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  • 151.
    Ahlberg, Mona
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Bäckman, Carl
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Jones, Christina
    Musculoskeletal Biology, Institute of Ageing & Chronic Disease, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK.
    Walther, Sten
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center.
    Moving on in life after intensive care - partners' experience of group communication2015In: Nursing in Critical Care, ISSN 1362-1017, E-ISSN 1478-5153, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 256-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:Partners have a burdensome time during and after their partners’ intensive care period. They may appear to be coping welloutwardly but inside feel vulnerable and lost. Evaluated interventions for partners on this aspect are limited.

    Aim:The aim of this study was to describe the experience of participating in group communication with other partners of former intensivecare patients.

    Design:The study has a descriptive intervention-based design where group communication for partners of former, surviving intensive careunit (ICU) patients was evaluated.

    Methods:A strategic selection was made of adult partners to former adult intensive care patients (n=15), 5 men and 10 women, aged37–89 years. Two group communication sessions lasting 2 h were held at monthly intervals with three to five partners. The partners later wrote,in a notebook, about their feelings of participating in group communications. To deepen the understanding of the impact of the sessions, six ofthe partners were interviewed. Content analysis was used to analyse the notebooks and the interviews.

    Findings:Three categories were identified: (1) Emotional impact, the partners felt togetherness and experienced worries and gratitude, (2)Confirmation, consciousness through insight and reflection and (3) The meeting design, group constellation and recommendation to participatein group communication.

    Conclusion:Partners of an intensive care patient are on a journey, constantly trying to adapt to the new situation and find new strategiesto ever-changing circumstances. Group communications contributed to togetherness and confirmation. To share experiences with others is oneway for partners to be able to move forward in life.

    Relevance to clinical practice:Group communication with other patients’ partners eases the process of going through the burden ofbeing a partner to an intensive care patient. Group communications needs to be further developed and evaluated to obtain consensus andevidence for the best practice.

  • 152.
    Ahldén, Ingegerd
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alehagen, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlgren, Lars Owe
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Parents' Expectations About Participating in Antenatal Parenthood Education Classes2012In: The Journal of Perinatal Education, ISSN 1058-1243, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 11-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our objective was to assess parents' expectations about participating in antenatal parenthood education classes and to determine whether their expectations might be related to gender, age, and educational level. Data from 1,117 women and 1,019 partners residing in three cities in Sweden were collected with a questionnaire in a cross-sectional study. Participants believed that antenatal education classes would help them to feel more secure as parents and to be better oriented toward childbirth. Men had more positive expectations about the childbirth than the women. The participants mostly wanted help in preparing for parenthood and in learning infant care skills, followed by help in preparing for childbirth. The participants' expectations were affected by gender, age, and educational level. The expectant parents appeared to want more focus on preparation for parenthood than on childbirth.

  • 153.
    Ahldén, Ingegerd
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Göransson, Anne
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Alehagen, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Parenthood education in Swedish antenatal care: perceptions of midwives and obstetricians in charge.2008In: The Journal of perinatal education : an ASPO/Lamaze publication, ISSN 1058-1243, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 21-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe perceptions of parenthood education among midwives and obstetricians in charge of antenatal care in Sweden. Focus group interviews of 25 obstetricians and midwives were conducted. Data were analyzed with a phenomenographic approach. Five main categories emerged: aim of the parenthood education, content and expectations, implementation, support to group leaders, and strategies for the future. There is a strong belief in parenthood education, and the overall aim was considered to be support in the transition to parenthood. Contents should focus on awareness of the expected child, confidence in the biological processes, and the changes of roles. Pedagogies training, cost effectiveness, development, and the need to reach target groups were emphasized.

  • 154.
    Ahle, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Drott, Peder
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Epidemiology and Trends of Necrotizing Enterocolitis in Sweden: 1987-20092013In: Pediatrics, ISSN 0031-4005, E-ISSN 1098-4275, Vol. 132, no 2, p. E443-E451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate temporal, seasonal, and geographic variations in the incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and its relation to early infant survival in the Swedish population and in subgroups based on gestational age, birth weight, and gender. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMETHODS: In the Swedish birth cohort of 1987 through 2009 all children with a diagnosis of NEC were identified in the National Patient Register, the Swedish Medical Birth Register, and the National Cause of Death Register. NEC incidence, early mortality, and seasonality were analyzed with descriptive statistics, Poisson regression, and auto regression. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanRESULTS: The overall incidence of NEC was 3.4 in 10 000 live births, higher in boys than in girls (incidence rate ratio 1.22, 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.40, P = .005), with a peak in November and a trough in May, and increased with an average of similar to 5% a year during the study period. In most subgroups, except the most immature, an initial decrease was followed by a steady increase. Seven-day mortality decreased strongly in all subgroups over the entire study period (annual incidence rate ratio 0.96, 95% confidence interval 0.95-0.96, P andlt; .001). This was especially marked in the most premature and low birth weight infants. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanCONCLUSIONS: After an initial decrease, the incidence of NEC has increased in Sweden during the last decades. An association with the concurrent dramatically improved early survival seems likely.

  • 155.
    Ahle, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Drott, Peder
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Elfvin, Anders
    Department of Pediatrics, Institution of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson, Roland E.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Surgery, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden .
    Maternal, fetal and perinatal factors associated with necrotizing enterocolitis in Sweden: A national case-control study2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 3, article id e0194352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To analyze associations of maternal, fetal, gestational, and perinatal factors with necrotizing enterocolitis in a matched case-control study based on routinely collected, nationwide register data.

    Study design

    All infants born in 1987 through 2009 with a diagnosis of necrotizing enterocolitis in any of the Swedish national health care registers were identified. For each case up to 6 controls, matched for birth year and gestational age, were selected. The resulting study population consisted of 720 cases and 3,567 controls. Information on socioeconomic data about the mother, maternal morbidity, pregnancy related diagnoses, perinatal diagnoses of the infant, and procedures in the perinatal period, was obtained for all cases and controls and analyzed with univariable and multivariable logistic regressions for the whole study population as well as for subgroups according to gestational age.

    Results

    In the study population as a whole, we found independent positive associations with necrotizing enterocolitis for isoimmunization, fetal distress, cesarean section, neonatal bacterial infection including sepsis, erythrocyte transfusion, persistent ductus arteriosus, cardiac malformation, gastrointestinal malformation, and chromosomal abnormality. Negative associations were found for maternal weight, preeclampsia, maternal urinary infection, premature rupture of the membranes, and birthweight. Different patterns of associations were seen in the subgroups of different gestational age.

    Conclusion

    With some interesting exceptions, especially in negative associations, the results of this large, population based study, are in keeping with earlier studies. Although restrained by the limitations of register data, the findings mirror conceivable pathophysiological processes and underline that NEC is a multifactorial disease.

  • 156.
    Ahlen, Gustaf
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Sweden .
    Chen, Antony
    Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Sweden .
    Roe, Barbara
    University of Coll Dublin, Ireland .
    Falkeborn, Tina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Frelin, Lars
    Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Sweden .
    Hall, William W
    University of Coll Dublin, Ireland .
    Sallberg, Matti
    Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Sweden .
    Soderholm, Jonas
    Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Sweden University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Limited effect on NS3-NS4A protein cleavage after alanine substitutions within the immunodominant HLA-A2-restricted epitope of the hepatitis C virus genotype 3a non-structural 3/4A protease2012In: Journal of General Virology, ISSN 0022-1317, E-ISSN 1465-2099, Vol. 93, p. 1680-1686Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been well established that immunological escape mutations within the hepatitis C virus genotype (gt) la non-structural (NS) 3/4A protease are partly prevented by a reduction in viral protease fitness. Surprisingly little is known about whether similar mutations affect proteases from other genotypes. In the present study, we assessed both the HLA-A2-restricted CTL response and gt3a NS3/4A protease fitness. Similar to gt1, the 1073-1081 epitope was immunodominant within the gt3a-specific HLA-A2-restricted CTL response, despite sequence similarity of only 56% between the gt1a and gt3a genes. However, unlike the gt1a NS3/4A protease, all residues within the gt3a 1073-1081 epitope could be replaced sequentially by alanine while retaining protease activity, at least in part.

  • 157.
    Ahlen, K.
    et al.
    Åhlén, K., Dept. Med. Biochem. and Microbiol., University of Uppsala, Biomedical Center, SE-751 23 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ring, P.
    Dept. Med. Biochem. and Microbiol., University of Uppsala, Biomedical Center, SE-751 23 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Tomasini-Johansson, B.
    Dept. Med. Biochem. and Microbiol., University of Uppsala, Biomedical Center, SE-751 23 Uppsala, Sweden, Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 4285 MSC, 1300 University Ave, Madison, WI 53706, United States.
    Holmqvist, K.
    Dept. Med. Biochem. and Microbiol., University of Uppsala, Biomedical Center, SE-751 23 Uppsala, Sweden, Department of Medical Cell Biology, University of Uppsala, Biomedical Center, SE-751 23 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Karl-Eric
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology .
    Rubin, K.
    Dept. Med. Biochem. and Microbiol., University of Uppsala, Biomedical Center, SE-751 23 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Platelet-derived growth factor-BB modulates membrane mobility of ß1 integrins2004In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 314, no 1, p. 89-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB elicits a migratory response including reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton in different cell types. Here we have investigated the effects of PDGF-BB stimulation on ß 1 integrin containing focal adhesions in human diploid fibroblasts adhered to collagen type I. Stimulation with PDGF-BB dissociated focal adhesions and relocated ß1 integrins from focal adhesions to the periphery of the cells. These changes were rapid and transient in character. Relocation of ß1 integrins was prevented by inhibitors of phosphoinositide-3-kinase and protein kinase C. PDGF-BB stimulated fibroblasts exhibited an increased diffusion coefficient of cell surface ß1 integrins as determined by fluorescence recovery of photobleaching. The cell surface expression of ß1 integrins was not changed after stimulation with PDGF-BB. Our data suggest that PDGF-BB increases the dynamic properties of cell-surface ß1 integrins, which most likely are important for the migratory response elicited by PDGF-BB. © 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 158.
    Ahlner, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zackrisson, Anna Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindblom, Bertil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Forensic Genetics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bertilsson, Leif
    Karolinska Institute.
    Editorial Material: CYP2D6, serotonin and suicide2010In: Pharmacogenomics (London), ISSN 1462-2416, E-ISSN 1744-8042, Vol. 11, no 7, p. 903-905Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 159.
    Ahlstrand, I
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Falkmer, T
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Björk, M
    OP0209-HPR Less Pain and Activity Limitations in Today's Early RA Patients Compared with Patients Diagnosed 10 Years Earlier (The Swedish Tira-Project)2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Over the last decades the RA-treatment strategies have changed considerably. Routines for early RA diagnosis and instituted disease modifying anti rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) have been established. In the early 2000s biologic agents also became available for treatment purposes. Despite these altered and improved strategies RA patients continue to report pain and activity limitations; women more so than men.Objectives: To study differences regarding pain and activity limitations during the first three years after diagnosis of RA in today's patients compared with patients diagnosed 10 years earlier from a gender perspective.Methods: This study was based on patients recruited to the project “early interventions in RA” (TIRA). In the first cohort (TIRA-1) 320 patients were included during 1996-1998. In the second cohort (TIRA-2) 463 patients were included during 2006-2008. Disease activity score 28 joint count (DAS-28) and medication were registered. Pain intensity (VAS), bodily pain (BP) in Short Form36 (SF-36) and activity limitation (Health Assessment Questionnaire, HAQ) were reported at inclusion and at follow-ups after one, two and three years.Results: Disease activity did not differ between cohorts at inclusion, but was significant lower at the follow ups in the TIRA-2 cohort compared with the TIRA-1 cohort. Patients in TIRA2 were prescribed traditional DMARD:s and biologic agents more frequent than in TIRA-1. The TIRA-2 patients reported significantly higher pain intensity and activity limitations at inclusion but lower pain intensity and activity limitations at all follow-ups than TIRA-1 patients. There were no significant differences between cohorts regarding bodily pain at inclusion, but thereafter the TIRA-2 patients showed significant lower bodily pain than the TIRA-1 patients. Men reported lower activity limitation than women in TIRA-1; otherwise there were no gender differences in TIRA-1. In TIRA-2, there were no significant gender differences regarding pain at inclusion. However, men reported lower pain than women at all follow-ups. Women, in turn, reported significantly higher activity limitations at all time points in TIRA-2. Pain and activity limitations were significantly reduced from inclusion to the one year follow-up but remained stable thereafter.Conclusions: Both women and men in today's early RA patient cohort report lower pain and less activity limitations at the follow ups after diagnosis of RA compared to 10 years earlier. However, both activity limitations and bodily pain are still pronounced.Disclosure of Interest: None declared

  • 160.
    Ahlstrand, I.
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden; School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Rehabilitation Center. School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Pain and activity limitations in women and men with contemporary treated early RA compared to 10 years ago: the Swedish TIRA project2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 259-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To study differences regarding pain and activity limitations during the 3 years following diagnosis in women and men with contemporary treated early RA compared with their counterparts who were diagnosed 10 years earlier. Method: This study was based on patients recruited to the Early Intervention in RA (TIRA) project. In the first cohort (TIRA-1) 320 patients were included in time for diagnosis during 1996-1998 and 463 patients were included in the second cohort (TIRA-2) during 2006-2009. Disease activity, pain intensity (Visual Analogue Scale, VAS), bodily pain (BP) in the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), activity limitations (Health Assessment Questionnaire, HAQ), and medication were reported at inclusion and at follow-up after 1, 2, and 3 years. Results: Disease activity, pain, and activity limitations were pronounced at inclusion across both genders and in both cohorts, with some improvement observed during the first year after diagnosis. Disease activity did not differ between cohorts at inclusion but was significantly lower at the follow-ups in the TIRA-2 cohort, in which the patients were prescribed traditional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and biological agents more frequently. In TIRA-2, patients reported significantly lower pain and activity limitations at all follow-ups, with men reporting lower pain than women. Women reported significantly higher activity limitations at all time points in TIRA-2. Conclusions: Pain and activity limitations were still pronounced in the contemporary treated early RA cohort compared with their counterparts diagnosed 10 years earlier and both of these factors need to be addressed in clinical settings.

  • 161.
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    et al.
    Hälsohögskolan, Högskolan i Jönköping, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Hälsohögskolan, Högskolan i Jönköping, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Börsbo, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Hälsohögskolan, Högskolan i Jönköping, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering.
    Smärta och dagliga aktiviteter vid Reumatoid artrit ur ett patientperspektiv2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: Smärta vid Reumatoid artrit (RA) ärett välkänt symtom som orsakar lidande ochaktivitetsbegränsning. Traditionellt mäts smärtainom reumatologin som smärtintensitet på enVisuell Analog Skala (VAS). Kunskapen kring hurpatienter med RA upplever smärta och dess konsekvenser är begränsad. Patientens egenbeskrivning behövs som underlag för behandlingsplanering och för att utveckla nya metoderför att beskriva problematiken.Syfte: Syftet med studien är att beskriva smärtavid RA ur ett patientperspektiv med fokus på hursmärtan påverkar dagliga aktiviteter.Metod: Patienter med diagnostiserad RA i syd-östra Sverige identifierades via Svenska Reumatologiregistret. Urvalet baserades på minst 5 årssjukdomsduration och minst 40 mm smärtintensitet på VAS vid de två senaste besöken på reumatologklinik. Sammanlagt 33 patienter, 7 män och26 kvinnor, deltog i sju fokusgrupper. Gruppernaformades utifrån kön och ålder. Intervjuguideninnehöll frågor som: Hur beskriver patienter medRA sin smärta? Vad påverkar smärtan? Vilkakonsekvenser har smärtan för aktivitetsutförande,aktivitetsbalans och undvikande av aktivitet? Enkvalitativ innehållsanalys görs.Resultat/förväntat resultat: Analyser hittills visar patienternas frustration över att inteklara det man vill eller behöver göra, beroendeav andra, minskade möjligheter till delaktigheti sociala sammanhang. Och närståendes betydelse. Analyserna visar att smärtan är relaterad till Göteborg6-8 april 201134trötthet, stress och sinnesstämning och att arbeteeller andra aktiviteter medverkar till att glömmabort smärtan och uppehålla förmåga. Analysenslutförs under hösten.Konklusion: Denna studie förväntas genererany angelägen kunskap om och förståelse försmärta.

  • 162.
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    et al.
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Rehabilitation Center. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Jonköping University, Sweden; Curtin University, Australia.
    Pain and difficulties performing valued life activities in women and men with rheumatoid arthritis2015In: Clinical Rheumatology, ISSN 0770-3198, E-ISSN 1434-9949, Vol. 34, no 8, p. 1353-1362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to examine the difficulties with performing valued life activities in relation to pain intensity in women and men with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In total, 737 persons with RA (73 % women) from three rheumatology units in Sweden responded to a questionnaire measuring performance of 33 valued life activities and self-rated pain. The relationships between performance of valued life activities (VLAs) and pain (measured by visual analogue scale (VAS)) were analysed based on gender. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted with the total VLA score as dependent variable. Women reported more pain and difficulties in performing valued life activities than men. Across genders, 85 % reported at least one valued life activity affected by RA. Significantly more women than men encountered difficulties in performing some activities such as cooking, gardening and meeting new people. Women reported higher pain intensity (35 mm) than men (31 mm). Almost all 33 difficulty ratings for valued life activities were higher among persons with high pain (greater than 40 mm) than persons with lower pain. Difficulty ratings for valued life activities correlated positively with pain in persons with lower pain, but not among those with high pain. The results highlight the importance of addressing pain, especially among women with RA, as they reported pain to impact on their valued life activities. Interestingly, this was evident also in women with lower levels of pain.

  • 163.
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    et al.
    School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Self-efficacy and pain acceptance as mediators of the relationship between pain and performance of valued life activities in women and men with rheumatoid arthritis2017In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 824-834Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To study whether personal factors (self-efficacy and pain acceptance) mediate the relationship between pain and performance of valued life activities in persons with rheumatoid arthritis.

    METHODS: Persons with rheumatoid arthritis for at least four years (n = 737; 73% women) answered a questionnaire measuring self-efficacy, pain acceptance, performance of valued life activities, and self-rated pain. Relationships among these constructs were explored using univariate and multivariate analyses. Structural equation modelling was then used to examine the mediational role of personal factors on the relationship between pain and performance of valued life activities.

    RESULTS: A direct negative association between pain and performance of valued life activities was identified (Beta = .34, P < .001). This suggests that people with rheumatoid arthritis who had higher levels of pain has increased difficulties in performing valued life activities. Self-efficacy and activity engagement component of pain acceptance mediated the relationship between pain and performance of valued life activities, however the pain willingness component of pain acceptance did not influence participation in valued life activities.

    CONCLUSION: These findings highlight the importance of considering personal factors, such as pain acceptance and self-efficacy, in facilitating participation in valued life activities.

  • 164.
    Ahlstrom, Christina A.
    et al.
    US Geol Survey, AK 99508 USA.
    Bonnedahl, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Kalmar Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Woksepp, Hanna
    Kalmar Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Hernandez, Jorge
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Olsen, Bjorn
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Ramey, Andrew M.
    US Geol Survey, AK 99508 USA.
    Acquisition and dissemination of cephalosporin-resistant E.coli in migratory birds sampled at an Alaska landfill as inferred through genomic analysis2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 7361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in bacterial pathogens threatens global health, though the spread of AMR bacteria and AMR genes between humans, animals, and the environment is still largely unknown. Here, we investigated the role of wild birds in the epidemiology of AMR Escherichia coli. Using next-generation sequencing, we characterized cephalosporin-resistant E. coli cultured from sympatric gulls and bald eagles inhabiting a landfill habitat in Alaska to identify genetic determinants conferring AMR, explore potential transmission pathways of AMR bacteria and genes at this site, and investigate how their genetic diversity compares to isolates reported in other taxa. We found genetically diverse E. coli isolates with sequence types previously associated with human infections and resistance genes of clinical importance, including blaCTX-M and blaCMY. Identical resistance profiles were observed in genetically unrelated E. coli isolates from both gulls and bald eagles. Conversely, isolates with indistinguishable core-genomes were found to have different resistance profiles. Our findings support complex epidemiological interactions including bacterial strain sharing between gulls and bald eagles and horizontal gene transfer among E. coli harboured by birds. Results suggest that landfills may serve as a source for AMR acquisition and/or maintenance, including bacterial sequence types and AMR genes relevant to human health.

  • 165.
    Ahlstrom, Christina A.
    et al.
    US Geol Survey, AK 99508 USA.
    Bonnedahl, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Kalmar Cty Council, Sweden.
    Woksepp, Hanna
    Kalmar Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Hernandez, Jorge
    Kalmar Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Reed, John A.
    US Geol Survey, AK 99508 USA.
    Tibbitts, Lee
    US Geol Survey, AK 99508 USA.
    Olsen, Bjoern
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Douglas, David C.
    US Geol Survey, AK USA.
    Ramey, Andrew M.
    US Geol Survey, AK 99508 USA.
    Satellite tracking of gulls and genomic characterization of faecal bacteria reveals environmentally mediated acquisition and dispersal of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska2019In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 28, no 10, p. 2531-2545Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gulls (Larus spp.) have frequently been reported to carry Escherichia coli exhibiting antimicrobial resistance (AMR E. coli); however, the pathways governing the acquisition and dispersal of such bacteria are not well described. We equipped 17 landfill-foraging gulls with satellite transmitters and collected gull faecal samples longitudinally from four locations on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska to assess: (a) gull attendance and transitions between sites, (b) spatiotemporal prevalence of faecally shed AMR E. coli, and (c) genomic relatedness of AMR E. coli isolates among sites. We also sampled Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) harvested as part of personal-use dipnet fisheries at two sites to assess potential contamination with AMR E. coli. Among our study sites, marked gulls most commonly occupied the lower Kenai River (61% of site locations) followed by the Soldotna landfill (11%), lower Kasilof River (5%) and upper Kenai River (amp;lt;1%). Gulls primarily moved between the Soldotna landfill and the lower Kenai River (94% of transitions among sites), which were also the two locations with the highest prevalence of AMR E. coli. There was relatively high spatial and temporal variability in AMR E. coli prevalence in gull faeces and there was no evidence of contamination on salmon harvested in personal-use fisheries. We identified E. coli sequence types and AMR genes of clinical importance, with some isolates possessing genes associated with resistance to as many as eight antibiotic classes. Our findings suggest that gulls acquire AMR E. coli at habitats with anthropogenic inputs and subsequent movements may represent pathways through which AMR is dispersed.

  • 166.
    Ahlstrom, Christina A.
    et al.
    US Geol Survey, AK 99508 USA.
    Ramey, Andrew M.
    US Geol Survey, AK 99508 USA.
    Woksepp, Hanna
    Kalmar Council, Sweden.
    Bonnedahl, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Kalmar Council, Sweden.
    Early emergence of mcr-1-positive Enterobacteriaceae in gulls from Spain and Portugal2019In: Environmental Microbiology Reports, ISSN 1758-2229, E-ISSN 1758-2229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We tested extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing bacteria from wild gulls (Larus spp.) sampled in 2009 for the presence of mcr-1. We report the detection of mcr-1 and describe genome characteristics of four Escherichia coli and one Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate from Spain and Portugal that also exhibited colistin resistance. Results represent the earliest evidence for colistin-resistant bacteria in European wildlife.

  • 167.
    Ahlstrom, Christina A.
    et al.
    US Geol Survey, AK 99508 USA.
    Ramey, Andrew M.
    US Geol Survey, AK 99508 USA.
    Woksepp, Hanna
    Dept Dev and Publ and Hlth, Sweden.
    Bonnedahl, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Dept Infect Dis, Sweden.
    Repeated Detection of Carbapenemase-Producing Escherichia coil in Gulls Inhabiting Alaska2019In: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, ISSN 0066-4804, E-ISSN 1098-6596, Vol. 63, no 8, article id e00758-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here, we report the first detection of carbapenemase-producing Escherichia coli in Alaska and in wildlife in the United States. Wild bird (gull) feces sampled at three locations in Southcentral Alaska yielded isolates that harbored plasmidencoded bla(kpc-2), or chromosomally encoded bla(OXA-48) and genes associated with antimicrobial resistance to up to eight antibiotic classes.

  • 168.
    Ahlstrom, G.
    et al.
    Ahlström, G., Department of Health Sciences, University of Örebro, SE-701 82 Örebro, Sweden.
    Lindvall, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Wenneberg, S.
    Department of Health Sciences, University of Örebro, SE-701 82 Örebro, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, L.G.
    Department of Neurology and Neurophysiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    A comprehensive rehabilitation programme tailored to the needs of adults with muscular dystrophy2006In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 132-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To assess if activities of daily living (ADL), coping and quality of life could be improved in adults with muscular dystrophy through a comprehensive rehabilitation programme. Design: Quasi-experimental, controlled clinical study comparing patients with similar age and disease aspects. Setting: Two different counties in Sweden, being either study or control setting. Subjects: The study group comprised 37 adults (21 women, 16 men, mean age 50 years), while the control group comprised 39 people (25 women, 14 men, mean age 46 years). Interventions: Four rehabilitation sessions tailored to different medical, physical and psychosocial needs of the patients, comprising a total of 10 days over a period of 18 months. Main measures: ADL, the Mental Adjustment to Cancer Scale measuring coping strategies, the Sickness Impact Profile measuring health-related quality of life, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the Psychosocial Well-being Questionnaire. Results: No significant differences were found between groups with regard to the outcome measures. There was increased dependence on others in ADL after 18 months in both groups, but it was more pronounced in the control group. Furthermore, a clear trend was observed in the data with regard to coping patterns, the control group using more coping strategies such as 'Helplessness/hopelessness' (P = 0.057), 'Anxious preoccupation' (P = 0.085) and 'Fatalistic' (P = 0.073) when being compared to the study group. Conclusions: No apparent effects on ADL were found from the rehabilitation programme, although there was a tendency of reduction of maladaptive coping patterns in the study group. This initial study may provide the rationale and basis for a randomized controlled trial. © 2006 Edward Arnold (Publishers) Ltd.

  • 169.
    Ahmad, Faiyaz
    et al.
    NHLBI, Translat Med Branch, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA .
    Lindh, Rebecka
    Lund University, Department Expt Med Science, S-22184 Lund, Sweden .
    Tang, Yan
    NHLBI, Translat Med Branch, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA .
    Ruishalme, Iida
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öst, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sahachartsiri, Bobby
    NHLBI, Translat Med Branch, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA .
    Strålfors, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Degerman, Eva
    Lund University, Department Expt Med Science, S-22184 Lund, Sweden .
    C Manganiello, Vincent
    NHLBI, Translat Med Branch, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA .
    Differential regulation of adipocyte PDE3B in distinct membrane compartments by insulin and the beta(3)-adrenergic receptor agonist CL316243: effects of caveolin-1 knockdown on formation/maintenance of macromolecular signalling complexes2009In: BIOCHEMICAL JOURNAL, ISSN 0264-6021, Vol. 424, no 3, p. 399-410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In adipocytes, PDE3B (phosphodiesterase 3B) is an important regulatory effector in signalling pathways controlled by insulin and cAMP-increasing hormones. Stimulation of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with insulin or the beta(3)-adrenergic receptor agonist CL316243 (termed CL) indicated that insulin preferentially phosphorylated/activated PDE3B associated with internal membranes (endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi), whereas CL preferentially phosphorylated/activated PDE3B associated with caveolae. siRNA (small interfering RNA)-mediated KD (knockdown) of CAV-1 (caveolin-1) in 3T3-L1 adipocytes resulted in down-regulation of expression of membrane-associated PDE3B. Insulin-induced activation of PDE3B was reduced, whereas CL-mediated activation was almost totally abolished. Similar results were obtained in adipocytes from Cav-1-deficient mice. siRNA-mediated KID of CAV-1 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes also resulted in inhibition of CL-stimulated phosphorylation of HSL (hormone-sensitive lipase) and perilipin A, and of lipolysis. Superose 6 gel-filtration chromatography of solubilized membrane proteins from adipocytes stimulated with insulin or CL demonstrated the reversible assembly of distinct macromolecular complexes that contained P-32-phosphorylated PDE3B and signalling molecules thought to be involved in its activation. Insulin- and CL-induced macromolecular complexes were enriched in cholesterol, and contained certain common signalling proteins [14-3-3, PP2A (protein phosphatase 2A) and cav-1]. The complexes present in insulin-stimulated cells contained tyrosine-phosphorylated IRS-1 (insulin receptor substrate 1) and its downstream signalling proteins, whereas CL-activated complexes contained beta(3)-adrenergic receptor, PKA-RII [PKA (cAMP-dependent protein kinase)-regulatory subunit] and HSL. Insulin- and CL-mediated macromolecular complex formation was significantly inhibited by CAV-1 KID. These results suggest that cav-1 acts as a molecular chaperone or scaffolding molecule in cholesterol-rich lipid rafts that may be necessary for the proper stabilization and activation of PDE3B in response to CL and insulin.

  • 170.
    Ahmad, Fareed
    et al.
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany.
    Shankar, Esaki M.
    University of Malaya, Malaysia; University of Malaya, Malaysia; School Basic Appl Science, India.
    Yong, Yean K.
    University of Malaya, Malaysia.
    Tan, Hong Y.
    University of Malaya, Malaysia.
    Ahrenstorf, Gerrit
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany.
    Jacobs, Roland
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany.
    Larsson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Schmidt, Reinhold E.
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany.
    Kamarulzaman, Adeeba
    University of Malaya, Malaysia; University of Malaya, Malaysia.
    Ansari, Abdul W.
    University of Malaya, Malaysia; University of Malaya, Malaysia.
    Negative Checkpoint Regulatory Molecule 2B4 (CD244) Upregulation Is Associated with Invariant Natural Killer T Cell Alterations and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Disease Progression2017In: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 8, article id 338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are implicated in innate immune responses against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). However, the determinants of cellular dysfunction across the iNKT cells subsets are seldom defined in HIV disease. Herein, we provide evidence for the involvement of the negative checkpoint regulator (NCR) 2B4 in iNKT cell alteration in a well-defined cohort of HIV-seropositive anti-retroviral therapy (ART) naive, ART-treated, and elite controllers (ECs). We report on exaggerated 2B4 expression on iNKT cells of HIV-infected treatment-naive individuals. In sharp contrast to CD4-iNKT cells, 2B4 expression was significantly higher on CD4+ iNKT cell subset. Notably, an increased level of 2B4 on iNKT cells was strongly correlated with parameters associated with HIV disease progression. Further, iNKT cells from ARTnaive individuals were defective in their ability to produce intracellular IFN-gamma Together, our results suggest that the levels of 2B4 expression and the downstream co-inhibitory signaling events may contribute to impaired iNKT cell responses.

  • 171.
    Ahmadi, Ahmad
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jonsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Flodin, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Interaction between smoking and glutathione S-transferase polymorphisms in solvent-induced chronic toxic encephalopathy2002In: Toxicology and industrial health, ISSN 0748-2337, E-ISSN 1477-0393, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 289-296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exposure to organic solvents is still common in industrial and other work environments, and increases the risk of chronic toxic encephalopathy (CTE). Genetic variation in metabolic enzymes for solvents and other xenobiotics may modify the risk of developing toxic effects. Therefore, we investigated the presence of null genotypes for glutathione S-transferases M1 and T1 (GSTM1, GSTT1) and two genetic polymorphisms of microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEPHX) in relation to the risk for chronic toxic encephalopathy (CTE) when exposed to solvents and smoking. We genotyped 115 patients who were classified into three categories: CTE (n = 56), incipient CTE (n = 27) and non-CTE (n = 32) patients. DNA was isolated from leucocytes and the GSTM 1 and GSTT1 null genotypes were determined by multiplex-polymerase chain reaction. The two polymorphisms of mEPHX were analysed by PCR-RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism) based assays. All analyses were performed blindly with regard to both exposure and disease status. An increased binomial regression risk ratio = 2.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.5-4.2, of the GSTM1 null genotype for CTE was found in smokers and for the GSTT1 null genotype (binomial regression risk ratio 1.5, 95% CI 1.0-2.0). In nonsmokers, the GSTM1 null genotype did not confer any risk for CTE. None of the studied mEPHX polymorphisms were associated with an increased risk for CTE. We suggest that the GSTM1 null genotype in smokers is a possible risk for solvent-induced CTE.

  • 172.
    Ahn, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Baranowski, Jacek
    Myasnikova, Irina
    Rahgozar, Mohammad
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Delshad, Baz
    First in man: wireless pressure sensors in left heart rooms'2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 173.
    Ahn, Jae-Il
    et al.
    Ottawa Hospital, Canada .
    Kuffova, Lucia
    University of Aberdeen, Scotland .
    Merrett, Kimberley
    Ottawa Hospital, Canada .
    Mitra, Debbie
    Ottawa Hospital, Canada .
    Forrester, John V.
    University of Aberdeen, Scotland .
    Li, Fengfu
    Ottawa Hospital, Canada .
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Ottawa Hospital, Canada .
    Crosslinked collagen hydrogels as corneal implants: Effects of sterically bulky vs. non-bulky carbodiimides as crosslinkers2013In: Acta Biomaterialia, ISSN 1742-7061, E-ISSN 1878-7568, Vol. 9, no 8, p. 7796-7805Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have previously shown that recombinant human collagen can be crosslinked with N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N-ethylcarbodiimide (EDC) to fabricate transparent hydrogels possessing the shape and dimensions of the human cornea. These corneal implants have been tested in a Phase I human clinical study. Although these hydrogels successfully promoted corneal tissue and nerve regeneration, the gelling kinetics were difficult to control during the manufacture of the implants. An alternative carbodiimide capable of producing hydrogels of similar characteristics as EDC in terms of strength and biocompatibility, but with a longer gelation time would be a desirable alternative. Here, we compared the crosslinking kinetics and properties of hydrogels crosslinked with a sterically bulky carbodiimide, N-Cyclohexyl-N-(2-morpholinoethyl) carbodiimide metho-p-toluenesulfonate (CMC), with that of EDC. CMC crosslinking was possible at ambient temperature whereas the EDC reaction was too rapid to control and had to be carried out at low temperatures. The highest tensile strength obtained using optimized formulations were equivalent, although CMC crosslinked hydrogels were found to be stiffer. The collagenase resistance of CMC crosslinked hydrogels was superior to that of EDC crosslinked hydrogels while biocompatibility was similar. We are also able to substitute porcine collagen with recombinant human collagen and show that the in vivo performance of both resulting hydrogels as full-thickness corneal implants is comparable in a mouse model of an orthotopic corneal graft. In conclusion, CMC is a viable alternative to EDC as a crosslinker for collagen-based biomaterials for use as corneal implants, and potentially for use in other tissue engineering applications.

  • 174.
    Ahn, Song-Ee
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Rimpiläinen, Sanna
    University of Gothenburg.
    Theodorsson, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Fenwick, Tara
    University of Stirling.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Learning in Technology-Enhanced Medical Simulation:Locations and Knowings2015In: Professions & Professionalism, ISSN 1893-1049, E-ISSN 1893-1049, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This qualitative study focuses on how knowings and learning take place in full-scale simulation training of medical and nursing students, by drawing upon actor-network theory (ANT). ANT situates materiality as a part of the social practic-es. Knowing and learning, according to ANT, are not simply cognitive or social phenomena, but are seen as emerging as effects of the relation between material assemblages and human actors being performed into being in particular locations. Data consists of observations of simulations performed by ten groups of students. The analysis focuses on the emerging knowings in the socio-material—arrangements of three locations involved in the simulation—the simulation room, the observation room and the reflection room. The findings indicate that medical knowing, affective knowing and communicative knowing are produced in different ways in the different locations and material arrangements of the simulation cycle.

  • 175.
    Ahnström, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Askmalm Stenmark, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Skoog, Lambert
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Altered expression of cyclin E and the retinoblastoma protein influences the effect of adjuvant therapy in breast cancer2009In: International Journal of Oncology, ISSN 1019-6439, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 441-448Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cyclin E and the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) are both important regulators of the G(1) phase in the cell cycle. Overexpression of cyclin E and lost expression of Rb has previously been observed in breast tumours at frequencies of 10-50% and 20-30%, respectively. We explored the prognostic role of cyclin E and Rb in breast cancer patients randomised for tamoxifen (TAM), CMF (cyclophosphamide, metotrexate, 5-fluorouracil) chemotherapy and radiotherapy (RT) and how their expression affects the patients response to treatment. Protein expression was assessed with immunohistochemistry. We found overexpression of cyclin E in 32.1% (71/221) of the tumours and loss of Rb expression in 25.0% (59/236). Increased expression of cyclin E correlated to dysfunctional p53 (P=0.003) while loss of Rb correlated to normal p53 status (P=0.001). Our results suggest that patients with high cyclin E tumours have less benefit from tamoxifen (ER+, TAM vs. no TAM; RR=0.97; 95% CI, 0.36-2.60) than patients whose tumours show low expression (ER+, TAM vs. no TAM; RR =0.41; 95% CI, 0.24-0.72). Cyclin E also tended to predict the benefit from radiotherapy with a local recurrence rate of 0.31 (RT vs. CMF; 95% CI, 0.12-0.93) for patients with low expression and 0.68 (RT vs. CMF; 95% CI, 0.2-2.32) for patients with high expression of cyclin E. When the p53 status was taken in consideration the results showed that patients with both normal p53 and normal Rb expression had considerably lower locoregional recurrence rate when treated with radiotherapy instead of CMF (RR=0.17; 95% CI, 0.052-0.58) as compared to patients with either altered Rb or p53 or both (RR=0.70; 95% CI, 0.28-1.73).

  • 176.
    Ahnström Waltersson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cell cycle alterations and 11q13 amplification in breast cancer: prediction of adjuvant treatment response2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The growth and development of the breast is to a large extent regulated by oestrogens through the oestrogen receptor (ER). Activation of the ERα triggers transcription of genes that are important for cell proliferation and stimulates entry into the G1 phase of the cell cycle. In breast cancer the ERα is often upregulated and is therefore a suitable target for adjuvant therapies such as tamoxifen. Although tamoxifen is an effective treatment in most cases, tumours sometimes acquire resistance to the drug. The aim of this thesis was to investigate the impact of G1 phase proteins and 11q13 amplification on prognosis and treatment response in breast cancer. The material used was from a clinical trial in which postmenopausal breast cancer patients were randomised to chemotherapy or radiotherapy and tamoxifen or no adjuvant treatment. We studied the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E and Rb with immunohisochemistry and amplification of CCND1 and PAK1 with real time PCR. We found that among patients with high tumour expression of cyclin D1, overexpression of ErbB2 was associated with reduced recurrence-free survival. Both cyclin D1 and cyclin E overexpression were associated with reduced tamoxifen response. High expression of cyclin D1 has been found to induce ligand independent activation of ERα in breast cancer cells and might also switch tamoxifen from acting as an antagonist to an agonist. Overexpression of cyclin E has been shown to be associated with expression of low molecular weight isoforms of the protein that possess an increased kinase activity and are insensitive to p21 and p27 inhibition. Furthermore, amplification of 11q13, and in particular the gene PAK1, was a strong predictor of tamoxifen resistance. The pak1 protein is involved in phosphorylation and ligand independent activation of the ERα. We also found that lost expression of either p53 or Rb reduced the patients benefit from radiotherapy compared with patients with normal expression of both proteins. Normally, ionizing radiation upregulates p53 resulting in G1 arrest or apoptosis. If either functional p53 or Rb is missing the cells can proceed from G1 to the S phase despite damaged DNA. The expression of the microRNA, miR-206, was analysed with real time PCR, and the results showed that high expression of miR-206 correlated to low expression of ERα and 11q13 amplification. In vitro studies have shown that miR-206 negatively regulates the expression of ERα. Taken together the G1 regulators and amplification of 11q13 seem to have an important role in predicting the patient’s response to adjuvant therapy.

    List of papers
    1. Role of cyclin D1 in ErbB2-positive breast cancer and tamoxifen resistance.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Role of cyclin D1 in ErbB2-positive breast cancer and tamoxifen resistance.
    Show others...
    2005 (English)In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, ISSN 0167-6806, E-ISSN 1573-7217, Vol. 91, no 2, p. 145-151Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Cyclin D1 plays an important role in the regulation of the G1 phase in the cell cycle. In mammary epithelial cells the expression of cyclin D1 is regulated through the oestrogen receptor and via ErbB2 signalling. Here we investigated the prognostic significance of cyclin D1 among 230 breast cancer patients randomised for tamoxifen, CMF chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The importance of combined cyclin D1 and ErbB2 overexpression was also analysed. Immunohistochemical analysis of the cyclin D1 expression resulted in 69 (29.8%) weakly positive, 107 (46.5%) moderately positive and 54 (23.7%) strongly positive cases. The prognostic importance of ErbB2 was significantly greater for patients whose tumours overexpressed cyclin D1 than for other patients (p = 0.026). In the former group, ErbB2 overexpression was strongly associated with increased risk of recurrence (RR = 4.7; 95% CI, 2.1-10.4) and breast cancer death (RR = 5.4; 95% CI, 2.3-12.6). This result is in accordance with experimental studies demonstrating a link between cyclin D1 and ErbB2 in oncogenesis. Among oestrogen receptor positive patients, those with moderate cyclin D1 expression significantly did benefit from tamoxifen treatment (RR = 0.42; 95% CI, 0.21-0.82) whereas those with weak or strong expression did not. Therefore cyclin D1 might be a predictive marker for tamoxifen resistance.

    Keywords
    Beta, fonder, prediction, OLS, LAD, WLS
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-17431 (URN)10.1007/s10549-004-6457-4 (DOI)15868442 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2009-03-25 Created: 2009-03-24 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Altered expression of cyclin E and the retinoblastoma protein influences the effect of adjuvant therapy in breast cancer
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Altered expression of cyclin E and the retinoblastoma protein influences the effect of adjuvant therapy in breast cancer
    Show others...
    2009 (English)In: International Journal of Oncology, ISSN 1019-6439, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 441-448Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Cyclin E and the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) are both important regulators of the G(1) phase in the cell cycle. Overexpression of cyclin E and lost expression of Rb has previously been observed in breast tumours at frequencies of 10-50% and 20-30%, respectively. We explored the prognostic role of cyclin E and Rb in breast cancer patients randomised for tamoxifen (TAM), CMF (cyclophosphamide, metotrexate, 5-fluorouracil) chemotherapy and radiotherapy (RT) and how their expression affects the patients response to treatment. Protein expression was assessed with immunohistochemistry. We found overexpression of cyclin E in 32.1% (71/221) of the tumours and loss of Rb expression in 25.0% (59/236). Increased expression of cyclin E correlated to dysfunctional p53 (P=0.003) while loss of Rb correlated to normal p53 status (P=0.001). Our results suggest that patients with high cyclin E tumours have less benefit from tamoxifen (ER+, TAM vs. no TAM; RR=0.97; 95% CI, 0.36-2.60) than patients whose tumours show low expression (ER+, TAM vs. no TAM; RR =0.41; 95% CI, 0.24-0.72). Cyclin E also tended to predict the benefit from radiotherapy with a local recurrence rate of 0.31 (RT vs. CMF; 95% CI, 0.12-0.93) for patients with low expression and 0.68 (RT vs. CMF; 95% CI, 0.2-2.32) for patients with high expression of cyclin E. When the p53 status was taken in consideration the results showed that patients with both normal p53 and normal Rb expression had considerably lower locoregional recurrence rate when treated with radiotherapy instead of CMF (RR=0.17; 95% CI, 0.052-0.58) as compared to patients with either altered Rb or p53 or both (RR=0.70; 95% CI, 0.28-1.73).

    Keywords
    cell cycle, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, overexpression, Rb, p53
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-16619 (URN)10.3892/ijo_00000168 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-02-07 Created: 2009-02-06 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    3. Amplification of CCND1 and PAK1 as predictors of recurrence and tamoxifen resistance in postmenopausal breast cancer.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Amplification of CCND1 and PAK1 as predictors of recurrence and tamoxifen resistance in postmenopausal breast cancer.
    Show others...
    2007 (English)In: Oncogene, ISSN 0950-9232, E-ISSN 1476-5594, Vol. 26, no 49, p. 6997-7005Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The 11q13 region is amplified in approximately 15% of all breast tumors. Situated in this region are the cyclin D1 gene (CCND1) and the p-21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) gene. Both genes encode proteins shown to activate the estrogen receptor (ER), leading to transcription of CCND1 and other ER-responsive genes. Here, we investigate the prognostic and treatment predictive role of CCND1 and PAK1 gene amplification in postmenopausal breast cancer patients randomized to tamoxifen treatment or no adjuvant treatment. Amplification of CCND1 and PAK1, assessed by real-time PCR, was observed in 12.5 and 9.3%, respectively. Amplification of PAK1 was seen in 37% of the CCND1-amplified tumors, indicating coamplification (P<0.001). In ER-positive patients, amplification of at least one of the genes indicated a reduced recurrence-free survival (P=0.025). When response to tamoxifen treatment was analysed, patients with PAK1 amplification showed decreased benefit from the drug (ER+; relative risk ratio (RR)=1.62; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.47-5.55) compared to patients without amplification (ER+; RR=0.53; 95% CI, 0.32-0.88). This was not evident for CCND1 amplification. We show that PAK1 may be a predictor of tamoxifen resistance and furthermore, we do not discard PAK1 as a potential candidate oncogene in the 11q13 amplicon. In addition, we show that high pak1 protein levels may predict tamoxifen insensitivity.

    Keywords
    Cyclin D1, pak1, drug resistance, breast cancer, real-time PCR
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-17456 (URN)10.1038/sj.onc.1210506 (DOI)17486065 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2009-03-25 Created: 2009-03-25 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    4. miR-206 expression is downregulated in cyclin D1 amplified breast tumours
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>miR-206 expression is downregulated in cyclin D1 amplified breast tumours
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Amplification in the 11q13 region has been found in around 15% of all breast cancers and is strongly correlated with oestrogen receptor (ER) positive tumours. We have previously found that amplification of at least one of the genes PAK1 or CCND1 is associated with decreased recurrencefree survival among ER+ patients. Other genes in the amplicon might also contribute to this effect and situated close to CCND1 are the FGF-3, -4 and - 19 genes. The FGF-4 protein has been shown to inhibit the expression of the ERα regulator miR-206 in chicken embryo. In this study we analysed 23 tumours with and 27 tumours without previously detected 11q13 amplification to explore if 11q13 amplification is associated with decreased levels of miR-206 and if miR-206 is associated with ER expression. Using real-time PCR, we found that miR-206 expression was inversely correlated to CCND1 and 11q13 amplification (P=0.016 and P=0.022 respectively). Tumours with low miR-206 expression had higher levels of ERα than tumours with intermediate and high expression (P=0.043). We conclude that miR-206 might be an important regulator of the ERα. Our finding that low mir-206 is associated with CCND1 amplification and thereby also FGF-4 amplification points towards the possibility of a miR-206 regulator, FGF-4 or another FGF, present in the amplicon.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-17457 (URN)
    Available from: 2009-03-25 Created: 2009-03-25 Last updated: 2010-01-14Bibliographically approved
  • 177.
    Ahnström Waltersson, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Department of Cytology, Karolinska University Hospital, SE-104 01 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Skoog, Lambert
    Department of Cytology, Karolinska University Hospital, SE-104 01 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    miR-206 expression is downregulated in cyclin D1 amplified breast tumoursManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Amplification in the 11q13 region has been found in around 15% of all breast cancers and is strongly correlated with oestrogen receptor (ER) positive tumours. We have previously found that amplification of at least one of the genes PAK1 or CCND1 is associated with decreased recurrencefree survival among ER+ patients. Other genes in the amplicon might also contribute to this effect and situated close to CCND1 are the FGF-3, -4 and - 19 genes. The FGF-4 protein has been shown to inhibit the expression of the ERα regulator miR-206 in chicken embryo. In this study we analysed 23 tumours with and 27 tumours without previously detected 11q13 amplification to explore if 11q13 amplification is associated with decreased levels of miR-206 and if miR-206 is associated with ER expression. Using real-time PCR, we found that miR-206 expression was inversely correlated to CCND1 and 11q13 amplification (P=0.016 and P=0.022 respectively). Tumours with low miR-206 expression had higher levels of ERα than tumours with intermediate and high expression (P=0.043). We conclude that miR-206 might be an important regulator of the ERα. Our finding that low mir-206 is associated with CCND1 amplification and thereby also FGF-4 amplification points towards the possibility of a miR-206 regulator, FGF-4 or another FGF, present in the amplicon.

  • 178.
    Ahnström Waltersson, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Haematology UHL.
    Rutqvist, Lars Erik
    Department of Oncology, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Skoog, Lambert
    Department of Cytology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Role of cyclin D1 in ErbB2-positive breast cancer and tamoxifen resistance.2005In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, ISSN 0167-6806, E-ISSN 1573-7217, Vol. 91, no 2, p. 145-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cyclin D1 plays an important role in the regulation of the G1 phase in the cell cycle. In mammary epithelial cells the expression of cyclin D1 is regulated through the oestrogen receptor and via ErbB2 signalling. Here we investigated the prognostic significance of cyclin D1 among 230 breast cancer patients randomised for tamoxifen, CMF chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The importance of combined cyclin D1 and ErbB2 overexpression was also analysed. Immunohistochemical analysis of the cyclin D1 expression resulted in 69 (29.8%) weakly positive, 107 (46.5%) moderately positive and 54 (23.7%) strongly positive cases. The prognostic importance of ErbB2 was significantly greater for patients whose tumours overexpressed cyclin D1 than for other patients (p = 0.026). In the former group, ErbB2 overexpression was strongly associated with increased risk of recurrence (RR = 4.7; 95% CI, 2.1-10.4) and breast cancer death (RR = 5.4; 95% CI, 2.3-12.6). This result is in accordance with experimental studies demonstrating a link between cyclin D1 and ErbB2 in oncogenesis. Among oestrogen receptor positive patients, those with moderate cyclin D1 expression significantly did benefit from tamoxifen treatment (RR = 0.42; 95% CI, 0.21-0.82) whereas those with weak or strong expression did not. Therefore cyclin D1 might be a predictive marker for tamoxifen resistance.

  • 179.
    Aho, Nikolas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Victimization, Prevalence, Health and Peritraumatic Reactions in Swedish Adolescents2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis was to expand the knowledge of victimization in children and youth in Sweden. Victimization, prevalence, health and peritraumatic reactions were explored in a cross sectional, representative sample of 5,960 second grade high school students in Sweden. A computerized survey was developed and administered in class room setting.

    Lifetime victimization was found in 84.1% of the sample (m=83.0%, f=85.2%), and, in relation to the five domains, 66.4% had experienced conventional crime, 24% child maltreatment, 54.4% peer and sibling victimization, 21.8% sexual victimization, and 54% had experienced witness victimization. Females experienced significantly more child maltreatment, peer and sibling victimization, sexual victimization, and witnessed victimization, males more conventional crime (p<0.001). Using logistic regression risk factors for victimization were confirmed by a significant increase OR regarding gender, environment and lack of both parents.

    Symptoms (TSCC), were clearly associated with both victimizations per se and the number of victimizations. The results indicated a relatively linear increase in symptoms with an increase in number of events experienced. Mental health of the polyvictimized group was significantly worse than that of the non-polyvictimized group, with significantly elevated TSCC scores (t<0.001). Hierarchical regression analysis resulted in beta value reduction when polyvictimization was introduced supporting the independent effect on symptoms. Social anxiety was found in 10.2 % (n = 605) of the total group (n = 5,960). A significant gender difference emerged, with more females than males reporting social anxiety. Elevated PTSS was found in 14.8 % (n=883). Binary logistic regression revealed the highest OR for having had contact with child and adolescent psychiatry was found for the combined group with social anxiety and elevated PTSS (OR = 4.88, 95 % CI = 3.53–6.73, p<001). Significant associations were also found between use of child and adolescent psychiatry and female gender (OR = 2.05, 95 % CI = 1.70–2.45), Swedish birth origin (OR = 1.68, 95 % CI = 1.16–2.42) and living in a small municipality (OR = 1.33, 95 % CI = 1.02–1.73).

    Mediation models used peritraumatic reactions (PT): total, physiological arousal (PA), peritraumatic dissociation (PD), and intervention thoughts (IT) and JVQ and TSCC. Of the n=5,332 cases, a total of n=4,483 (84.1%) reported at least one victimizing event (m = 83.0%, f = 85.2%). Of these, 74.9% (n=3,360) also experienced a PT reaction of some kind. The effect mediated by PT tot was b= 0.479, BCa CI [0.342 – 0.640], representing a relatively small effect of 7.6%, κ2=0.076, 95% BCa CI [0.054- 0.101]. The mediating effect of JVQ on TSCC was mediated by PD more for males (b=0.394 BCa CI [0.170-0.636]) than for females (b=0.247, BCa CI [0.021-0.469]). The indirect effect of the JVQ on the TSCC tot mediated by the different PT reactions was significant for PD (b=0.355, BCa CI [0.199- 0.523]. In males a mediating effect of PD could be seen in the different models, while females had a more mixed result. IT did not show any indirect effect in males, but had a mixed effect for females.

    The empirical findings in this thesis lead to the conclusion that victimization is highly prevalent in children and youth and is related to health issues. The association of victimization on symptoms was mediated by peritraumatic reactions. Using a comprehensive instrument such as the JVQ provides the researcher or clinician the opportunity to acquire more complete measurement and also makes it possible to identify polyvictimization, a high-level category of events with severe impact on health.  

    List of papers
    1. The Prevalence of Potentially Victimizing Events, Poly-Victimization, and Its Association to Sociodemographic Factors: A Swedish Youth Survey
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Prevalence of Potentially Victimizing Events, Poly-Victimization, and Its Association to Sociodemographic Factors: A Swedish Youth Survey
    2016 (English)In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, ISSN 0886-2605, E-ISSN 1552-6518, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 620-651Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Studying the extent to which children are exposed to victimizing events is important to fully understand the effect of such exposure in shaping them as adults. The aim of this study was to use self-report by adolescents to measure the prevalence of victimizing events and of poly-victimization. A representative sample of 5,960 students (aged 17) from high schools in Sweden was given the self-administrated version of the Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire (JVQ) along with questions concerning gender, birthplace, parents birthplace and employment, residence, educational program, and municipality size. The results show that 84.1% (83.0% young men and 85.2% young women) of the students had experienced victimization during their lifetime, and 10.3% were categorized as poly-victims (8.1% young men and 12.5% young women; OR = 1.62, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.35, 1.94]). Adolescents living with both parents were at lower risk of any form of victimization for both genders, while females were at higher risk of maltreatment, peer victimization, and, most significantly, sexual victimization. In conclusion, the vast majority of young people have been victimized during their lifetime. A greater awareness of the impact of these victimizing events on children and adolescents is important as a basis for providing a safer milieu and establishing better interventions, especially for those that have been victimized on multiple occasions. The high-exposure group was determined by using 10 events as a cutoff. Findings on this group corresponded with findings in other international studies regarding distribution, elevated risk for females, and the possibility of limiting the effects of victimization by modifying living conditions.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC, 2016
    Keywords
    JVQ; victim; youth; poly-victimization; sociodemographics
    National Category
    Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124456 (URN)10.1177/0886260514556105 (DOI)000367838200004 ()25392393 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Crime Victim Compensation and Support Authority in Sweden; Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden

    Available from: 2016-02-02 Created: 2016-02-01 Last updated: 2018-02-21
    2. Victimization, polyvictimization , and health in Swedish adolescents
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Victimization, polyvictimization , and health in Swedish adolescents
    2016 (English)In: Adolescent Health, Medicine and Therapeutics, ISSN 1179-318X, Vol. 7, p. 89-99Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The main objective of this article was to study the relationship between the different areas of victimization (eg, sexual victimization) and psychological symptoms, taking into account the full range of victimization domains. The final aim was to contribute further evidence regarding the bias that studies that focus on just one area of victimization may be introduced into our psychological knowledge. The sample included 5,960 second-year high school students in Sweden with a mean age of 17.3 years (range =16–20 years, standard deviation =0.652), of which 49.6% were females and 50.4% males. The Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire and the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children were used to assess victimization and psychological problems separately. The results show that a majority of adolescents have been victimized, females reported more total events and more sexual victimization and childhood maltreatment, and males were more often victims of conventional crime. The majority of victimization domains as well as the sheer number of events (polyvictimization [PV]) proved to be harmful to adolescent health, affecting females more than males. PV explained part of the health effect and had an impact on its own and in relation to each domain. This suggests the possibility that PV to a large degree explains trauma symptoms. In order to understand the psychological effects of trauma, clinicians and researchers should take into account the whole range of possible types of victimization.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Dovepress, 2016
    Keywords
    victimization, childhood trauma, psychological symptoms, JVQ, TSCC
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Psychiatry Neurosciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-132626 (URN)10.2147/AHMT.S109587 (DOI)27616895 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2016-11-17 Created: 2016-11-17 Last updated: 2018-02-21Bibliographically approved
    3. Posttraumatic stress symptoms and mental health services utilization in adolescents with social anxiety disorder and experiences of victimization
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Posttraumatic stress symptoms and mental health services utilization in adolescents with social anxiety disorder and experiences of victimization
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 177-184Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Recent findings from studies on adults show similarities between social anxiety disorder (SAD) and posttraumatic stress in the form of recurrent memories and intrusive and distressing images of earlier aversive events. Further, treatment models for SAD in adults have been successfully developed by using transdiagnostic knowledge on posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS). Studies on adolescents are though missing. The present study aimed at exploring the association between PTSS and SAD in Swedish adolescents. A second aim was to study mental health services utilization in relation to these conditions. A total of 5,960 high-school students participated and reported on SAD, life time victimization, PTSS and mental health service utilization. Socially anxious adolescents reported significantly higher levels of PTSS than adolescents not reporting SAD and this difference was seen in victimized as well as non-victimized subjects. Contact with a school counselor was the most common mental health service utilization in subjects with SAD and those with elevated PTSS. In the prediction of contact with a CAP-clinic, significant odds ratios were found for a condition of SAD and elevated PTSS (OR = 4.88, 95 % CI = 3.53–6.73) but not for SAD only. Screening of PTSS in adolescents with SAD is recommended. The service of school counselors is important in detecting and helping young people with SAD and elevated PTSS. Clinical studies on SAD and PTSS in adolescents could aid in modifying treatment models for SAD.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer, 2013
    Keywords
    Social anxiety disorder, victimization, mental health service utilization, adolescents
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-89939 (URN)10.1007/s00787-012-0336-z (DOI)000315736200005 ()
    Available from: 2013-03-11 Created: 2013-03-11 Last updated: 2018-02-21
  • 180.
    Aho, Nikolas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gren Landell, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience (CSAN).
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    The Prevalence of Potentially Victimizing Events, Poly-Victimization, and Its Association to Sociodemographic Factors: A Swedish Youth Survey2016In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, ISSN 0886-2605, E-ISSN 1552-6518, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 620-651Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studying the extent to which children are exposed to victimizing events is important to fully understand the effect of such exposure in shaping them as adults. The aim of this study was to use self-report by adolescents to measure the prevalence of victimizing events and of poly-victimization. A representative sample of 5,960 students (aged 17) from high schools in Sweden was given the self-administrated version of the Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire (JVQ) along with questions concerning gender, birthplace, parents birthplace and employment, residence, educational program, and municipality size. The results show that 84.1% (83.0% young men and 85.2% young women) of the students had experienced victimization during their lifetime, and 10.3% were categorized as poly-victims (8.1% young men and 12.5% young women; OR = 1.62, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.35, 1.94]). Adolescents living with both parents were at lower risk of any form of victimization for both genders, while females were at higher risk of maltreatment, peer victimization, and, most significantly, sexual victimization. In conclusion, the vast majority of young people have been victimized during their lifetime. A greater awareness of the impact of these victimizing events on children and adolescents is important as a basis for providing a safer milieu and establishing better interventions, especially for those that have been victimized on multiple occasions. The high-exposure group was determined by using 10 events as a cutoff. Findings on this group corresponded with findings in other international studies regarding distribution, elevated risk for females, and the possibility of limiting the effects of victimization by modifying living conditions.

  • 181.
    Aho, Nikolas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Proczkowska Björklund, Marie
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Peritraumatic reactions in relation to trauma exposure and symptoms of posttraumatic stress in high school students2017In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8066, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 1380998Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Exposure to traumatic events is clearly associated with a diversity of subsequent mental health problems, with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as the most prevalent disorder. Epidemiologically, trauma exposure rates are more prevalent than PTSD, indicating that most trauma victims do not develop PTSD. More knowledge is needed to understand the development of the different posttraumatic pathways including the significance of pretraumatic, peritraumatic and posttraumatic risk factors. Objective: To study peritraumatic reactions in relation to trauma exposure and symptoms of posttraumatic stress and to enhance our understanding of peritraumatic reactions as mediators between trauma and later symptomatology. Method: The study was composed of a representative community sample of 5332 second year high school students (mean age 17.3 years) who completed the Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire (SAQ/JVQ), Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children (TSCC) and answered questions about peritraumatic reactions. Mediation effects of peritraumatic reactions on the trauma exposure relationship to symptoms was tested using the PROCESS macro for SPSS. Results: Traumatic events are common (84.1%) and are accompanied in three-quarters of the students with at least one form of peritraumatic reaction. Peritraumatic reactions, especially peritraumatic dissociative reactions, mediate the relationship between trauma exposure and symptoms, and gender moderates the effect of peritraumatic dissociation. This moderating effect was found to be larger for boys than for girls, indicating gender differences in response to trauma. Conclusions: The results indicate the need to screen for peritraumatic reactions as early as possible after a traumatic event in order to identify those at risk for PTSD.

  • 182.
    Aho, Nikolas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Proczkowska-Björklund, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Victimization, polyvictimization , and health in Swedish adolescents2016In: Adolescent Health, Medicine and Therapeutics, ISSN 1179-318X, Vol. 7, p. 89-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main objective of this article was to study the relationship between the different areas of victimization (eg, sexual victimization) and psychological symptoms, taking into account the full range of victimization domains. The final aim was to contribute further evidence regarding the bias that studies that focus on just one area of victimization may be introduced into our psychological knowledge. The sample included 5,960 second-year high school students in Sweden with a mean age of 17.3 years (range =16–20 years, standard deviation =0.652), of which 49.6% were females and 50.4% males. The Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire and the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children were used to assess victimization and psychological problems separately. The results show that a majority of adolescents have been victimized, females reported more total events and more sexual victimization and childhood maltreatment, and males were more often victims of conventional crime. The majority of victimization domains as well as the sheer number of events (polyvictimization [PV]) proved to be harmful to adolescent health, affecting females more than males. PV explained part of the health effect and had an impact on its own and in relation to each domain. This suggests the possibility that PV to a large degree explains trauma symptoms. In order to understand the psychological effects of trauma, clinicians and researchers should take into account the whole range of possible types of victimization.

  • 183.
    Ahrén, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Olsson, Petter
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Klasson, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology . Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Petoral, Rodrigo Jr
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry .
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Rare earth nanoparticles as contrast agent in MRI: Nanomaterial design and biofunctionalization2007In: IVC-17/ICSS-13 ICNT,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 184.
    Aili Fagerholm, Siri
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Insulin signaling in primary adipocytes in insulin sensitive and insulin resistant states2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing numbers of people world-wide develops the disease type 2 diabetes. Development of type 2 diabetes is characterized by a shift from an insulin sensitive state to an insulin resistant state in peripheral insulin responding organs, which originates from the development of insulin resistance in the adipose tissue. Insulin resistance in combination with reduced pancreatic insulin secretion lead to overt type 2 diabetes.

    In this thesis, the insulin signaling network in primary adipocytes was analyzed. Key proteins and mechanisms were studied to gain deeper knowledge of signaling both in the insulin sensitive state and in the insulin resistant state produced by rapid weight gain as well as in type 2 diabetes.

    The surface of the adipocyte is dotted with invaginations in the cell membrane called caveolae that act as important metabolic and signaling platforms in adipocytes, and also harbor the insulin receptor. In paper I we show that insulin stimulation of primary adipocytes results in a rapid phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and caveolin-1, and that internalization of the proteins is mediated by endocytosis of caveolae.

    Weight gain due to overfeeding and obesity has been associated with the development of insulin resistance in insulin sensitive tissues such as the adipose tissue. In paper II we show that short-term overfeeding for one month of lean subjects results in an insulin resistant state. At the end of the study, the subjects had developed a mild systemic insulin resistance. Moreover, in isolated subcutaneous adipocytes we found several alterations of the insulin signaling pathway that mimicked alterations found in isolated subcutaneous adipocytes from subjects with type 2 diabetes.

    In paper III we present a first dynamic mathematical model of the insulin signaling network in human adipocytes that are based on experimental data acquired in a consistent fashion. The model takes account of insulin signaling in both the healthy, insulin sensitive state and in the insulin resistant state of type 2 diabetes. We show that attenuated mTORC1-mediated positive feedback to control of phosphorylation of IRS1 at Ser307 is an essential component of the insulin resistant state of type 2 diabetes. A future application of the model is the identification and evaluation of drug targets for the treatment of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

    In paper IV we examine the protein kinase that catalyzes the insulin stimulated mTORC1- mediated feedback to IRS1. We find that the phosphorylation of IRS1 at Ser307 is not likely to be catalyzed by the kinases S6K1, mTOR or PKB. However, a catalyzing protein kinase for the in vitro phosphorylation of IRS1 at Ser307 was found to be associated with the complex mTORC1.

    In conclusion, this thesis provide new insights and characterize mechanisms of the intrinsically complex insulin signaling network of primary adipocytes, both in insulin sensitive and insulin resistant states.

    List of papers
    1. Rapid insulin-dependent endocytosis of the insulin receptor by caveolae in primary adipocytes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rapid insulin-dependent endocytosis of the insulin receptor by caveolae in primary adipocytes
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    2009 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 4, no 6, p. e5985-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The insulin receptor is localized in caveolae and is dependent on caveolae or cholesterol for signaling in adipocytes. When stimulated with insulin, the receptor is internalized. Methodology/Principal Findings: We examined primary rat adipocytes by subcellular fractionation to examine if the insulin receptor was internalized in a caveolae-mediated process. Insulin induced a rapid, t1/2 less than3 min, endocytosis of the insulin receptor in parallel with receptor tyrosine autophosphorylation. Concomitantly, caveolin-1 was phosphorylated at tyrosine(14) and endocytosed. Vanadate increased the phosphorylation of caveolin-1 without affecting insulin receptor phosphorylation or endocytosis. Immunocapture of endosomal vesicles with antibodies against the insulin receptor co-captured caveolin-1 and immunocapture with antibodies against tyrosine(14)-phosphorylated caveolin-1 co-captured the insulin receptor, demonstrating that the insulin receptor was endocytosed together with tyrosine(14)-phosphorylated caveolin-1. By immunogold electron microscopy the insulin receptor and caveolin-1 were colocalized in endosome vesicles that resembled caveosomes. Clathrin was not endocytosed with the insulin receptor and the inhibitor of clathrin-coated pit-mediated endocytosis, chlorpromazine, did not inhibit internalization of the insulin receptor, while transferrin receptor internalization was inhibited. Conclusion: It is concluded that in response to insulin stimulation the autophosphorylated insulin receptor in primary adipocytes is rapidly endocytosed in a caveolae-mediated process, involving tyrosine phosphorylation of caveolin-1.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-21319 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0005985 (DOI)
    Note
    Original Publication: Siri Fagerholm, Unn Örtegren Kugelberg, M. Karlsson, I. Ruishalme and Peter Strålfors, Rapid insulin-dependent endocytosis of the insulin receptor by caveolae in primary adipocytes, 2009, PLoS ONE, (4), 6, e5985. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0005985 Available from: 2009-09-30 Created: 2009-09-30 Last updated: 2013-07-08
    2. Short-Term Overeating Induces Insulin Resistance in Fat Cells in Lean Human Subjects
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Short-Term Overeating Induces Insulin Resistance in Fat Cells in Lean Human Subjects
    Show others...
    2009 (English)In: Molecular medicine (Cambridge, Mass. Print), ISSN 1076-1551, E-ISSN 1528-3658, Vol. 15, no 7-8, p. 228-234Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are closely linked to obesity. Numerous prospective studies have reported on weight gain, insulin resistance, and insulin signaling in experimental animals, but not in humans. We examined insulin signaling in adipocytes from lean volunteers, before and at the end of a 4-wk period of consuming a fast-food, high-calorie diet that led to weight gain. We also examined adipocytes from patients with T2D. During the high-calorie diet, subjects gained 10% body weight and 19% total body fat, but stayed lean (body mass index = 24.3 kg/m2) and developed moderate systemic insulin resistance. Similarly to the situation in T2D subjects, in subjects on the high-calorie diet, the amount of insulin receptors was reduced and phosphorylation of IRS1 at tyrosine and at serine-307 (human sequence, corresponding to murine serine-302) were impaired. The amount of insulin receptor substrate protein-1 (IRS1) and the phosphorylation of IRS1 at serine-312 (human sequence, corresponding to murine serine-307) were unaffected by the diet. Unlike the T2D subjects, in subjects on the high-calorie diet, likely owing to the ongoing weight-gain, phosphorylation of MAP-kinases ERK1/2 became hyperresponsive to insulin. To our knowledge this study is the first to investigate insulin signaling during overeating in humans, and it demonstrates that T2D effects on intracellular insulin signaling already occur after 4 wks of a high-calorie diet and that the effects in humans differ from those in laboratory animals.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-20893 (URN)10.2119/molmed.2009.00037 (DOI)000276043800004 ()
    Available from: 2009-09-24 Created: 2009-09-24 Last updated: 2019-06-28
    3. Insulin Signaling in Type 2 Diabetes: Experimental and Modeling Analyses Reveal Mechanisms of Insulin Resistance in Human Adipocytes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Insulin Signaling in Type 2 Diabetes: Experimental and Modeling Analyses Reveal Mechanisms of Insulin Resistance in Human Adipocytes
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    2013 (English)In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 288, no 14, p. 9867-9880Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Type 2 diabetes originates in an expanding adipose tissue that for unknown reasons becomes insulin resistant. Insulin resistance reflects impairments in insulin signaling, but mechanisms involved are unclear because current research is fragmented. We report a systems-level mechanistic understanding of insulin resistance in humans. We developed a dynamic mathematical model of insulin signaling – normally and in diabetes – based on quantitative steady-state and dynamic time-course data on signaling intermediaries in human mature adipocytes. At the core of insulin resistance is attenuation of a positive feedback from mammalian target of rapamycin in complex with raptor (mTORC1) to the insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1), which explains reduced sensitivity and signal strength throughout the signaling network. We demonstrate the potential of the model for identification of drug targets, e.g. increasing the feedback restores insulin signaling. Our findings suggest that insulin resistance in an expanded adipose tissue results from cell growth restriction to prevent cell necrosis.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-84999 (URN)10.1074/jbc.M112.432062 (DOI)000317114000027 ()
    Available from: 2012-10-30 Created: 2012-10-30 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    4. Phosphorylation of IRS1 at Serine 307 in Response to Insulin in Human Adipocytes Is Not Likely to be Catalyzed by p70 Ribosomal S6 Kinase
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Phosphorylation of IRS1 at Serine 307 in Response to Insulin in Human Adipocytes Is Not Likely to be Catalyzed by p70 Ribosomal S6 Kinase
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    2013 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1) is phosphorylated on serine 307 (human sequence, corresponding to murine serine 302) in response to insulin as part of a feedback loop that controls IRS1 phosphorylation on tyrosine residues by the insulin receptor. This in turn directly affects downstream signaling and is in human adipocytes implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. The phosphorylation is inhibited by rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in complex with raptor (mTORC1). The mTORC1-downstream p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6K1), which is activated by insulin, can phosphorylate IRS1 at serine 307 in vitro and is considered the physiological protein kinase. Because the IRS1 serine 307-kinase catalyzes a critical step in the control of insulin signaling and constitutes a potential target for treatment of insulin resistance, it is important to know whether S6K1 is the physiological serine 307-kinase or not. We report that, by several criteria, S6K1 does not phosphorylate IRS1 at serine 307 in response to insulin in intact human primary adipocytes: (i) The time-courses for phosphorylation of S6K1 and its phosphorylation of S6 are not compatible with the phosphorylation of IRS1 at serine 307; (ii) A dominant-negative construct of S6K1 inhibits the phosphorylation of S6, without effect on the phosphorylation of IRS1 at serine 307; (iii) The specific inhibitor of S6K1 PF-4708671 inhibits the phosphorylation of S6, without effect on phosphorylation of IRS1 at serine 307. mTOR-immunoprecipitates from insulin-stimulated adipocytes contains an unidentified protein kinase specific for phosphorylation of IRS1 at serine 307, but it is not mTOR or S6K1.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Public Library of Science, 2013
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-93257 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0059725 (DOI)000317717300032 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Diabetes Fund||Novo Nordic Foundation||University of Linkoping||Swedish Research Council||

    Available from: 2013-05-28 Created: 2013-05-28 Last updated: 2019-06-28
  • 185.
    Aira, Naomi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Anna-Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Singh, Susmita K.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mckay, Derek M.
    University of Calgary, Canada.
    Blomgran, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Species dependent impact of helminth-derived antigens on human macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Direct effect on the innate anti-mycobacterial response2017In: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, ISSN 1935-2727, E-ISSN 1935-2735, Vol. 11, no 3, article id e0005390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background In countries with a high prevalence of tuberculosis there is high coincident of helminth infections that might worsen disease outcome. While Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) gives rise to a pro-inflammatory Th1 response, a Th2 response is typical of helminth infections. A strong Th2 response has been associated with decreased protection against tuberculosis. Principal findings We investigated the direct effect of helminth-derived antigens on human macrophages, hypothesizing that helminths would render macrophages less capable of controlling Mtb. Measuring cytokine output, macrophage surface markers with flow cytometry, and assessing bacterial replication and phagosomal maturation revealed that antigens from different species of helminth directly affect macrophage responses to Mtb. Antigens from the tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta and the nematode Trichuris muris caused an anti-inflammatory response with M2-type polarization, reduced macrophage phagosome maturation and ability to activate T cells, along with increased Mtb burden, especially in T. muris exposed cells which also induced the highest IL-10 production upon co-infection. However, antigens from the trematode Schistosoma mansoni had the opposite effect causing a decrease in IL-10 production, M1-type polarization and increased control of Mtb. Conclusion We conclude that, independent of any adaptive immune response, infection with helminth parasites, in a species-specific manner can influence the outcome of tuberculosis by either enhancing or diminishing the bactericidal function of macrophages.

  • 186.
    Aittomaki, K.
    et al.
    Aittomäki, K., Department of Clinical Genetics, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland, Department of Clinical Genetics, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 140, FI-00029 HUS Helsinki, Finland.
    Bergh, C.
    Department of Obstetrics, Institute of Women and Children's Health, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Hazekamp, J.
    Department of Reproductive Medicine, Volvat Medical Center, Oslo, Norway.
    Nygren, K.-G.
    IVF Clinic, Sophiahemmet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Selbing, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Soderstrom-Anttila, V.
    Söderström-Anttila, V., Infertility Clinic, Family Federation of Finland, Helsinki, Finland.
    Wennerholm, U.-B.
    Department of Obstetrics, Institute of Women and Children's Health, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Genetics and assisted reproduction technology2005In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 84, no 5, p. 463-473Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past 20 years, a significant improvement has been shown in the treatment for infertility in both women and men through the development of in vitro fertilization (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Only donated sperm could be previously used for treatment, now oocytes can also be donated. Furthermore, the combination of IVF and ICSI with advanced genetic methods has made preimplantation genetic diagnosis possible for many genetic conditions. These methods enable genetic testing of the early human embryo by using only a single cell, one blastomere biopsied from the embryo, as the sample from which the diagnosis of many chromosome rearrangements and other inherited diseases can be made. It has also been established that a considerable proportion of infertility is caused by genetic defects, which have several implications for infertility treatment. The purpose of this review is to give a concise introduction on how genetics is involved in assisted reproduction technology to specialists who may not be working in this particular field of gynecology, but who would need some knowledge of this for proper care of their patients. © Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand (2005).

  • 187.
    Aittoniemi, J
    et al.
    Klin mikro Tampere, Finland.
    Turpeinen, H
    Virologen Turku, Finland.
    Tiitanen, M
    National Public Health Institute Helsinki, Finland.
    Knip, M
    Hospital for Children and Adolescents Helsinki, Finland.
    Simell, O
    Paediatrics Turku, Finland.
    Ilonen, J
    Virologen Turku, Finland.
    Vaarala, Outi
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics .
    Relation among mannose-binding lectin 2 genotype, β-cell autoantibodies, and risk for type 1 diabetes in Finnish children2008In: Human Immunology, ISSN 0198-8859, E-ISSN 1879-1166, Vol. 69, no 2, p. 108-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a key mediator of innate immunity, the insufficiency of which is caused by point mutations in the MBL2 gene. MBL insufficiency is associated with increased susceptibility to infections and certain autoimmune diseases, but its impact in the pathogenesis and risk of type 1 diabetes (T1D) is controversial. We investigated the significance of the MBL2 genotype on the risk of T1D in a Finnish study population comprising 470 diabetic children and 501 controls. Furthermore, the effect of MBL2 gene polymorphism on the emergence of β-cell autoantibodies in 289 unaffected children with human leukocyte antigen-conferred susceptibility to T1D was assessed. MBL genotype had no significant effect on the risk or onset age of T1D. However, children with the biallelic variant genotype reflecting total MBL deficiency tested positive more frequently for ≥3 autoantibodies compared with children with another genotype (odds ratio = 6.0, 95% confidence interval 1.3-28, p = 0.013). In conclusion, the MBL2 genotype did not affect susceptibility to T1D in children, and this finding does not support previous reports implicating a role of the MBL2 genotype as a factor predisposing to T1D. The association of the biallelic variant genotype with positivity for multiple autoantibodies suggests that intermolecular epitope spreading may be linked with impaired clearance of autoantigens as a result of MBL deficiency. © 2008 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics.

  • 188.
    Ajanovic, Dina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Korjenic, Dalida
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Utarbetning av språkpillerböcker skrivna på bosniska/kroatiska/serbiska för barn med BKS som modersmål: En kontrastiv grammatisk analys2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Projektet ”Språkpiller” har utformats genom ett samarbete mellan logopeder och biblioteken i Östergötland. Projektet syftar till att stimulera språket hos barn med språkstörning och fungerar i första hand som ett komplement till logopedisk behandling (Linköpings kommun, 2012).

    Föreliggande studie syftar till att undersöka om bilderböcker skrivna på bosniska/kroatiska/serbiska (BKS) tränar samma grammatiska struktur som motsvarande bilderböcker på svenska gör. Syftet är även att granska huruvida böckerna i föreliggande studie går att rekommendera som träningsmaterial för barn med språkliga svårigheter.

    En kontrastiv analys mellan BKS och svenska har genomförts av totalt tre bilderböcker. Böckerna i studien innehåller skillnader mellan BKS och svenska inom de flesta grammatiska kategorier och stämmer väl överrens med vad som beskrivits i litteraturen. Det föreliggande materialet antas därför kunna användas som träningsmaterial till vissa grammatiska strukturer.

  • 189.
    Ajileye, Adebisi
    et al.
    Birmingham Heartlands Hospital, England.
    Alvarez, Nataly
    Corp Invest Biol, Colombia; University of Pontificia Bolivariana, Colombia.
    Merker, Matthias
    Research Centre Borstel, Germany; German Centre Infect Research, Germany.
    Walker, Timothy M.
    University of Oxford, England.
    Akter, Suriya
    Institute Trop Med, Belgium.
    Brown, Kerstin
    Birmingham Heartlands Hospital, England.
    Moradigaravand, Danesh
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, England.
    Schön, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden.
    Andres, Soenke
    Research Centre Borstel, Germany.
    Schleusener, Viola
    Research Centre Borstel, Germany.
    Omar, Shaheed V.
    Centre TB, South Africa.
    Coll, Francesc
    London School Hyg and Trop Med, England.
    Huang, Hairong
    Capital Medical University, Peoples R China.
    Diel, Roland
    University Hospital, Germany.
    Ismail, Nazir
    Centre TB, South Africa.
    Parkhill, Julian
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, United Kingdom.
    de Jong, Bouke C.
    Institute Trop Med, Belgium.
    Peto, Tim E. A.
    University of Oxford, England.
    Crook, Derrick W.
    University of Oxford, England; Public Health England Microbiol Serv, England.
    Niemann, Stefan
    Research Centre Borstel, Germany; German Centre Infect Research, Germany.
    Robledo, Jaime
    Corp Invest Biol, Colombia; University of Pontificia Bolivariana, Colombia.
    Grace Smith, E.
    Birmingham Heartlands Hospital, England.
    Peacock, Sharon J.
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, England; London School Hyg and Trop Med, England; University of Cambridge, England.
    Koeser, Claudio U.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Some Synonymous and Nonsynonymous gyrA Mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Lead to Systematic False-Positive Fluoroquinolone Resistance Results with the Hain GenoType MTBDRsl Assays2017In: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, ISSN 0066-4804, E-ISSN 1098-6596, Vol. 61, no 4, article id e02169-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, using the Hain GenoType MTBDRsl assays (versions 1 and 2), we found that some nonsynonymous and synonymous mutations in gyrA in Mycobacterium tuberculosis result in systematic false-resistance results to fluoroquinolones by preventing the binding of wild-type probes. Moreover, such mutations can prevent the binding of mutant probes designed for the identification of specific resistance mutations. Although these mutations are likely rare globally, they occur in approximately 7% of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis strains in some settings.

  • 190.
    Akanda, Nesar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Voltage-dependent anion channels (VDAC) in the plasma membrane induce apoptosis2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, is essential for proper development and functioning of the body systems. During development, apoptosis plays a central role to sculpt the embryo, and in adults, to maintain tissue homeostasis by eliminating redundant, damaged or effete cells. Therefore, a tight regulation of this process is essential. Cell shrinkage associated efflux of K+ and Cl through plasma membrane ion channels is an early event of apoptosis. However, little is known about these fluxes. The aim of this thesis was to investigate ion channels in the plasma membrane of neurons undergoing apoptosis. We studied differentiated (the mouse hippocampal cell line HT22, the human neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-MC, and rat primary hippocampal neurons) and undifferentiated (rat primary cortical neural stem cells cNSCs) cells with the patch-clamp technique. All cell types displayed a low electrical activity under control conditions. However, during apoptosis in differentiated neurons, we found an activation of a voltage-dependent anion channel. The conductance of the channel is 400 pS, the voltage dependence of the opening is bell shaped with respect to membrane voltage with a maximum open probability at 0 mV, and the Cl to cation selectivity is >5:1. These biophysical properties remind about the voltage-dependent anion channel normally found in the outer mitochondrial membrane (VDACmt). Hence, we call our apoptosis-inducing plasma membrane channel VDACpl. The molecular identity of the channel was corroborated with the specific labelling of different anti-VDAC antibodies. Block of this channel either with antibodies or with sucrose prevented apoptosis, suggesting a critical role for VDACpl in the apoptotic process. VDACpl is a NADH (-ferricyanide) reductase in control cells. We found that the enzymatic activity is altered while the VDACpl channel is activated during apoptosis. Surprisingly, in cNSCs we did not find any activation of VDACpl, no VDACpl-specific labelling, no enzymatic activity, and no prevention of apoptosis with VDACpl-blocking strategies. Instead, we found an activation of a voltage-independent 37 pS ion channel, and that the Cl channel blocker DIDS prevented apoptosis in cNSCs. Our finding that activation of VDACpl is critical for apoptosis in differentiated neurons hopefully can lead to new strategies in the treatment of several diseases related to apoptosis.

    List of papers
    1. Opening of plasma membrane voltage-dependent anion channels (VDAC) precedes caspase activation in neuronal apoptosis induced by toxic stimuli
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Opening of plasma membrane voltage-dependent anion channels (VDAC) precedes caspase activation in neuronal apoptosis induced by toxic stimuli
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    2005 (English)In: Cell Death and Differentiation, ISSN 1350-9047, E-ISSN 1476-5403, Vol. 12, no 8, p. 1134-1140Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Apoptotic cell death is an essential process in the development of the central nervous system and in the pathogenesis of its degenerative diseases. Efflux of K+ and Cl- ions leads to the shrinkage of the apoptotic cell and facilitates the activation of caspases. Here, we present electrophysiological and immunocytochemical evidences for the activation of a voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) in the plasma membrane of neurons undergoing apoptosis. Anti-VDAC antibodies blocked the channel and inhibited the apoptotic process. In nonapoptotic cells, plasma membrane VDAC1 protein can function as a NADH (-ferricyanide) reductase. Opening of VDAC channels in apoptotic cells was associated with an increase in this activity, which was partly blocked by VDAC antibodies. Hence, it appears that there might be a dual role for this protein in the plasma membrane: (1) maintenance of redox homeostasis in normal cells and (2) promotion of anion efflux in apoptotic cells.

    Keywords
    VDAC, voltage-dependent anion channel; STS, staurosporine; PS, phosphatidylserine
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14278 (URN)10.1038/sj.cdd.4401646 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-02-01 Created: 2007-02-01 Last updated: 2018-01-25
    2. Voltage-dependent anion channels (VDAC) in the plasma membrane play a critical role in apoptosis in differentiated hippocampal neurons but not in neural stem cells
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Voltage-dependent anion channels (VDAC) in the plasma membrane play a critical role in apoptosis in differentiated hippocampal neurons but not in neural stem cells
    Show others...
    2008 (English)In: Cell Cycle, ISSN 1538-4101, E-ISSN 1551-4005, Vol. 7, no 20, p. 3225-3234Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate a large variety of cellular processes including differentiation, apoptosis and proliferation. Several miRNAs display defective expression patterns in human tumors with the consequent alteration of target oncogene or tumor suppressor genes. Many of these miRNAs modulate the major proliferation pathways through direct interaction with critical regulators such as RAS, PI3K/PTEN or ABL, as well as members of the retinoblastoma pathway, Cyclin-CDK complexes or cell cycle inhibitors of the INK4 or Cip/Kip families. A complex interplay between miRNAs and MYC or E2F family members also exists to modulate cell cycle-dependent transcription during normal or tumoral proliferation. The ability of miRNAs to modulate these proliferation pathways may have relevant implications not only in physiological or developmental processes but also in tumor progression or cancer therapy.

    Keywords
    patch clamp, single-channel recordings, apoptosis, VDAC, hippocampal neurons, neural stem cells, sodium channels
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-47952 (URN)10.4161/cc.7.20.6831 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2018-01-25
    3. Biophysical properties of the apoptosis-inducing plasma membrane voltage-dependent anion channel
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biophysical properties of the apoptosis-inducing plasma membrane voltage-dependent anion channel
    2006 (English)In: Biophysical Journal, ISSN 0006-3495, E-ISSN 1542-0086, Vol. 90, no 12, p. 4405-4417Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Ion channels in the plasma membrane play critical roles in apoptosis. In a recent study we found that a voltage-dependent anion channel in the plasma membrane (VDACpl) of neuronal hippocampal cell line (HT22) cells was activated during apoptosis and that channel block prevented apoptosis. Whether or not VDACpl is identical to the mitochondrial VDACmt has been debated. Here, we biophysically characterize the apoptosis-inducing VDACpl and compare it with other reports of VDACpls and VDACmt. Excised membrane patches of apoptotic HT22 cells were studied with the patch-clamp technique. VDACpl has a large main-conductance state (400 pS) and occasionally subconductance states of µ28 pS and 220 pS. The small subconductance state is associated with long-lived inactivated states, and the large subconductance state is associated with excision of the membrane patch and subsequent activation of the channel. The open-probability curve is bell shaped with its peak around 0mV and is blocked by 30µM Gd3+. The gating can be described by a symmetrical seven-state model with one open state and six closed or inactivated states. These channel properties are similar to those of VDACmt and other VDACpls and are discussed in relation to apoptosis.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14280 (URN)10.1529/biophysj.105.080028 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-02-01 Created: 2007-02-01 Last updated: 2018-01-25
    4. Sucrose reduces the current through plasma membrane voltage-dependent anion channels (VDACpl) mainly by reducing the open probability
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sucrose reduces the current through plasma membrane voltage-dependent anion channels (VDACpl) mainly by reducing the open probability
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14281 (URN)
    Available from: 2007-02-01 Created: 2007-02-01 Last updated: 2010-01-13
  • 191.
    Akanda, Nesar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cellbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Elinder, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cellbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Biophysical properties of the apoptosis-inducing plasma membrane voltage-dependent anion channel2006In: Biophysical Journal, ISSN 0006-3495, E-ISSN 1542-0086, Vol. 90, no 12, p. 4405-4417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ion channels in the plasma membrane play critical roles in apoptosis. In a recent study we found that a voltage-dependent anion channel in the plasma membrane (VDACpl) of neuronal hippocampal cell line (HT22) cells was activated during apoptosis and that channel block prevented apoptosis. Whether or not VDACpl is identical to the mitochondrial VDACmt has been debated. Here, we biophysically characterize the apoptosis-inducing VDACpl and compare it with other reports of VDACpls and VDACmt. Excised membrane patches of apoptotic HT22 cells were studied with the patch-clamp technique. VDACpl has a large main-conductance state (400 pS) and occasionally subconductance states of µ28 pS and 220 pS. The small subconductance state is associated with long-lived inactivated states, and the large subconductance state is associated with excision of the membrane patch and subsequent activation of the channel. The open-probability curve is bell shaped with its peak around 0mV and is blocked by 30µM Gd3+. The gating can be described by a symmetrical seven-state model with one open state and six closed or inactivated states. These channel properties are similar to those of VDACmt and other VDACpls and are discussed in relation to apoptosis.

  • 192.
    Akanda, Nesar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology.
    Tofighi, Roshan
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden .
    Brask, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology.
    Tamm, Christoffer
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden .
    Elinder, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ceccatelli, Sandra
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden .
    Voltage-dependent anion channels (VDAC) in the plasma membrane play a critical role in apoptosis in differentiated hippocampal neurons but not in neural stem cells2008In: Cell Cycle, ISSN 1538-4101, E-ISSN 1551-4005, Vol. 7, no 20, p. 3225-3234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate a large variety of cellular processes including differentiation, apoptosis and proliferation. Several miRNAs display defective expression patterns in human tumors with the consequent alteration of target oncogene or tumor suppressor genes. Many of these miRNAs modulate the major proliferation pathways through direct interaction with critical regulators such as RAS, PI3K/PTEN or ABL, as well as members of the retinoblastoma pathway, Cyclin-CDK complexes or cell cycle inhibitors of the INK4 or Cip/Kip families. A complex interplay between miRNAs and MYC or E2F family members also exists to modulate cell cycle-dependent transcription during normal or tumoral proliferation. The ability of miRNAs to modulate these proliferation pathways may have relevant implications not only in physiological or developmental processes but also in tumor progression or cancer therapy.

  • 193.
    Akefeldt, Selma O
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Sweden .
    Finnström, Orvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Gavhed, Desiree
    Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Sweden .
    Henter, Jan-Inge
    Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Sweden .
    Langerhans cell histiocytosis in children born 1982-2005 after in vitro fertilization2012In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 101, no 11, p. 1151-1155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: In a recent Swedish study, comparing data from the Swedish Cancer Register with the Medical Birth Register including data on IVF, an increased risk of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) was found in children born 19822005 after IVF. Here, we aimed to verify the LCH diagnoses and examine whether any special forms of the disease were overrepresented in this population. Methods: Medical records for all children with LCH conceived by IVF were acquired and the diagnosis confirmed or discarded. Disease characteristics were compared with data from children diagnosed with LCH 19922001 in the Stockholm County. Results: We verified LCH in seven children born after IVF, all born prior to 2002. These children did not have milder disease forms. The odds ratio (OR) to develop LCH for the whole group born after IVF was 3.2 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.47.3] and for children born before 2002, 5.2 [95% CI, 2.311.9], compared with children in Stockholm County 19922001. Conclusion: LCH was overrepresented in children born after IVF prior to 2002. Affected children did not have milder disease forms. These findings may be valuable to understand LCH aetiology. Additional studies on a putative correlation between IVF and LCH in the offspring are encouraged.

  • 194.
    Akerblom, H.K.
    et al.
    Åkerblom, H.K., Biomedicum Helsinki Institute, B.P. 700, Haartmaninkatu 8, FIN-00029 HUS, Finland, Department of Pediatrics, University of Helsinki.
    Vaarala, Outi
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics.
    Hyoty, H.
    Hyöty, H., Department of Virology, University of Tampere, Finland.
    Ilonen, J.
    Institute of Microbiology and Pathology, University of Turku.
    Knip, M.
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Helsinki.
    Environmental factors in the etiology of type 1 diabetes2002In: American Journal of Medical Genetics, ISSN 0148-7299, E-ISSN 1096-8628, Vol. 115, no 1, p. 18-29Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Type 1 diabetes is considered to be an autoimmune disease in which T lymphocytes infiltrate the islets of pancreas and destroy the insulin producing beta cell population. Besides antigen specificity, the quality of immune reactivity against islet cell antigen(s) is an important determinant of the beta cell destruction. Much evidence indicates that the function of the gut immune system is central in the pathogenesis, as the regulation of the gut immune system may be aberrant in type 1 diabetes. The role of virus infections in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes has been supported by substantial new evidence suggesting that one virus group, enteroviruses, may trigger the beta-cell damaging process in a considerable proportion of patients. The latest evidence comes from studies indicating the presence of viral genome in diabetic patients and from prospective studies confirming epidemiological risk effect. If this association holds still true in ongoing large-scale studies, intervention trials should be considered to confirm causality. Of the dietary putative etiological factors, cow's milk proteins have received the main attention. Many studies indicate an association between early exposure to dietary cow's milk proteins and an increased risk of type 1 diabetes. The question will be answered by a large scale, prospective, randomized, international intervention trial Another dietary factor in need of more studies is the deficiency of vitamin D. Among toxins, N-nitroso compounds are the main candidates. An interaction of genetic and environmental factors is important in evaluating the possible role of a certain environmental factor in the etiology of type 1 diabetes. © 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  • 195.
    Akeroyd, Michael A.
    et al.
    MRC, England.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bentler, Ruth A.
    University of Iowa, IA 52242 USA.
    Boothroyd, Arthur
    San Diego State University, CA 92182 USA.
    Dillier, Norbert
    University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Dreschler, Wouter A.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Gagne, Jean-Pierre
    University of Montreal, Canada.
    Lutman, Mark
    University of Southampton, England.
    Wouters, Jan
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Wong, Lena
    University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Kollmeier, Birger
    Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, Germany; Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, Germany; HorTechnical gGmbH, Germany.
    International C