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  • 151.
    Ågren, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Berg, Sören
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Psychoeducational support to post cardiac surgery heart failure patients and their partners: A randomised pilot study2015In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 10-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Postoperative heart failure is a serious complication that changes the lives of both the person who is critically ill and family in many ways. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of an intervention in postoperative heart failure patient-partner dyads regarding health, symptoms of depression and perceived control.

    RESEARCH METHODOLOGY/DESIGN: Pilot study with a randomised controlled design evaluating psychosocial support and education from an interdisciplinary team.

    SETTING: Patients with postoperative heart failure and their partners.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: SF-36, Beck Depression Inventory, Perceived Control at baseline, 3 and 12 months.

    RESULTS: A total of 42 patient-partner completed baseline assessment. Partners in the intervention group increased health in the role emotional and mental health dimensions and patients increased health in vitality, social function and mental health dimensions compared with the control group. Patients' perceived control improved significantly in the intervention group over time.

    CONCLUSION: Psychoeducational support to post cardiac surgery heart failure dyads improved health in both patients and partners at short term follow-up and improved patients' perceived control at both short and long-term follow-up. Psychoeducational support appears to be a promising intervention but the results need to be confirmed in larger studies.

  • 152.
    Ågren, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Eriksson, Anna
    Hälsostödjande samtal2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Families who have a seriously ill family member in an intensive care unit face a demanding situation,threatening the normal functioning of the family. The burden onfamilies can be reduced by usingavailable resources, cohesiveness, supportive communication, flexibility and othersocial resources outsidethe family.If health promoting conversationsoffered to the family's ownabilities is strengthened, thisshould result in health promoting values to the family. In order to gain a better understanding of familyadaptation, we must not only see the family as a unit but also acknowledge the experiences of eachmember of the family.

    To investigate outcomes of the nurse led intervention, “Health promoting conversations with families” on family functioning and wellbeing in families with a member who has had critical illness.

    The study is a RCT study using a pre-test, post-test intervention and control group design. The inclusioncriteria will be: Patients over the age of 18, a minimum of 72 hours at the intensive care unit, and at leastone family member (>15 years) to each patient interested in participating. Within the study, quantitativeand qualitative data will be collected and analysed with descriptive and analytical statistical methods ofthe quantitative data and content analysis of the qualitative data.

    The conversations were considered to be healing and learning, because the family members can completememory loss from other family members' stories. Families showed a tendency to less stress and morehope, better mental health but poorer physical health in a pilot study. The project highlights knowledgeabout the health benefits of conversations about families where a family member has suffered from poorhealth. The health promoting conversations has a structure that makes conversations relatively easy toimplement in everyday healthcare and will be beneficial for many patients with critical illness and theirfamilies.

  • 153.
    Ågren, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Eriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    The health promoting conversations intervention for families with a critically ill relative: A pilot study2019In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 50, p. 103-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: After intensive care unit treatment, patients often have prolonged impairments that affect their physical, cognitive and mental health. Family members can face overwhelming and emotionally challenging situations and their concerns and needs must be addressed. Objective: We investigated the outcomes of pilot randomised control trial, a nurse-led family intervention, Health Promoting Conversations, which focused on family functioning and wellbeing in families with a critically ill member. Study design: This randomised controlled pilot study used a pre-test, post-test design with intervention and control groups to investigate the outcomes of the nurse-led intervention in 17 families. Outcome measures: The Health Promoting Conversations intervention was evaluated using validated instruments that measure family functioning and family wellbeing: the General Functioning sub-scale from the McMaster Family Assessment Device; the Family Sense of Coherence, the Herth Hope Index, and the Medical Outcome Short-Form Health Survey. Descriptive and analytical statistical methods were used to analyse the data. Results: After 12 months, the intervention group reported better family functioning than the control group. The intervention group also had better social functioning and mental health after 12 months. Conclusion: This intervention may improve family wellbeing by improving family function, reducing stress, and promoting better mental health. (C) 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 154.
    Ågren, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Ivarsson, Bodil
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Psychosocial impact in family members before and up to two years after heart or lung transplantation.2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 155.
    Ågren, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Ivarsson, Bodil
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    The Unsteady Mainstay of the Family: Adult Children’s Retrospective View on Social Support in Relation to Their Parent’s Heart Transplantation2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 156.
    Ågren, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Trygve
    Skånes universitetssjukhus, Lund.
    Ekmehag, Björn
    Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala.
    Wiborg, Maj-Britt
    Skånes universitetssjukhus, Lund.
    Ivarsson, Bodil
    Avdelningen för thoraxkirurgi, Institutionen för kliniska vetenskaper, Lunds universitet; Medicinsk service, Region Skåne.
    Patients' self-perceived health, coping, anxiety, depression and stress before and up to 2 years after a heart or lung transplantation.2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Psychosocial factors are important aspects for patients before, on waiting list, and after a heart or lung transplantation.

    Aim: To illuminate patients' self-­‐perceived health, coping, anxiety, depression and stress before and up to 2 years after heart or lung transplantation.

    Method: Fifty-­‐four adult patients (28 cardiac and 26 lung) were included. They responded to questionnaires about quality of life, coping, anxiety, depression and stress when they were accepted for the transplant waiting list, then 6 months, 1 year and 2 years after a heart or lung transplantation. 

    Result: Mean waiting time was 37 weeks for cardiac patients and 29 weeks for lung patients. The patients had a lower coping ability and self-­‐perceived health at baseline and showed an improvement over time after the transplantation. Excluding pain, which increased and persisted over time after the transplantation, especially for the lung patients. Twenty-­‐three percent of all patients showed clinically anxiety before transplantation compared to 0-­‐8 % after transplantation. However, both before and after, clinical depression was significantly less frequent. Nearly half (44 %) of the patients scored medium or high level of intrusion stress and 38% of avoidance stress before the transplantation, which declined gradually over the years.

    Conclusion: Transplantation has led to positive psychosocial effects at 6 months, 1 year and 2 years after the heart or lung transplantation for most of the patients. The healthcare professionals must ensure to be aware of the challenges faced by their patients in daily living, not only the symptoms of their severe chronic disease but also psychosocial factors mainly before but even after a heart or lung transplantation. Patients have an underlying serious, chronic disease where severe long-­‐term life-­‐threatening complications suddenly can occur

  • 157.
    Ågren, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Trygve
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Ekmehag, Björn
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.
    Wiborg, Maj-Britt
    Caring Science, Uppsala University, Sweden; Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Cardiology, Skåne University Hospital Lund, Lund, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Bodil
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Psycho-social aspects before and up to 2 years after heart or lung transplantation - experience of patients and their next of kin.2017In: Clinical Transplantation, ISSN 0902-0063, E-ISSN 1399-0012, Vol. 31, no 3, article id e12905Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Psychosocial factors are important for patients undergoing heart (HTx) or lung (LTx) transplantation, and for their next of kin (NoK).

    AIM: To describe health-related quality of life (patients only), anxiety, depression, stress, coping ability and burden (NoK only) for patients and their NoK before and up to 2 years after HTx or LTx.

    DESIGN: Adult patients (28 heart and 26 lung) and their appointed NoK were surveyed with questionnaires about specific psychosocial topics when they were accepted for the transplantation waiting list and 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after transplantation.

    FINDINGS: Patients' coping ability and self-perceived health were low at baseline and improved over time after the transplantation. However, lung patients took longer time to recover in terms of health-related quality of life, depression, and stress than heart patients. Similarly, NoK of lung patients experienced a higher burden and more stress 1 year after transplantation than NoK of heart patients.

    CONCLUSIONS: Healthcare professionals should be aware of the psychosocial challenges patients and their NoK face in daily living and provide support both before and after heart or lung transplantation. Especially, given that these patients have a serious, chronic, underlying disease. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 158.
    Ågren, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Luttik, Marie Louise A.
    Hanze University of Appl Science, Netherlands.
    Caregiving tasks and caregiver burden; effects of an psycho-educational intervention in partners of patients with post-operative heart failure2015In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 270-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of a psycho-educational intervention on caregiver burden in partners of patients with postoperative heart failure. Background: Since partners of cardiac surgery patients play a significant role in the patients recovery, it is important to address their needs during hospitalization and after discharge. Methods: Forty-two patients with postoperative heart failure and their partners participated in a randomized controlled pilot study. Dyads in the intervention group received psycho-educational support from a multidisciplinary team. Dyads in the control group received usual care. Results: No significant differences were found in the performance of caregiving tasks and perceived caregiver burden in the control versus the intervention group. Conclusion: A pilot study exploring the effects of a psycho-educational intervention in patients and their partners did not reveal significant effects with regard to reduced feelings of burden in partners. Alleviating caregiver burden in partners may need a more intense or specific approach. (C) 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

1234 151 - 158 of 158
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