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  • 151.
    Braun, Oscar O.
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Johan
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Finn
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Dellgren, Goran
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Fiane, Arnt E.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Lemstrom, Karl
    Helsinki Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Hübbert, Laila
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Hellgren, Laila
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Lund, Lars H.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Continuous-flow LVADs in the Nordic countries: complications and mortality and its predictors2019In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 14-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to assess complications and mortality and its predictors, with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) in the Nordic Countries. Design: This was a retrospective, international, multicenter cohort study. Results: Between 1993 and 2013, 442 surgically implanted long-term mechanical assist devices were used among 8 centers in the Nordic countries. Of those, 238 were CF-LVADs (HVAD or HeartMate II) implanted in patients amp;gt;18 years with complete data. Postoperative complications and survival were compared and Cox proportion hazard regression analysis was used to identify predictors of mortality. The overall Kaplan-Meier survival rate was 75% at 1 year, 69% at 2 years and 63% at 3 years. A planned strategy of destination therapy had poorer survival compared to a strategy of bridge to transplantation or decision (2-year survival of 41% vs. 76%, p amp;lt; .001). The most common complications were non-driveline infections (excluding sepsis) (44%), driveline infection (27%), need for continuous renal replacement therapy (25%) and right heart failure (24%). In a multivariate model age and left ventricular diastolic dimension was left as independent risk factors for mortality with a hazard ratio of 1.35 (95% confidence interval (CI) [1.01-1.80], p = .046) per 10 years and 0.88 (95% CI [0.72-0.99], p = .044) per 5 mm, respectively. Conclusion: Outcome with CF LVAD in the Nordic countries was comparable to other cohorts. Higher age and destination therapy require particularly stringent selection.

  • 152.
    Braunschweig, Frieder
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Linde, Cecilia
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Benson, Lina
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Science and Education, South Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ståhlberg, Marcus
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lund, Lars H
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    New York Heart Association functional class, QRS duration, and survival in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction: implications for cardiac resychronization therapy.2017In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 366-376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: Symptom severity assessed by NYHA functional class and QRS duration are essential criteria for selection of heart failure (HF) patients for CRT. This study assessed the relationship between NYHA class, QRS duration, and survival in a nationwide HF registry.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: We studied 13 423 patients with HF in NYHA class II-IV and LVEF <40% in the Swedish Heart Failure Registry. Survival was followed via the Swedish Population Registry. Of 12 534 patients without CRT (age 71 ± 12 years, 29% women), 51% and 49% were in NYHA class II and III-IV, respectively. Patients in NYHA class II compared with class III-IV were younger (69 vs. 73 years), and had a better systolic function (49% vs. 58% with LVEF <30%), P <0.001 for all, and a favourable co-morbidity profile. QRS duration was 116 ± 29 ms in NYHA class II and 119 ± 29 ms in NYHA class III-IV with QRS ≥120 ms found in 37% vs. 44%, and an LBBB in 23% vs. 28% (P < 0.001 for all). Upon multivariable Cox regression adjusting for 40 clinically relevant variables, mortality risk was higher in NYHA class III-IV vs. class II, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.31, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.23-1.40. Mortality was also higher with QRS prolongation ≥120 ms vs. narrow QRS. The HR in NYHA class II patients with non-LBBB was 1.19 (95% CI 1.05 - 1.36) and in those with LBBB it was 1.16 (95% CI 1.03-1.41). The corresponding HRs in NYHA class III-IV were 1.33 (95% CI 1.21-1.47) and 1.12 (95% CI 1.02-1.22). There was no significant interaction between the effects of NYHA class and QRS duration or morphology on mortality. Applying different scenarios to estimate guideline adherence, fewer patients with NYHA class II (range 14.4-42.6%) compared with NYHA class III-IV (18.0-45.4%) had received a CRT device when indicated.

    CONCLUSIONS: In HF with reduced LVEF, QRS prolongation is common and independently linked to worse survival. The increase in mortality risk associated with QRS prolongation of both LBBB and non-LBBB morphology is similar in NYHA class II and III-IV.

  • 153.
    Bremer, Anders
    et al.
    Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar/Växjö, Sweden; Division of Emergency Medical Services, Kalmar County Council, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Dahné, Tova
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Akademiska Hospital, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Stureson, Lovisa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar/Växjö, Sweden; The Research Section, Kalmar County Council, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lived experiences of surviving in-hospital cardiac arrest2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 156-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors suffer from psychological distress and cognitive impairments. They experience existential insecurity and vulnerability and are striving to return to a life in which well-being and the meaning of life have partly changed. However, research highlighting the experiences of in-hospital cardiac arrest survivors is lacking. This means that evidence for postresuscitation care has largely been extrapolated from studies on out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors, without considering potential group differences. Studies investigating survivors experiences of an in-hospital cardiac arrest are therefore needed.

  • 154.
    Brolin, Gustav
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Edenbrandt, Lars
    EQUALIS AB, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden.
    Granerus, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Olsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Afzelius, David
    EQUALIS AB, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Agneta
    EQUALIS AB, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Cathrine
    EQUALIS AB, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hagerman, Jessica
    EQUALIS AB, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Johansson, Lena
    EQUALIS AB, Sweden; Central Hospital Karlstad, Sweden.
    Riklund, Katrine
    EQUALIS AB, Sweden; Umeå University, Sweden.
    Ljungberg, Michael
    Lund University, Sweden.
    The accuracy of quantitative parameters in Tc-99m-MAG3 dynamic renography: a national audit based on virtual image data2016In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 146-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assessment of image analysis methods and computer software used in Tc-99m-MAG3 dynamic renography is important to ensure reliable study results and ultimately the best possible care for patients. In this work, we present a national multicentre study of the quantification accuracy in Tc-99m-MAG3 renography, utilizing virtual dynamic scintigraphic data obtained by Monte Carlo-simulated scintillation camera imaging of digital phantoms with time-varying activity distributions. Three digital phantom studies were distributed to the participating departments, and quantitative evaluation was performed with standard clinical software according to local routines. The differential renal function (DRF) and time to maximum renal activity (T-max) were reported by 21 of the 28 Swedish departments performing Tc-99m-MAG3 studies as of 2012. The reported DRF estimates showed a significantly lower precision for the phantom with impaired renal uptake than for the phantom with normal uptake. The T-max estimates showed a similar trend, but the difference was only significant for the right kidney. There was a significant bias in the measured DRF for all phantoms caused by different positions of the left and right kidney in the anterior-posterior direction. In conclusion, this study shows that virtual scintigraphic studies are applicable for quality assurance and that there is a considerable uncertainty associated with standard quantitative parameters in dynamic Tc-99m-MAG3 renography, especially for patients with impaired renal function.

  • 155.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Department of Nursing, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Wahlin, Ake
    Institute of Gerontology, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Sex-Specific Associations Between Self-reported Sleep Duration, Cardiovascular Disease, Hypertension, and Mortality in an Elderly Population.2018In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 422-428Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Both short and long sleep durations have been associated to increased mortality. Knowledge about sex-specific differences among elderly regarding associations between sleep duration, cardiovascular health, and mortality is sparse.

    OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study are to examine the association between self-reported sleep duration and mortality and to investigate whether this association is sex specific and/or moderated by cardiovascular morbidity, and also to explore potential mediators of sleep duration effects on mortality.

    METHODS: A population-based, observational, cross-sectional design with 6-year follow-up with mortality as primary outcome was conducted. Self-rated sleep duration, clinical examinations, echocardiography, and blood samples (N-terminal fragment of proBNP) were collected. A total of 675 persons (50% women; mean age, 78 years) were divided into short sleepers (≤6 hours; n = 231), normal sleepers (7-8 hours; n = 338), and long sleepers (≥9 hours; n = 61). Data were subjected to principal component analyses. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and hypertension factors were extracted and used as moderators and as mediators in the regression analyses.

    RESULTS: During follow-up, 55 short sleepers (24%), 68 normal sleepers (20%), and 21 long sleepers (34%) died. Mediator analyses showed that long sleep was associated with mortality in men (hazard ratio [HR], 1.8; P = .049), independently of CVD and hypertension. In men with short sleep, CVD acted as a moderator of the association with mortality (HR, 4.1; P = .025). However, when using N-terminal fragment of proBNP, this effect became nonsignificant (HR, 3.1; P = .06). In woman, a trend to moderation involving the hypertension factor and short sleep was found (HR, 4.6; P = .09).

    CONCLUSION: Short and long sleep duration may be seen as risk markers, particularly among older men with cardiovascular morbidity.

  • 156.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Wahlin, Ake
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Sex-specific associations between self-reported sleep duration, depression, anxiety, fatigue and daytime sleepiness in an older community-dwelling population2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 290-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to explore whether associations between self-reported sleep duration, depressive symptoms, anxiety, fatigue and daytime sleepiness differed in older community-dwelling men and women. DesignCross-sectional. MethodsA community-dwelling sample of 675 older men and women (mean age 77.7years, SD 3.8years) was used. All participants underwent a clinical examination by a cardiologist. Validated questionnaires were used to investigate sleep duration, depressive symptoms, anxiety, fatigue and daytime sleepiness. Subjects were divided into short sleepers (6hours), n=231; normal sleepers (7-8hours), n=338; and long sleepers (9hours), n=61. ancovas were used to explore sex-specific effects. ResultsDepressive symptoms were associated with short sleep in men, but not in women. Fatigue was associated with both short and long sleep duration in men. No sex-specific associations of sleep duration with daytime sleepiness or anxiety were found. ConclusionNurses investigating sleep duration and its correlates, or effects, in clinical practice need to take sex into account, as some associations may be sex specific. Depressive symptoms and fatigue can be used as indicators to identify older men with sleep complaints.

  • 157.
    Buck, Harleah G.
    et al.
    Univ S Florida, FL 33620 USA.
    Bekelman, David
    Univ Colorado Denver Anschutz Med Campus, CO USA.
    Cameron, Jan
    Monash Univ, Australia.
    Chung, Misook
    Univ Kentucky, KY USA.
    Hooker, Stephanie
    Univ Minnesota Twin Cities, MN USA.
    Pucciarelli, Gianluca
    Univ Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Riegel, Barbara
    Univ Penn, PA 19104 USA.
    Vellone, Ercole
    Univ Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    A body of work, a missed opportunity: Dyadic research in older adults2019In: Journal of The American Geriatrics Society, ISSN 0002-8614, E-ISSN 1532-5415, Vol. 67, no 4, p. 854-855Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 158.
    Buck, Harleah G.
    et al.
    Univ S Florida, FL 33612 USA.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Chung, Misook L.
    Univ Kentucky, KY USA.
    Donovan, Kristine A.
    Moffit Canc Ctr, FL USA.
    Harkness, Karen
    McMaster Univ, Canada.
    Howard, Allison M.
    Univ S Florida, FL USA.
    Perkiö Kato, Naoko
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Polo, Randall
    Univ S Florida, FL USA.
    Evangelista, Lorraine S.
    Univ Calif Irvine, CA 92697 USA.
    A systematic review of heart failure dyadic self-care interventions focusing on intervention components, contexts, and outcomes2018In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 77, p. 232-242Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Having support from an informal carer is important for heart failure patients. Carers have the potential to improve patient self-care. At the same time, it should be acknowledged that caregiving could affect the carer negatively and cause emotional reactions of burden and stress. Dyadic (patient and informal carer) heart failure self-care interventions seek to improve patient self-care such as adherence to medical treatment, exercise training, symptom monitoring and symptom management when needed. Currently, no systematic assessment of dyadic interventions has been conducted with a focus on describing components, examining physical and delivery contexts, or determining the effect on patient and/or carer outcomes. Objective: To examine the components, context, and outcomes of dyadic self-care interventions. Design: A systematic review registered in PROSPERO, following PRISMA guidelines with a narrative analysis and realist synthesis. Data Sources: PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, PsycINFO, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched using MeSH, EMTREE terms, keywords, and keyword phrases for the following concepts: dyadic, carers, heart failure and intervention. Eligible studies were original research, written in English, on dyadic self-care interventions in adult samples. Review methods: We used a two-tiered analytic approach including both completed studies with power to determine outcomes and ongoing studies including abstracts, small pilot studies and protocols to forecast future directions. Results: Eighteen papers - 12 unique, completed intervention studies (two quasi- and ten experimental trials) from 2000 to 2016 were reviewed. Intervention components fell into three groups education, support, and guidance. Interventions were implemented in 5 countries, across multiple settings of care, and involved 3 delivery modes face to face, telephone or technology based. Dyadic intervention effects on cognitive, behavioral, affective and health services utilization outcomes were found within studies. However, findings across studies were inconclusive as some studies reported positive and some non-sustaining outcomes on the same variables. All the included papers had methodological limitations including insufficient sample size, mixed intervention effects and counter-intuitive outcomes. Conclusions: We found that the evidence from dyadic interventions to promote heart failure self-care, while growing, is still very limited. Future research needs to involve advanced sample size justification, innovative solutions to increase and sustain behavior change, and use of mixed methods for capturing a more holistic picture of effects in clinical practice.

  • 159.
    Burman, Pia
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Eden-Engstrom, Britt
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Ekman, Bertil
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Anders Karlsson, F.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Schwarcz, Erik
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Wahlberg Topp, Jeanette
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Limited value of cabergoline in Cushings disease: a prospective study of a 6-week treatment in 20 patients2016In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 174, no 1, p. 17-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context and objective: The role of cabergoline in Cushings disease (CD) remains controversial. The experience is limited to case reports and few open studies that report the effects determined after &gt;= 1 month of treatment. In prolactinomas and dopamine-responsive GH-secreting tumours, effects of cabergoline are seen within days or weeks. Here, we searched for short-term effects of cabergoline in CD. Design: Twenty patients (19 naive and one recurrent) were included in a prospective study. Cabergoline was administered in increasing doses of 0.5-5 mg/week over 6 weeks. Methods: Urinary free cortisol (UFC) 24 h, morning cortisol and ACTH, and salivary cortisol at 0800, 1600 and 2300 h were determined once weekly throughout. Diurnal curves (six samples) of serum cortisol were measured at start and end. Results: At study end, the median cabergoline dose was 5 mg, range 2.5-5 mg/week. The prolactin levels, markers of compliance, were suppressed in all patients. During the treatment, hypercortisolism varied, gradual and dose-dependent reductions were not seen. Five patients had a &gt;50% decrease of UFC, three had a &gt;50% rise of UFC. Salivary cortisol at 2300 h showed a congruent &gt;50% change with UFC in two of the five cases with decreased UFC, and in one of the three cases with increased UFC. One patient with decreases in both UFC and 2300 h salivary cortisol also had a reduction in diurnal serum cortisol during the course of the study. Conclusions: Cabergoline seems to be of little value in the management of CD. Only one patient had a response-like pattern. Given the known variability of disease activity in CD, this might represent a chance finding.

  • 160.
    Bustamante, Mariana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Gupta, Vikas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Improving visualization of 4D flow cardiovascular magnetic resonance with four-dimensional angiographic data: generation of a 4D phase-contrast magnetic resonance CardioAngiography (4D PC-MRCA)2017In: Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, ISSN 1097-6647, E-ISSN 1532-429X, Vol. 19, article id 47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) and Phase-Contrast MRA (PC-MRA) approaches used for assessment of cardiovascular morphology typically result in data containing information from the entire cardiac cycle combined into one 2D or 3D image. Information specific to each timeframe of the cardiac cycle is, however, lost in this process. This study proposes a novel technique, called Phase-Contrast Magnetic Resonance CardioAngiography (4D PC-MRCA), that utilizes the full potential of 4D Flow CMR when generating temporally resolved PC-MRA data to improve visualization of the heart and major vessels throughout the cardiac cycle. Using non-rigid registration between the timeframes of the 4D Flow CMR acquisition, the technique concentrates information from the entire cardiac cycle into an angiographic dataset at one specific timeframe, taking movement over the cardiac cycle into account. Registration between the timeframes is used once more to generate a time-resolved angiography. The method was evaluated in ten healthy volunteers. Visual comparison of the 4D PC-MRCAs versus PC-MRAs generated from 4D Flow CMR using the traditional approach was performed by two observers using Maximum Intensity Projections (MIPs). The 4D PC-MRCAs resulted in better visibility of the main anatomical regions of the cardiovascular system, especially where cardiac or vessel motion was present. The proposed method represents an improvement over previous PC-MRA generation techniques that rely on 4D Flow CMR, as it effectively utilizes all the information available in the acquisition. The 4D PC-MRCA can be used to visualize the motion of the heart and major vessels throughout the entire cardiac cycle.

  • 161.
    Bustamante, Mariana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Gupta, Vikas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Forsberg, Daniel
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Sectra, Linköping, Sweden.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Automated multi-atlas segmentation of cardiac 4D flow MRI2018In: Medical Image Analysis, ISSN 1361-8415, E-ISSN 1361-8423, Vol. 49, p. 128-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Four-dimensional (4D) flow magnetic resonance imaging (4D Flow MRI) enables acquisition of time-resolved three-directional velocity data in the entire heart and all major thoracic vessels. The segmentation of these tissues is typically performed using semi-automatic methods. Some of which primarily rely on the velocity data and result in a segmentation of the vessels only during the systolic phases. Other methods, mostly applied on the heart, rely on separately acquired balanced Steady State Free Precession (b-SSFP) MR images, after which the segmentations are superimposed on the 4D Flow MRI. While b-SSFP images typically cover the whole cardiac cycle and have good contrast, they suffer from a number of problems, such as large slice thickness, limited coverage of the cardiac anatomy, and being prone to displacement errors caused by respiratory motion. To address these limitations we propose a multi-atlas segmentation method, which relies only on 4D Flow MRI data, to automatically generate four-dimensional segmentations that include the entire thoracic cardiovascular system present in these datasets. The approach was evaluated on 4D Flow MR datasets from a cohort of 27 healthy volunteers and 83 patients with mildly impaired systolic left-ventricular function. Comparison of manual and automatic segmentations of the cardiac chambers at end-systolic and end-diastolic timeframes showed agreements comparable to those previously reported for automatic segmentation methods of b-SSFP MR images. Furthermore, automatic segmentation of the entire thoracic cardiovascular system improves visualization of 4D Flow MRI and facilitates computation of hemodynamic parameters.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-08-13 11:32
  • 162.
    Bustamante, Mariana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Petersson, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Jonatan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Atlas-based analysis of 4D flow CMR: Automated vessel segmentation and flow quantification2015In: Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, ISSN 1097-6647, E-ISSN 1532-429X, Vol. 17, no 87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Flow volume quantification in the great thoracic vessels is used in the assessment of several cardiovascular diseases. Clinically, it is often based on semi-automatic segmentation of a vessel throughout the cardiac cycle in 2D cine phase-contrast Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) images. Three-dimensional (3D), time-resolved phase-contrast CMR with three-directional velocity encoding (4D flow CMR) permits assessment of net flow volumes and flow patterns retrospectively at any location in a time-resolved 3D volume. However, analysis of these datasets can be demanding. The aim of this study is to develop and evaluate a fully automatic method for segmentation and analysis of 4D flow CMR data of the great thoracic vessels. Methods: The proposed method utilizes atlas-based segmentation to segment the great thoracic vessels in systole, and registration between different time frames of the cardiac cycle in order to segment these vessels over time. Additionally, net flow volumes are calculated automatically at locations of interest. The method was applied on 4D flow CMR datasets obtained from 11 healthy volunteers and 10 patients with heart failure. Evaluation of the method was performed visually, and by comparison of net flow volumes in the ascending aorta obtained automatically (using the proposed method), and semi-automatically. Further evaluation was done by comparison of net flow volumes obtained automatically at different locations in the aorta, pulmonary artery, and caval veins. Results: Visual evaluation of the generated segmentations resulted in good outcomes for all the major vessels in all but one dataset. The comparison between automatically and semi-automatically obtained net flow volumes in the ascending aorta resulted in very high correlation (r(2) = 0.926). Moreover, comparison of the net flow volumes obtained automatically in other vessel locations also produced high correlations where expected: pulmonary trunk vs. proximal ascending aorta (r(2) = 0.955), pulmonary trunk vs. pulmonary branches (r(2) = 0.808), and pulmonary trunk vs. caval veins (r(2) = 0.906). Conclusions: The proposed method allows for automatic analysis of 4D flow CMR data, including vessel segmentation, assessment of flow volumes at locations of interest, and 4D flow visualization. This constitutes an important step towards facilitating the clinical utility of 4D flow CMR.

  • 163.
    Buzzetti, Elena
    et al.
    Royal Free Hosp, England; UCL, England.
    Hall, Andrew
    Royal Free Hosp, England; Royal Free Hosp, England.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Manuguerra, Roberta
    Royal Free Hosp, England.
    Misas, Marta Guerrero
    Royal Free Hosp, England; UCL, England.
    Covelli, Claudia
    Royal Free Hosp, England.
    Leandro, Gioacchino
    S de Bellis Res Hosp, Italy.
    Luong, TuVinh
    Royal Free Hosp, England.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Manesis, Emanuel K.
    Hippokrateion Hosp, Greece.
    Pinzani, Massimo
    Royal Free Hosp, England; UCL, England.
    Dhillon, Amar P.
    Royal Free Hosp, England.
    Tsochatzis, Emmanuel A.
    Royal Free Hosp, England; UCL, England.
    Collagen proportionate area is an independent predictor of long-term outcome in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease2019In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, ISSN 0269-2813, E-ISSN 1365-2036, Vol. 49, no 9, p. 1214-1222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Collagen proportionate area (CPA) measurement is a technique that quantifies fibrous tissue in liver biopsies by measuring the amount of collagen deposition as a proportion of the total biopsy area. CPA predicts clinical outcomes in patients with HCV and can sub-classify cirrhosis. Aim To test the ability of CPA to quantify fibrosis and predict clinical outcomes in patients with NAFLD. Methods We assessed consecutive patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD from three European centres. Clinical and laboratory data were collected at baseline and at the time of the last clinical follow-up or death. CPA was performed at two different objective magnifications, whole biopsy macro and x4 objective magnification, named standard (SM) and high (HM) magnification respectively. The correlation between CPA and liver stiffness was assessed in a sub-group of patients. Results Of 437 patients, 32 (7.3%) decompensated and/or died from liver-related causes during a median follow-up of 103 months. CPA correlated with liver stiffness and liver fibrosis stage across the whole spectrum of fibrosis. HM CPA was significantly higher than SM CPA in stages F0-F3 but similar in cirrhosis, reflecting a higher ability to capture pericellular/perisinusoidal fibrosis at early stages. Age at baseline (HR: 1.04, 95% CI: 1.01-1.08), HM CPA (HR: 1.04 per 1% increase, 95% CI: 1.01-1.08) and presence of advanced fibrosis (HR: 15.4, 95% CI: 5.02-47.84) were independent predictors of liver-related clinical outcomes at standard and competing risk multivariate Cox-regression analysis. Conclusions CPA accurately measures fibrosis and is an independent predictor of clinical outcomes in NAFLD; hence it merits further evaluation as a surrogate endpoint in clinical trials.

  • 164. Bäckman, C
    et al.
    Ahlberg, M
    Jones, C
    Walther, S
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science.
    Group conversations after a long stay in the intensive care2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 165.
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Carlsson, Anders K
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Olausson, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Multivariate proteomic analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with peripheral neuropathic pain and healthy controls: a hypothesis-generating pilot study2015In: Journal of Pain Research, ISSN 1178-7090, E-ISSN 1178-7090, Vol. 8, p. 321-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pain medicine lacks objective biomarkers to guide diagnosis and treatment. Combining two-dimensional gel proteomics with multivariate data analysis by projection, we exploratively analyzed the cerebrospinal fluid of eleven patients with severe peripheral neuropathic pain due to trauma and/or surgery refractory to conventional treatment and eleven healthy controls. Using orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis, we identified a panel of 36 proteins highly discriminating between the two groups. Due to a possible confounding effect of age, a new model with age as outcome variable was computed for patients (n=11), and four out of 36 protein spots were excluded due to a probable influence of age. Of the 32 remaining proteins, the following seven had the highest discriminatory power between the two groups: an isoform of angiotensinogen (upregulated in patients), two isoforms of alpha-1-antitrypsin (downregulated in patients), three isoforms of haptoglobin (upregulated in patients), and one isoform of pigment epithelium-derived factor (downregulated in patients). It has recently been hypothesized that the renin–angiotensin system may play a role in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain, and a clinical trial of an angiotensin II receptor antagonist was recently published. It is noteworthy that when searching for neuropathic pain biomarkers with a purely explorative methodology, it was indeed a renin–angiotensin system protein that had the highest discriminatory power between patients and controls in the present study. The results from this hypothesis-generating pilot study have to be confirmed in larger, hypothesis-driven studies with age-matched controls, but the present study illustrates the fruitfulness of combining proteomics with multivariate data analysis in hypothesis-generating pain biomarker studies in humans.

  • 166.
    Cacciata, Marysol
    et al.
    Univ Calif Irvine, CA 92697 USA.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lee, Jung-Ah
    Univ Calif Irvine, CA 92697 USA.
    Sorkin, Dara
    Univ Calif Irvine, CA USA.
    Lombardo, Dawn
    Univ Calif Irvine Hlth, CA USA.
    Clancy, Steve
    Univ Calif Irvine, CA USA.
    Nyamathi, Adeline
    Univ Calif Irvine, CA 92697 USA.
    Evangelist, Lorraine S.
    Univ Calif Irvine, CA 92697 USA.
    Effect of exergaming on health-related quality of life in older adults: A systematic review2019In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 93, p. 30-40Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Exercise through video or virtual reality games (i.e. exergames) has grown in popularity among older adults; however, there is limited evidence on efficacy of exergaming on well-being related to health in this population. This systematic review examined the effectiveness of exergaming on health related quality of life in older adults. Methods: PRISMA guidelines for this systematic review. Several databases were searched using keywords to identify peer-reviewed journal articles in English. Randomized control trials that evaluated the effect of exergaming on health-related quality of life in older adults when compared to a control group and published between January 2007 to May 2017 were included. Results: Nine articles that in total included 614 older adults with varying levels of disability, mean age 73.6 + 7.9 years old, and 67% female were analyzed. Significant improvements in health-related quality of life of older adults engaged in exergaming were reported in three studies. Sample sizes were small in 7 of the studies (N amp;lt; 60). The study participants, exergaming platforms, health-related quality of life instruments, study settings and length, duration and frequency of exergaming varied across studies. Conclusion: Exergaming is a new emerging form of exercise that is popular among older adults. However, findings from this analysis were not strong enough to warrant recommendation due to the small sample sizes and heterogeneity in the study participants, exergaming platforms, health-related quality of life instruments, length, duration and frequency of the intervention and study settings. Further research is needed with larger sample sizes and less heterogeneity to adequately explore the true effects of exergaming on health-related quality of life of older adults. (C) 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 167.
    Cadrin-Tourigny, Julia
    et al.
    Johns Hopkins Univ Hosp, MD 21287 USA; Univ Montreal, Canada.
    Bosman, Laurens P.
    Netherlands Heart Inst, Netherlands; Univ Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Nozza, Anna
    Univ Montreal, Canada.
    Wang, Weijia
    Johns Hopkins Univ Hosp, MD 21287 USA.
    Tadros, Rafik
    Univ Montreal, Canada.
    Bhonsale, Aditya
    Johns Hopkins Univ Hosp, MD 21287 USA.
    Bourfiss, Mimount
    Univ Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Fortier, Annik
    Univ Montreal, Canada.
    Lie, Oyvind H.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Saguner, Ardan M.
    Univ Heart Ctr Zurich, Switzerland.
    Svensson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Andorin, Antoine
    Univ Montreal, Canada.
    Tichnell, Crystal
    Johns Hopkins Univ Hosp, MD 21287 USA.
    Murray, Brittney
    Johns Hopkins Univ Hosp, MD 21287 USA.
    Zeppenfeld, Katja
    Leiden Univ, Netherlands.
    van den Berg, Maarten P.
    Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Netherlands.
    Asselbergs, Folkert W.
    Netherlands Heart Inst, Netherlands; Univ Utrecht, Netherlands; UCL, England.
    Wilde, Arthur A. M.
    Univ Amsterdam Heart Ctr, AZ 1105 USA.
    Krahn, Andrew D.
    Univ British Columbia, Canada.
    Talajic, Mario
    Univ Montreal, Canada.
    Rivard, Lena
    Univ Montreal, Canada.
    Chelko, Stephen
    Johns Hopkins Univ Hosp, MD 21287 USA.
    Zimmerman, Stefan L.
    Johns Hopkins Univ Hosp, MD 21287 USA.
    Kamel, Ihab R.
    Johns Hopkins Univ Hosp, MD 21287 USA.
    Crosson, Jane E.
    Johns Hopkins Univ Hosp, MD 21287 USA.
    Judge, Daniel P.
    Johns Hopkins Univ Hosp, MD 21287 USA.
    Yap, Sing-Chien
    Erasmus MC, Netherlands.
    van der Heijden, Jeroen F.
    Univ Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Tandri, Harikrishna
    Johns Hopkins Univ Hosp, MD 21287 USA.
    Jongbloed, Jan D. H.
    Univ Groningen, Netherlands.
    Guertin, Marie-Claude
    Univ Montreal, Canada.
    van Tintelen, J. Peter
    Netherlands Heart Inst, Netherlands; Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Platonov, Pyotr G.
    Lund Univ Hosptial, Sweden.
    Duru, Firat
    Univ Heart Ctr Zurich, Switzerland.
    Haugaa, Kristina H.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Khairy, Paul
    Univ Montreal, Canada.
    Hauer, Richard N. W.
    Netherlands Heart Inst, Netherlands; Univ Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Calkins, Hugh
    Johns Hopkins Univ Hosp, MD 21287 USA.
    te Riele, Anneline S. J. M.
    Netherlands Heart Inst, Netherlands; Univ Utrecht, Netherlands.
    James, Cynthia A.
    Johns Hopkins Univ Hosp, MD 21287 USA.
    A new prediction model for ventricular arrhythmias in arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy2019In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 40, no 23, p. 1850-1858Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is characterized by ventricular arrhythmias (VAs) and sudden cardiac death (SCD). We aimed to develop a model for individualized prediction of incident VA/SCD in ARVC patients. Methods and results Five hundred and twenty-eight patients with a definite diagnosis and no history of sustained VAs/SCD at baseline, aged 38.2 +/- 15.5 years, 44.7% male, were enrolled from five registries in North America and Europe. Over 4.83 (interquartile range 2.44-9.33) years of follow-up, 146 (27.7%) experienced sustained VA, defined as SCD, aborted SCD, sustained ventricular tachycardia, or appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy. A prediction model estimating annual VA risk was developed using Cox regression with internal validation. Eight potential predictors were pre-specified: age, sex, cardiac syncope in the prior 6 months, non-sustained ventricular tachycardia, number of premature ventricular complexes in 24 h, number of leads with T-wave inversion, and right and left ventricular ejection fractions (LVEFs). All except LVEF were retained in the final model. The model accurately distinguished patients with and without events, with an optimism-corrected C-index of 0.77 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.73-0.81] and minimal over-optimism [calibration slope of 0.93 (95% CI 0.92-0.95)]. By decision curve analysis, the clinical benefit of the model was superior to a current consensus-based ICD placement algorithm with a 20.6% reduction of ICD placements with the same proportion of protected patients (P amp;lt; 0.001). Conclusion Using the largest cohort of patients with ARVC and no prior VA, a prediction model using readily available clinical parameters was devised to estimate VA risk and guide decisions regarding primary prevention ICDs (www.arvcrisk.com).

  • 168.
    Cardona-Guarache, Ricardo
    et al.
    Univ Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Åström-Aneq, Meriam
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Oesterle, Adam
    Univ Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Asirvatham, Roshini
    Univ Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Svetlichnaya, Jana
    Kaiser Permanente, CA USA.
    Marcus, Gregory M.
    Univ Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Gerstenfeld, Edward P.
    Univ Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Klein, Liviu
    Univ Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Scheinman, Melvin M.
    Univ Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Atrial arrhythmias in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy: Prevalence, echocardiographic predictors, and treatment2019In: Cardiovascular Electrophysiology, ISSN 1045-3873, E-ISSN 1540-8167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    The clinical role of atrial arrhythmias (AA) in arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) and the echocardiographic variables that predict them are not well defined. We describe the prevalence, types, echocardiographic predictors, and management of AA in patients with ARVC.

    Methods

    We retrospectively evaluated medical records of 117 patients with definite ARVC (2010 Task Force Criteria) from two tertiary care centers. We identified those patients with sustained AA (>30 seconds), including atrial fibrillation (AF), atrial flutter (AFL), and atrial tachycardia (AT). We collected demographic, genetic, and clinical data. The median follow‐up was 3.4 years (interquartile range = 2.0‐5.7).

    Results

    Total 26 patients (22%) had one or more types of AA: AF (n = 19), AFL (n = 9), and AT (n = 8). We performed genetic testing on 84 patients with ARVC (71.8%). Two patients with AA (8%) had peripheral emboli, and one patient (4%) suffered inappropriate implantable cardioverter‐defibrillator shock. We performed catheter ablation of AA in eight patients (31%), with no procedural complications. Right atrial area and left atrial volume index were independently associated with increased odds of AA; odds ratio (OR), 1.1 (95% confidence interval [CI]:1.02‐1.16) (P = .01) and OR, 1.1 (95% CI:1.03‐1.15) (P = .003), respectively. An increase in tricuspid annular plane peak systolic excursion was independently associated with reduced odds; OR, 0.3 (95% CI: 0.1‐0.94) (P = .003).

    Conclusions

    Atrial arrhythmias (AA) are common in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC). Inappropriate shocks and systemic emboli may be associated with AA. Atrial size and right ventricular dysfunction may help identify patients with ARVC at increased odds of AA.

  • 169.
    Cardona-Guarache, Ricardo
    et al.
    Univ Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Åström-Aneq, Meriam
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Oesterle, Adam
    Univ Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Asirvatham, Roshini
    Univ Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Svetlichnaya, Jana
    Kaiser Permanente, CA USA.
    Marcus, Gregory M.
    Univ Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Gerstenfeld, Edward P.
    Univ Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Klein, Liviu
    Univ Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Scheinman, Melvin M.
    Univ Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Atrial arrhythmias in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy: Prevalence, echocardiographic predictors, and treatment2019In: Cardiovascular Electrophysiology, ISSN 1045-3873, E-ISSN 1540-8167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    The clinical role of atrial arrhythmias (AA) in arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) and the echocardiographic variables that predict them are not well defined. We describe the prevalence, types, echocardiographic predictors, and management of AA in patients with ARVC.

    Methods

    We retrospectively evaluated medical records of 117 patients with definite ARVC (2010 Task Force Criteria) from two tertiary care centers. We identified those patients with sustained AA (>30 seconds), including atrial fibrillation (AF), atrial flutter (AFL), and atrial tachycardia (AT). We collected demographic, genetic, and clinical data. The median follow‐up was 3.4 years (interquartile range = 2.0‐5.7).

    Results

    Total 26 patients (22%) had one or more types of AA: AF (n = 19), AFL (n = 9), and AT (n = 8). We performed genetic testing on 84 patients with ARVC (71.8%). Two patients with AA (8%) had peripheral emboli, and one patient (4%) suffered inappropriate implantable cardioverter‐defibrillator shock. We performed catheter ablation of AA in eight patients (31%), with no procedural complications. Right atrial area and left atrial volume index were independently associated with increased odds of AA; odds ratio (OR), 1.1 (95% confidence interval [CI]:1.02‐1.16) (P = .01) and OR, 1.1 (95% CI:1.03‐1.15) (P = .003), respectively. An increase in tricuspid annular plane peak systolic excursion was independently associated with reduced odds; OR, 0.3 (95% CI: 0.1‐0.94) (P = .003).

    Conclusions

    Atrial arrhythmias (AA) are common in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC). Inappropriate shocks and systemic emboli may be associated with AA. Atrial size and right ventricular dysfunction may help identify patients with ARVC at increased odds of AA.

  • 170.
    Carlsson Almlöf, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Alexsson, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Imgenberg-Kreuz, Juliana
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sylwan, Lina
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Backlin, Christofer
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Leonard, Dag
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Nordmark, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Tandre, Karolina
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Eloranta, Maija-Leena
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Padyukov, Leonid
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Christine
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Jonsen, Andreas
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Rantapaa Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Bengtsson, Anders A.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Iva
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Ronnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sandling, Johanna K.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Syvanen, Ann-Christine
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Novel risk genes for systemic lupus erythematosus predicted by random forest classification2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 6236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genome-wide association studies have identified risk loci for SLE, but a large proportion of the genetic contribution to SLE still remains unexplained. To detect novel risk genes, and to predict an individuals SLE risk we designed a random forest classifier using SNP genotype data generated on the "Immunochip" from 1,160 patients with SLE and 2,711 controls. Using gene importance scores defined by the random forest classifier, we identified 15 potential novel risk genes for SLE. Of them 12 are associated with other autoimmune diseases than SLE, whereas three genes (ZNF804A, CDK1, and MANF) have not previously been associated with autoimmunity. Random forest classification also allowed prediction of patients at risk for lupus nephritis with an area under the curve of 0.94. By allele-specific gene expression analysis we detected cis-regulatory SNPs that affect the expression levels of six of the top 40 genes designed by the random forest analysis, indicating a regulatory role for the identified risk variants. The 40 top genes from the prediction were overrepresented for differential expression in B and T cells according to RNA-sequencing of samples from five healthy donors, with more frequent over-expression in B cells compared to T cells.

  • 171.
    Carlsson Almlöf, Jonas Carlsson
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Nystedt, Sara
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Leonard, Dag
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Eloranta, Maija-Leena
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Grosso, Giorgia
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Bengtsson, Anders A.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Jonsen, Andreas
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Iva
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Sandling, Johanna K.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Syvanen, Ann-Christine
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Whole-genome sequencing identifies complex contributions to genetic risk by variants in genes causing monogenic systemic lupus erythematosus2019In: Human Genetics, ISSN 0340-6717, E-ISSN 1432-1203, Vol. 138, no 2, p. 141-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, OMIM 152700) is a systemic autoimmune disease with a complex etiology. The mode of inheritance of the genetic risk beyond familial SLE cases is currently unknown. Additionally, the contribution of heterozygous variants in genes known to cause monogenic SLE is not fully understood. Whole-genome sequencing of DNA samples from 71 Swedish patients with SLE and their healthy biological parents was performed to investigate the general genetic risk of SLE using known SLE GWAS risk loci identified using the ImmunoChip, variants in genes associated to monogenic SLE, and the mode of inheritance of SLE risk alleles in these families. A random forest model for predicting genetic risk for SLE showed that the SLE risk variants were mainly inherited from one of the parents. In the 71 patients, we detected a significant enrichment of ultra-rare (0.1%) missense and nonsense mutations in 22 genes known to cause monogenic forms of SLE. We identified one previously reported homozygous nonsense mutation in the C1QC (Complement C1q C Chain) gene, which explains the immunodeficiency and severe SLE phenotype of that patient. We also identified seven ultra-rare, coding heterozygous variants in five genes (C1S, DNASE1L3, DNASE1, IFIH1, and RNASEH2A) involved in monogenic SLE. Our findings indicate a complex contribution to the overall genetic risk of SLE by rare variants in genes associated with monogenic forms of SLE. The rare variants were inherited from the other parent than the one who passed on the more common risk variants leading to an increased genetic burden for SLE in the child. Higher frequency SLE risk variants are mostly passed from one of the parents to the offspring affected with SLE. In contrast, the other parent, in seven cases, contributed heterozygous rare variants in genes associated with monogenic forms of SLE, suggesting a larger impact of rare variants in SLE than hitherto reported.

  • 172.
    Carlsson, Annica
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden; Ängelholm Hospital, Sweden.
    Svensson, Åke
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Baranovskaya, Irina
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Hindsen-Stenstrom, Monica
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Holt, Ingebjorg
    Angelholm Hospital, Sweden.
    Meding, Birgitta
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Stenberg, Berndt
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Ganemo, Agneta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Scoring of Hand Eczema: Good Reliability of the Hand Eczema Extent Score (HEES)2017In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 97, no 2, p. 193-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is good agreement between dermatological staff and patients using the Hand Eczema Extent Score (HEES). The aim of this study was to assess inter-and intra-observer reliability of the HEES in dermatologists and intra-observer reliability of the HEES in patients with hand eczema. Six dermatologists assessed 18 patients twice. Only the hands of the patients were visible to the assessors. Patients performed a selfassessment twice. Inter-and intra-observer reliability was tested with intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The mean HEES score for all dermatologists assessments was 21.0 (range 3.6-46.3). The corresponding mean scores for all patients own assessments were 24.9 (range 4.0-54.0). Inter-observer reliability in the dermatologists observations ICC classification was very good, median value 0.82 (range 0.56-0.92). The overall intra-observer reliability for the 6 dermatologists ICC classification was very good (range 0.88-0.94). Intra-observer reliability in the patients 2 self-assessments ICC classification was very good (ICC 0.95). In conclusion, HEES is a reliable tool for both dermatologists and patients to grade the extent of hand eczema.

  • 173.
    Carlsson, Axel C.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, "Primary Health Care in Motala".
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Jennersjö, Pär
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Arnlov, Johan
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Dalarna University,Falun Sweden.
    Association of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 with nephropathy, cardiovascular events, and total mortality in type 2 diabetes2016In: Cardiovascular Diabetology, ISSN 1475-2840, E-ISSN 1475-2840, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 40-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims/hypothesis: Soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 (sTNFR1 and sTNFR2) contribute to experimental diabetic kidney disease, a condition with substantially increased cardiovascular risk when present in patients. Therefore, we aimed to explore the levels of sTNFRs, and their association with prevalent kidney disease, incident cardiovascular disease, and risk of mortality independently of baseline kidney function and microalbuminuria in a cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes. In pre-defined secondary analyses we also investigated whether the sTNFRs predict adverse outcome in the absence of diabetic kidney disease. Methods: The CARDIPP study, a cohort study of 607 diabetes patients [mean age 61 years, 44 % women, 45 cardiovascular events (fatal/non-fatal myocardial infarction or stroke) and 44 deaths during follow-up (mean 7.6 years)] was used. Results: Higher sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 were associated with higher odds of prevalent kidney disease [odd ratio (OR) per standard deviation (SD) increase 1.60, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.32-1.93, p &lt; 0.001 and OR 1.54, 95 % CI 1.21-1.97, p = 0.001, respectively]. In Cox regression models adjusting for age, sex, glomerular filtration rate and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio, higher sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 predicted incident cardiovascular events [hazard ratio (HR) per SD increase, 1.66, 95 % CI 1.29-2.174, p &lt; 0.001 and HR 1.47, 95 % CI 1.13-1.91, p = 0.004, respectively]. Results were similar in separate models with adjustments for inflammatory markers, HbA1c, or established cardiovascular risk factors, or when participants with diabetic kidney disease at baseline were excluded (p &lt; 0.01 for all). Both sTNFRs were associated with mortality. Conclusions/Interpretations: Higher circulating sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 are associated with diabetic kidney disease, and predicts incident cardiovascular disease and mortality independently of microalbuminuria and kidney function, even in those without kidney disease. Our findings support the clinical utility of sTNFRs as prognostic markers in type 2 diabetes.

  • 174.
    Carlsson, Axel Carl
    et al.
    Division of Family Medicine, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular Epidemiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, "Primary Health Care in Motala".
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Larsson, Anders
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular Epidemiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; School of Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    The association between endostatin and kidney disease and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes2016In: Diabetes & Metabolism, ISSN 1262-3636, E-ISSN 1878-1780, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 351-357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Circulating endostatin, a biologically active derivate of collagen XVIII, is considered to be a marker of kidney disease and a risk factor for its related mortality. However, less is known of the role of endostatin in diabetes and the development of diabetic nephropathy. For this reason, our study investigated the associations between circulating endostatin and the prevalence and progression of kidney disease, and its mortality risk in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D).

    METHODS: This was a cohort study of 607 patients with T2D (mean age: 61 years, 44% women). Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), calculated using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) creatinine equation, was used to assess the patients' kidney function decline and mortality.

    RESULTS: Of the total study cohort, 20 patients declined by ≥20% in eGFR over 4 years, and 44 died during the follow-up (mean duration: 6.7 years). At baseline, participants with diabetic nephropathy (defined as eGFR<60mL/min/1.73m(2)) and/or microalbuminuria [defined as a urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR)>3g/mol] had higher median levels of endostatin than those without nephropathy (62.7μg/L vs 57.4μg/L, respectively; P=0.031). In longitudinal analyses adjusted for age, gender, baseline eGFR and ACR, higher endostatin levels were associated with a higher risk of decline (≥20% in eGFR, OR per 1 SD increase: 1.73, 95% CI: 1.13-2.65) and a higher risk of mortality (HR per 1 SD increase: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.19-2.07).

    CONCLUSION: In patients with T2D, circulating endostatin levels can predict the progression of kidney disease and mortality independently of established kidney disease markers. The clinical usefulness of endostatin as a risk marker in such patients merits further studies.

  • 175.
    Carlsson, R. M.
    et al.
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden; Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden; Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, L.
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden.
    Hallander, H. O.
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden.
    Ljungman, M.
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden.
    Olin, P.
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden.
    Gothefors, L.
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden; Umeå University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden.
    Netterlid, E.
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Two consecutive randomized controlled pertussis booster trials in children initially vaccinated in infancy with an acellular vaccine: The first with a five-component Tdap vaccine to 5-year olds and the second with five- or monocomponent Tdap vaccines at age 14-15 years2015In: Vaccine, ISSN 0264-410X, E-ISSN 1873-2518, Vol. 33, no 31, p. 3717-3725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prior study children from a DTaP efficacy trial were recruited at ages 5 and 15 years to randomized booster trials addressing immunogenicity and reactogenicity; 475 preschool children received mixed or separate injections of a reduced antigen vaccine (Tdap5, Sanofi Pasteur MSD) and an inactivated polio vaccine, and 230 adolescents received the same or another booster vaccine (Tdap1, SSI, Denmark). Pre-vaccination antibody concentrations against pertussis antigens were significantly higher at 15 than 5 years of age, probably due to natural boosting between the studies. Tdap5 induced comparable anti-PT concentrations at both ages, but antibody responses were significantly higher to filamentous haemagglutinin, pertactin and fimbriae 2/3 in adolescents. As expected, a higher amount of PT (Tdap1, 20 mu g) induced a stronger anti-PT response than a lower amount (Tdap5, 2.5 mu g). The frequency of adverse events was low and there were no serious adverse reactions. All local reactions had an early onset and a short duration. A large swelling or redness of more than half of the upper arm circumference was reported in 8/475 5-year-olds and in 6/230 15-year-olds. Children vaccinated with Tdap5 reported more moderate pain in adolescence than at preschool age, whereas itching was only reported in preschool children. Sweden introduced DTaP vaccines in 1996 after a 17-year hiatus with no general pertussis vaccination and pertussis was still endemic at the time of the studies. The frequency of adverse events was nevertheless low in both preschool children and adolescents and antibody responses were adequate. These studies document immunogenicity and reactogenicity in a trial cohort consecutively vaccinated with acellular pertussis vaccines from infancy to adolescence. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 176.
    Carlsson, R. M.
    et al.
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden; Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    von Segebaden, K.
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden.
    Bergstrom, J.
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden.
    Kling, A. M.
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lennart J
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Surveillance of infant pertussis in Sweden 1998-2012; severity of disease in relation to the national vaccination programme2015In: Eurosurveillance, ISSN 1025-496X, E-ISSN 1560-7917, Vol. 20, no 6, article id 21032Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, pertussis was excluded from the national vaccination programme in 1979 until acellular vaccination was introduced in a highly endemic setting in 1996. The general incidence dropped 10-fold within a decade, less in infants. Infant pertussis reached 40–45 cases per 100,000 in 2008 to 2012; few of these cases were older than five months. We present an observational 15-year study on the severity of infant pertussis based on 1,443 laboratory-confirmed cases prospectively identified from 1998 to 2012 in the national mandatory reporting system and followed up by telephone contact. Analyses were made in relation to age at onset of symptoms and vaccination history. Pertussis decreased in non-vaccinated infants (2003 to 2012, p < 0.001), indicating herd immunity, both in those too young to be vaccinated and those older than three months. The hospitalisation rates also decreased (last five-year period vs the previous five-year periods, p <0.001), but 70% of all cases in under three month-old infants and 99% of cases with apnoea due to pertussis were admitted to hospital in 1998 to 2012. Median duration of hospitalisation was seven days for unvaccinated vs four days for vaccinated infants aged 3–5 months. Nine unvaccinated infants died during the study period.

  • 177.
    Carlén, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Gustafsson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Åström, Meriam
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Exercise-induced ST depression in an asymptomatic population without coronary artery disease2019In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 206-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. Exercise electrocardiogram (ExECG) in low risk populations frequently generates false positive ST depression. We aimed to characterize factors that are associated with exercise-induced ST depression in asymptomatic men without coronary artery disease. Design. Cycle ergometer exercise tests from 509 male firefighters without imaging proof of significant coronary artery disease were analysed. Analysed test data included heart rate at rest before exercise, and workload, blood pressure, heart rate, ST depression and ST segment slope at peak exercise. ST depression of amp;gt;0.1 mV was considered significant (STdep). With a mean follow-up of 6.1 +/- 1.7 years, medical records were reviewed for cardiovascular diagnoses, hyperlipidemia and diabetes. Logistic regression analysis was used for risk assessment. Results. In total, 22% had STdep in amp;gt;= 1 lead. Subjects with STdep were older than those with normal ExECG (p amp;lt; .001). Downsloping STdep was more common in extremity leads (9%) than in precordial leads (2%). STdep was categorized according to location (precordial/extremity) and slope direction into eight categories. Larger age-adjusted heart rate increase predicted STdep in seven categories (p amp;lt; .05). Age-adjusted peak heart rate correlated with STdep in five categories, predominantly where the ST slope was positive. Peak blood pressure and exercise capacity were both associated with STdep in few categories. We found no association between STdep and hypertension, hyperlipidemia or diabetes (all p amp;gt; .05). Conclusions. In asymptomatic men with a physically demanding occupation and no coronary artery disease, both age and heart rate response were associated with ST depression, whereas common cardiovascular risk factors, blood pressure response and exercise capacity were not.

  • 178.
    Carlén, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Åström Aneq, Meriam
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Gustafsson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    ST/HR variables in firefighter exercise ECG: relation to ischemic heart disease2019In: Physiological Reports, E-ISSN 2051-817X, Vol. 7, no 2, article id e13968Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exercise electrocardiography (ExECG) is regularly performed by Swedish firefighters by law. Heart rate-corrected analysis of ST segment variables (ST/HR) has shown improved prediction of ischemic heart disease (IHD) compared to ST depression alone. This has not previously been extensively studied in asymptomatic persons with a low probability of IHD. We therefore evaluated the predictive performance of ST/HR analysis in firefighter ExECG. ExECG was studied in 521 male firefighters. During 8.4 ± 2.1 years, 2.3% (n = 12) were verified with IHD by catheterization or myocardial scintigraphy (age 51.5 ± 5.5 years) and were compared with firefighters without imaging proof of IHD (44.2 ± 10.1 years). The predictive value of ST depression, ST/HR index, ST/HR slope, and area and rotation of the ST/HR loop was calculated as age-adjusted odds ratios (OR), in 10 ECG leads. Predictive accuracy was analyzed with receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis. ST/HR index ≤-1.6 μV/bpm and ST/HR slope ≤-2.4 μV/bpm were associated with increased IHD risk in three individual leads (all OR > 1.0, P < 0.05). ST/HR loop area lower than the fifth percentile of non-IHD subjects indicated IHD risk in V4, V5, aVF, II, and -aVR (P < 0.05). ST depression ≤-0.1 mV was associated with IHD only in V4 (OR, 9.6, CI, 2.3-40.0). ROC analysis of each of these variables yielded areas under the curve of 0.72 or lower for all variables and leads. Clockwise-rotated ST/HR loops was associated with increased risk in most leads compared to counterclockwise rotation. The limited clinical value of ExECG in low-risk populations was emphasized, but if performed, ST/HR analysis should probably be given more importance.

  • 179.
    Carlén, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Åström Aneq, Meriam
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Gustafsson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Loaded treadmill walking and cycle ergometry to assess work capacity: a retrospective comparison in 424 firefighters.2017In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 37-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fitness of firefighters is regularly evaluated using exercise tests. We aimed to compare, with respect to age and body composition, two test modalities for the assessment work capacity. A total of 424 Swedish firefighters with cycle ergometer (CE) and treadmill (TM) tests available from Jan 2004 to Dec 2010 were included. We compared results from CE (6 min at 200 W, 250 W or incremental ramp exercise) with TM (6 min at 8° inclination, 4·5 km h(-1) or faster, wearing 24-kg protective equipment). Oxygen requirements were estimated by prediction equations. It was more common to pass the TM test and fail the supposedly equivalent CE test (20%), than vice versa (0·5%), P<0·001. Low age and tall stature were significant predictors of passing both CE and TM tests (P<0·05), while low body mass predicted accomplishment of TM test only (P = 0·006). Firefighters who passed the TM but failed the supposedly equivalent CE test within 12 months had significantly lower body mass, lower BMI, lower BSA and shorter stature than did those who passed both tests. Calculated oxygen uptake was higher in TM tests compared with corresponding CE tests (P<0·001). Body constitution affected approval differently depending on the test modality. A higher approval rate in TM testing suggests lower cardiorespiratory requirements compared with CE testing, even though estimated oxygen uptake was higher during TM testing. The relevance of our findings in relation to the occupational demands needs reconsidering.

  • 180.
    Casas Garcia, Belén
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lantz, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    4D Flow MRI-Based Pressure Loss Estimation in Stenotic Flows: Evaluation Using Numerical Simulations2016In: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, ISSN 0740-3194, E-ISSN 1522-2594, Vol. 75, no 4, p. 1808-1821Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To assess how 4D flow MRI-based pressure and energy loss estimates correspond to net transstenotic pressure gradients (TPG(net)) and their dependence on spatial resolution. Methods: Numerical velocity data of stenotic flow were obtained from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations in geometries with varying stenosis degrees, poststenotic diameters and flow rates. MRI measurements were simulated at different spatial resolutions. The simplified and extended Bernoulli equations, Pressure-Poisson equation (PPE), and integration of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and viscous dissipation were compared against the true TPG(net). Results: The simplified Bernoulli equation overestimated the true TPG(net) (8.74 +/- 0.67 versus 6.76 +/- 0.54 mmHg). The extended Bernoulli equation performed better (6.57 +/- 0.53 mmHg), although errors remained at low TPG(net). TPG(net) estimations using the PPE were always close to zero. Total TKE and viscous dissipation correlated strongly with TPG(net) for each geometry (r(2) &gt; 0.93) and moderately considering all geometries (r(2) = 0.756 and r(2) = 0.776, respectively). TKE estimates were accurate and minorly impacted by resolution. Viscous dissipation was overall underestimated and resolution dependent. Conclusion: Several parameters overestimate or are not linearly related to TPG(net) and/or depend on spatial resolution. Considering idealized axisymmetric geometries and in absence of noise, TPG(net) was best estimated using the extended Bernoulli equation. (C) 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance.

  • 181.
    Casas Garcia, Belén
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Lantz, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Viola, Frederica
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Cedersund, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bolger, Ann F.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. University of Calif San Francisco, CA USA.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Bridging the gap between measurements and modelling: a cardiovascular functional avatar2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 6214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lumped parameter models of the cardiovascular system have the potential to assist researchers and clinicians to better understand cardiovascular function. The value of such models increases when they are subject specific. However, most approaches to personalize lumped parameter models have thus far required invasive measurements or fall short of being subject specific due to a lack of the necessary clinical data. Here, we propose an approach to personalize parameters in a model of the heart and the systemic circulation using exclusively non-invasive measurements. The personalized model is created using flow data from four-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging and cuff pressure measurements in the brachial artery. We term this personalized model the cardiovascular avatar. In our proof-of-concept study, we evaluated the capability of the avatar to reproduce pressures and flows in a group of eight healthy subjects. Both quantitatively and qualitatively, the model-based results agreed well with the pressure and flow measurements obtained in vivo for each subject. This non-invasive and personalized approach can synthesize medical data into clinically relevant indicators of cardiovascular function, and estimate hemodynamic variables that cannot be assessed directly from clinical measurements.

  • 182.
    Casas Garcia, Belén
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Viola, Frederica
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Cedersund, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Univ Calif San Francisco, CA USA.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Non-invasive Assessment of Systolic and Diastolic Cardiac Function During Rest and Stress Conditions Using an Integrated Image-Modeling Approach2018In: Frontiers in Physiology, ISSN 1664-042X, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 9, article id 1515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The possibility of non-invasively assessing load-independent parameters characterizing cardiac function is of high clinical value. Typically, these parameters are assessed during resting conditions. However, for diagnostic purposes, the parameter behavior across a physiologically relevant range of heart rate and loads is more relevant than the isolated measurements performed at rest. This study sought to evaluate changes in non-invasive estimations of load-independent parameters of left-ventricular contraction and relaxation patterns at rest and during dobutamine stress. Methods: We applied a previously developed approach that combines non-invasive measurements with a physiologically-based, reduced-order model of the cardiovascular system to provide subject-specific estimates of parameters characterizing left ventricular function. In this model, the contractile state of the heart at each time point along the cardiac cycle is modeled using a time-varying elastance curve. Non-invasive data, including four-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D Flow MRI) measurements, were acquired in nine subjects without a known heart disease at rest and during dobutamine stress. For each of the study subjects, we constructed two personalized models corresponding to the resting and the stress state. Results: Applying the modeling framework, we identified significant increases in the left ventricular contraction rate constant [from 1.5 +/- 0.3 to 2 +/- 0.5 (p = 0.038)] and relaxation constant [from 37.2 +/- 6.9 to 46.1 +/- 12 (p = 0.028)]. In addition, we found a significant decrease in the elastance diastolic time constant from 0.4 +/- 0.04 s to 0.3 +/- 0.03 s = 0.008). Conclusions: The integrated image-modeling approach allows the assessment of cardiovascular function given as model-based parameters. The agreement between the estimated parameter values and previously reported effects of dobutamine demonstrates the potential of the approach to assess advanced metrics of pathophysiology that are otherwise difficult to obtain non-invasively in clinical practice.

  • 183.
    Cermakova, Pavla
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Int Clin Research Centre, Czech Republic; St Annes University Hospital, Czech Republic.
    Lund, Lars H.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Johnell, Kristina
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Winblad, Bengt
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Eriksdotter, Maria
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Religa, Dorota
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Heart failure and dementia: survival in relation to types of heart failure and different dementia disorders2015In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 612-619Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimsHeart failure (HF) and dementia frequently coexist, but little is known about their types, relationships to each other and prognosis. The aims were to (i) describe patients with HF and dementia, assess (ii) the proportion of specific dementia disorders in types of HF based on ejection fraction and (iii) the prognostic role of types of HF and dementia disorders. Methods and resultsThe Swedish Heart Failure Registry (RiksSvikt) and The Swedish Dementia Registry (SveDem) were record-linked. Associations between dementia disorders and HF types were assessed with multinomial logistic regression and survival was investigated with Kaplan-Meier analysis and multivariable Cox regression. We studied 775 patients found in both registries (55% men, mean age 82years). Ejection fraction was preserved in 38% of patients, reduced in 34%, and missing in 28%. The proportions of dementia disorders were similar across HF types. Vascular dementia was the most common dementia disorder (36%), followed by other dementias (28%), mixed dementia (20%), and Alzheimer disease (16%). Over a mean follow-up of 1.5years, 76% of patients survived 1year. We observed no significant differences in survival with regard to HF type (P=0.2) or dementia disorder (P=0.5). After adjustment for baseline covariates, neither HF types nor dementia disorders were independently associated with survival. ConclusionsHeart failure with preserved ejection fraction was the most common HF type and vascular dementia was the most common dementia disorder. The proportions of dementia disorders were similar across HF types. Neither HF types nor specific dementia disorders were associated with survival.

  • 184.
    Chalise, Jaya Prakash
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Chenna Narendra, Sudeep
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Biggs, Sophie
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Kalinke, Ulrich
    Twincore, Germany.
    Iacono, Alberta
    Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy.
    Boon, Louis
    EPIRUS Biopharmaceuticals, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Magnusson, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Regulatory T cells manifest IFN-α mediated protection during antigen induced arthritisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Type I interferon induces tolerance against arthritogenic antigen and protects against antigen induced arthritis (AIA). Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) resolve aberrant immune reaction, maintain self-tolerance and prevent the development of autoimmune diseases. We here investigated the impact of Interferon alpha (IFN-α) on Treg cells development and function during antigen induced arthritis.

    Methods

    For AIA, mice were immunized with methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) at day 1 and 7 in presence or absence of IFN-α. At day 21, arthritis was induced by intra-articular injection of mBSA and arthritis was evaluated at day 28. At various days of AIA, CD4, CD25, Foxp3 and CTLA-4 expression was quantified by FACS in blood cells, splenocytes, lymph nodes cells and in ex vivo re-stimulated leucocytes (pooled splenocytes and lymph nodes cells) isolated at same days. To investigate the importance of Treg cells in IFN-α protection in AIA, Foxp3DTReGFP+mice were used, where Treg cells can be depleted transiently by administration of diptherin toxin. CFSE based suppression assay was used to assess the suppression by Treg cells isolated day 4, 10, 20 of AIA against proliferation of mBSA or anti-CD3 stimulated responder T cells (Tresp cells) isolated at same days. For adoptive transfer experiments, 250,000 Treg cells from IFN-α treated or untreated mice day 20 of AIA were intravenously injected to recipient pre-immunized mice without IFN-α treatment during the induction of arthritis. The importance of IFN-α signalling on T cells for the IFN-α protection was evaluated by using CD4-Cre+/- IFNAR flox/flox mice.

    Results

    Protective effects of IFN-α in AIA were associated with significant TGF-β dependent increase in Foxp3+ T cells in blood at day 4 and minor increase of Foxp3+T cells in spleen and lymph node cells. However IFN-α signalling in T cells is not required for IFN-α-protection. Upon ex vivo re-stimulation in presence of IFN-α with mBSA but not anti-CD3, the Treg cells numbers were increased in leucocytes isolated from day 4 and day 10 of AIA. Transient depletion of Treg cells during induction of arthritis (day 21) abolished IFN-α-protection however the protection was not affected when Treg cells are depleted during immunization phase (day 1 and day 7). Against mBSA-stimulated proliferation of Tresp cells, suppression by Treg cells isolated from day 10 and day 20 from IFN-α treated mice are significantly higher than Treg cells from untreated mice. Treg cells isolated from IFN-α or untreated mice at day 20 of AIA when transferred to pre-immunized untreated mice prevent the development of arthritis.

    Conclusion

    Treg cells are critically associated with IFN-α protective effects in AIA. IFN-α enhances TGF-β dependent early development of Treg cells and later IFN-α enhances their suppressive capacity against T cells proliferation in antigen specific manner during AIA.

  • 185.
    Charitakis, Emmanouil
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Barmano, Neshro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Internal Medicine, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Walfridsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Walfridsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Factors Predicting Arrhythmia-Related Symptoms and Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients Referred for Radiofrequency Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation: An Observational Study (the SMURF Study)2017In: JACC: Clinical Electrophysiology, ISSN 2405-500X, Vol. 3, no 5, p. 9p. 497-502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conclusions Anxiety, depression, and low-grade inflammation were the factors that predicted both arrhythmia-related symptoms and HRQoL in patients with AF. Obesity was the most significant predictor of patient general physical status. These factors need to be addressed in patients with AF to improve management of their disease. Intensive risk factor modification can be of great importance. (Reasons for Variations in Health Related Quality of Life and Symptom Burden in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation [SMURF]; NCT01553045)

  • 186.
    Charitakis, Emmanouil
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Walfridsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Short‐Term Influence of Radiofrequency Ablation on NT‐proBNP, MR‐proANP, Copeptin, and MR‐proADM in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation: Data From the Observational SMURF Study2016In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 5, no 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background There is limited knowledge on the short‐term influence of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of atrial fibrillation (AF) on 2 cardiac biomarkers; the N‐terminal pro‐B‐type natriuretic peptide (NT‐proBNP) and the midregional fragment of the N‐terminal of pro‐ANP (MR‐proANP) and 2 extracardiac biomarkers; the c‐terminal provasopressin (copeptin) and the midregional portion of proadrenomedullin (MR‐proADM). There are also limited data concerning cardiac production of the latter two.

    Methods and Results We studied 192 consecutive patients eligible for RFA of AF referred to the University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden. NT‐proBNP, MR‐proANP, copeptin, and MR‐proADM levels were measured in peripheral blood, the coronary sinus (CS), and the left atrium before ablation, and in peripheral blood immediately and the day after RFA. The level of NT‐proBNP decreased the day after RFA in participants in AF at the time of RFA, compared to the participants in sinus rhythm who showed a slight increase (P<0.001). Furthermore, regardless of the actual rhythm, the level of MR‐proANP showed an increase immediately after RFA (P<0.001), followed by a decrease the day after ablation (P<0.001). Copeptin level showed a 6‐fold increase immediately after RFA compared to baseline (P<0.001), whereas MR‐proADM level increased the day after RFA (P<0.001). Levels of copeptin and MR‐proADM were not higher in the CS compared to peripheral blood.

    Conclusions RFA of AF is a strong stimulus with a significant and direct impact on different neurohormonal systems. We found no sign of a cardiac release of MR‐proADM or copeptin.

  • 187.
    Charitakis, Emmanouil
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Walfridsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Neurohormonal Activation After Atrial Fibrillation Initiation in Patients Eligible for Catheter Ablation: A Randomized Controlled Study2016In: JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION, ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 5, no 12, article id e003957Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background-Biomarker activation in atrial fibrillation (AF) has been widely studied, but the immediate effect of AF initiation remains unclear. We studied the effect of AF initiation on 2 cardiac biomarkers: the N-terminal fragment of the proB-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), the midregional fragment of the N-terminal of pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP), and 2 extracardiac biomarkers-the copeptin and the midregional portion of proadrenomedullin (MR-proADM). Methods and Results-This was a randomized controlled study, including 45 patients with AF who had been referred for radiofrequency ablation to the University Hospital, Link_ oping, Sweden, between February 2012 and April 2014. Freedom from AF during the 4 days prior to radiofrequency ablation was confirmed by transtelephonic ECGs. Biomarkers were collected from the femoral vein (fv), coronary sinus (CS), and left atrium (LA) prior to AF initiation (baseline) and 30 minutes later. The MR-proANP and NT-proBNP concentrations increased in the intervention group compared with the control group 30 minutes after the initiation of AF (MR-proANP: P-fvamp;lt;0.001, P-CSamp;lt;0.001, P-LAamp;lt;0.001; NT-proBNP: P-LAamp;lt;0.001). Copeptin levels in patients without ischemic heart disease were decreased after the initiation of AF (P-fv= 0.003, P-CS= 0.015, P-LA= 0.011). Conclusions-AF is a strong stimulus that results in immediate activation of different biomarkers.

  • 188.
    Charitakis, Emmanouil
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Walfridsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Nylander, Eva
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Walfridsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Symptom burden, Metabolic profile, Ultrasound findings, Rhythm, neurohormonal activation, haemodynamics and health-related quality of life in patients with atrial Fibrillation (SMURF): a protocol for an observational study with a randomised interventional component2015In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 5, no 12, article id e008723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, with an estimated prevalence of 1.5-2%. It is an independent risk factor for ischaemic stroke and is estimated to cause about 20-25% of all stroke cases. AF has a great impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL); however, one unresolved issue related to AF is the wide variation in its symptoms.

    METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The symptom burden, metabolic profile, ultrasound findings, rhythm, neurohormonal activation, haemodynamics and HRQoL in patients with AF (Symptom burden, Metabolic profile, Ultrasound findings, Rhythm, neurohormonal activation, haemodynamics and health-related quality of life in patients with atrial Fibrillation, SMURF) study is a prospective observational, cohort study, with a randomised interventional part. The aim of the study is to investigate, in patients with AF, the relationship between symptom burden and metabolic aspects, atrial function and different neurohormones, and the effect of radiofrequency ablation (RFA). The interventional part of the study will give an insight into the neurohormonal and intracardiac pressure changes directly after initiation of AF. Consecutive patients with symptomatic AF accepted for treatment with RFA for the first time at Linköping University Hospital are eligible for participation. The enrolment started in January 2012, and a total of 200 patients are to be included into the study, with 45 of them being enrolled into the interventional study with initiation of AF. The sample size of the interventional study is based on a small pilot study with 5 patients induced to AF while 2 served as controls. The results indicated that, in order to find a statistically significant difference, there was a need to include 28 patients; for safety reasons, 45 patients will be included.

    ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The SMURF study is approved by the Regional Ethical Review Board at the Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping, Sweden. The results will be presented through peer-review journals and conference presentation.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT01553045; Pre-results.

  • 189.
    Chiala, Oronzo
    et al.
    Univ Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Vellone, Ercole
    Univ Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Klompstra, Leonie
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ortali, Giorgio Alberto
    Casa Cura Villa della Querce Nemi, Italy.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    RELATIONSHIPS AMONG MEASURES OF PHYSICAL FITNESS IN ADULT PATIENTS WITH HEART FAILURE2019In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 51, no 8, p. 607-615Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To describe the relationships among 3 measures of physical fitness (exercise capacity, muscle function and functional capacity) in patients with heart failure, and to determine whether these measures are influenced by impairment of movement. Methods: Secondary analysis of baseline data from the Italian subsample (n= 96) of patients with heart failure enrolled in a randomized controlled trial, the HF-Wii study. Exercise capacity was measured with the 6-min walk test, muscle function was measured with the unilateral isotonic heel-lift, bilateral isometric shoulder abduction and unilateral isotonic shoulder flexion, and functional capacity was measured with the Duke Activity Status Index. Principal component analysis was used to detect covariance of the data. Results: Exercise capacity correlated with all of the tests related to muscle function (r=0.691-0.423, pamp;lt; 0.001) and functional capacity (r = 0.531). Moreover, functional capacity correlated with muscle function (r=0.482-0.393). Principal component analysis revealed the bidimensional structure of these 3 measures, thus accounting for 58% of the total variance in the variables measured. Conclusion: Despite the correlations among exercise capacity, muscle function and functional capacity, these measures loaded on 2 different factors. The use of a wider range of tests will help clinicians to perform a more tailored assessment of physical fitness, especially in those patients with heart failure who have impairment of movement.

  • 190.
    Chiala, Oronzo
    et al.
    Univ Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Vellone, Ercole
    Univ Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Klompstra, Leonie
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ortali, Giorgio Alberto
    Cardiopulm Rehabil Casa Cura Villa Querce Nemi, Italy.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Univ Calif Irvine, CA USA.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Australian Catholic Univ, Australia.
    Relationships between exercise capacity and anxiety, depression, and cognition in patients with heart failure2018In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 465-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Symptoms of anxiety, depression, and cognitive impairment are common in heart failure (HF) patients, but there are inconsistencies in the literature regarding their relationship and effects on exercise capacity. Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore the relationships between exercise capacity and anxiety, depression, and cognition in HF patients. Methods: This was a secondary analysis on the baseline data of the Italian subsample (n = 96) of HF patients enrolled in the HF-Wii study. Data was collected with the 6-minute walk test (6MWT), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Montreal Cognitive Assessment. Results: The HF patients walked an average of 222 (SD 114) meters on the 6MWT. Patients exhibited clinically elevated anxiety (48%), depression (49%), and severe cognitive impairment (48%). Depression was independently associated with the distance walked on the 6MWT. Conclusions: The results of this study reinforced the role of depression in relation to exercise capacity and call for considering strategies to reduce depressive symptoms to improve outcomes of HF patients. (C) 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 191.
    Christidis, Nikolaos
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; SCON, Sweden.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Larsson, Anette
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; .
    Palstam, Annie
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mannerkorpi, Kaisa
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; .
    Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lofgren, Monika
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bjersing, Jan
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kosek, Eva
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Stockholm Spine Centre, Sweden.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ernberg, Malin
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; SCON, Sweden.
    Comparison of the Levels of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines Released in the Vastus Lateralis Muscle of Patients with Fibromyalgia and Healthy Controls during Contractions of the Quadriceps Muscle - A Microdialysis Study2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 12, p. e0143856-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Fibromyalgia is associated with central hyperexcitability, but it is suggested that peripheral input is important to maintain central hyperexcitability. The primary aim was to investigate the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines released in the vastus lateralis muscle during repetitive dynamic contractions of the quadriceps muscle in patients with fibromyalgia and healthy controls. Secondarily, to investigate if the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines were correlated with pain or fatigue during these repetitive dynamic contractions. Material and Methods 32 women with fibromyalgia and 32 healthy women (controls) participated in a 4 hour microdialysis session, to sample IL-1 beta, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF from the most painful point of the vastus lateralis muscle before, during and after 20 minutes of repeated dynamic contractions. Pain (visual analogue scale; 0-100) and fatigue Borgs Rating of Perceived Exertion Scale; 6-20) were assessed before and during the entire microdialysis session. Results The repetitive dynamic contractions increased pain in the patients with fibromyalgia (P &lt; .001) and induced fatigue in both groups (P &lt; .001). Perceived fatigue was significantly higher among patients with fibromyalgia than controls (P &lt; .001). The levels of IL-1 beta did not change during contractions in either group. The levels of TNF did not change during contractions in patients with fibromyalgia, but increased in controls (P &lt; .001) and were significantly higher compared to patients with fibromyalgia (P = .033). The levels of IL-6 and IL-8 increased in both groups alike during and after contractions (Ps &lt; .001). There were no correlations between pain or fatigue and cytokine levels after contractions. Conclusion There were no differences between patients with fibromyalgia and controls in release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and no correlations between levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and pain or fatigue. Thus, this study indicates that IL-1 beta, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF do not seem to play an important role in maintenance of muscle pain in fibromyalgia.

  • 192.
    Chung, Rosanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Pigment hade antiinflammatoriska effekter vid kranskärlssjukdom2017In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 114, no 33-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 193.
    Chung, Rosanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Gustafsson, Nelly
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Liberation of lutein from spinach: Effects of heating time, microwavereheating and liquefaction2019In: Food Chemistry, ISSN 0308-8146, E-ISSN 1873-7072, Vol. 277, p. 573-578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lutein, abundant in dark leafy vegetables, has been associated with several health promoting effects. Still, to what extent different preparation conditions and practices affect the liberation of lutein from food is not fully understood. Here, we compared a range of domestic methods under realistic conditions to prepare spinach, the most common lutein-rich vegetable. After preparations, samples were processed by in vitro digestion and lutein was quantified by HPLC. Data indicate that short-term and medium-term heating of spinach, independent of heating method, substantially reduced liberated lutein and reduction was most pronounced after long boiling times. Interestingly, the loss of lutein in heated samples was partly compensated when samples were reheated in the microwave. However, the highest yield of liberated lutein was obtained from liquefied spinach. Additional dairy enhanced the liquefaction effect. Thus, for optimal liberation of lutein, liquefaction of raw spinach appears to be the method of choice.

  • 194.
    Chung, Rosanna W S
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Leandersson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Lundberg, Anna K
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lutein exerts anti-inflammatory effects in patients with coronary artery disease.2017In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 262, p. 87-93, article id S0021-9150(17)30197-1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Many coronary artery disease (CAD) patients exhibit chronic low-grade inflammation. Carotenoids are anti-oxidants with potential anti-inflammatory properties. Here, we first assessed relationships between interleukin (IL)-6 and individual carotenoids in plasma from CAD patients. Based on the results, we proceeded to assess anti-inflammatory effects of one carotenoid, lutein, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from CAD patients.

    METHODS: Lutein + zeaxanthin (isomers with lutein being dominant), β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, α- and β-carotene and IL-6 were measured in plasma from 134 patients with stable angina (SA) and 59 patients with acute coronary syndrome. In 42 patients, plasma measurements were also performed 3 months after coronary intervention. PBMCs from SA patients were pre-treated with lutein (1, 5 and 25 μM) for 24 h followed by 24 h incubation ± lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Cell pellets were collected for IL-6, IL-1β and TNF mRNA and intracellular lutein. Cytokine secretion was measured in cell media.

    RESULTS: Only lutein + zeaxanthin were inversely correlated with IL-6 in SA patients at baseline (r = -0.366, p < 0.001) and follow-up (r = -0.546, p < 0.001). Ex vivo, lutein was taken up by PBMCs from SA patients in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Pre-treatment with lutein dose-dependently lowered LPS-induced secretion of IL-6, IL-1β (p < 0.01) and TNF (p < 0.05), and also reduced IL-6, IL-1β and TNF mRNA expression (p < 0.05).

    CONCLUSIONS: Clinical findings highlighted the inverse association between lutein and IL-6 in CAD patients. Anti-inflammatory effects of lutein in PBMCs from CAD patients were consolidated in ex vivo experiments. Taken together, these results show that lutein has the potential to play a role in resolution of chronic inflammation in CAD patients.

  • 195.
    Cibis, Merih
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Bustamante, Mariana
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Eriksson, Jonatan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Creating Hemodynamic Atlases of Cardiac 4D Flow MRI2017In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 1389-1399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Hemodynamic atlases can add to the pathophysiological understanding of cardiac diseases. This study proposes a method to create hemodynamic atlases using 4D Flow magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The method is demonstrated for kinetic energy (KE) and helicity density (Hd). Materials and Methods: Thirteen healthy subjects underwent 4D Flow MRI at 3T. Phase-contrast magnetic resonance cardioangiographies (PC-MRCAs) and an average heart were created and segmented. The PC-MRCAs, KE, and Hd were nonrigidly registered to the average heart to create atlases. The method was compared with 1) rigid, 2) affine registration of the PC-MRCAs, and 3) affine registration of segmentations. The peak and mean KE and Hd before and after registration were calculated to evaluate interpolation error due to nonrigid registration. Results: The segmentations deformed using nonrigid registration overlapped (median: 92.3%) more than rigid (23.1%, P amp;lt; 0.001), and affine registration of PC-MRCAs (38.5%, P amp;lt; 0.001) and affine registration of segmentations (61.5%, P amp;lt; 0.001). The peak KE was 4.9 mJ using the proposed method and affine registration of segmentations (P50.91), 3.5 mJ using rigid registration (P amp;lt; 0.001), and 4.2 mJ using affine registration of the PC-MRCAs (P amp;lt; 0.001). The mean KE was 1.1 mJ using the proposed method, 0.8 mJ using rigid registration (P amp;lt; 0.001), 0.9 mJ using affine registration of the PC-MRCAs (P amp;lt; 0.001), and 1.0 mJ using affine registration of segmentations (P50.028). The interpolation error was 5.262.6% at mid-systole, 2.863.8% at early diastole for peak KE; 9.669.3% at mid-systole, 4.064.6% at early diastole, and 4.964.6% at late diastole for peak Hd. The mean KE and Hd were not affected by interpolation. Conclusion: Hemodynamic atlases can be obtained with minimal user interaction using nonrigid registration of 4D Flow MRI. Level of Evidence: 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1

  • 196.
    Cibis, Merih
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Karlsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Left Atrial 4D Blood Flow Dynamics and Hemostasis following Electrical Cardioversion of Atrial Fibrillation2017In: Frontiers in Physiology, ISSN 1664-042X, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 8, article id 1052Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Electrical cardioversion in patients with atrial fibrillation is followed by a transiently impaired atrial mechanical function, termed atrial stunning. During atrial stunning, a retained risk of left atrial thrombus formation exists, which may be attributed to abnormal left atrial blood flow patterns. 4D Flow cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) enables blood flow assessment from the entire three-dimensional atrial volume throughout the cardiac cycle. We sought to investigate left atrial 4D blood flow patterns and hemostasis during left atrial stunning and after left atrial mechanical function was restored. Methods: 4D Flow and morphological CMR data as well as blood samples were collected in fourteen patients at two time-points: 2-3 h (Time-1) and 4 weeks (Time-2) following cardioversion. The volume of blood stasis and duration of blood stasis were calculated. In addition, hemostasis markers were analyzed. Results: From Time-1 to Time-2: Heart rate decreased (61 +/- 7 vs. 56 +/- 8 bpm, p = 0.01); Maximum change in left atrial volume increased (8 +/- 4 vs. 22 +/- 15%, p = 0.009); The duration of stasis (68 +/- 11 vs. 57 +/- 8%, p = 0.002) and the volume of stasis (14 +/- 9 vs. 9 +/- 7%, p = 0.04) decreased; Thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT) decreased (5.2 +/- 3.3 vs. 3.3 +/- 2.2it.g/L, p = 0.008). A significant correlation was found between TAT and the volume of stasis (r(2) = 0.69, p amp;lt; 0.001) at Time-1 and between TAT and the duration of stasis (r(2) = 0.34, p = 0.04) at Time-2. Conclusion: In this longitudinal study, left atrial multidimensional blood flow was altered and blood stasis was elevated during left atrial stunning compared to the restored left atrial mechanical function. The coagulability of blood was also elevated during atrial stunning. The association between blood stasis and hypercoagulability proposes that assessment of left atrial 4D flow can add to the pathophysiological understanding of thrombus formation during atrial fibrillation related atrial stunning.

  • 197.
    Cinthio, Magnus
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Albinsson, John
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Erlov, Tobias
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Bjarnegård, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Ryden Ahlgren, Asa
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    LONGITUDINAL MOVEMENT OF THE COMMON CAROTID ARTERY WALL: NEW INFORMATION ON CARDIOVASCULAR AGING2018In: Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0301-5629, E-ISSN 1879-291X, Vol. 44, no 11, p. 2283-2295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Putative changes in the multiphasic pattern of longitudinal movement of the common carotid artery wall in the normal aging process are unknown. The aim of this study was to explore the phases, and resulting patterns, of the longitudinal movement of the intima-media complex of the human common carotid artery with respect to age and gender. One hundred thirty-five healthy non-smoking patients of different ages were investigated using in-house-developed ultrasound methods. The patterns of longitudinal movement seen in middle-aged and older patients were markedly different from those commonly seen in young patients, including the appearance of two additional phases of motion and, thus, new complex patterns. The displacement and maximum velocity of one of the phases, occurring at the time of aortic valve closure, increased quadratically with age in both men and women. (C) 2018 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine amp; Biology. All rights reserved.

  • 198.
    Clavarino, Giovanna
    et al.
    Ctr Hosp Univ Grenoble Alpes, France; Univ Grenoble Alpes, France.
    Gauthier, Arnaud
    Ctr Hosp Univ Grenoble Alpes, France.
    Hellmark, Thomas
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Carron, Pierre-Louis
    Ctr Hosp Univ Grenoble Alpes, France.
    Giovannini, Diane
    Ctr Hosp Univ Grenoble Alpes, France.
    Colliard, Sophie
    Ctr Hosp Univ Grenoble Alpes, France.
    Dragon-Durey, Marie-Agnes
    Hop Europeen Georges Pompidou, France.
    Segelmark, Mårten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Cesbron, Jean-Yves
    Ctr Hosp Univ Grenoble Alpes, France; Univ Grenoble Alpes, France.
    Dumestre-Perard, Chantal
    Ctr Hosp Univ Grenoble Alpes, France; Univ Grenoble Alpes, France.
    Letter: Routinely used immunoassays do not detect circulating anti-GBM antibodies against native NC1 hexamer and EA epitope of the 3 chain of type IV collagen in EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF IMMUNOLOGY, vol 48, issue 6, pp 1082-10842018In: European Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0014-2980, E-ISSN 1521-4141, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 1082-1084Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 199.
    Collet, Jean-Philippe
    et al.
    Sorbonne Université Paris 6, ACTION Study Group, Hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière (AP-HP), Paris, France.
    Kerneis, Mathieu
    Sorbonne Université Paris 6, ACTION Study Group, Hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière (AP-HP), Paris, France.
    Lattuca, Benoit
    Department of Cardiology, CHU Caremeau, Université de Montpellier, ACTION Study Group, Nimes, France.
    Yan, Yan
    Sorbonne Université Paris 6, ACTION Study Group, Hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière (AP-HP), Paris, France.
    Cayla, Guillaume
    Department of Cardiology, CHU Caremeau, Université de Montpellier, ACTION Study Group, Nimes, France.
    Silvain, Johanne
    Sorbonne Université Paris 6, ACTION Study Group, Hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière (AP-HP), Paris, France.
    Lapostolle, Frédéric
    SAMU 93 Hôpital Avicenne, Bobigny, France.
    Ecollan, Patrick
    Service Médical d’Urgence, Brigade de Sapeurs-Pompiers de Paris, Paris, France.
    Diallo, Abdourahmane
    ACTION Study Group, Unité de Recherche Clinique, Hôpital Lariboisière, Paris, France.
    Vicaut, Eric
    ACTION Study Group, Unité de Recherche Clinique, Hôpital Lariboisière, Paris, France.
    Hamm, Christian W
    Kerckhoff Klinik, Bad Nauheim, Universitätsklinikum Gießen, Giessen, Germany.
    Van 't Hof, Arnoud W
    Department of Cardiology, Isala Clinics, Zwolle, the Netherlands.
    Montalescot, Gilles
    Sorbonne Université Paris 6, ACTION Study Group, Hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière (AP-HP), Paris, France.
    ATLANTIC Investigators, (Contributor)
    Impact of age on the effect of pre-hospital P2Y12 receptor inhibition in primary percutaneous coronary intervention for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: the ATLANTIC-Elderly analysis2018In: EuroIntervention, ISSN 1774-024X, E-ISSN 1969-6213, Vol. 14, no 7, p. 789-797, article id EIJ-D-18-00182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: The aim of the study was to examine the main results of the ATLANTIC trial in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), randomised to pre- versus in-hospital ticagrelor, according to age.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients were evaluated by age class (<75 vs. ≥75 years) for demographics, prior cardiovascular history, risk factors, management, and outcomes. Elderly patients (≥75 years; 304/1,862) were more likely to be women, diabetic, lean, with a prior history of myocardial infarction and CABG, and with comorbidities (p<0.01 for all). Elderly patients presented more frequently with acute heart failure and less frequently had thromboaspiration, a stent implanted (p<0.01) and an aggressive antithrombotic regimen. Elderly patients had lower rates of pre- and post-PCI ≥70% ST-segment elevation resolution (43.9% vs. 51.6%; p=0.035), of pre- and post-PCI TIMI 3 flow (17.1% vs. 27.5%, p=0.0002), and a higher rate of the composite of death/MI/stroke/urgent revascularisation (9.9% vs. 2.9%; OR 3.67, 95% CI [2.27; 5.93], p<0.0001) and mortality (8.5% vs. 1.5%; OR 6.45, 95% CI [2.75; 15.11], p<0.0001). There was a non-significant trend towards more frequent major bleedings among elderly patients (TIMI major 2.3% vs. 1.1%; OR 2.13, 95% CI [0.88; 5.18], p=0.095). There was no significant interaction between time of ticagrelor administration (pre-hospital versus in-lab) and class of age for all outcomes.

    CONCLUSIONS: Elderly patients, who represented one sixth of the patients randomised in the ATLANTIC trial, had less successful mechanical reperfusion and a sixfold increase in mortality at 30 days, probably due to comorbidities and possible undertreatment. The effect of early ticagrelor was consistent irrespective of age.

  • 200.
    Cortez, Daniel
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden; Penn State Milton S Hershey Medical Centre, PA 17033 USA.
    Svensson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Carlson, Jonas
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Graw, Sharon
    University of Colorado Denver AMC, CO USA.
    Sharma, Nandita
    Penn State Milton S Hershey Medical Centre, PA 17033 USA.
    Brun, Francesca
    University of Colorado Denver AMC, CO USA; Osped Riuniti, Italy; University of Trieste, Italy.
    Spezzacatene, Anita
    University of Colorado Denver AMC, CO USA; Osped Riuniti, Italy; University of Trieste, Italy.
    Mestroni, Luisa
    University of Colorado Denver AMC, CO USA; Osped Riuniti, Italy; University of Trieste, Italy.
    Platonov, Pyotr G.
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Right precordial-directed electrocardiographical markers identify arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy in the absence of conventional depolarization or repolarization abnormalities2017In: BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, ISSN 1471-2261, E-ISSN 1471-2261, Vol. 17, article id 261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C) carries a risk of sudden death. We aimed to assess whether vectorcardiographic (VCG) parameters directed toward the right heart and a measured angle of the S-wave would help differentiate ARVD/C with otherwise normal electrocardiograms from controls. Methods: Task Force 2010 definite ARVD/C criteria were met for all patients. Those who did not fulfill Task Force depolarization or repolarization criteria (-ECG) were compared with age and gender-matched control subjects. Electrocardiogram measures of a 3-dimentional spatial QRS-T angle, a right-precordial-directed orthogonal QRS-T (RPD) angle, a root mean square of the right sided depolarizing forces (RtRMS-QRS), QRS duration (QRSd) and the corrected QT interval (QTc), and a measured angle including the upslope and downslope of the S-wave (S-wave angle) were assessed. Results: Definite ARVD/C was present in 155 patients by 2010 Task Force criteria (41.7 +/- 17.6 years, 65.2% male). -ECG ARVD/C patients (66 patients) were compared to 66 control patients (41.7 +/- 17.6 years, 65.2% male). All parameters tested except the QRSd and QTc significantly differentiated -ECG ARVD/C from control patients (p amp;lt; 0.004 to p amp;lt; 0.001). The RPD angle and RtRMS-QRS best differentiated the groups. Combined, the 2 novel criteria gave 81.8% sensitivity, 90.9% specificity and odds ratio of 45.0 (95% confidence interval 15.8 to 128.2). Conclusion: ARVD/C disease process may lead to development of subtle ECG abnormalities that can be distinguishable using right-sided VCG or measured angle markers better than the spatial QRS-T angle, the QRSd or QTc, in the absence of Taskforce ECG criteria.

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