PUCRS, Brazil.
    Braga Silva, Jefferson
    Pontificia University of Catolica Rio Grande do Sul PUCRS, Brazil.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Effect of platelet-rich plasma on rat Achilles tendon healing is related to microbiota2017In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 88, no 4, p. 416-421Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - In 3 papers in Acta Orthopaedica 10 years ago, we described that platelet-rich plasma (PRP) improves tendon healing in a rat Achilles transection model. Later, we found that microtrauma has similar effects, probably acting via inflammation. This raised the suspicion that the effect ascribed to growth factors within PRP could instead be due to unspecific influences on inflammation. While testing this hypothesis, we noted that the effect seemed to be related to the microbiota. Material and methods - We tried to reproduce our old findings with local injection of PRP 6h after tendon transection, followed by mechanical testing after 11 days. This failed. After fruitless variations in PRP production protocols, leukocyte concentration, and physical activity, we finally tried rats carrying potentially pathogenic bacteria. In all, 242 rats were used. Results - In 4 consecutive experiments on pathogen-free rats, no effect of PRP on healing was found. In contrast, apparently healthy rats carrying Staphylococcus aureus showed increased strength of the healing tendon after PRP treatment. These rats had higher levels of cytotoxic T-cells in their spleens. Interpretation - The failure to reproduce older experiments in clean rats was striking, and the difference in response between these and Staphylococcus-carrying rats suggests that the PRP effect is dependent on the immune status. PRP functions may be more complex than just the release of growth factors. Extrapolation from our previous findings with PRP to the situation in humans therefore becomes even more uncertain.1

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  • 171.
    Dietrich-Zagonel, Franciele
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Hammerman, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Tätting, Love
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Dietrich, Fabricia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Kozak Ljunggren, Monika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Blomgran, Parmis
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Eliasson, Pernilla T.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Stimulation of Tendon Healing With Delayed Dexamethasone Treatment Is Modified by the Microbiome2018In: American Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0363-5465, E-ISSN 1552-3365, Vol. 46, no 13, p. 3281-3287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    The immune system reflects the microbiome (microbiota). Modulation of the immune system during early tendon remodeling by dexamethasone treatment can improve rat Achilles tendon healing. The authors tested whether changes in the microbiota could influence the effect of dexamethasone treatment.

    Hypothesis:

    A change in microbiome would influence the response to dexamethasone on regenerate remodeling, specifically tendon material properties (peak stress).

    Study Design:

    Controlled laboratory study.

    Methods:

    Specific opportunist and pathogen-free female rats were housed separately (n = 41) or together with specific pathogen-free rats carrying opportunistic microbes such as Staphylococcus aureus (n = 41). After 6 weeks, all co-housed rats appeared healthy but now carried S aureus. Changes in the gut bacterial flora were tested by API and RapID biochemical tests. All rats (clean and contaminated) underwent Achilles tendon transection under aseptic conditions. Flow cytometry was performed 8 days postoperatively on tendon tissue. Sixty rats received subcutaneous dexamethasone or saline injections on days 5 through 9 after transection. The tendons were tested mechanically on day 12. The predetermined primary outcome was the interaction between contamination and dexamethasone regarding peak stress, tested by 2-way analysis of variance.

    Results:

    Dexamethasone increased peak stress in all groups but more in contaminated rats (105%) than in clean rats (53%) (interaction, P = .018). A similar interaction was found for an estimate of elastic modulus (P = .021). Furthermore, dexamethasone treatment reduced transverse area but had small effects on peak force and stiffness. In rats treated with saline only, contamination reduced peak stress by 16% (P = .04) and elastic modulus by 35% (P = .004). Contamination led to changes in the gut bacterial flora and higher levels of T cells (CD3+CD4+) in the healing tendon (P < .05).

    Conclusion:

    Changes in the microbiome influence tendon healing and enhance the positive effects of dexamethasone treatment during the early remodeling phase of tendon healing.

    Clinical Relevance:

    The positive effect of dexamethasone on early tendon remodeling in rats is strikingly strong. If similar effects could be shown in humans, immune modulation by a few days of systemic corticosteroids, or more specific compounds, could open new approaches to rehabilitation after tendon injury.

  • 172.
    Djerf, K
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Edholm, P
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Hedbrant, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A simplified roentgen stereophotogrammetric method. Analysis of small movements between the prosthetic stem and the femur after total hip replacement.1987In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 603-606Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A simplified roentgen stereophotogrammetric method is described. It is based on the use of a 50 mm thick reference plate consisting of a carbon-fibre-reinforced polyester box. The patient is placed directly on this box, which makes the methods less cumbersome and more suitable for routine use. The method has been tested in a model experiment designed for detecting small movements between femur and prosthesis at an early stage after total hip replacement. The head and two hemispheres on the prosthesis and three small tantalum balls inserted in the femur serve as reference points. The model experiment now reported shows that the method has acceptable precision.

  • 173.
    Dostalek, Lukas
    et al.
    Charles Univ Prague, Czech Republic.
    Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Creutzberg, Carien L.
    Leiden Univ, Netherlands.
    Kurdiani, Dina
    Tbilisi Canc Ctr, Rep of Georgia.
    Ponce, Jordi
    Univ Barcelona, Spain.
    Dostalkova, Iva
    Univ South Bohemia, Czech Republic.
    Cibula, David
    Charles Univ Prague, Czech Republic.
    ESGO Survey on Current Practice in the Management of Cervical Cancer2018In: International Journal of Gynecological Cancer, ISSN 1048-891X, E-ISSN 1525-1438, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 1226-1231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The aim of this survey was to acquire an overview of the current management of cervical cancer with an emphasis on the early disease stages. Materials and Methods A hyperlink to the survey was sent to the European Society of Gynaecological Oncology Office database. The survey contained 6 groups of questions regarding the characteristics of respondents, pretreatment workup, management of the early stages of cervical cancer, adjuvant treatment, fertility-sparing treatment, and surveillance. Results In total, 566 responses were collected. The most frequent imaging method used in the workup was magnetic resonance imaging (74%), followed by computed tomography (54%) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (25%). Conization or simple hysterectomy was a preferred procedure in stage T1a1 lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI)-positive for 79% of respondents, in stage T1a2 LVSI-negative for 58%, and in stage T1a2 LVSI-positive for 28%. Sentinel lymph node biopsy alone was reported in stage T1a1 by 17% and in stage T1b1 less than 2 cm by 9%, whereas systematic lymphadenectomy by 29% and 90% of respondents. Macrometastases, micrometastases, and isolated tumor cells in lymph nodes were considered indications for adjuvant treatment by 96%, 93%, and 68% of respondents, respectively. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was reported by 28% and 19% of respondents in fertility-sparing and nonsparing management in stage T1b1. Over 60% of respondents recommend primary surgery for their patients with T1b2 N0 disease and 81% of them use a combination of adverse prognostic factors as indication for adjuvant radiotherapy in pN0 disease. Conclusions The results of this survey indicate considerable differences in the workup and treatment of cervical cancer in current clinical practice.

  • 174.
    Droog Tesselaar, Erik
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Flejmer, Anna M.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. The Skandion Clinic, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Changes in skin microcirculation during radiation therapy for breast cancer2017In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 56, no 8, p. 1072-1080Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract:

    Background: The majority of breast cancer patients who receive radiation treatment are affected by acute radiation-induced skin changes. The assessment of these changes is usually done by subjective methods, which complicates the comparison between different treatments or patient groups. This study investigates the feasibility of new robust methods for monitoring skin microcirculation to objectively assess and quantify acute skin reactions during radiation treatment.

    Material and methods: Laser Doppler flowmetry, laser speckle contrast imaging, and polarized light spectroscopy imaging were used to measure radiation-induced changes in microvascular perfusion and red blood cell concentration (RBC) in the skin of 15 patients undergoing adjuvant radiation therapy for breast cancer. Measurements were made before treatment, once a week during treatment, and directly after the last fraction.

    Results: In the treated breast, perfusion and RBC concentration were increased after 1–5 fractions (2.66–13.3 Gy) compared to baseline. The largest effects were seen in the areola and the medial area. No changes in perfusion and RBC concentration were seen in the untreated breast. In contrast, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scores were increased only after 2 weeks of treatment, which demonstrates the potential of the proposed methods for early assessment of skin changes. Also, there was a moderate to good correlation between the perfusion (r = 0.52) and RBC concentration (r = 0.59) and the RTOG score given a week later.

    Conclusion: We conclude that radiation-induced microvascular changes in the skin can be objectively measured using novel camera-based techniques before visual changes in the skin are apparent. Objective measurement of microvascular changes in the skin may be valuable in the comparison of skin reactions between different radiation treatments and possibly in predicting acute skin effects at an earlier stage.

  • 175.
    Drott, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fomichov Casaballe, Victoria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sense of coherence and health-related quality of life in patients with neurotoxicity after cancer chemotherapy: Assessment from a real-time mobile phone-based system2020In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 107-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    In the present study, we aimed to assess sense of coherence (SOC) and health‐related quality of life (HRQOL) during and after adjuvant chemotherapy by mobile phone‐based reporting in patients with colorectal cancer experiencing neurotoxicity.

    Methods

    In this prospective descriptive cohort study, a mobile phone‐based system was used to receive a series of real‐time longitudinal patient‐reported assessments of SOC (13‐item), HRQOL (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy‐General (FACT‐G) 27‐item), and neurotoxicity (OANQ 29‐item) from 43 patients with colorectal cancer after being treated with chemotherapy including oxaliplatin. Measurements were conducted during the whole treatment period (mean 5 cycles) and up to 12 months after completing chemotherapy.

    Results

    In total, 817 questionnaire responses (226 SOC, 221 FACT‐G, 370 OANQ) answered during and after chemotherapy treatment were available for analysis. Even though all patients experienced neurotoxicity during the treatment period, HRQOL was stable over time. Over time, the ratings of physical wellbeing tended to increase, while the subscale of social wellbeing tended to decrease. Overall SOC, including the three components comprehensibility, manageability, and meaningfulness was stable during the entire study period. No internal data was missing due to the mobile phone‐based system.

    Conclusions

    All patients had neurotoxicity during the treatment period that seemed to affect the social wellbeing component of HRQOL, but SOC seemed unaffected. Real‐time patient‐reported assessment using mobile phone technology could be valuable in the clinical setting to provide continuous individualised monitoring to help identify patients who need further evaluation to maintain or improve their psychosocial health.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-10-31 13:43
  • 176.
    Drott, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Fomichov, Victoria
    Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Starkhammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Kjellgren, Karin I.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Oxaliplatin-Induced Neurotoxic Side Effects and Their Impact on Daily Activities2019In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 42, no 6, p. E40-E48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Oxaliplatin (OXA) is frequently used in the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer, and OXA-induced neurotoxic side effects are common. Reports on real-time patient-reported neurotoxic side effects and impact on the patient's daily activities are sparse in existing studies. Objective: The aim of this study was to identify and assess patient-reported OXA-induced neurotoxic side effects and their impact on the patient's daily activities, during and after chemotherapy. Methods: In a multicenter prospective longitudinal study, 46 chemo-naïve patients with colorectal cancer treated with postoperative adjuvant OXA-based chemotherapy were monitored during treatment and at 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month follow-ups. Patients were recruited from September 2013 to June 2016. In total, 370 Oxaliplatin-Associated Neurotoxicity Questionnaire responses were available for analysis. A mobile phone-based system was used to receive real-time assessments. Results: All patients reported neurotoxic side effects and impact on daily activities during treatment. The side effects changed in character and body location over time and had an impact on the daily activities. Conclusions: The high prevalence of OXA-induced neurotoxic side effects significantly interfered with the patients' daily activities. We found significant differences between baseline data and follow-up time points for neurotoxicity, and the patients had not returned to baseline after 1 year. Implications for Practice: The real-time assessment using mobile phone technology seems to be a valuable tool for monitoring patient-reported neurotoxicity and interventions for tailored care. Effectively identifying neurotoxicity and its impact on the patient's daily activities is important in supportive cancer care.

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  • 177.
    Drott, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Starkhammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Kjellgren, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The trajectory of neurotoxic side effects' impact on daily life: a qualitative study2016In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 24, no 8, p. 3455-3461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxic side effects among patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) and how these side effects influenced their daily lives over time.

    METHODS:

    To assess neurotoxic side effects, ten patients were repeatedly interviewed. The patients were recruited from two hospitals in south of Sweden, had stage II-III CRC, and had been treated with adjuvant oxaliplatin postoperatively, from November 2013 to October 2015. They had received FOLFOX and XELOX, with a mean total dose of 791 mg oxaliplatin. After completed chemotherapy, at 3, 6, and 12 months into the post-treatment phase, 25 interviews were conducted and thematic analysis was used according to Braun and Clarke.

    RESULTS:

    Oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity affects patients in several ways in the long term. Four themes were identified: Expectation of cure, Dubiety, Normalization, and Learn to live with neurotoxicity. The findings of this study describe the trajectory of neurotoxicity and its impact on these patients' life situation. The findings confirmed that neurotoxicity is multi-faceted and that the experience of it changes over time.

    CONCLUSION:

    The desire to survive stimulates adaptations and strategies to manage daily life, and patients learn to live with the neurotoxic side effects. This study provides evidence that these patients need individual attention and support during the trajectory of neurotoxic side effects. Current care provision is inadequate due to a lack of knowledge of the ways in which neurotoxicity impacts the patient's daily life. This study provides insights that could be used to develop a more person-centered care.

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  • 178.
    Drott, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Starkhammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Kjellgren, Karin I.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Neurotoxic Side Effects Early in the Oxaliplatin Treatment Period in Patients With Colorectal Cancer2018In: Oncology Nursing Forum, ISSN 0190-535X, E-ISSN 1538-0688, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 690-697Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To identify and describe experiences of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) who have neurotoxic side effects early in the oxaliplatin treatment period, and how neurotoxicity affects their daily lives.

    PARTICIPANTS & SETTING: 10 patients with stage II-III CRC were included. All were treated with adjuvant oxaliplatin postoperatively and assessed neurotoxicity via a platform-independent mobile phone-based system. Patients were recruited from two hospitals in southern Sweden from November 2013 to August 2014.

    METHODOLOGIC APPROACH: Qualitative interview study conducted through open-ended, face-to-face, qualitative interviews. Thematic analysis was used.

    FINDINGS: A main theme was identified.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: Nurses have an obligation to communicate the importance of early detection of neurotoxicity. Mobile phone technology seems to be a valuable tool for monitoring patient-reported neurotoxicity to improve communication and supportive care.

  • 179.
    Drott, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wilhelmson, Maria
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kolorektal cancer patienters upplevelser av att besvara symtom via ett mobiltelefonbaserat system2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 180.
    Drott, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wilhelmsson, Maria
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Mobiltelefon - Framtidens sätt att följa cancerpatienter? Kolorektal cancer patienters upplevelser av att besvara symtom via ett mobiltelefonbaserat system2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 181.
    Dudman, N. P. B.
    et al.
    Department of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Prince Henry Hospital, Uttle Bay, UK.
    Wilcken, D. E.
    Department of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Prince Henry Hospital, Uttle Bay, UK.
    Wang, J.
    Department of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Prince Henry Hospital, Uttle Bay, UK.
    Lynch, J. F.
    Department of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Prince Henry Hospital, Uttle Bay, UK.
    Macey, D.
    Department of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Prince Henry Hospital, Uttle Bay, UK.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Department of Biochemistry, University of Sydney, Sydney (P.L.), Australia.
    Disordered methionine/homocysteine metabolism in premature vascular disease. Its occurrence, cofactor therapy, and enzymology1993In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 13, no 9, p. 1253-1260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mild homocysteinemia occurs surprisingly often in patients with premature vascular disease. We studied the possible enzymatic sources of this mild hyperhomocysteinemia and the control of homocysteine levels in plasma by treatment of patients with the cofactors and cosubstrates of homocysteine catabolism. We assessed homocysteine metabolism in 131 patients who had premature disease in their coronary, peripheral, or cerebrovascular circulation by using a standard oral methionine-load test. Impaired homocysteine metabolism occurred in 28 patients. We assayed levels of the primary enzymes of homocysteine catabolism in cultured skin fibroblast extracts from 15 of these 28 patients. The patients' cystathionine beta-synthase levels (3.68 +/- 2.52 nmol/h per milligram of cell protein, mean +/- SD) were markedly depressed compared with those from 31 healthy adult control subjects (7.61 +/- 4.49, P < .001). The patients' levels of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate: homocysteine methyltransferase were normal. While betaine: homocysteine methyltransferase was not expressed in skin fibroblasts, 24-hour urinary betaine and N,N-dimethylglycine measurements were consistent with normal or enhanced remethylation of homocysteine by betaine: homocysteine methyltransferase in the 13 patients tested. When treated daily with choline and betaine, pyridoxine, or folic acid, there was a normalization of the postmethionine plasma homocysteine level in 16 of 19 patients. Our results indicate that mild homocysteinemia in premature vascular disease may be caused by either a folate deficiency or deficiencies in cystathionine beta-synthase activity. It does not necessarily involve deficiencies of either 5-methyltetrahydrofolate:homocysteine methyltransferase or betaine:homocysteine methyltransferase. Effective treatment regimens are also defined.

  • 182.
    Dutta, Ravi Kumar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Arnesen, Thomas
    Haukeland Hosp, Norway; Univ Bergen, Norway; Univ Bergen, Norway.
    Heie, Anette
    Haukeland Hosp, Norway.
    Walz, Martin
    Klin Chirurg and Zentrum Minimal Invas Chirurg, Germany.
    Alesina, Piero
    Klin Chirurg and Zentrum Minimal Invas Chirurg, Germany.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical genetics.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    A somatic mutation in CLCN2 identified in a sporadic aldosterone-producing adenoma2019In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 181, no 5, p. K37-K41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To screen for CLCN2 mutations in apparently sporadic cases of aldosterone-producing adenomas (APAs). Description: Recently, CLCN2, encoding for the voltage-gated chloride channel protein 2 (CIC-2), was identified to be mutated in familial hyperaldosteronism II (FH II). So far, somatic mutations in CLCN2 have not been reported in sporadic cases of APAs. We screened 80 apparently sporadic APAs for mutations in CLCN2. One somatic mutation was identified at p.Gly24Asp in CLCN2. The male patient had a small adenoma in size but high aldosterone levels preoperatively. Postoperatively, the patient had normal aldosterone levels and was clinically cured. Conclusion: In this study, we identified a CLCN2 mutation in a sporadic APA comprising about 1% of all APAs investigated. This mutation was complementary to mutations in other susceptibility genes for sporadic APAs and may thus be a driving mutation in APA formation.

  • 183.
    Dutta, Ravi Kumar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Genetics of primary hyperaldosteronism2016In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 23, no 10, p. R437-R454Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hypertension is a common medical condition and affects approximately 20% of the population in developed countries. Primary aldosteronism is the most common form of secondary hypertension and affects 8-13% of patients with hypertension. The two most common causes of primary aldosteronism are aldosterone-producing adenoma and bilateral adrenal hyperplasia. Familial hyperaldosteronism types I, II and III are the known genetic syndromes, in which both adrenal glands produce excessive amounts of aldosterone. However, only a minority of patients with primary aldosteronism have one of these syndromes. Several novel susceptibility genes have been found to be mutated in aldosterone-producing adenomas: KCNJ5, ATP1A1, ATP2B3, CTNNB1, CACNA1D, CACNA1H and ARMC5. This review describes the genes currently known to be responsible for primary aldosteronism, discusses the origin of aldosterone-producing adenomas and considers the future clinical implications based on these novel insights.

  • 184.
    Ebbinge, Maria
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Berglund, Anders
    EpiStat, Sweden.
    Varenhorst, Eberhard
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Hedlund, Per Olov
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Sandblom, Gabriel
    Soder Sjukhuset, Sweden.
    Clinical and prognostic significance of changes in haemoglobin concentration during 1 year of androgen-deprivation therapy for hormone-naive bone-metastatic prostate cancer2018In: BJU International, ISSN 1464-4096, E-ISSN 1464-410X, Vol. 122, no 4, p. 583-591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To estimate the strength of change in haemoglobin (Hb) concentrations during 1 year of androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) as a predictor of survival in hormone-naive patients with bone-metastatic (Stage M1b) prostate cancer. Patients and Methods The patients included in this study were taken from the randomised trial (number 5) carried out by the Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group (SPCG), comparing parenteral oestrogen with total androgen blockade (TAB) in hormone-naive M1b prostate cancer. We identified 597 men where Hb measurements were made at enrolment, as well as at 3, 6 and 12 months of ADT. The time-dependent impact of Hb concentration changes on overall survival (OS) was analysed using multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis. The 10-year OS according to increase/decrease in Hb concentration for the three treatment periods was demonstrated using Kaplan-Meier curves. Results Multivariate analysis of changes in Hb concentration between baseline and 3 months showed better survival in patients with a decrease in Hb concentration (hazard ratio [HR] 1.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.11-1.80) compared to those with an increase, whilst there was no difference in survival associated with a change in Hb concentration between 3 and 6 months (HR 0.93, 95% CI 0.76-1.12). Contrary to the first 3 months, poorer survival was seen in patients with a decrease in Hb concentration between 6 and 12 months (HR 0.76, 95% CI 0.62-0.92) compared to those with an increase. Conclusions In a large cohort of Scandinavian men with hormone-nave M1b prostate cancer, an increase in Hb concentration between baseline and 3 months of ADT was associated with significantly poorer survival, whereas an increase between 6 and 12 months was associated with better survival. These findings provide new information about patterns of change in Hb concentrations during 12 months of ADT for M1b prostate cancer, and survival. Clinicians should be aware of the prognostic value of Hb concentration changes during ADT in M1b prostate cancer.

  • 185.
    Eberhardson, M.
    et al.
    Danderyd Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Soderling, J. K.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Neovius, M.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Cars, T.
    Public Healthcare Serv, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Ludvigsson, J. F.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Askling, J.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Ekbom, A.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Olen, O.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Sachs Childrens Hospital, Sweden.
    Anti-TNF treatment in Crohns disease and risk of bowel resection-a population based cohort study2017In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, ISSN 0269-2813, E-ISSN 1365-2036, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 589-598Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: TNF inhibitors (TNFi) have been shown to reduce the need for surgery in Crohns disease, but few studies have examined their effect beyond the first year of treatment. Aim: To conduct a register-based observational cohort study in Sweden 2006-2014 to investigate the risk of bowel resection in bowel surgery naive TNFi-treated Crohns disease patients and whether patients on TNFi amp;gt;= 12 months are less likely to undergo bowel resection than patients discontinuing treatment before 12 months. Methods: We identified all individuals in Sweden with Crohns disease through the Swedish National Patient Register 1987-2014 and evaluated the incidence of bowel resection after first ever dispensation of adalimumab or infliximab from 2006 and up to 7 years follow-up. Results: We identified 1856 Crohns disease patients who had received TNFi. Among these patients, 90% treatment retention was observed at 6 months after start of TNFi and 65% remained on the drug after 12 months. The cumulative rates of surgery in Crohns disease patients exposed to TNFi years 1-7 were 7%, 13%, 17%, 20%, 23%, 25% and 28%. Rates of bowel resection were similar between patients with TNFi survival amp;lt; 12 months and amp;gt;= 12 months respectively (P=.27). No predictors (eg, sex, age, extension or duration of disease) for bowel resection were identified. Conclusions: The risk of bowel resection after start of anti-TNF treatment is higher in regular health care than in published RCTs. Patients on sustained TNFi treatment beyond 12 months have bowel resection rates similar to those who discontinue TNFi treatment earlier.

  • 186.
    Edholm, David
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Institution of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Early intake of solid food after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and complications. A cohort study from the Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry2018In: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases, ISSN 1550-7289, E-ISSN 1878-7533, Vol. 14, no 9, p. 1256-1260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is the most common bariatric procedure worldwide. There are few studies investigating how early return to solid food affects complications. Objective: The aim of this study was to explore how oral intake was resumed in RYGB patients and how the postoperative food regimen affects outcomes, such as complications and length of stay. Setting: Retrospective nationwide registry study. Methods: The Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry included prospective data from RYGB patients operated in 2009 to 2014. A questionnaire assessed the postoperative reintroduction of solid food applied at each bariatric center. The postoperative regimen was established in 23,589 patients. Outcomes were recorded at 30-day follow-up according to the standard Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry routine. Results: Nine percent of patients (n = 2074) returned to solid food within the first week after surgery. Most commonly solid food was resumed in week 4 (37%, n=8659). Median length of stay was 2 days for all. Of all, 2.8% suffered from a severe complication (amp;gt;Clavien-Dindo 3a). After adjusting for the annual volume of procedures at hospitals, there was no correlation that the timing of solid food affected complication rates. The odds ratio for a severe complication was significantly lower for intermediate- (odds ratio .64 95% confidence interval .48.85) or high (odds ratio .52 95% confidence interval .42.66) volume centers. The rate of leaks and small bowel obstructions were evenly distributed between the different postoperative food regimens. Conclusion: Early return to solid food after RYGB did not affect the risk of severe complications. Patients operated at centers with an annual volume of amp;gt; 100 procedures have a lower risk of severe complications. (C) 2018 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 187.
    Edholm, David
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Response to "Association between early intake of solid food after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and complications"2019In: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases, ISSN 1550-7289, E-ISSN 1878-7533, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 358-358Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 188.
    Edholm, David
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Circular- and Linear-Stapled Gastro-jejunostomy in Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass2019In: Obesity Surgery, ISSN 0960-8923, E-ISSN 1708-0428, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 1946-1953Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To compare circular stapler (CS) with linear stapler (LS) in a meta-analysis concerning operative time, anastomotic leaks, wound infections, strictures, and length of stay. Pubmed, Medline, and Scopus were searched for articles published since 2006. Four hundred and five articles were assessed, and 13 articles of which only one was a randomized controlled trial were included in all 49,331 patients from different regions of the world. The pooled analysis shows that operative time was shorter in LS than in CS (weighted mean difference 36.2min; 95% CI 34.7-37.6.; pamp;lt;0.0001). No difference was seen concerning leaks or strictures. The relative risk (RR) of leakage after LS was 80% of the risk after CS; however, the 95% confidence interval (CI) showed overlap (0.58-1.11). The RR of anastomotic stricture after LS was 74% of the risk after CS; however, 95% CI (0.52-1.05) showed overlap. Wound infections were less common after LS than after CS; RR was 27% (95% CI 0.21-0.33). Length of stay (LOS) was 0.65days shorter after LS than after CS (95% CI 0.51-0.78). LS compared with CS results in shorter operative time, less wound infections, and shorter length of stay, but no difference was seen concerning risks of leaks or strictures.

  • 189.
    Ehinger, Anna
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden; Blekinge County Hospital, Sweden.
    Malmstrom, Per
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Bendahl, Pär-Ola
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Elston, Christopher W.
    Nottingham University Hospital NHS Trust, England.
    Falck, Anna-Karin
    Helsingborg Hospital, Sweden.
    Forsare, Carina
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Grabau, Dorthe
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Ryden, Lisa
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Ferno, Marten
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Histological grade provides significant prognostic information in addition to breast cancer subtypes defined according to St Gallen 20132017In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 68-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The St Gallen surrogate definition of the intrinsic subtypes of breast cancer consist of five subgroups based on estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR), human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2), and Ki-67. PgR and Ki-67 are used for discriminating between the Luminal A-like and Luminal B-like (HER2-negative) subtypes. Histological grade (G) has prognostic value in breast cancer; however, its relationship to the St Gallen subtypes is not clear. Based on a previous pilot study, we hypothesized that G could be a primary discriminator for ER-positive/HER2-negative breast cancers that were G1 or G3, whereas Ki-67 and PgR could provide additional prognostic information specifically for patients with G2 tumors. To test this hypothesis, a larger patient cohort was examined. Patients and methods: Six hundred seventy-one patients (amp;gt;= 35 years of age, pT1-2, pN0-1) with ER-positive/HER2-negative breast cancer and complete data for PgR, Ki-67, G, lymph node status, tumor size, age, and distant disease-free survival (DDFS; median follow-up 9.2 years) were included. Results: Luminal A-like tumors were mostly G1 or G2 (90%) whereas Luminal B-like tumors were mostly G2 or G3 (87%) and corresponded with good and poor DDFS, respectively. In Luminal B-like tumors that were G1 (n = 23), no metastasis occurred, whereas 14 of 40 Luminal A-like tumors that were G3 metastasized. In the G2 subgroup, low PgR and high Ki-67 were associated with an increased risk of distant metastases, hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.8 (0.95-3.4) and 1.5 (0.80-2.8), respectively. Conclusions: Patients with ER-positive/HER2-negative/G1 breast cancer have a good prognosis, similar to that of Luminal A-like, while those with ER-positive/HER2-negative/G3 breast cancer have a worse prognosis, similar to that of Luminal B-like, when assessed independently of PgR and Ki-67. Therapy decisions based on Ki-67 and PgR might thus be restricted to the subgroup G2.

  • 190.
    Eketorp Sylvan, Sandra
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Asklid, Anna
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Johansson, Hemming
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Klintman, Jenny
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Bjellvi, Jenny
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Tolvgard, Staffan
    Ostersunds Hosp, Sweden.
    Kimby, Eva
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Norin, Stefan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Andersson, Per-Ola
    South Alvsborg Hosp, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Claes
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Karin
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Lauri, Birgitta
    Sunderby Hosp, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Mattias
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Sandstedt, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strandberg, Maria
    Sundsvall Hosp, Sweden.
    Osterborg, Anders
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Hansson, Lotta
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    FFirst-line therapy in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: a Swedish nation-wide real-world study on 1053 consecutive patients treated between 2007 and 20132019In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 104, no 4, p. 797-805Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate long-term outcome following first-line therapy in consecutive chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients in a well-defined geographic area: Sweden. All patients diagnosed with CLL (2007-2013) (n=3672) were identified from national registries, screening of patient files identified all (100%) treated first line (n=1053) and for those, an in-depth analysis was performed. End points were overall response rate, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and safety. Median age was 71 years; 53% had Rai stage III-IV and 97% had performance status grade 0-2. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed in 57% of patients: 15% had del(17p). Chlorambucil + prednisone was used in 39% (5% also received rituximab). Fludarabine+cyclophosphamide+rituximab or fludarabine+cyclophosphamide was used in 43% and bendamustine + rituximab in 6%. Overall response rate was 64%; chlorambucil 43%, fludarabine+cyclophosphamide+rituximab 84%, fludarabine+cyclophosphamide 75% and bendamustine + rituximab 75%. Median PFS and OS was 24 and 58 months, respectively, both were significantly associated (multivariate analysis) with type of treatment, del(17p), performance status, gender, age and geographical region (OS only). Chlorambucil-treated patients had a median PFS and OS of only 9 and 33 months, respectively. Chlorambucil usage declined gradually throughout the study period, but one-third of patients still received chlorambucil + rituximab in 2013. Infections amp;gt;= grade III were significantly associated with treatment; chlorambucil 19% versus fludarabine+cyclophosphamide+rituximab 30%. Richter transformation occurred in 5.5% of the patients, equally distributed across therapies. This is the largest retrospective, real-world cohort of consecutive first-line treated CLL patients with a complete follow up. In elderly patients, an unmet need for more effective, well-tolerated therapies was identified.

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  • 191.
    Ekholm, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Dept Oncol, Jönköping, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Bendahl, P. O.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Ferno, M.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Ryden, L.
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Effects of adjuvant tamoxifen over three decades on breast cancerefree and distant recurrence-free interval among premenopausal women with oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer randomised in the Swedish SBII:2pre trial2019In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 110, p. 53-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The primary aim was to compare 2 years of adjuvant tamoxifen versus no systemic treatment in premenopausal patients with oestrogen receptor (ER) epositive tumours, regarding breast cancerefree interval (BCFi) and distant recurrenceefree interval (D-RFi), with 30 years of follow-up and for specified intervals. Moreover, we aimed to investigate the effects of adjuvant tamoxifen on the incidence of secondary malignancies and survival after distant recurrence. Methods: Premenopausal patients with primary breast cancer were randomised to 2 years of tamoxifen (n=277) or no systemic treatment (n=287), irrespective of ER status. Information regarding events was collected by a review of medical records and from national registers. Results: The median follow-up for all patients without events was 28 years, and only four of the patients alive had a follow-up of amp;lt;20 years. With 30 years of follow-up, tamoxifen prolonged BCFi in the intention-to-treat population (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.61-0.94, p = 0.011) compared with no treatment. In patients with ER-positive tumours (n = 362), tamoxifen prolonged BCFi (HR = 0.62, 95% CI 0.47-0.82, p = 0.001) and D-RFi (HR = 0.73, 95% CI 0.54-0.99, p = 0.043). The positive effect on BCFi was significant also for the interval amp;gt; 15-30 years (HR = 0.53, 95% CI 0.28-0.98, p = 0.042). For patients with ER-positive tumours who were diagnosed with distant recurrence (n=165), survival after distant recurrence was shorter among tamoxifen-treated patients (median, 29 months versus 43 months). The incidence of contralateral breast cancer was 42% lower in the tamoxifen group (HR=0.58, 95% CI 0.35-0.96, p=0.035), whereas no differences were observed regarding other secondary malignancies. Conclusions: With three decades of follow-up, 2 years of adjuvant tamoxifen reduced the incidence of breast cancererelated events and distant recurrence, and the carryover effect seems to extend beyond 15 years. Moreover, adjuvant tamoxifen seems to be associated with shorter survival after diagnosis of distant recurrence. (C) 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

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  • 192.
    Ekholm, Maria
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden; Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Bendahl, Par-Ola
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ferno, Marten
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Ryden, Lisa
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Two Years of Adjuvant Tamoxifen Provides a Survival Benefit Compared With No Systemic Treatment in Premenopausal Patients With Primary Breast Cancer: Long-Term Follow-Up (> 25 years) of the Phase III SBII:2pre Trial2016In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0732-183X, E-ISSN 1527-7755, Vol. 34, no 19, p. 2232-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term effect of 2 years of adjuvant tamoxifen compared with no systemic treatment (control) in premenopausal patients with breast cancer over different time periods through long-term (amp;gt; 25 years) follow-up. Patients and Methods Premenopausal patients with primary breast cancer (N = 564) were randomly assigned to 2 years of tamoxifen (n = 276) or no systemic treatment (n = 288). Data regarding date and cause of death were obtained from the Swedish Cause of Death Register. End points were cumulative mortality (CM) and cumulative breast cancer-related mortality (CBCM). The median follow-up for the 250 patients still alive in April 2014 was 26.3 years (range, 22.7 to 29.7 years). Results In patients with estrogen receptor-positive tumors (n = 362), tamoxifen was associated with a marginal reduction in CM (hazard ratio [HR], 0.77; 95% CI, 0.58 to 1.03; P = .075) and a significant reduction in CBCM (HR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.53 to 0.99; P = .046). The effect seemed to vary over time (CM years 0 to 5: HR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.64 to 1.73; years amp;gt;5 to 15: HR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.37 to 0.91; and after 15 years: HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.48 to 1.42; CBCM years 0 to 5: HR, 1.09; 95% CI, 0.65 to 1.82; years amp;gt;5 to 15: HR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.33 to 0.86; and after 15 years: HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.36 to 1.44). Conclusion Two years of adjuvant tamoxifen resulted in a long-term survival benefit in premenopausal patients with estrogen receptor-positive primary breast cancer. (C) 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology. Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives 4.0 License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

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  • 193.
    Ekstrom, Magnus Pär
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Bergström, Göran
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Brandberg, John
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Caidahl, Kenneth
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Engström, Gunnar
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Eriksson, Maria
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Gränsbo, Klas
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Hansen, Tomas
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lars
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Ulf
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Olin, Anna-Carin
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Persson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Respiratory Medicine.
    Rosengren, Annika
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sandelin, Martin
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Sköld, Magnus
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Sundström, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Tanash, Hanan A.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Torén, Kjell
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Ödeshög.
    Lindberg, Eva
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    The association of body mass index, weight gain and central obesity with activity-related breathlessness: the Swedish Cardiopulmonary Bioimage Study2019In: Thorax, ISSN 0040-6376, E-ISSN 1468-3296, Vol. 74, no 10, p. 958-964Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Breathlessness is common in the population, especially in women and associated with adverse health outcomes. Obesity (body mass index (BMI) amp;gt;30 kg/m(2)) is rapidly increasing globally and its impact on breathlessness is unclear. Methods This population-based study aimed primarily to evaluate the association of current BMI and self-reported change in BMI since age 20 with breathlessness (modified Research Council score amp;gt;= 1) in the middle-aged population. Secondary aims were to evaluate factors that contribute to breathlessness in obesity, including the interaction with spirometric lung volume and sex. Results We included 13 437 individuals; mean age 57.5 years; 52.5% women; mean BMI 26.8 (SD 4.3); mean BMI increase since age 20 was 5.0 kg/m(2); and 1283 (9.6%) reported breathlessness. Obesity was strongly associated with increased breathlessness, OR 3.54 (95% CI, 3.03 to 4.13) independent of age, sex, smoking, airflow obstruction, exercise level and the presence of comorbidities. The association between BMI and breathlessness was modified by lung volume; the increase in breathlessness prevalence with higher BMI was steeper for individuals with lower forced vital capacity (FVC). The higher breathlessness prevalence in obese women than men (27.4% vs 12.5%; pamp;lt;0.001) was related to their lower FVC. Irrespective of current BMI and confounders, individuals who had increased in BMI since age 20 had more breathlessness. Conclusion Breathlessness is independently associated with obesity and with weight gain in adult life, and the association is stronger for individuals with lower lung volumes.

  • 194.
    Elander, Nils
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Hussain, Syed A.
    Univ Sheffield, England.
    Mutation Analysis of the FGFR3-encoding gene Does Not Predict Response to Checkpoint Inhibitor Treatment2019In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 76, no 5, p. 604-606Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 195.
    Elawa, Sherif
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Zdolsek, Johann
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Intestinal obstruction following harvest of VRAM-flap for reconstruction of a large perineal defect2015In: Case Reports in Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, ISSN 2332-0885, Vol. 2, no 3-4, p. 88-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A patient with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the rectum was operated with abdominoperineal resection and perineal reconstruction with a vertical rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap. Six days postoperatively, there was herniation of the small bowel, between the anterior and posterior rectus sheaths, to a subcutaneous location.

  • 196.
    Eliasson, Pernilla T.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dietrich, Franciele
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lundin, Anna-Carin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Michaelsson, Karl
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Statin treatment increases the clinical risk of tendinopathy through matrix metalloproteinase release - a cohort study design combined with an experimental study2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 17958Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent experimental evidence indicates potential adverse effects of statin treatment on tendons but previous clinical studies are few and inconclusive. The aims of our study were, first, to determine whether statin use in a cohort design is associated with tendinopathy disorders, and second, to experimentally understand the pathogenesis of statin induced tendinopathy. We studied association between statin use and different tendon injuries in two population-based Swedish cohorts by time-dependent Cox regression analysis. Additionally, we tested simvastatin in a 3D cell culture model with human tenocytes. Compared with never-users, current users of statins had a higher incidence of trigger finger with adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) of 1.50 for men (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.21-1.85) and 1.21 (1.02-1.43) for women. We also found a higher incidence of shoulder tendinopathy in both men (aHR 1.43; 1.24-1.65) and women (aHR 1.41; 0.97-2.05). Former users did not confer a higher risk of tendinopathies. In vitro experiments revealed an increased release of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-13 and a weaker, disrupted matrix after simvastatin exposure. Current statin use seems to increase the risk of trigger finger and shoulder tendinopathy, possibly through increased MMP release, and subsequently, a weakened tendon matrix which will be more prone to injuries.

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  • 197.
    Ellegård, Sander
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Veenstra, Cynthia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Pérez-Tenorio, Gizeh
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Fagerström, Victor
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Department of Surgery, Kalmar Hospital, Kalmar.
    Gårsjö, Jon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Gert, Krista
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Sundquist, Marie
    Department of Surgery, Kalmar Hospital, Kalmar.
    Malmström, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Wingren, Sten
    Department of Clinical Medicine, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Elander, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Hallbeck, Anna-Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    ERBB2 and PTPN2 gene copy numbers as prognostic factors in HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer treated with trastuzumab2019In: Oncology Letters, ISSN 1792-1074, E-ISSN 1792-1082, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 3371-3381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trastuzumab has markedly improved the treatment and long-term prognosis of patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. A frequent clinical challenge in patients with relapsing and/or metastatic disease is de novo or acquired trastuzumab resistance, and to date no predictive biomarkers for palliative trastuzumab have been established. In the present study, the prognostic values of factors involved in the HER2-associated PI3K/Akt signalling pathway were explored. The first 46 consecutive patients treated at the Department of Oncology, Linkoping University Hospital between 2000 and 2007 with trastuzumab for HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer were retrospectively included. The gene copy number variation and protein expression of several components of the PI3K/Akt pathway were assessed in the tumour tissue and biopsy samples using droplet digital polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Patients with tumours displaying a high-grade ERBB2 (HER2) amplification level of amp;gt;= 6 copies had a significantly improved overall survival hazard ratio [(HR)=0.4; 95%, confidence interval (CI): 0.2-0.9] and progression-free survival (HR=0.3; 95% CI: 0.1-0.7) compared with patients with tumours harbouring fewer ERBB2 copies. High-grade ERBB2 amplification was significantly associated with the development of central nervous system metastases during palliative treatment. Copy gain (amp;gt;= 3 copies) of the gene encoding the tyrosine phosphatase PTPN2 was associated with a shorter overall survival (HR=2.0; 95% CI: 1.0-4.0) and shorter progression-free survival (HR=2.1; 95% CI: 1.0-4.1). In conclusion, high ERBB2 amplification level is a potential positive prognostic factor in trastuzumab-treated HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer, whereas PTPN2 gain is a potential negative prognostic factor. Further studies are warranted on the role of PTPN2 in HER2 signalling.

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  • 198.
    Enblom, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Complementary and alternative medicine self-care strategies for nausea in patients undergoing abdominal or pelvic irradiation for cancer: A longitudinal observational study of implementation in routine care2017In: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, ISSN 0965-2299, E-ISSN 1873-6963, Vol. 34, p. 141-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To longitudinally describe practice of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) self-care strategies for nausea during radiotherapy. Methods: Two hundred patients daily registered nausea and practice of CAM self-care strategies, beside conventional antiemetic medications, for nausea during abdominal/pelvic irradiation (median five weeks) for gynecological (69%) colorectal (27%) or other tumors (4%). Results: During radiotherapy, 131 (66%) experienced nausea, and 50 (25%) practiced self-care for nausea at least once, for a mean (m) of 15.9 days. The six of 50 patients who stayed free from nausea practiced self-care more frequent (m = 25.8 days) than the 44 patients experiencing nausea (m = 14.5) (p = 0.013). The CAM self-care strategies were: modifying eating (80% of all self-care practicing patients, 80% of the nauseous patients versus 83% of the patients free from nausea; ns) or drinking habits (38%, 41% vs 17%; ns), taking rests (18%, 20% vs 0%; ns), physical exercising (6%, 2% vs 33%; p = 0.035), acupressure (4%, 5% vs 0%; ns) and self-induced vomiting (2%, 2% vs 0%; ns). Conclusion: A fourth of patients undergoing emetogenic radiotherapy practiced CAM self-care for nausea, mostly by modifying eating or drinking habits. The CAM self-care practicing patients who did not become nauseous practiced self-care more frequent than the nauseous patients did. To make such self-care evidence based, we need studies evaluating its efficacy.

  • 199.
    Enblom, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Gothenburg Univ, Sweden.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Methodology Aspects of Nausea Measuring During Pelvic Radiotherapy: Daily Nausea Measuring Is Successful to Identify Patients Experiencing Nausea2020In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 93-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Nausea seems underreported during pelvic radiotherapy. Objective The aims of this study were to investigate if a 5-week recall measure of nausea covering the entire radiotherapy period was comparable with accumulated daily nausea measurements and to investigate if the measuring method affected potential difference in quality of life (QoL) between nauseated patients and patients free from nausea. Methods This longitudinal methodology study covered 200 patients (mean age, 64 years; 84% women; 69% had gynecological cancer). The patients graded QoL (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General). They registered nausea daily and at a 5-week recall at the end of radiotherapy. Results The nausea-intensity category scale and visual analog scale correlated well (Spearman correlation coefficient = 0.622). According to the 5-week recall, 57 of 157 answering patients (36%) experienced nausea during the radiotherapy period. Using the daily nausea measurements, 94 of 157 patients (60%) experienced nausea (relative risk, 1.65; 95% confidence interval, 1.29-2.10). Of these 94 nauseated patients, 39 (42%) did not report nausea using the 5-week recall. The nauseated patients experienced worse QoL (physical/functional subscores) than patients free from nausea whether nausea was registered daily or at the 5-week recall. Conclusions Almost half, 42%, of the patients who experienced nausea according to daily nausea measurements did not report having had nausea according to the 5-week recall. Nauseated patients graded worse QoL than patients who were free from nausea. Implications for Practice Nursing professionals should measure nausea repeatedly to identify patients at risk of nausea and worsened QoL, to be able to deliver evidence-based antiemetic treatment strategies.

  • 200.
    Enblom, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Institutionen för klinisk neurovetenskap, Osher centrum för integrativ medicin, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Institutionen för onkologi-patologi, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm; Institutionen för kliniska vetenskaper, avdelning för onkologi, Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science.
    Reduced Need for Rescue Antiemetics and Improved Capacity to Eat in Patients Receiving Acupuncture Compared to Patients Receiving Sham Acupuncture or Standard Care during Radiotherapy.2017In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1741-427X, E-ISSN 1741-4288, Vol. 2017, article id 5806351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To evaluate if consumption of emesis-related care and eating capacity differed between patients receiving verum acupuncture, sham acupuncture, or standard care only during radiotherapy. Methods. Patients were randomized to verum (n = 100) or sham (n = 100) acupuncture (telescopic blunt sham needle) (median 12 sessions) and registered daily their consumption of antiemetics and eating capacity. A standard care group (n = 62) received standard care only and delivered these data once. Results. More patients in the verum (n = 73 of 89 patients still undergoing radiotherapy; 82%, Relative Risk (RR) 1.23, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.01-1.50) and the sham acupuncture group (n = 79 of 95; 83%, RR 1.24, CI 1.03-1.52) did not need any antiemetic medications, as compared to the standard care group (n = 42 out of 63; 67%) after receiving 27 Gray dose of radiotherapy. More patients in the verum (n = 50 of 89; 56%, RR 1.78, CI 1.31-2.42) and the sham acupuncture group (n = 58 of 94 answering patients; 62%, RR 1.83, CI 1.20-2.80) were capable of eating as usual, compared to the standard care group (n = 20 of 63; 39%). Conclusion. Patients receiving acupuncture had lower consumption of antiemetics and better eating capacity than patients receiving standard antiemetic care, plausible by nonspecific effects of the extra care during acupuncture.

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