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  • 151.
    Cauvi, D.M.
    et al.
    University of California, San Diego, CA, USA.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Pollard, K. Michael
    The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA, USA.
    Autoimmune models2015In: Reference module in biomedical sciences, Elsevier, 2015, p. 413-438Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Models of autoimmunity fall into four categories: (a) those induced by immunization with self-antigen, (b) those induced by exogenous agents, (c) those which arise spontaneously, and (d) those which are produced by genetic manipulation. The autoimmunity exhibited by these models covers a spectrum of diseases which fall into the two broad categories, organ-specific and systemic autoimmunity. Animal models of autoimmune diseases have played an essential role in the discovery of many of mechanisms that result in the breaking of self-tolerance. This chapter describes a number of experimental animal models of autoimmunity and the underlying mechanisms that lead to disease.

  • 152.
    Cavallo, Joel S.
    et al.
    University of Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Mayo, Leah
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience (CSAN).
    de Wit, Harriet
    University of Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Acquisition of Conditioning between Methamphetamine and Cues in Healthy Humans2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 8, p. e0161541-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental stimuli repeatedly paired with drugs of abuse can elicit conditioned responses that are thought to promote future drug seeking. We recently showed that healthy volunteers acquired conditioned responses to auditory and visual stimuli after just two pairings with methamphetamine (MA, 20 mg, oral). This study extended these findings by systematically varying the number of drug-stimuli pairings. We expected that more pairings would result in stronger conditioning. Three groups of healthy adults were randomly assigned to receive 1, 2 or 4 pairings (Groups P1, P2 and P4, Ns = 13, 16, 16, respectively) of an auditory-visual stimulus with MA, and another stimulus with placebo (PBO). Drug-cue pairings were administered in an alternating, counterbalanced order, under double-blind conditions, during 4 hr sessions. MA produced prototypic subjective effects (mood, ratings of drug effects) and alterations in physiology (heart rate, blood pressure). Although subjects did not exhibit increased behavioral preference for, or emotional reactivity to, the MA-paired cue after conditioning, they did exhibit an increase in attentional bias (initial gaze) toward the drug-paired stimulus. Further, subjects who had four pairings reported " liking" the MApaired cue more than the PBO cue after conditioning. Thus, the number of drug-stimulus pairings, varying from one to four, had only modest effects on the strength of conditioned responses. Further studies investigating the parameters under which drug conditioning occurs will help to identify risk factors for developing drug abuse, and provide new treatment strategies.

  • 153.
    Chakrabarti, Sankha Shubhra
    et al.
    Banaras Hindu University, Division of Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, Banaras, India.
    Bir, Aritri
    ICARE Institute of Medical Sciences and Research — Biochemistry, Haldia, India.
    Poddar, Jit
    Institute of post Graduate Medical Education and Research, — Biochemistry, Kolkata, India.
    Sinha, Maitrayee Sardar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ganguly, Anirban
    Institute of Post Graduate Medical Education and Research — Biochemistry, Kolkata, India.
    Chakrabarti, Sasanka
    ICARE Institute Medical Science and Research, India.
    Ceramide and Sphingosine-1-Phosphate in Cell Death Pathways: Relevance to the Pathogenesis of Alzheimers Disease2016In: Current Alzheimer Research, ISSN 1567-2050, E-ISSN 1875-5828, Vol. 13, no 11, p. 1232-1248Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The metabolic turnover of sphingolipids produces several signaling molecules that profoundly affect the proliferation, differentiation and death of cells. In particular, an enormous body of information is available that defines the varied role of ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate in cell death and survival. This review specifically examines the role of ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate in triggering neuronal death in Alzheimers disease by analyzing the data from post-mortem studies and experimental research. There is compelling evidence that ceramide plays a key role in the neurodegeneration and amyloidogenesis occurring in the brain in Alzheimers disease. Further, it appears that ceramide and amyloid beta protein orchestrate an attack on mitochondria to set in the pathways of cell death. However, the complexity of metabolic and signaling pathways of sphingolipid derivatives precludes an immediate identification of effective drug targets for the therapy of Alzheimers disease.

  • 154.
    Chalise, Jaya Prakash
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Immune tolerance by interferon-alpha in experimental arthritis2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Type I Interferons (mainly IFN-α & IFN-β) belong to a family of cytokines that possess strong antiviral and immunomodulatory properties. Pro- and/or anti-inflammatory effects of type I IFN have been observed in infectious diseases and several autoimmune diseases including SLE, MS, RA and experimental models thereof, but what defines either outcome is largely obscure. The main aim of this thesis is to understand how IFN-α may act anti-inflammatory in a model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). In this model, mice are sensitised with methylated-BSA (mBSA) emulsified in Freund’s adjuvant at day 1 and 7 followed by intra-articular injection of mBSA in the knee joint at day 21, which induces arthritis within 1 week.

    Administration of IFN-α at the time of mBSA sensitisations (day 1 and day 7) but not at induction of arthritis (day 21) clearly protected against arthritis in a type I IFN receptor dependent manner. Humoral immunity might not be involved in this protection as the levels of antigen-specific IgG (total, IgG1, IgG2a and IgG2b), IgA, IgE in serum were not altered in IFN-α treated mice. However, IFN-α-protection was accompanied by delayed and decreased antigen-specific proliferative responses in spleen and lymph node cells ex vivo, including impaired proliferative recall responses after intra-articular antigenic challenge.

    In the course of AIA, IFN-α inhibited the increase of circulatory IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and TNF in the sensitisation phase (day 0-21) and also the re-call response of IL-1β, IL-10, IL-12, TNF, IFN-γ, and IL-17 induced by intra-articular mBSA challenge in arthritis phase (day 21-28). This IFN-α-inhibition of cytokines was also apparent in mBSA-re-stimulated spleen and lymph node cell cultures ex vivo, including inhibited cytokine production in CD4+ T helper cells and macrophages. In contrast to the inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines, the levels of immunomodulatory TGF-β was clearly enhanced in IFN-α-treated mice, both in serum and in re-stimulated leucocytes cultures including both macrophages, especially in the sensitisation phase, and in CD4+ T cells in the arthritis phase. By  inhibiting TGF-β signalling in vivo, the protective effect of IFN-α was  shown to be dependent on TGF-β signalling in the sensitisation phase.

    The cytokine TGF-β is an activator of the indoleamine 2,3 dioxygnese (IDO1), a potent immuneregulatory component that acts via enzymatic production of kynurenine (Kyn) and signalling activity. The IFN-α-protective effect in AIA was associated with both increased expression and enzymatic activity of IDO1 and the IFN-α-protection was totally ablated in mice lacking IDO1 expression (IDO1 KO mice) and in mice treated with the inhibitor of the enzymatic activity of IDO1 (1-Methyl Tryptophan; 1-MT). Interestingly, administration of the IDO-metabolite Kyn protected mice from AIA in an IFNARindependent manner. These observations show that the IDO1 enzymatic activity is important for the protective effect of IFN-α. Using 1-MT, it was further shown that the enzymatic activity of IDO1 was, like TGF-β, crucial only at the sensitisation but not in the arthritis phase of AIA for IFN-α to protect against arthritis. Instead, IDO1’s non-enzymatic signalling activity, characterized by sustained expression of IDO1 and non-canonical NF-κB activation in pDCs, was observed in the arthritis phase in spleen cells from mice treated with IFN-α.

    Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) were also found to be important for IFN-α-protection in AIA. Transient depletion of Treg cells by diphtheria toxin in DEREG mice in the arthritis phase, but not during the sensitisation phase abolished IFN-α-protection. Treatment with IFN-α enhanced the numbers of Treg cells in the course of AIA and their function; compared to untreated mice, Treg cells isolated at day 10 and 20 of AIA from IFN-α- treated mice exhibited higher suppressive activity against mBSA-stimulated proliferation of responder T cells. The enhancing effect of IFN-α on Treg cell numbers was observed in blood, spleen, LNs and also in ex-vivo cultures of leucocytes re-stimulated with mBSA and IFN-α. Although IFN-α clearly increased the suppressive activity of Treg cells, adoptive transfer of Treg cells from mBSA immunized mice, regardless of IFN-α treatment, prevented the development of arthritis.

    Conclusion

    In the presence of IFN-α during antigen sensitisation, a state of tolerance is established, which is able to prevent joint inflammation induced by antigenic re-challenge. This immunological tolerance is created in the sensitisation phase of AIA and is characterized by inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines, increased TGF-β production and activity of the IDO1 enzyme, the latter two being indispensable for IFN-α-induced protection. Administration of Kyn, the metabolite of the enzymatic activity of IDO1, in the sensitisation phase also protected against AIA downstream of type I IFN signalling. In the arthritis phase regulatory T cells, whose numbers and suppressive capacity was clearly enhanced by IFN-α, mediate the actual prevention of arthritis development in IFN-α-treated animals. We have thus identified molecular and cellular components of the anti-inflammatory program elicited by IFN-α including Kyn that may not have the pro-inflammatory effects associated with IFN.

    List of papers
    1. Type I IFN protects against antigen-induced arthritis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Type I IFN protects against antigen-induced arthritis
    2011 (English)In: European Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0014-2980, E-ISSN 1521-4141, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 1687-1695Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis (RA) involve immune reactions against specific antigens. The type I IFN system is suspected to promote autoimmunity in systemic lupus erythematosus, but may also dampen immune reactions in e. g. inflammatory bowel disease. This prompted us to investigate the role of type I IFN in antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). The importance of type I IFN in methylated (m) BSA-induced arthritis was studied by using mice deficient for the type I IFN receptor (IFNAR) and by administration of the IFN-alpha activator viral double-stranded (ds) RNA or recombinant IFN-alpha at antigen sensitization. In IFNAR knock-out mice, arthritis severity was significantly higher than in WT mice. Administration of dsRNA at antigen sensitization protected WT but not IFNAR KO mice from arthritis. Also, addition of recombinant IFN-alpha during the immunization, but not the induction phase of arthritis, almost abolished arthritis. Protection mediated by IFN-alpha was accompanied by delayed and decreased antigen-specific proliferative responses, including impaired lymph node recall responses after intra-articular antigenic challenge. In conclusion, we demonstrate that type I IFN can prevent joint inflammation by downregulating antigen-specific cellular immunity.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley and Sons, Ltd, 2011
    Keywords
    Arthritis; Tolerance; Type I IFN
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-69898 (URN)10.1002/eji.201040956 (DOI)000291559700019 ()
    Available from: 2011-08-09 Created: 2011-08-08 Last updated: 2017-12-08
    2. Interferon alpha inhibits antigen-specific production of proinflammatory cytokines and enhances antigen-specific transforming growth factor beta production in antigen-induced arthritis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interferon alpha inhibits antigen-specific production of proinflammatory cytokines and enhances antigen-specific transforming growth factor beta production in antigen-induced arthritis
    2013 (English)In: Arthritis Research and Therapy, ISSN 1478-6354, Vol. 15, no 5, p. R143-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Interferon alpha (IFN-α) has a complex role in autoimmunity, in that it may both enhance and prevent inflammation. We have previously shown that the presence of IFN-α at sensitization protects against subsequent antigen-triggered arthritis. To understand this tolerogenic mechanism, we performed a descriptive, hypothesis-generating study of cellular and humoral responses associated with IFN-α-mediated protection against arthritis.Methods: Arthritis was evaluated at day 28 in mice given a subcutaneous injection of methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA), together with Freund adjuvant and 0 to 5,000 U IFN-α at days 1 and 7, followed by intraarticular injection of mBSA alone at day 21. The effect of IFN-α on mBSA-specific IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, IgA, and IgE was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cytokines in circulation and in ex vivo cultures on mBSA restimulation was evaluated with ELISA and Luminex, and the identity of cytokine-producing cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis.Results: Administration of IFN-α protected mice from arthritis in a dose-dependent manner but had no effect on antigen-specific antibody levels. However, IFN-α did inhibit the initial increase of IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and TNF, and the recall response induced by intraarticular mBSA challenge of IL-1β, IL-10, IL-12, TNF, IFN-γ, and IL-17 in serum. IFN-α decreased both macrophage and CD4+ T cell-derived IFN-γ production, whereas IL-17 was decreased only in CD4+ T cells. Ex vivo, in mBSA-restimulated spleen and lymph node cell cultures, the inhibitory effect of in vivo administration of IFN-α on proinflammatory cytokine production was clearly apparent, but had a time limit. An earlier macrophage-derived, and stronger activation of the antiinflammatory cytokine transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) was observed in IFN-α-treated animals, combined with an increase in CD4+ T cells producing TGF-β when arthritis was triggered by mBSA (day 21). Presence of IFN-α at immunizations also prevented the reduction in TGF-β production, which was induced by the intraarticular mBSA injection triggering arthritis in control animals.Conclusions: Administration of IFN-α has a profound effect on the cellular response to mBSA plus adjuvant, but does not affect antigen-specific Ig production. By including IFN-α at immunizations, spleen and lymph node cells inhibit their repertoire of antigen-induced proinflammatory cytokines while enhancing antiinflammatory TGF-β production, first in macrophages, and later also in CD4+ T cells. On intraarticular antigen challenge, this antiinflammatory state is reenforced, manifested as inhibition of proinflammatory recall responses and preservation of TGF-β levels. This may explain why IFN-α protects against antigen-induced arthritis. © 2013 Chalise et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London, UK: BioMed Central, 2013
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-102367 (URN)10.1186/ar4326 (DOI)000329737400043 ()
    Available from: 2013-12-09 Created: 2013-12-09 Last updated: 2015-11-03Bibliographically approved
    3. IDO1 and TGF- 1 β mediate protective effects of IFN-α in antigen-induced arthritis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>IDO1 and TGF- 1 β mediate protective effects of IFN-α in antigen-induced arthritis
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Interferon-α (IFN-α) prevents antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) in mice by an unknown mechanism. Indoleamine 2, 3 dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) is an immunoregulator via enzymatic as well as signalling activity, which can be activated by TGF-β and further mediated via non canonical NF-κB signalling. We here investigated whether IDO1 and TGF-β are involved in IFN-α protective effects in AIA. Arthritis was induced in wt, Ido1-/- or Ifnar-/- mice, treated or not with IFN-α or kynurenine, the main IDO1 product, and antibodies neutralizing TGF-β or 1-methyltryptophan (1-MT), an inhibitor of IDO1 catalytic activity. IDO1 expression and enzymatic activity were determined by RT-PCR and HPLC, respectively. Proliferation was measured by 3H-Thymidine incorporation. Non-canonical NF-κB signalling was evaluated by ELISA and Western blot in plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) from treated mice. Protective effects of IFN-α in AIA were associated with increased IDO1 expression and kynurenine production in spleen cells, particularly at the time of mBSA sensitization. Lack of IDO1 ablated IFN-α protection and kynurenine prevented AIA in an IFNAR-independent manner. The IDO1 catalytic activity was crucial for IFN-α effects at the sensitization but not effector phase of AIA. The disease effector phase in mice treated with IFN-α was instead characterized by sustained IDO1 and TGF-β expression and activation of the noncanonical NF-κB pathway in pDCs. IFN-α protective effects in AIA involves IDO1 enzymatic and signalling activity in the disease sensitization and effector phase, respectively. Kynurenine, the main IDO1 metabolite, can be used as an alternative treatment to IFN-α in protecting mice from AIA.

    National Category
    Pharmacology and Toxicology Rheumatology and Autoimmunity Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122461 (URN)
    Funder
    Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Rheumatism AssociationLinköpings universitet
    Available from: 2015-11-03 Created: 2015-11-03 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
    4. Regulatory T cells manifest IFN-α mediated protection during antigen induced arthritis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regulatory T cells manifest IFN-α mediated protection during antigen induced arthritis
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Type I interferon induces tolerance against arthritogenic antigen and protects against antigen induced arthritis (AIA). Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) resolve aberrant immune reaction, maintain self-tolerance and prevent the development of autoimmune diseases. We here investigated the impact of Interferon alpha (IFN-α) on Treg cells development and function during antigen induced arthritis.

    Methods

    For AIA, mice were immunized with methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) at day 1 and 7 in presence or absence of IFN-α. At day 21, arthritis was induced by intra-articular injection of mBSA and arthritis was evaluated at day 28. At various days of AIA, CD4, CD25, Foxp3 and CTLA-4 expression was quantified by FACS in blood cells, splenocytes, lymph nodes cells and in ex vivo re-stimulated leucocytes (pooled splenocytes and lymph nodes cells) isolated at same days. To investigate the importance of Treg cells in IFN-α protection in AIA, Foxp3DTReGFP+mice were used, where Treg cells can be depleted transiently by administration of diptherin toxin. CFSE based suppression assay was used to assess the suppression by Treg cells isolated day 4, 10, 20 of AIA against proliferation of mBSA or anti-CD3 stimulated responder T cells (Tresp cells) isolated at same days. For adoptive transfer experiments, 250,000 Treg cells from IFN-α treated or untreated mice day 20 of AIA were intravenously injected to recipient pre-immunized mice without IFN-α treatment during the induction of arthritis. The importance of IFN-α signalling on T cells for the IFN-α protection was evaluated by using CD4-Cre+/- IFNAR flox/flox mice.

    Results

    Protective effects of IFN-α in AIA were associated with significant TGF-β dependent increase in Foxp3+ T cells in blood at day 4 and minor increase of Foxp3+T cells in spleen and lymph node cells. However IFN-α signalling in T cells is not required for IFN-α-protection. Upon ex vivo re-stimulation in presence of IFN-α with mBSA but not anti-CD3, the Treg cells numbers were increased in leucocytes isolated from day 4 and day 10 of AIA. Transient depletion of Treg cells during induction of arthritis (day 21) abolished IFN-α-protection however the protection was not affected when Treg cells are depleted during immunization phase (day 1 and day 7). Against mBSA-stimulated proliferation of Tresp cells, suppression by Treg cells isolated from day 10 and day 20 from IFN-α treated mice are significantly higher than Treg cells from untreated mice. Treg cells isolated from IFN-α or untreated mice at day 20 of AIA when transferred to pre-immunized untreated mice prevent the development of arthritis.

    Conclusion

    Treg cells are critically associated with IFN-α protective effects in AIA. IFN-α enhances TGF-β dependent early development of Treg cells and later IFN-α enhances their suppressive capacity against T cells proliferation in antigen specific manner during AIA.

    Keywords
    Interferon alpha, regulatory T cells, antigen induced arthritis, TGF-beta
    National Category
    Pharmacology and Toxicology Rheumatology and Autoimmunity Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122462 (URN)
    Funder
    Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Rheumatism AssociationLinköpings universitet
    Available from: 2015-11-03 Created: 2015-11-03 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
  • 155.
    Chalise, Jaya Prakash
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Chenna Narendra, Sudeep
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Biggs, Sophie
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Kalinke, Ulrich
    Twincore, Germany.
    Iacono, Alberta
    Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy.
    Boon, Louis
    EPIRUS Biopharmaceuticals, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Magnusson, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Regulatory T cells manifest IFN-α mediated protection during antigen induced arthritisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Type I interferon induces tolerance against arthritogenic antigen and protects against antigen induced arthritis (AIA). Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) resolve aberrant immune reaction, maintain self-tolerance and prevent the development of autoimmune diseases. We here investigated the impact of Interferon alpha (IFN-α) on Treg cells development and function during antigen induced arthritis.

    Methods

    For AIA, mice were immunized with methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) at day 1 and 7 in presence or absence of IFN-α. At day 21, arthritis was induced by intra-articular injection of mBSA and arthritis was evaluated at day 28. At various days of AIA, CD4, CD25, Foxp3 and CTLA-4 expression was quantified by FACS in blood cells, splenocytes, lymph nodes cells and in ex vivo re-stimulated leucocytes (pooled splenocytes and lymph nodes cells) isolated at same days. To investigate the importance of Treg cells in IFN-α protection in AIA, Foxp3DTReGFP+mice were used, where Treg cells can be depleted transiently by administration of diptherin toxin. CFSE based suppression assay was used to assess the suppression by Treg cells isolated day 4, 10, 20 of AIA against proliferation of mBSA or anti-CD3 stimulated responder T cells (Tresp cells) isolated at same days. For adoptive transfer experiments, 250,000 Treg cells from IFN-α treated or untreated mice day 20 of AIA were intravenously injected to recipient pre-immunized mice without IFN-α treatment during the induction of arthritis. The importance of IFN-α signalling on T cells for the IFN-α protection was evaluated by using CD4-Cre+/- IFNAR flox/flox mice.

    Results

    Protective effects of IFN-α in AIA were associated with significant TGF-β dependent increase in Foxp3+ T cells in blood at day 4 and minor increase of Foxp3+T cells in spleen and lymph node cells. However IFN-α signalling in T cells is not required for IFN-α-protection. Upon ex vivo re-stimulation in presence of IFN-α with mBSA but not anti-CD3, the Treg cells numbers were increased in leucocytes isolated from day 4 and day 10 of AIA. Transient depletion of Treg cells during induction of arthritis (day 21) abolished IFN-α-protection however the protection was not affected when Treg cells are depleted during immunization phase (day 1 and day 7). Against mBSA-stimulated proliferation of Tresp cells, suppression by Treg cells isolated from day 10 and day 20 from IFN-α treated mice are significantly higher than Treg cells from untreated mice. Treg cells isolated from IFN-α or untreated mice at day 20 of AIA when transferred to pre-immunized untreated mice prevent the development of arthritis.

    Conclusion

    Treg cells are critically associated with IFN-α protective effects in AIA. IFN-α enhances TGF-β dependent early development of Treg cells and later IFN-α enhances their suppressive capacity against T cells proliferation in antigen specific manner during AIA.

  • 156.
    Chalise, Jaya Prakash
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Pallotta, Maria Teresa
    Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy.
    Chenna Narendra, Sudeep
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Iacono, Alberta
    Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy.
    Boon, Louis
    EPIRUS Biopharmaceuticals, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Grohmann, Ursula
    Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy.
    Magnusson, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    IDO1 and TGF- 1 β mediate protective effects of IFN-α in antigen-induced arthritisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Interferon-α (IFN-α) prevents antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) in mice by an unknown mechanism. Indoleamine 2, 3 dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) is an immunoregulator via enzymatic as well as signalling activity, which can be activated by TGF-β and further mediated via non canonical NF-κB signalling. We here investigated whether IDO1 and TGF-β are involved in IFN-α protective effects in AIA. Arthritis was induced in wt, Ido1-/- or Ifnar-/- mice, treated or not with IFN-α or kynurenine, the main IDO1 product, and antibodies neutralizing TGF-β or 1-methyltryptophan (1-MT), an inhibitor of IDO1 catalytic activity. IDO1 expression and enzymatic activity were determined by RT-PCR and HPLC, respectively. Proliferation was measured by 3H-Thymidine incorporation. Non-canonical NF-κB signalling was evaluated by ELISA and Western blot in plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) from treated mice. Protective effects of IFN-α in AIA were associated with increased IDO1 expression and kynurenine production in spleen cells, particularly at the time of mBSA sensitization. Lack of IDO1 ablated IFN-α protection and kynurenine prevented AIA in an IFNAR-independent manner. The IDO1 catalytic activity was crucial for IFN-α effects at the sensitization but not effector phase of AIA. The disease effector phase in mice treated with IFN-α was instead characterized by sustained IDO1 and TGF-β expression and activation of the noncanonical NF-κB pathway in pDCs. IFN-α protective effects in AIA involves IDO1 enzymatic and signalling activity in the disease sensitization and effector phase, respectively. Kynurenine, the main IDO1 metabolite, can be used as an alternative treatment to IFN-α in protecting mice from AIA.

  • 157.
    Chang, You
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kim, Nam Keun
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Simulation of Bone-Conducted Sound Transmission in a Three-Dimensional Finite-Element Model of a Human Skull2015In: MECHANICS OF HEARING: PROTEIN TO PERCEPTION, AMER INST PHYSICS , 2015, Vol. 1703, no 060014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bone conduction (BC) is the transmission of sound to the inner ear through the bones of the skull. This type of transmission is used in humans fitted with BC hearing aids as well as to classify between conductive and sensorineural hearing losses. The objective of the present study is to develop a finite-element (FE) model of the human skull based on cryosectional images of a female cadaver head in order to gain better understanding of the sound transmission. Further, the BC behavior was validated in terms of sound transmission against experimental data published in the literature. Results showed the responses of the simulated skull FE model were consistent with the experimentally reported data.

  • 158.
    Chang, You
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kim, Namkeun
    Incheon National University, South Korea.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The development of a whole-head human finite-element model for simulation of the transmission of bone-conducted sound2016In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 140, no 3, p. 1635-1651Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A whole head finite element model for simulation of bone conducted (BC) sound transmission was developed. The geometry and structures were identified from cryosectional images of a female human head and eight different components were included in the model: cerebrospinal fluid, brain, three layers of bone, soft tissue, eye, and cartilage. The skull bone was modeled as a sandwich structure with an inner and outer layer of cortical bone and soft spongy bone (diploe) in between. The behavior of the finite element model was validated against experimental data of mechanical point impedance, vibration of the cochlear promontories, and transcranial BC sound transmission. The experimental data were obtained in both cadaver heads and live humans. The simulations showed multiple low-frequency resonances where the first was caused by rotation of the head and the second was close in frequency to average resonances obtained in cadaver heads. At higher frequencies, the simulation results of the impedance were within one standard deviation of the average experimental data. The acceleration response at the cochlear promontory was overall lower for the simulations compared with experiments but the overall tendencies were similar. Even if the current model cannot predict results in a specific individual, it can be used for understanding the characteristic of BC sound transmission in general. (C) 2016 Acoustical Society of America.

  • 159.
    Chen, Michelle P
    et al.
    Asian Hospital And Medical Center, Muntinlupa.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Lowén, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Labus, Jennifer S.
    Brain Research Institute UCLA, Los Angeles, USA.
    Kilpatrick, Lisa A.
    American Academy of Physician Assistants, USA.
    Mayer, Emeran A.
    Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicin, Los Angeles, USA.
    Tillisch, Kirsten
    Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, USA.
    Irritable Bowel Syndrome Symptoms Are Related to the Resting Brain's Sensorimotor Network2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 160.
    Chenna Narendra, Sudeep
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Systemic and local regulation of experimental arthritis by IFN-α, dendritic cells and uridine2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis, we have studied the immunological processes of joint inflammation that may be targets for future treatment of patients with arthritis. We focus on the immune-modulating properties of interferon-α (IFN-α) and uridine in experimental arthritis. The nucleoside uridine, which is regarded a safe treatment has anti-inflammatory properties notably by inhibiting tumor necrosis factor (TNF) release. Because the inflamed synovium in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterised by pathogenic TNF-production, uridine could potentially be away to ameliorate arthritis. Systemic administration of uridine had no effect on antigeninduced arthritis (AIA), which is a T-cell dependent model where animals are immunized twice (sensitization) with bovine serum albumin (mBSA), before local triggering of arthritis by intra-articular antigen (mBSA) re-challenge. In contrast, intra-articular administration of uridine clearly down modulated development of AIA in a dose dependent manner and inhibited the expression of synovial adhesion molecules, influx of inflammatory leukocytes and synovial expression of TNF and interleukin 6, but did not affect systemic levels of proinflammatory cytokines or antigen-specific T-cell responses. Local administration of uridine may thus be a viable therapeutic option for treatment of arthritis in the future.

    Viral double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (dsRNA), a common nucleic acid found in most viruses, can be found in the joints of RA patients and local deposition of such viral dsRNA induces arthritis by activating IFN-α. Here we show that arthritis induced by dsRNA can be mediated by IFN-producing dendritic cells in the joint and this may thus explain why viral infections are sometimes associated with arthritis.

    Earlier, to study the effect of dsRNA and IFN-α in an arthritis model, that like RA, is dependent on adaptive immunity, dsRNA and IFN-α were administered individually during the development of AIA. Both molecules clearly protected against AIA in a type I IFN receptor-dependent manner but were only effective if administered in the sensitization phase of AIA. Here we show that the anti-inflammatory effect of IFN-α is critically dependent on signalling via transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and the enzymatic activity of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase 1 (IDO). The IDO enzyme is produced by plasmacytoid DC and this cell type was critically required both during antigen sensitization and in the arthritis phase of AIA for the protective effect of IFN-α against AIA. In contrast, TGF-β and the enzymatic activity of IDO were only required during sensitization, which indicate that they are involved in initial steps of tolerogenic antigen sensitization. In this scenario, IFN- α first activates the enzymatic activity of IDO in pDC, which converts Tryptophan to Kynurenine, which thereafter activates TGF-β. Common for IDO-expressing pDC, Kyn and TGF-β is their ability to induce development of regulatory T cells (Tregs). We found that Tregs were crucial for IFN-α-mediated protection against AIA, but only in the arthritis phase. In line with this, adoptive transfer of Tregs isolated from IFN-α treated mice to recipient animals in the arthritis phase clearly protected against AIA. The numbers of Tregs were not significantly altered by IFN-α but IFN-α increased the suppressive capacity of Tregs against antigen-induced proliferation. This enhanced suppressive activity of Tregs in the arthritis phase was dependent on the earlier activated enzyme IDO1 during the sensitization phase of AIA. Thus, presence of IFN-α at the time of antigen sensitization activates the enzymatic activity of IDO, which generates Tregs with enhanced suppressive capacity that upon antigen re-challenge prevents inflammation. We have thus identified one example of how immune tolerance can be developed, that may be a future way to combat autoimmunity.

    List of papers
    1. Local but Not Systemic Administration of Uridine Prevents Development of Antigen-Induced Arthritis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Local but Not Systemic Administration of Uridine Prevents Development of Antigen-Induced Arthritis
    2015 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 10, p. e0141863-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Uridine has earlier been show to down modulate inflammation in models of lung inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of uridine in arthritis. Methods Arthritis was induced by intra-articular injection of mBSA in the knee of NMRI mice preimmunized with mBSA. Uridine was either administered locally by direct injection into the knee joint or systemically. Systemic treatment included repeated injections or implantation of a pellet continuously releasing uridine during the entire experimental procedure. Anti-mBSA specific immune responses were determined by ELISA and cell proliferation and serum cytokine levels were determined by Luminex. Immunohistochemistry was used to identify cells, study expression of cytokines and adhesion molecules in the joint. Results Local administration of 25-100 mg/kg uridine at the time of arthritis onset clearly prevented development of joint inflammation. In contrast, systemic administration of uridine (max 1.5 mg uridine per day) did not prevent development of arthritis. Protection against arthritis by local administration of uridine did not affect the anti-mBSA specific immune response and did not prevent the rise in serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines associated with the triggering of arthritis. In contrast, local uridine treatment efficiently inhibited synovial expression of ICAM-1 and CD18, local cytokine production and recruitment of leukocytes to the synovium. Conclusion Local, but not systemic administration of uridine efficiently prevented development of antigen- induced arthritis. The protective effect did not involve alteration of systemic immunity to mBSA but clearly involved inhibition of synovial expression of adhesion molecules, decreased TNF and IL-6 production and prevention of leukocyte extravasation. Further, uridine is a small, inexpensive molecule and may thus be a new therapeutic option to treat joint inflammation in RA.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 2015
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123070 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0141863 (DOI)000363920300089 ()26512984 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Vetenskapsradet-Grant [521-2011-3095]; Reumatikerforbundet Grant [155261]; County Council of Ostergotland, Sweden; Linkoping University

    Available from: 2015-12-04 Created: 2015-12-03 Last updated: 2017-12-01
    2. IDO1 and TGF-beta Mediate Protective Effects of IFN-alpha in Antigen-Induced Arthritis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>IDO1 and TGF-beta Mediate Protective Effects of IFN-alpha in Antigen-Induced Arthritis
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 197, no 8, p. 3142-3151Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    IFN-alpha prevents Ag-induced arthritis (AIA), and in this study we investigated the role of IDO1 and TGF-beta signaling for this anti-inflammatory property of IFN-alpha. Arthritis was induced by methylated BSA (mBSA) in mBSA-sensitized wild-type (WT), Ido1(-/-), or Ifnar(-/-) mice, treated or not with IFN-alpha or the IDO1 product kynurenine (Kyn). Enzymatic IDO1 activity, TGF-beta, and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) were neutralized by 1-methyltryptophan and Abs against TGF-beta and pDC, respectively. IDO1 expression was determined by RT-PCR, Western blot, and FACS, and enzymatic activity by HPLC. Proliferation was measured by H-3-thymidine incorporation and TGF-beta by RT-PCR and ELISA. WT but not Ido1(-/-) mice were protected from AIA by IFN-alpha, and Kyn, the main IDO1 product, also prevented AIA, both in WTand Ifnar(-/-) mice. Protective treatment with IFN-alpha increased the expression of IDO1 in pDC during AIA, and Ab-mediated depletion of pDC, either during mBSA sensitization or after triggering of arthritis, completely abrogated the protective effect of IFN-alpha. IFN-alpha treatment also increased the enzymatic IDO1 activity (Kyn/tryptophan ratio), which in turn activated production of TGF-beta. Neutralization of enzymatic IDO1 activity or TGF-beta signaling blocked the protective effect of IFN-alpha against AIA, but only during sensitization and not after triggering of arthritis. Likewise, inhibition of the IDO1 enzymatic activity in the sensitization phase, but not after triggering of arthritis, subdued the IFN-alpha-induced inhibition of mBSA-induced proliferation. In conclusion, presence of IFN-alpha at Ag sensitization activates an IDO1/TGF-beta-dependent anti-inflammatory program that upon antigenic rechallenge prevents inflammation via pDC.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    AMER ASSOC IMMUNOLOGISTS, 2016
    National Category
    Immunology in the medical area
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-133121 (URN)10.4049/jimmunol.1502125 (DOI)000387965100018 ()27647832 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2016-12-12 Created: 2016-12-09 Last updated: 2019-02-11
    3. Dendritic cells activated by double-stranded RNA induce arthritis via autocrine type I IFN signaling.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dendritic cells activated by double-stranded RNA induce arthritis via autocrine type I IFN signaling.
    2014 (English)In: Journal of Leukocyte Biology, ISSN 0741-5400, E-ISSN 1938-3673, Vol. 95, no 4, p. 661-666Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Viral dsRNA can be found at the site of inflammation in RA patients, and intra-articular injection of dsRNA induces arthritis by activating type I IFN signaling in mice. Further, DCs, a major source of IFN-α, can be found in the synovium of RA patients. We therefore determined the occurrence of DCs in dsRNA-induced arthritis and their ability to induce arthritis. Here, we show, by immunohistochemistry, that cells expressing the pan-DC marker CD11c and the pDC marker 120G8 are present in the inflamed synovium in dsRNA-induced arthritis. Flt3L-generated and splenic DCs preactivated with dsRNA before intra-articular injection, but not mock-stimulated cells, clearly induced arthritis. Induction of arthritis was dependent on type I IFN signaling in the donor DCs, whereas IFNAR expression in the recipient was not required. Sorting of the Flt3L-DC population into cDCs (CD11c(+), PDCA-1(-)) and pDCs (CD11c(+), PDCA-1(+)) revealed that both subtypes were arthritogenic and produced type I IFN if treated with dsRNA. Taken together, these results demonstrate that viral nucleic acids can elicit arthritis by activating type I IFN signaling in DCs. Once triggered, autocrine type I IFN signaling in dsRNA-activated DCs is sufficient to propagate arthritis.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Society for Leukocyte Biology, 2014
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-102370 (URN)10.1189/jlb.0613320 (DOI)000335346300011 ()24304616 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2013-12-09 Created: 2013-12-09 Last updated: 2017-12-06
  • 161.
    Chenna Narendra, Sudeep
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Chalise, Jaya Prakash
    Osaka Univ, Japan.
    Biggs, Sophie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kalinke, Ulrich
    Zentrum Expt and Klin Infekt Forsch, Germany.
    Magnusson, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Regulatory T-Cells Mediate IFN-alpha-Induced Resistance against Antigen-Induced Arthritis2018In: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 9, article id 285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: CD4(+)FoxP3(+)CD25(+) regulatory T-cells (T-regs) are important for preventing tissue destruction. Here, we investigate the role of T-regs for protection against experimental arthritis by IFN-alpha. Methods: Arthritis was triggered by intra-articular injection of methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) in wild-type mice, Foxp3DTReGFP(+/-) mice [allowing selective depletion of T-regs by diphtheria toxin (DT)] and CD4-Cre(+/-) IFNA1R flox/flox mice (devoid of IFNAR signaling in T-cells) earlier immunized with mBSA, with or without treatment with IFN-alpha or the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO)-metabolite kynurenine. T-regs were depleted in DT-treated Foxp3DTReGFP(+/-) mice and enumerated by FoxP3 staining. Suppressive capacity of FACS-sorted CD25(+high)CD4(+) T-regs was tested in vivo by adoptive transfer and ex vivo in cocultures with antigen-stimulated CFSE-stained T-responder (CD25-CD4(+)) cells. IDO was inhibited by 1-methyl tryptophan. Results: Both control mice and mice devoid of IFNAR-signaling in T helper cells were protected from arthritis by IFN-alpha. Depletion of T-regs in the arthritis phase, but not at immunization, abolished the protective effect of IFN-alpha and kynurenine against arthritis. IFN-alpha increased the number of T-regs in ex vivo cultures upon antigen recall stimulation but not in naive cells. IFN-alpha also increased the suppressive capacity of T-regs against mBSA-induced T-responder cell proliferation ex vivo and against arthritis when adoptively transferred. The increased suppressive activity against proliferation conferred by IFN-alpha was clearly reduced by in vivo inhibition of IDO at immunization, which also abolished the protective effect of IFN-alpha against arthritis. Conclusion: By activating IDO during antigen sensitization, IFN-alpha activates T-regs, which prevent arthritis triggered by antigen rechallenge. This is one way by which IFN-alpha suppresses inflammation.

  • 162.
    Chenna Narendra, Sudeep
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Prakash Chalise, Jaya
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Uppugunduri, Srinivas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Local but Not Systemic Administration of Uridine Prevents Development of Antigen-Induced Arthritis2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 10, p. e0141863-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Uridine has earlier been show to down modulate inflammation in models of lung inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of uridine in arthritis. Methods Arthritis was induced by intra-articular injection of mBSA in the knee of NMRI mice preimmunized with mBSA. Uridine was either administered locally by direct injection into the knee joint or systemically. Systemic treatment included repeated injections or implantation of a pellet continuously releasing uridine during the entire experimental procedure. Anti-mBSA specific immune responses were determined by ELISA and cell proliferation and serum cytokine levels were determined by Luminex. Immunohistochemistry was used to identify cells, study expression of cytokines and adhesion molecules in the joint. Results Local administration of 25-100 mg/kg uridine at the time of arthritis onset clearly prevented development of joint inflammation. In contrast, systemic administration of uridine (max 1.5 mg uridine per day) did not prevent development of arthritis. Protection against arthritis by local administration of uridine did not affect the anti-mBSA specific immune response and did not prevent the rise in serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines associated with the triggering of arthritis. In contrast, local uridine treatment efficiently inhibited synovial expression of ICAM-1 and CD18, local cytokine production and recruitment of leukocytes to the synovium. Conclusion Local, but not systemic administration of uridine efficiently prevented development of antigen- induced arthritis. The protective effect did not involve alteration of systemic immunity to mBSA but clearly involved inhibition of synovial expression of adhesion molecules, decreased TNF and IL-6 production and prevention of leukocyte extravasation. Further, uridine is a small, inexpensive molecule and may thus be a new therapeutic option to treat joint inflammation in RA.

  • 163.
    Christidis, Nikolaos
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; SCON, Sweden.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Larsson, Anette
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; .
    Palstam, Annie
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mannerkorpi, Kaisa
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; .
    Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lofgren, Monika
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bjersing, Jan
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kosek, Eva
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Stockholm Spine Centre, Sweden.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ernberg, Malin
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; SCON, Sweden.
    Comparison of the Levels of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines Released in the Vastus Lateralis Muscle of Patients with Fibromyalgia and Healthy Controls during Contractions of the Quadriceps Muscle - A Microdialysis Study2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 12, p. e0143856-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Fibromyalgia is associated with central hyperexcitability, but it is suggested that peripheral input is important to maintain central hyperexcitability. The primary aim was to investigate the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines released in the vastus lateralis muscle during repetitive dynamic contractions of the quadriceps muscle in patients with fibromyalgia and healthy controls. Secondarily, to investigate if the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines were correlated with pain or fatigue during these repetitive dynamic contractions. Material and Methods 32 women with fibromyalgia and 32 healthy women (controls) participated in a 4 hour microdialysis session, to sample IL-1 beta, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF from the most painful point of the vastus lateralis muscle before, during and after 20 minutes of repeated dynamic contractions. Pain (visual analogue scale; 0-100) and fatigue Borgs Rating of Perceived Exertion Scale; 6-20) were assessed before and during the entire microdialysis session. Results The repetitive dynamic contractions increased pain in the patients with fibromyalgia (P < .001) and induced fatigue in both groups (P < .001). Perceived fatigue was significantly higher among patients with fibromyalgia than controls (P < .001). The levels of IL-1 beta did not change during contractions in either group. The levels of TNF did not change during contractions in patients with fibromyalgia, but increased in controls (P < .001) and were significantly higher compared to patients with fibromyalgia (P = .033). The levels of IL-6 and IL-8 increased in both groups alike during and after contractions (Ps < .001). There were no correlations between pain or fatigue and cytokine levels after contractions. Conclusion There were no differences between patients with fibromyalgia and controls in release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and no correlations between levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and pain or fatigue. Thus, this study indicates that IL-1 beta, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF do not seem to play an important role in maintenance of muscle pain in fibromyalgia.

  • 164.
    Christmann, Benjamin S.
    et al.
    University of Alabama Birmingham, AL 35294 USA.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bernstein, Charles N.
    University of Manitoba, Canada.
    Wayne Duck, L.
    University of Alabama Birmingham, AL 35294 USA.
    Mannon, Peter J.
    University of Alabama Birmingham, AL 35294 USA.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bjorksten, Bengt
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Elson, Charles O.
    University of Alabama Birmingham, AL 35294 USA.
    Human seroreactivity to gut microbiota antigens2015In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 136, no 5, p. 1378-1386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although immune responses directed against antigens from the intestinal microbiota are observed in certain diseases, the normal human adaptive immune response to intestinal microbiota is poorly defined. Objective: Our goal was to assess the adaptive immune response to the intestinal microbiota present in 143 healthy adults and compare this response with the response observed in 52 children and their mothers at risk of having allergic disease. Methods: Human serum was collected from adults and children followed from birth to 7 years of age, and the serum IgG response to a panel of intestinal microbiota antigens was assessed by using a novel protein microarray. Results: Nearly every subject tested, regardless of health status, had serum IgG that recognized a common set of antigens. Seroreactivity to the panel of antigens was significantly lower in atopic adults. Healthy infants expressed the highest level of IgG seroreactivity to intestinal microbiota antigens. This adaptive response developed between 6 and 12 months of age and peaked around 2 years of age. Low IgG responses to certain clusters of microbiota antigens during infancy were associated with allergy development during childhood. Conclusions: There is an observed perturbation of the adaptive response to antigens from the microbiota in allergic subjects. These perturbations are observable even in childhood, suggesting that optimal stimulation of the adaptive immune system by the microbiota might be needed to prevent certain immune-mediated diseases.

  • 165.
    Chung, Rosanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Gustafsson, Nelly
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Liberation of lutein from spinach: Effects of heating time, microwavereheating and liquefaction2019In: Food Chemistry, ISSN 0308-8146, E-ISSN 1873-7072, Vol. 277, p. 573-578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lutein, abundant in dark leafy vegetables, has been associated with several health promoting effects. Still, to what extent different preparation conditions and practices affect the liberation of lutein from food is not fully understood. Here, we compared a range of domestic methods under realistic conditions to prepare spinach, the most common lutein-rich vegetable. After preparations, samples were processed by in vitro digestion and lutein was quantified by HPLC. Data indicate that short-term and medium-term heating of spinach, independent of heating method, substantially reduced liberated lutein and reduction was most pronounced after long boiling times. Interestingly, the loss of lutein in heated samples was partly compensated when samples were reheated in the microwave. However, the highest yield of liberated lutein was obtained from liquefied spinach. Additional dairy enhanced the liquefaction effect. Thus, for optimal liberation of lutein, liquefaction of raw spinach appears to be the method of choice.

  • 166.
    Chung, Rosanna W S
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Leandersson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Lundberg, Anna K
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lutein exerts anti-inflammatory effects in patients with coronary artery disease.2017In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 262, p. 87-93, article id S0021-9150(17)30197-1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Many coronary artery disease (CAD) patients exhibit chronic low-grade inflammation. Carotenoids are anti-oxidants with potential anti-inflammatory properties. Here, we first assessed relationships between interleukin (IL)-6 and individual carotenoids in plasma from CAD patients. Based on the results, we proceeded to assess anti-inflammatory effects of one carotenoid, lutein, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from CAD patients.

    METHODS: Lutein + zeaxanthin (isomers with lutein being dominant), β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, α- and β-carotene and IL-6 were measured in plasma from 134 patients with stable angina (SA) and 59 patients with acute coronary syndrome. In 42 patients, plasma measurements were also performed 3 months after coronary intervention. PBMCs from SA patients were pre-treated with lutein (1, 5 and 25 μM) for 24 h followed by 24 h incubation ± lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Cell pellets were collected for IL-6, IL-1β and TNF mRNA and intracellular lutein. Cytokine secretion was measured in cell media.

    RESULTS: Only lutein + zeaxanthin were inversely correlated with IL-6 in SA patients at baseline (r = -0.366, p < 0.001) and follow-up (r = -0.546, p < 0.001). Ex vivo, lutein was taken up by PBMCs from SA patients in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Pre-treatment with lutein dose-dependently lowered LPS-induced secretion of IL-6, IL-1β (p < 0.01) and TNF (p < 0.05), and also reduced IL-6, IL-1β and TNF mRNA expression (p < 0.05).

    CONCLUSIONS: Clinical findings highlighted the inverse association between lutein and IL-6 in CAD patients. Anti-inflammatory effects of lutein in PBMCs from CAD patients were consolidated in ex vivo experiments. Taken together, these results show that lutein has the potential to play a role in resolution of chronic inflammation in CAD patients.

  • 167.
    Cieślar-Pobuda, Artur
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Institute of Automatic Control, Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland.
    Vilas Jain, Mayur
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kratz, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Rzeszowska-Wolny, Joanna
    Institute of Automatic Control, Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland.
    Ghavami, Saeid
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Science, University of Manitoba, Manitoba, Canada.
    Wiechec, Emilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The expression pattern of PFKFB3 enzyme distinguishes between induced-pluripotent stem cells and cancer stem cells.2015In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 6, no 30, p. 29753--29770Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) have become crucial in medicine and biology. Several studies indicate their phenotypic similarities with cancer stem cells (CSCs) and a propensity to form tumors. Thus it is desirable to identify a trait which differentiates iPS populations and CSCs. Searching for such a feature, in this work we compare the restriction (R) point-governed regulation of cell cycle progression in different cell types (iPS, cancer, CSC and normal cells) based on the expression profile of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-biphosphatase3 (PFKFB3) and phosphofructokinase (PFK1). Our study reveals that PFKFB3 and PFK1 expression allows discrimination between iPS and CSCs. Moreover, cancer and iPS cells, when cultured under hypoxic conditions, alter their expression level of PFKFB3 and PFK1 to resemble those in CSCs. We also observed cell type-related differences in response to inhibition of PFKFB3. This possibility to distinguish CSC from iPS cells or non-stem cancer cells by PFKB3 and PFK1 expression improves the outlook for clinical application of stem cell-based therapies and for more precise detection of CSCs.

  • 168.
    Civitelli, Livia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Roma La Sapienza, Italy.
    Marcocci, Maria Elena
    University of Roma La Sapienza, Italy.
    Celestino, Ignacio
    University of Roma La Sapienza, Italy.
    Piacentini, Roberto
    University of Cattolica Sacro Cuore, Italy.
    Garaci, Enrico
    Telemat University, Italy.
    Grassi, Claudio
    University of Cattolica Sacro Cuore, Italy.
    De Chiara, Giovanna
    CNR, Italy.
    Palamara, Anna Teresa
    University of Roma La Sapienza, Italy.
    Herpes simplex virus type 1 infection in neurons leads to production and nuclear localization of APP intracellular domain (AICD): implications for Alzheimers disease pathogenesis2015In: Journal of Neurovirology, ISSN 1355-0284, E-ISSN 1538-2443, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 480-490Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several data indicate that neuronal infection with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) causes biochemical alterations reminiscent of Alzheimers disease (AD) phenotype. They include accumulation of amyloid-beta (A beta), which originates from the cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP), and hyperphosphorylation of tau protein, which leads to neurofibrillary tangle deposition. HSV-1 infection triggers APP processing and drives the production of several fragments including APP intracellular domain (AICD) that exerts transactivating properties. Herein, we analyzed the production and intracellular localization of AICD following HSV-1 infection in neurons. We also checked whether AICD induced the transcription of two target genes, neprilysin (nep) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (gsk3 beta), whose products play a role in A beta clearance and tau phosphorylation, respectively. Our data indicate that HSV-1 led to the accumulation and nuclear translocation of AICD in neurons. Moreover, results from chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that AICD binds the promoter region of both nep and gsk3 beta. Time course analysis of NEP and GSK3 beta expression at both mRNA and protein levels demonstrated that they are differently modulated during infection. NEP expression and enzymatic activity were initially stimulated but, with the progression of infection, they were down-regulated. In contrast, GSK3 beta expression remained nearly unchanged, but the analysis of its phosphorylation suggests that it was inactivated only at later stages of HSV-1 infection. Thus, our data demonstrate that HSV-1 infection induces early upstream events in the cell that may eventually lead to A beta deposition and tau hyperphosphorylation and further suggest HSV-1 as a possible risk factor for AD.

  • 169.
    Civitelli, Livia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sandin, Linnea
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nelson, Erin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science.
    Iqbal Khattak, Sikander
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Brorsson, Ann-Christin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The Luminescent Oligothiophene p-FTAA Converts Toxic A beta(1-42) Species into Nontoxic Amyloid Fibers with Altered Properties2016In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 291, no 17, p. 9233-9243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aggregation of the amyloid-(beta) peptide (A beta) in the brain leads to the formation of extracellular amyloid plaques, which is one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer disease (AD). It is a general hypothesis that soluble prefibrillar assemblies of the A beta peptide, rather than mature amyloid fibrils, cause neuronal dysfunction and memory impairment in AD. Thus, reducing the level of these prefibrillar species by using molecules that can interfere with the A beta fibrillation pathway may be a valid approach to reduce A beta cytotoxicity. Luminescent-conjugated oligothiophenes (LCOs) have amyloid binding properties and spectral properties that differ when they bind to protein aggregates with different morphologies and can therefore be used to visualize protein aggregates. In this study, cell toxicity experiments and biophysical studies demonstrated that the LCO p-FTAA was able to reduce the pool of soluble toxic A beta species in favor of the formation of larger insoluble nontoxic amyloid fibrils, there by counteracting A beta-mediated cytotoxicity. Moreover, p-FTAA bound to early formed A beta species and induced a rapid formation of beta-sheet structures. These p-FTAA generated amyloid fibrils were less hydrophobic and more resistant to proteolysis by proteinase K. In summary, our data show that p-FTAA promoted the formation of insoluble and stable A beta species that were nontoxic which indicates that p-FTAA might have therapeutic potential.

  • 170.
    Clarke, Emily L.
    et al.
    Univ Leeds, England; Leeds Teaching Hosp NHS Trust, England.
    Revie, Craig
    FFEI Ltd, England.
    Brettle, David
    Leeds Teaching Hosp NHS Trust, England.
    Shires, Michael
    Univ Leeds, England.
    Jackson, Peter
    Leeds Teaching Hosp NHS Trust, England.
    Cochrane, Ravinder
    FFEI Ltd, England.
    Wilson, Robert
    FFEI Ltd, England.
    Mello-Thoms, Claudia
    Univ Sydney, Australia.
    Treanor, Darren
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology. Univ Leeds, England; Leeds Teaching Hosp NHS Trust, England.
    Development of a novel tissue-mimicking color calibration slide for digital microscopy2018In: Color Research and Application, ISSN 0361-2317, E-ISSN 1520-6378, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 184-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital microscopy produces high resolution digital images of pathology slides. Because no acceptable and effective control of color reproduction exists in this domain, there is significant variability in color reproduction of whole slide images. Guidance from international bodies and regulators highlights the need for color standardization. To address this issue, we systematically measured and analyzed the spectra of histopathological stains. This information was used to design a unique color calibration slide utilizing real stains and a tissue-like substrate, which can be stained to produce the same spectral response as tissue. By closely mimicking the colors in stained tissue, our target can provide more accurate color representation than film-based targets, whilst avoiding the known limitations of using actual tissue. The application of the color calibration slide in the clinical setting was assessed by conducting a pilot user-evaluation experiment with promising results. With the imminent integration of digital pathology into the routine work of the diagnostic pathologist, it is hoped that this color calibration slide will help provide a universal color standard for digital microscopy thereby ensuring better and safer healthcare delivery.

  • 171.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Fallman, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Relations between Concurrent Longitudinal Changes in Cognition, Depressive Symptoms, Self-Rated Health and Everyday Function in Normally Aging Octogenarians2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 8, p. e0160742-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ability to predict and prevent incipient functional decline in older adults may help prolong independence. Cognition is related to everyday function and easily administered, sensitive cognitive tests may help identify at-risk individuals. Factors like depressive symptoms and self-rated health are also associated with functional ability and may be as important as cognition. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between concurrent longitudinal changes in cognition, depression, self-rated health and everyday function in a well-defined cohort of healthy 85 year olds that were followed-up at the age of 90 in the Elderly in Linkoping Screening Assessment 85 study. Regression analyses were used to determine if cognitive decline as assessed by global (the Mini-Mental State Examination) and domain specific (the Cognitive Assessment Battery, CAB) cognitive tests predicted functional decline in the context of changes in depressive symptoms and self-rated health. Results showed deterioration in most variables and as many as 83% of these community-dwelling elders experienced functional difficulties at the age of 90. Slowing-down of processing speed as assessed by the Symbol Digits Modality Test (included in the CAB) accounted for 14% of the variance in functional decline. Worsening self-rated health accounted for an additional 6%, but no other variables reached significance. These results are discussed with an eye to possible preventive interventions that may prolong independence for the steadily growing number of normally aging old-old citizens.

  • 172.
    Comasco, Erika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Agnafors, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Aho, Nikolas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Psychiatric symptoms in adolescents: FKBP5 genotype-early life adversity interaction effects2015In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 24, no 12, p. 1473-1483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychiatric disorders are multi-factorial and their symptoms overlap. Constitutional and environmental factors influence each other, and this contributes to risk and resilience in mental ill-health. We investigated functional genetic variation of stress responsiveness, assessed as FKBP5 genotype, in relation to early life adversity and mental health in two samples of adolescents. One population-based sample of 909 12-year-old adolescents was assessed using the Life Incidence of Traumatic Events scale and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. One sample of 398 17-year-old adolescents, enriched for poly-victimized individuals (USSS), was assessed using the Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire and the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children (TSCC). The FKBP5 rs1360780 and rs3800373 polymorphisms were genotyped using a fluorescence-based competitive allele-specific PCR. Most prominently among poly-victimized older male adolescents, the least common alleles of the polymorphisms, in interaction with adverse life events, were associated with psychiatric symptoms, after controlling for ethno-socio-economic factors. The interaction effect between rs3800373 and adverse life events on the TSCC sub-scales-anxiety, depression, anger, and dissociation-and with the rs1360780 on dissociation in the USSS cohort remained significant after Bonferroni correction. This pattern of association is in line with the findings of clinical and neuroimaging studies, and implies interactive effects of FKBP5 polymorphisms and early life environment on several psychiatric symptoms. These correlates add up to provide constructs that are relevant to several psychiatric symptoms, and to identify early predictors of mental ill-health.

  • 173.
    Cooper, Karen
    et al.
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Quayle, Ethel
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Jonsson, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Adolescents and self-taken sexual images: A review of the literature2016In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 55, no part B, p. 706-716Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite increasing public interest and concern about young peoples involvement in the self-production of sexual images (or sexting), there remains a dearth of research into their reasons for making and sending images, the processes involved, and the consequences arising from their experiences. This article reviews the motivational, lifestyle and personality factors influencing adolescent sexting practices and explores the research evidence within the wider context of debates around contemporary social and visual media cultures and gender. A systematic search of databases was conducted and eighty-eight records were identified for inclusion in the review. The findings reveal that sexting is remarkably varied in terms of context, meaning and intention, with the potential for consensual and non-consensual aspects of the activity. Whilst sexting can be a means of flirting or enhancing a sexual relationship, it can highlight potential vulnerabilities to victimisation or to participation in risky sexual practices. Sexting is also inextricably linked to social expectations of gendered sexual behaviours, with females often deriving less satisfaction from their experiences and being perceived more negatively by their peers. Further research linking adolescent motivations, well-being, relationships and lifestyles with the broader socio-cultural and media landscape will ultimately help drive understanding about the subject forward. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 174.
    Crisci, Elisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ellegård, Rada
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Rondahl, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Serrander, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Bergström, Tomas
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Eriksson, Kristina
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Larsson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Complement opsonization promotes HSV-2 infection of human dendritic cells2016In: Journal of Virology, ISSN 0022-538X, E-ISSN 1098-5514, Vol. 90, no 10, p. 4939-4950Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herpes virus type 2 (HSV2) is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections globally with a very high prevalence in many countries. During HSV2 infection viral particles become coated with complement proteins and antibodies, both existent in the genital fluids, which could influence the activation of the immune responses. In genital mucosa, the primary target cells for HSV2 infection are epithelial cells, but resident immune cells such as dendritic cells (DCs) are also infected. The DCs are the activators of the ensuing immune responses directed against HSV2, and the aim of this study was to examine the effects opsonization of HSV2, either with complement alone or with complement and antibodies, had on the infection of immature DCs and their ability to mount inflammatory and antiviral responses. Complement opsonization of HSV2 enhanced both the direct infection of immature DCs and their production of new infectious viral particles. The enhanced infection required activation of the complement cascade and functional complement receptor 3. Furthermore, HSV2 infection of DCs required endocytosis of viral particles and their delivery into an acid endosomal compartment. The presence of complement in combination with HSV1 or HSV2 specific antibodies more or less abolished the HSV2 infection of DCs.Our results clearly demonstrate the importance of studying HSV2 infection under conditions that ensue in vivo, i.e. when the virions are covered in complement fragments and complement fragments and antibodies, as this will shape the infection and the subsequent immune response and needs to be further elucidated.

    IMPORTANCE: During HSV2 infection viral particles should become coated with complement proteins and antibodies, both existent in the genital fluids, which could influence the activation of the immune responses. The dendritic cells are the activators of the immune responses directed against HSV2, and the aim of this study was to examine the effects of complement alone or complement and antibodies, on the HSV2 infection of dendritic cells and their ability to mount inflammatory and antiviral responses.Our results demonstrate that the presence of antibodies and complement in the genital environment can influence HSV2 infection under in vitro conditions that reflect the in vivo situation. We believe that our findings are highly relevant for the understanding of HSV2 pathogenesis.

  • 175.
    Croy, Ilona
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Technical University of Dresden, Germany.
    Drechsler, Edda
    Technical University of Dresden, Germany.
    Hamilton, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience (CSAN).
    Hummel, Thomas
    Technical University of Dresden, Germany.
    Olausson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Olfactory modulation of affective touch processing - A neurophysiological investigation2016In: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, Vol. 135, p. 135-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Touch can be highly emotional, and depending on the environment, it can be perceived as pleasant and comforting or disgusting and dangerous. Here, we studied the impact of context on the processing of tactile stimuli using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) paradigm. This was achieved by embedding tactile stimulation in a variable olfactory environment. Twenty people were scanned with BOLD fMRI while receiving the following stimulus blocks: Slow stroking Touch, Civette odor (feces like), Rose odor, Touch + Civette, and Touch + Rose. Ratings of pleasantness and intensity of tactile stimuli and ratings of disgust and intensity of olfactory stimuli were collected. The impact of the olfactory context on the processing of touch was studied using covariance analyses. Coupling between olfactory processing and somatosensory processing areas was assessed with psychophysiological interaction analysis (PPI). A subjectively disgusting olfactory environment significantly reduced the perceived pleasantness of touch. The touch fMRI activation in the secondary somatosensory cortex, operculum 1 (OP1), was positively correlated with the disgust towards the odors. Decreased pleasantness of touch was related to decreased posterior insula activity. PPI analysis revealed a significant interaction between the OP1, posterior insula, and regions processing the disgust of odors (orbitofrontal cortex and amygdala). We conclude that the disgust evaluation of the olfactory environment moderates neural reactivity in somatosensory regions by upregulation of the OP1 and downregulation of the posterior insula. This adaptive regulation of affective touch processing may facilitate adaptive reaction to a potentially harmful stimulus. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 176.
    Croy, Ilona
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Technical University of Dresden, Germany.
    Geide, Helen
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience (CSAN).
    Paulus, Martin
    Laureate Institute Brain Research, OK USA.
    Weidner, Kerstin
    Technical University of Dresden, Germany.
    Olausson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Affective touch awareness in mental health and disease relates to autistic traits - An explorative neurophysiological investigation2016In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 245, p. 491-496Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Affective touch is important for social interaction within families and groups and there is evidence that unmyelinated C tactile fibers are involved in this process. Individuals with autism spectrum disorders show alterations in the perception and processing of affective touch. sThus, we hypothesized that affective touch awareness based on C tactile fiber activation is impaired in individuals with high levels of autistic trait. The pleasantness perception of optimal and suboptimal C tactile stimuli was tested in an explorative study in 70 patients recruited from an outpatient psychotherapy clinic and 69 healthy comparison subjects. All participants completed questionnaires about autistic traits, depressive symptomatology, childhood maltreatment, and about the daily amount of touch. Relative to comparison subjects, patients reported engaging in touch less frequently in daily life and rated touch less pleasant. Reduced valence ratings of touch were explained by childhood maltreatment but not by any particular disorder or depression severity. Among all tested variables, the affective touch awareness correlated with autistic traits only - in patients as well as in comparison subjects. Taken together, individuals with mental health issues have a lower baseline of expression and reception of affective touch. Autistic traits and childhood maltreatment modulate the experience of affective touch. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 177.
    Croy, Ilona
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Technical University of Dresden, Germany.
    Luong, A.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Triscoli, C.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience (CSAN). Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hofmann, E.
    Technical University of Dresden, Germany.
    Olausson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sailer, U.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Interpersonal stroking touch is targeted to C tactile afferent activation2016In: Behavioural Brain Research, ISSN 0166-4328, E-ISSN 1872-7549, Vol. 297, p. 37-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    C tactile fibers are a specialized group of fibers innervating the non-glabrous skin that are tuned to light gentle stroking applied with velocities between 1 and 10 cm/s. Those fibers add to the sensation of interpersonal caressing and pleasant touch. It is unclear whether people spontaneously apply touch that is tuned to optimally activate those fibers. This was investigated in three studies. In study one, 45 participants (21.8 +/- 2.3 years, 24 women) were asked to stroke an artificial arm. In study two, 32 participants (28.3 +/- 8.7years, 16 women) were asked to stroke their partner. In study three, 11 parents (29.4 +/- 5.7years, 6 women) were asked to stroke their babies. Stroking velocity was tracked in all conditions. Stroking velocities were significantly slower in the partner touch and baby touch condition than in the artificial arm condition and all of the participants stroking their partner or baby used velocities that can activate C tactile fibers. We conclude that human social stroking is optimized for C tactile stimulation. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 178.
    Croy, Ilona
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Tech Univ Dresden, Germany.
    Sehlstedt, Isac
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wasling, Helena Backlund
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ackerley, Rochelle
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Aix Marseille Univ, France.
    Olausson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gentle touch perception: From early childhood to adolescence2019In: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, ISSN 1878-9293, E-ISSN 1878-9307, Vol. 35, p. 81-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Affective touch plays an important role in childrens social interaction and is involved in shaping the development of the social brain. The positive affective component of touch is thought to be conveyed via a group of unmyelinated, low-threshold mechanoreceptive afferents, known as C-tactile fibers that are optimally activated by gentle, slow, stroking touch. Touch targeting these C-tactile fibers has been shown to decrease the heart rate in infants. The current study investigated the relationship between age and psychophysical ratings in response to affective touch. A total of n = 43 participants (early childhood: aged 5-8 years, 9 girls, 12 boys; late childhood: aged 9-12 years, 12 girls, 10 boys) were presented with C-tactile optimal and sub-optimal stroking velocities and rated touch pleasantness on an affective pictorial scale. For both age groups, we found that children preferred C-tactile-targeted stimulation. A comparison with previously published data showed that the childrens preference for C-tactile-targeted stimulation was similar to those obtained in adolescents and adults. We speculate that the effect of C-tactile-targeted touch, which is linked with pleasantness, shapes the childrens preference for C-tactile over non-C-tactile-targeted stimulation, and that C-tactile afferent stimulation is important for social development.

  • 179.
    Daferera, Niki
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Kumar Kumawat, Ashok
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Hultgren-Hornquist, Elisabeth
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Ignatova, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Ström, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Münch, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Fecal stream diversion and mucosal cytokine levels in collagenous colitis: A case report2015In: World Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 1007-9327, E-ISSN 2219-2840, Vol. 21, no 19, p. 6065-6071Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this case report, we examined the levels of cytokines expressed before and during fecal stream diversion and after intestinal continuity was restored in a patient with collagenous colitis. We report the case of a 46-year-old woman with chronic, active collagenous colitis who either failed to achieve clinical remission or experienced adverse effects with the following drugs: loperamide, cholestyramine, budesonide, methotrexate and adalimumab. Due to the intractable nature of the disease and because the patient was having up to 15 watery bowel movements per day, she underwent a temporary ileostomy. Colonic biopsies were analyzed for mucosal cytokine protein levels before and during fecal stream diversion and after intestinal continuity was restored. Mucosal protein levels of interleukin (IL)-1 beta, IL-2, IL-6, IL-12, IL-17 A, IL-23, TNF, IFN-gamma, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10 and IL-13 were all higher during active disease and decreased to non-detectable or considerably lower levels during fecal stream diversion. One month after the restoration of bowel continuity, when the patient experienced a relapse of symptoms, IL-2, IL-23 and IL-21 levels were again increased. Our results indicate that fecal stream diversion in this patient suppressed the levels of all cytokines analyzed in colonic biopsies. With the recurrence of clinical symptoms and histological changes after bowel reconstruction, the levels of primarily proinflammatory cytokines increased. Our findings support the hypothesis that a luminal factor triggers the inflammation observed in collagenous colitis.

  • 180.
    Daghighi, Abtin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Wikstrom, Frank
    Lund University, Sweden.
    A pure smoothness condition for rads theorem for alpha-analytic functions2016In: Czechoslovak Mathematical Journal, ISSN 0011-4642, E-ISSN 1572-9141, Vol. 66, no 1, p. 57-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Let be a bounded, simply connected a",-convex domain. Let alpha a a"currency sign (+) (n) and let f be a function on Omega which is separately -smooth with respect to z (j) (by which we mean jointly -smooth with respect to Rez (j) , Imz (j) ). If f is alpha-analytic on Omega\f (-1)(0), then f is alpha-analytic on Omega. The result is well-known for the case alpha (i) = 1, 1 a (c) 1/2 i a (c) 1/2 n, even when f a priori is only known to be continuous.

  • 181.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    The diagnostic accuracies of the 2012 SLICC criteria and the proposed EULAR/ACR criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus classification are comparable2019In: Lupus, ISSN 0961-2033, E-ISSN 1477-0962, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 778-782Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a joint effort, the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) and the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) recently proposed new criteria for the classification of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with the overarching goal to identify potential participants for clinical studies. Herein, we present the first independent evaluation of these criteria in comparison with older classification grounds using an adult Scandinavian study population of confirmed SLE cases and individuals with SLE-mimicking conditions. We included 56 confirmed SLE cases meeting the 1982 ACR criteria (ACR-82) and/or the Fries diagnostic principle (antinuclear antibodies on at least one occasion plus involvement of at least two defined organ systems) and 55 controls with possible systemic autoimmune disease, including the presence of any SLE-related autoantibody. The proposed EULAR/ACR criteria showed a diagnostic sensitivity of 93% (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.83-0.98) compared with 83% (95% CI, 0.72-0.91) for the updated ACR criteria from 1997. The diagnostic accuracy of all tested classification grounds was fairly similar, achieving approximately 85%. However, the disease specificity of the EULAR/ACR criteria reached only 73% (95% CI, 0.59-0.83), which was comparable with the 2012 Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) criteria, 75% (95% CI, 0.61-0.85), but clearly lower than for ACR-82, 94% (95% CI, 0.83-0.99). In this first independent evaluation of a limited number of cases, we found comparable results with respect to diagnostic sensitivity, specificity and accuracy regarding the SLICC-12 and the proposed EULAR/ACR classification criteria. However, their specificity for SLE appeared to be lower compared with ACR-82.

  • 182.
    Danielsson, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The Clinical and Pathological Spectrum of Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies: Implications for pathogenesis, classification and diagnosis2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) constitute a heterogeneous group of diseases with severe consequences for the life of affected patients. Dermatomyositis, polymyositis and inclusion body myositis (IBM) are the classical representatives of this group. The treatments given today often have limited effects, and are taken at the cost of side effects. Major obstacles in the search for more effective treatments are; (1) an incomplete understanding of the disease mechanisms, (2) difficulties to delineate homogeneous disease groups for clinical studies and (3) the sometimes challenging task to diagnose these diseases.

    Aims: We addressed a number of “loose ends” in the areas of pathogenesis, classification and diagnosis; mechanisms of muscle fiber degeneration in IIM, with a focus of programmed cell death (apoptosis) and invasion of muscle  fibers by inflammatory cells (partial invasion); protecting and mediating factors present in muscle; the association of other diseases with IIM, in particular celiac disease ; the evaluation of two classification systems and laboratory methods for increased diagnostic performance.

    The studies: We included 106 patients, diagnosed at the Neuromuscular unit in Linköping, Sweden, with pathological muscle findings consistent with IIM. The incidence in the county of Östergötland (during 5 years) was 7.3 per million/year (3 patients each year). Of 88 patients with confirmed IIM 4 (4.5 %) had celiac disease, 33 (38%) had an associated systemic inflammatory disease and 5 (5.7 %) had a malignancy. Ninety-nine patients were included for a comparison of two classification systems using criteria of the European Neuromuscle Centre (Amato/ENMC), and the widely used Bohan and Peter classification, both with the addition of IBM according to Griggs et al. Using the Amato/ENMC criteria the most prevalent diagnostic group after IBM (30%) was nonspecific myositis (23%), followed by polymyositis (20%) and dermatomyositis 17%). A substantial number of patients meeting Bohan and Peter (or Griggs) criteria were excluded by Amato/ENMC criteria, most (21/23) due to lack of detectable muscle weakness. Extended muscle sectioning increased the sensitivity of a muscle biopsy by 15 % and the specificity by 22%, and showed an overlap between disease groups. Muscle biopsies from patients with IIM and controls were used to investigate pathological findings considered specific for disease groups, and for the presence of programmed cell death (apoptosis) and disease protecting and mediating factors in muscle. The presence of apoptotic muscle fiber nuclei was detected in muscle with partial invasion (however not in the invaded fibers) in the presence of granzyme B and CD8+ cytotoxic T cells. The major apoptosis inhibiting protein Bcl-2 was shown to be constitutionally expressed in healthy muscle but weakened in IIM.

    Conclusion: We present apoptosis as a possible disease mechanism in parallel with partial invasion of fibers. Furthermore, partial invasion may not be a suitable distinguishing feature in the pathogenesis, or for classification and diagnosis of IIM. We also introduce the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 as a possible relevant muscle fiber protecting factor. A more extensive pathological work-up improves classification and diagnosis of IIM. The proposed Amato/ENMC creates a substantial portion of patients with non-specific or unclassified myositis. Associated diseases are common in IIM, and also include celiac disease.

    List of papers
    1. Classification and Diagnostic Investigation in Inflammatory Myopathies: A Study of 99 Patients
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Classification and Diagnostic Investigation in Inflammatory Myopathies: A Study of 99 Patients
    2013 (English)In: Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0315-162X, E-ISSN 1499-2752, Vol. 40, no 7, p. 1173-1182Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Insights into the pathogenesis of inflammatory myopathies have led to new diagnostic methods. The aims of our study were (1) to evaluate the consequences of using the classification of Amato/European Neuromuscular Centre Workshop (ENMC), compared to that of Bohan and Peter; and (2) to evaluate any diagnostic benefit in using an extended pathological investigation. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods. From a consecutive retrospective database, we evaluated 99 patients for classification. Patients with inclusion body myositis (IBM) were classified according to Griggs, et al. In addition to routine stainings and immunohistochemistry, a multilevel serial sectioning procedure was performed on paraffin-embedded material, to identify scarce pathological findings. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults. Classification according to Bohan and Peter could be performed for 83 of the 99 patients, whereas only 60 patients met the Amato/ENMC criteria, the latter resulting in the following diagnostic groups: IBM (n = 18), nonspecific myositis (n = 14), polymyositis (n = 12), dermatomyositis (n = 10), dermatomyositis sine dermatitis (n = 5), and immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (n = 1). Most of the Amato/ENMC diagnostic groups harbored patients from several of the Bohan and Peter groups, which included a substantial group lacking proximal muscle weakness. The serial sectioning procedure was essential for classification of 9 patients (15%), and led to a more specific diagnosis for 13 patients (22%) according to Amato/ENMC. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion. The classification of Amato/ENMC was more restrictive, forming groups based on clinical criteria and specified myopathological findings, which clearly differed from the groups of the Bohan and Peter classification. An extended pathological investigation increased the diagnostic yield of a muscle biopsy and highlights the quantity and specificity of certain pathological findings.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Journal of Rheumatology, 2013
    Keywords
    INFLAMMATORY MYOPATHIES, IDIOPATHIC INFLAMMATORY MYOPATHIES, POLYMYOSITIS, DERMATOMYOSITIS, INCLUSION BODY MYOSITIS
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-96992 (URN)10.3899/jrheum.120804 (DOI)000321993800023 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|University Hospital Linkoping||County Council of Ostergotland||

    Available from: 2013-09-02 Created: 2013-09-02 Last updated: 2017-12-06
    2. Expression of apoptosis related proteins in normal and diseased muscle: A possible role for Bcl-2 in protection of striated muscle
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Expression of apoptosis related proteins in normal and diseased muscle: A possible role for Bcl-2 in protection of striated muscle
    2009 (English)In: NEUROMUSCULAR DISORDERS, ISSN 0960-8966, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 412-417Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The unique absence of major histocompatibility complex class I antigen (MHC-I) expression in normal muscle is one possible mechanism protecting striated muscle. In order to define their possible involvement in protection of normal muscle. we investigated the expression of molecules involved in muscle fibre death and survival mechanisms (Bcl-2, Fas, Fas-ligand and TRAIL), focusing on disorders with possible involvement of cytotoxic T cells. We studied muscle biopsies from 20 healthy volunteers, from 10 patients affected by polymyositis and 10 by Duchenne muscular dystrophy. By using immunohistochemistry, Western blot and real-time PCR we detected a constitutional expression of Bcl-2 in healthy muscle, whereas the expression was weaker in disease processes. Fas-L and TRAIL were not detected in muscle fibres, and Fas only in muscle affected by disease. Our findings indicate that the major apoptotic protein Bcl-2 might have a hitherto unrecognized role in the protection of normal muscle.

    Keywords
    Inflammatory myopathy, Apoptosis, Bcl-2, TRAIL, Fas and Fas-L
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-19795 (URN)10.1016/j.nmd.2009.03.008 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-08-10 Created: 2009-08-10 Last updated: 2016-11-23
  • 183.
    Danielsson, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindvall, Björn
    University Hospital Örebro, Sweden.
    Hallert, Claes
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Increased prevalence of celiac disease in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies2017In: Brain and Behavior, ISSN 2162-3279, E-ISSN 2162-3279, Vol. 7, no 10, article id e00803Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectivesIdiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) are often associated with other immune-mediated diseases or malignancy. Some studies have reported a high frequency of celiac disease in IIM. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of celiac disease, systemic inflammatory diseases, and malignancy in a cohort of IIM patients, and estimate the incidence of IIM in the county of ostergotland, Sweden. Material and MethodsWe reviewed medical records and analyzed sera from 106 patients, fulfilling pathological criteria of inflammatory myopathy, for the presence of IgA antibodies against endomysium and gliadin. Antibody-positive patients were offered further investigation with small bowel biopsy or investigation for the presence of antibodies against antitissue transglutaminase (t-TG). The patients were classified according to Bohan and Peter or Griggs criteria. The presence of celiac disease, systemic inflammatory, and malignant diseases was documented. ResultsFour of 88 patients classified as IIM (4.5%) had biopsy-confirmed celiac disease, which is higher than the prevalence in the general population, detected with a similar screening procedure (0.53%). Thirty-three patients (38%) had a systemic inflammatory disease and five (5.7%) a malignancy. The incidence of confirmed IIM in the county of ostergotland was 7.3 per million/year. ConclusionsThe results highlight the high frequency of associated inflammatory and malignant diseases and confirm an increased prevalence of celiac disease in IIM.

  • 184.
    Dannapfel, Petra
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Törnvall, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Education to Increase Skills in Research Methods among Clinicians in Health Care2017In: Journal of Health & Medical Informatics, ISSN 2157-7420, Vol. 8, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    The aim of this study was to evaluate participants’ and managers’ experience of the design and content of an education programme. The Knowledge to Action (KTA) framework was applied to identify the steps of knowledge creation and action in the education programme.

    Methods

    Data were collected from 18 participants representing two groups: participants in the intervention and supervisors and managers. Two focus groups took place: two with participants in the intervention (4 and 3 in each) and one with eleven managers.

    Results

    All steps in the KTA framework were identified and discussed from several aspects. The importance of selecting projects that were relevant and added value in their clinics was mentioned by all participants. The participants also mentioned that after the education, they had further understanding and increased skills in how to be active and perform continuous improvement projects. The step in the KTA process regarding how to adapt knowledge to local context was not discussed explicitly by the participants or managers.

    Discussion

    Education in research methods and performing improvement projects to develop the clinic creates a more positive attitude to working with continuous improvement. The participant’s self-esteem and knowledge increased regarding how to work with improvements. It is important to have the manager’s support to perform a project. Emphasis was on knowledge inquiry and synthesis and presenting the results with or without possible solutions. The participants and managers talked about barriers and knowledge use more generally and at an organizational level. This means that the participants did not gain the last bit of nowledge needed to put the action into practice. This implies that the problem regarding lack of implementation skills in health care might remain.

  • 185.
    Davidovic, Monika
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Emma H.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Olausson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience (CSAN). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Björnsdotter Åberg, Malin
    Linköping University, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience (CSAN). Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Posterior Superior Temporal Sulcus Responses Predict Perceived Pleasantness of Skin Stroking2016In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5161, E-ISSN 1662-5161, Vol. 10, no 432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Love and affection is expressed through a range of physically intimate gestures, including caresses. Recent studies suggest that posterior temporal lobe areas typically associated with visual processing of social cues also respond to interpersonal touch. Here, we asked whether these areas are selective to caress-like skin stroking. We collected functional magnetic resonance imaging data from 23 healthy participants and compared brain responses to skin stroking and vibration. We did not find any significant differences between stroking and vibration in the posterior temporal lobe; however, right posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) responses predicted healthy participants perceived pleasantness of skin stroking, but not vibration. These findings link right pSTS responses to individual variability in perceived pleasantness of caress-like tactile stimuli. We speculate that the right pSTS may play a role in the translation of tactile stimuli into positively valenced, socially relevant interpersonal touch and that this system may be affected in disorders associated with impaired attachment.

  • 186.
    Dawson, Andreas
    et al.
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    List, Thomas
    Malmö University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Svensson, Peter
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Ernberg, Malin
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Effects of Experimental Tooth Clenching on Pain and Intramuscular Release of 5-HT and Glutamate in Patients With Myofascial TMD2015In: The Clinical Journal of Pain, ISSN 0749-8047, E-ISSN 1536-5409, Vol. 31, no 8, p. 740-749Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: It has been suggested that tooth clenching may be associated with local metabolic changes, and is a risk factor for myofascial temporomandibular disorders (M-TMD). This study investigated the effects of experimental tooth clenching on the levels of 5-HT, glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate, as well as on blood flow and pain intensity, in the masseter muscles of M-TMD patients. Methods: Fifteen patients with M-TMD and 15 pain-free controls participated. Intramuscular microdialysis was performed to collect 5-HT, glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate and to assess blood flow. Two hours after the insertion of a microdialysis catheter, participants performed a 20-minute repetitive tooth clenching task (50% of maximal voluntary contraction). Pain intensity was measured throughout. Results: A significant effect of group (P less than 0.01), but not of time, was observed on 5-HT levels and blood flow. No significant effects of time or group occurred on glutamate, pyruvate, or lactate levels. Time and group had significant main effects on pain intensity (P less than 0.05 and less than 0.001). No significant correlations were identified between: (1) 5-HT, glutamate, and pain intensity; or between (2) pyruvate, lactate, and blood flow. Discussion: This experimental tooth clenching model increased jaw muscle pain levels in M-TMD patients and evoked low levels of jaw muscle pain in controls. M-TMD patients had significantly higher levels of 5-HT than controls and significantly lower blood flow. These 2 factors may facilitate the release of other algesic substances that may cause pain.

  • 187.
    De Geer, Lina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Oscarsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Cardiac mortality after septic shock.2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 188.
    De Geer, Lina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Oscarsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Walther, Sten M.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Cardiac mortality after severe sepsis and septic shock: A nationwide observational cohort study2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Cardiac dysfunction is a well-known complication of sepsis, but its long-term consequences remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate cardiac outcome after sepsis by assessing causes of death in a nationwide register-based cohort.

    Methods: A cohort of 9,520 severe sepsis and septic shock intensive care (ICU) patients without preceding severe cardiac failure and discharged alive from the ICU was collected from the Swedish Intensive Care Registry (SIR) from 2008 to 2013, together with a nonseptic control group (n = 4,577). Patients were matched according to age, sex and severity of illness. Information on cause of death after ICU discharge was sought in the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare’s Cause of Death Registry.

    Results: After ICU discharge, 3,954 (42%) of severe sepsis or septic shock patients died. In 654 (16%) of these, cardiac failure was registered as the cause of death. The follow-up time was 17,693 person-years (median 583 days/person; maximum 5.7 years) and the median (IQR) time from ICU discharge to cardiac failure-related death 81 (17 - 379) days. With increasing severity of illness (quartiles of SAPS3), the hazard rate for cardiac failure-related death increased (hazard ratio (HR) 1.58 (95% CI 1.19 - 2.09, p <0.001) in the highest quartile compared to the lowest). In a matched comparison between severe sepsis or septic shock patients and controls, survival was similar, and the hazard rate for cardiac failurerelated death did not differ between groups (HR 0.97, 95% CI 0.88 – 1.10, p = 0.62).

    Conclusions: The risk of death with cardiac failure as the cause of death after severe sepsis or septic shock increases with severity of illness on admission. Patients with severe sepsis or septic shock are not, however, at an increased risk of death with cardiac failure as the cause of death when compared to other ICU patients with similar severity of illness.

  • 189.
    de Geer, Lina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Oscarsson Tibblin, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Walther, Sten M.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    No association with cardiac death after sepsis: A nationwide observational cohort study2019In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 63, no 3, p. 344-351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac dysfunction is a well-known complication of sepsis, but its long-term consequences and implications for patients remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate cardiac outcome in sepsis by assessing causes of death up to 2 years after treatment in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) in a nationwide register-based cohort collected from the Swedish Intensive Care Registry.

    METHODS: A cohort of 13 669 sepsis and septic shock ICU patients from 2008 to 2014 was collected together with a non-septic control group, matched regarding age, sex and severity of illness (n = 6582), and all without preceding severe cardiac disease. For a large proportion of the severe sepsis and septic shock patients (n = 7087), no matches were found. Information on causes of death up to 2 years after ICU admission was sought in the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare's Cause of Death Registry.

    RESULTS: Intensive Care Unit mortality was nearly identical in a matched comparison of sepsis patients to controls (24% in both groups) but higher in more severely ill sepsis patients for whom no matches were found (33% vs 24%, P < 0.001). There was no association of sepsis to cardiac deaths in the first month (OR 1.03, 95%CI 0.87 to 1.20, P = 0.76) nor up to 2 years after ICU admission (OR 1.01, 95%CI 0.82 to 1.25, P = 0.94) in an adjusted between-group comparison.

    CONCLUSIONS: There was no association with an increased risk of death related to cardiac disease in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock when compared to other ICU patients with similar severity of illness.

  • 190.
    Dessau, Ram B
    et al.
    Slagelse Hospital, Slagelse, Denmark.
    Fryland, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wilhelmsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nyman, Dag
    Åland University, Mariehamn, Finlad.
    Forsberg, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Study of a Cohort of 1,886 Persons To Determine Changes in Antibody Reactivity to Borrelia burgdorferi 3 Months after a Tick Bite2015In: Clinical and Vaccine Immunology, ISSN 1556-6811, E-ISSN 1556-679X, Vol. 22, no 7, p. 823-827Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lyme borreliosis is a tick-borne disease caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi. The most frequent clinical manifestation is a rash called erythema migrans. Changes in antibody reactivity to B. burgdorferi 3 months after a tick bite are measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). One assay is based on native purified flagellum antigen (IgG), and the other assay is based on a recombinant antigen called C6 (IgG or IgM). Paired samples were taken at the time of a tick bite and 3 months later from 1,886 persons in Sweden and the Åland Islands, Finland. The seroconversion or relative change is defined by dividing the measurement units from the second sample by those from the first sample. The threshold for the minimum level of significant change was defined at the 2.5% level to represent the random error level. The thresholds were a 2.7-fold rise for the flagellar IgG assay and a 1.8-fold rise for the C6 assay. Of 1,886 persons, 102/101 (5.4%) had a significant rise in antibody reactivity in the flagellar assay or the C6 assay. Among 40 cases with a diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis, the sensitivities corresponding to a rise in antibodies were 33% and 50% for the flagellar antigen and the C6 antigen, respectively. Graphical methods to display the antibody response and to choose thresholds for a rise in relative antibody reactivity are shown and discussed. In conclusion, 5.4% of people with tick bites showed a rise in Borrelia-specific antibodies above the 2.5% threshold in either ELISA but only 40 (2.1%) developed clinical Lyme borreliosis.

  • 191.
    Dessauvagie, Benjamin F.
    et al.
    Leeds Teaching Hosp NHS Trust, England; Univ Leeds, England; Fiona Stanley Hosp, Australia; Univ Western Australia, Australia; Univ Western Australia, Australia.
    Lee, Andrew H. S.
    Nottingham Univ Hosp NHS Trust, England.
    Meehan, Katie
    Univ Western Australia, Australia; Univ Western Australia, Australia.
    Nijhawan, Anju
    Leeds Teaching Hosp NHS Trust, England.
    Tan, Puay Hoon
    Singapore Gen Hosp, Singapore.
    Thomas, Jeremy
    Western Gen Hosp, Scotland.
    Tie, Bibiana
    Fiona Stanley Hosp, Australia.
    Treanor, Darren
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology. Leeds Teaching Hosp NHS Trust, England; Univ Leeds, England.
    Umar, Seemeen
    Leeds Teaching Hosp NHS Trust, England.
    Hanby, Andrew M.
    Leeds Teaching Hosp NHS Trust, England; Univ Leeds, England.
    Millican-Slater, Rebecca
    Leeds Teaching Hosp NHS Trust, England.
    Interobserver variation in the diagnosis of fibroepithelial lesions of the breast: a multicentre audit by digital pathology2018In: Journal of Clinical Pathology, ISSN 0021-9746, E-ISSN 1472-4146, Vol. 71, no 8, p. 672-679Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim Fibroepithelial lesions (FELs) of the breast span a morphological continuum including lesions where distinction between cellular fibroadenoma (FA) and benign phyllodes tumour (PT) is difficult. The distinction is clinically important with FAs managed conservatively while equivocal lesions and PTs are managed with surgery. We sought to audit core biopsy diagnoses of equivocal FELs by digital pathology and to investigate whether digital point counting is useful in clarifying FEL diagnoses. Method Scanned slide images from cores and subsequent excisions of 69 equivocal FELs were examined in a multicentre audit by eight pathologists to determine the agreement and accuracy of core needle biopsy (CNB) diagnoses and by digital point counting of stromal cellularity and expansion to determine if classification could be improved. Results Interobserver variation was high on CNB with a unanimous diagnosis from all pathologists in only eight cases of FA, diagnoses of both FA and PT on the same CNB in 15 and a weak mean kappa agreement between pathologists (k=0.36). Moderate agreement was observed on CNBs among breast specialists (k=0.44) and on excision samples (k=0.49). Up to 23% of lesions confidently diagnosed as FA on CNB were PT on excision and up to 30% of lesions confidently diagnosed as PT on CNB were FA on excision. Digital point counting did not aid in the classification of FELs. Conclusion Accurate and reproducible diagnosis of equivocal FELs is difficult, particularly on CNB, resulting in poor interobserver agreement and suboptimal accuracy. Given the diagnostic difficulty, and surgical implications, equivocal FELs should be reported in consultation with experienced breast pathologists as a small number of benign FAs can be selected out from equivocal lesions.

  • 192.
    Detert, H.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine.
    Hedlund, S.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Rodvall, Y.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Festin, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Whiteman, D. C.
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Validation of sun exposure and protection index (SEPI) for estimation of sun habits2015In: Cancer Epidemiology, ISSN 1877-7821, E-ISSN 1877-783X, Vol. 39, no 6, p. 986-993Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In both Sweden and Australia high incidence rates of skin cancer have become a major health problem. In prevention and risk communication, it is important to have reliable ways for identifying people with risky sun habits. In this study the validity and reliability of the questionnaire Sun Exposure Protection Index (SEPI), developed to assess individuals sun habits and their propensity to increase sun protection during routine, often brief, clinical encounters, has been evaluated. The aim of our study was to evaluate validity and reliability of the proposed SEPI scoring instrument, in two countries with markedly different ultraviolet radiation environments (Sweden and Australia). Method: Two subpopulations in Sweden and Australia respectively were asked to fill out the SEPI together with the previously evaluated Readiness to Alter Sun Protective Behaviour questionnaire (RASP-B) and the associated Sun-protective Behaviours Questionnaire. To test reliability, the SEPI was again filled out by the subjects one month later. Results: Comparison between SEPI and the questions in the Sun-protective Behaviours Questionnaire, analyzed with Spearmans Rho, showed good correlations regarding sun habits. Comparison between SEPI and RASP-B regarding propensity to increase sun protection showed concurrently lower SEPI mean scores for action stage, but no difference between precontemplation and contemplation stages. The SEPI test-retest analysis indicated stability over time. Internal consistency of the SEPI, assessed with Cronbachs alpha estimation showed values marginally lower than the desired &gt;0.70 coefficient value generally recommended, and was somewhat negatively affected by the question on sunscreen use, likely related to the classic "sunscreen paradox". There were some differences in the performance of the SEPI between the Swedish and Australian samples, possibly due to the influence of "available" sunlight and differing attitudes to behaviour and protection "at home" and on vacation. Conclusions: SEPI appears to be a stable instrument with an overall acceptable validity and reliability, applicable for use in populations exposed to different UVR environments, in order to evaluate individual sun exposure and protection. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • 193.
    Di Giuseppe, Daniela
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Frisell, Thomas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ernestam, Sofia
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Forsblad-DElia, Helena
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Lindqvist, Elisabet
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Lindstrom, Ulf
    Gothenburg Univ, Sweden.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Askling, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Uptake of rheumatology biosimilars in the absence of forced switching2018In: Expert Opinion on Biological Therapy, ISSN 1471-2598, E-ISSN 1744-7682, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 499-504Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To describe the uptake and system-level effects of the introduction of biosimilars in a setting without forced switching.Research design and methods: We used data from the Swedish Rheumatology Quality register from start of marketing of infliximab (Remsima (R) and Inflectra (R)) and etanercept (Benepali (R)) biosimilars until 31 December 2016. We compared users of each originator-product and its biosimilar(s) by line of treatment: bDMARD-naive patients, non-medical switchers (vs. matched patients remaining on originator), and patients switching from a previous bDMARD of another type.Results: From the start of marketing 1343 patients started an infliximab biosimilar (22 months) and 2691 started etanercept (9months). Overall, the introduction of these biosimilars resulted in an increase of the total number of ongoing infliximab and etanercept treatments (originator + biosimilar) . At the end of the study period, biosimilars accounted for 31% of all infliximab treatments and 31% of all etanercept-treated patients. For each line of therapy, we noted only small differences in patient characteristics between those starting the originator product vs. its biosimilar(s).Conclusions: Introduction of biosimilars have effects beyond replacement of the originator product, in terms of an increased rate of bDMARD initiation. Selection to non-medical switching displayed no particular disease- or patient-characteristics.

  • 194.
    Dick, H Burkhard
    et al.
    University Eye Hospital Bochum, Bochum, Germany.
    Schultz, Tim
    University Eye Hospital Bochum, Bochum, Germany.
    Lesieur, Gilles
    Centre Ophtalmologique Iridis, Albi, France.
    Morselli, Simonetta
    Ospedale di Bassano del Grappa Bassano del Grappa, Bassano del Grappa, Italy.
    Toso, Antonio
    Ospedale di Bassano del Grappa Bassano del Grappa, Bassano del Grappa, Italy.
    Alio, Jorge L
    Vissum-Instituto Oftalmologico de Alicante, University Miguel Hernandez, Alicante, Spain.
    Buckhurst, Phillip J
    School of Health Professions, Plymouth University, Plymouth, UK.
    Johansson, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping. St. Erik Eye Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Evaluation of clinical outcomes following implantation of a sub-2-mm hydrophilic acrylic MICS intraocular lens2019In: International ophtalmology, ISSN 0165-5701, E-ISSN 1573-2630, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 1043-1054Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To evaluate clinical outcomes following sub-2-mm microincision cataract surgery (MICS) and intraocular lens (IOL) implantation.

    SETTING: Five EU clinical sites.

    DESIGN: Prospective, multicenter, open-label, single-arm, non-randomized.

    METHODS: Preoperative assessment involved visual acuity (VA), intraocular pressure and biometry measurements. 1.4-mm wound-assisted or 1.8-mm MICS was performed. Follow-up visits were made 1 day, 1-2 weeks, 1-2 and 4-6 months after surgery. The incision size, corrected distance VA (CDVA), uncorrected distance VA, manifest refraction spherical equivalent (MRSE), refraction predictability/stability and IOL decentration were assessed. At 12-, 18-, and 24-month, long-term centration, posterior capsular opacification (PCO) and Nd:YAG capsulotomy rates were investigated.

    RESULTS: A total of 103 eyes were implanted with the study IOL (INCISE, Bausch & Lomb), 96 of which were included in visual outcome analysis. A mean 6-month CDVA of - 0.02 logMAR (20/20 + 1) was observed and 75 eyes (79.8%) and 93 eyes (98.3%) achieved a visual acuity of at least 20/20 or 20/40. Mean MRSE was - 0.20 ± 0.60 D. Mean absolute predictive error was 0.44 ± 0.36 D, with 90.4% within 1.00 D of target. Mean total decentration was 0.35 ± 0.36 mm at 6 months and 0.32 ± 0.14 mm at 24 months (p > 0.05). 24-month evaluation of posterior capsular opacification score was 0.03 for the central area. A Nd:YAG rate of 3.4% was observed at 24 months.

    CONCLUSIONS: The new MICS IOL provided excellent visual outcomes and was safe and effective for the sub-2-mm procedure. The MICS IOL demonstrated long-term centration, stability and a low rate of PCO development.

  • 195.
    Dieker, Jurgen
    et al.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Berden, Jo H.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Bakker, Marinka
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Briand, Jean-Paul
    CNRS, France.
    Muller, Sylviane
    CNRS, France.
    Voll, Reinhard
    University of Medical Centre Freiburg, Germany; University of Medical Centre Freiburg, Germany.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Herrmann, Martin
    Friedrich Alexander University of Erlangen Nuremberg, Germany.
    Hilbrands, Luuk B.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    van der Vlag, Johan
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Autoantibodies against Modified Histone Peptides in SLE Patients Are Associated with Disease Activity and Lupus Nephritis2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 10, article id e0165373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Persistent exposure of the immune system to death cell debris leads to autoantibodies against chromatin in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Deposition of antichromatin/ chromatin complexes can instigate inflammation in multiple organs including the kidney. Previously we identified specific cell death-associated histone modifications as targets of autoantibodies in SLE. In this study we addressed, in a large cohort of SLE patients and controls, the question whether plasma reactivities with specific histone peptides associated with serology and clinical features. Plasma from SLE patients with and without lupus nephritis, disease controls, and healthy controls, were tested in ELISA with histone H4 peptide acetylated at lysines 8, 12 and 16 (H4p(ac)), H2B peptide acetylated at lysine 12 (H2Bp(ac)), H3 peptide trimethylated at lysine 27 (H3p(me)), and their unmodified equivalents. SLE patients displayed a higher reactivity with the modified equivalent of each peptide. Reactivity with H4p(ac) showed both a high sensitivity (89%) and specificity (91%) for SLE, while H2Bp(ac) exhibited a high specificity (96%) but lower sensitivity (69%). Reactivity with H3p(me) appeared not specific for SLE. Anti-H4p(ac) and anti-H2Bp(ac) reactivity demonstrated a high correlation with disease activity. Moreover, patients reacting with multiple modified histone peptides exhibited higher SLEDAI and lower C3 levels. SLE patients with renal involvement showed higher reactivity with H2B/H2Bp(ac) and a more pronounced reactivity with the modified equivalent of H3p(me) and H2Bp(ac). In conclusion, reactivity with H4p(ac) and H2Bp(ac) is specific for SLE patients and correlates with disease activity, whereas reactivity with H2Bp(ac) is in particular associated with lupus nephritis.

  • 196.
    Dienus, Olaf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Sokolova, Ekaterina
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden; Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Matussek, Andreas
    Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Löfgren, Sture
    Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Blom, Lena
    Chalmers, Sweden; City Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Thomas J. R.
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Norovirus Dynamics in Wastewater Discharges and in the Recipient Drinking Water Source: Long-Term Monitoring and Hydrodynamic Modeling2016In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 50, no 20, p. 10851-10858Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Norovirus (NoV) that enters drinking water sources with wastewater discharges is a common cause of waterborne outbreaks. The impact of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) on the river Gota alv (Sweden) was studied using monitoring and hydrodynamic modeling. The concentrations of NoV genogroups (GG) I and II in samples collected at WWTPs and drinking water intakes (source water) during one year were quantified using duplex real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. The mean (standard deviation) NoV GGI and GGII genome concentrations were 6.2 (1.4) and 6.8 (1.8) in incoming wastewater and 5.3 (1.4) and 5.9 (1.4) log(10) genome equivalents (g.e.) L-1 in treated wastewater, respectively. The reduction at the WWTPs varied between 0.4 and 1.1 log(10) units. In source water, the concentration ranged from below the detection limit to 3.8 log(10) g.e. L-1. NoV GGII was detected in both wastewater and source water more frequently during the cold than the warm period of the year. The spread of NoV in the river was simulated using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. The modeling results indicated that the NoV GGI and GGII genome concentrations in source water may occasionally be up to 2.8 and 1.9 log(10) units higher, respectively, than the concentrations measured during the monitoring project.

  • 197.
    Dobrev, Ivo
    et al.
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Roosli, Christof
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Bolt, Lucy
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Pfiffner, Flurin
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Gerig, Rahel
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Huber, Alexander
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Hoon Sim, Jae
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Influence of stimulation position on the sensitivity for bone conduction hearing aids without skin penetration2016In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 55, no 8, p. 439-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study explores the influence of stimulation position on bone conduction (BC) hearing sensitivity with a BC transducer attached using a headband. Design:(1) The cochlear promontory motion was measured in cadaver heads using laser Doppler vibrometry while seven different positions around the pinna were stimulated using a bone anchored hearing aid transducer attached using a headband. (2) The BC hearing thresholds were measured in human subjects, with the bone vibrator Radioear B71 attached to the same seven stimulation positions. Study sample: Three cadaver heads and twenty participants. Results: Stimulation on a position superior-anterior to the pinna generated the largest promontory motion and the lowest BC thresholds. Stimulations on the positions superior to the pinna, the mastoid, and posterior-inferior to the pinna showed similar magnitudes of promontory motion and similar levels of BC thresholds. Conclusion: Stimulations on the regions superior to the pinna, the mastoid, and posterior-inferior to the pinna provide stable BC transmission, and are insensitive to small changes of the stimulation position. Therefore it is reliable to use the mastoid to determine BC thresholds in clinical audiometry. However, stimulation on a position superior-anterior to the pinna provides more efficient BC transmission than stimulation on the mastoid.

  • 198.
    Dock, Hua
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Theodorsson, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    DNA Methylation Inhibitor Zebularine Confers Stroke Protection in Ischemic Rats2015In: TRANSLATIONAL STROKE RESEARCH, ISSN 1868-4483, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 296-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    5-Aza-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) confers neuroprotection in ischemic mice by inhibiting DNA methylation. Zebularine is another DNA methylation inhibitor, less toxic and more stable in aqueous solutions and, therefore more biologically suitable. We investigated Zebularines effects on brain ischemia in a rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) model in order to elucidate its therapeutic potential. Male Wistar wild-type (WT) rats were randomly allocated to three treatment groups, vehicle, Zebularine 100 mu g, and Zebularine 500 mu g. Saline (10 mu L) or Zebularine (10 mu L) was administered intracerebroventricularly 20 min before 45-min occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. Reperfusion was allowed after 45-min occlusion, and the rats were sacrificed at 24-h reperfusion. The brains were removed, sliced, and stained with 2 % 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) before measuring infarct size. Zebularine (500 mu g) reduced infarct volumes significantly (p less than 0.05) by 61 % from 20.7 +/- 4.2 % in the vehicle treated to 8.1 +/- 1.6 % in the Zebularine treated. Zebularine (100 mu g) also reduced infarct volumes dramatically by 55 to 9.4 +/- 1.2 %. The mechanisms behind this neuroprotection is not yet known, but the results agree with previous studies and support the notion that Zebularine-induced inhibition of DNA methyltransferase ameliorates ischemic brain injury in rats.

  • 199.
    Domert, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Neuron-to-neuron propagation of neurodegenerative proteins; relation to degradative systems2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD) are defined by neurodegeneration and accumulations of misfolded proteins that spread through the brain in a well characterized manner. In AD these accumulations consist mainly of β-amyloid (Aβ) and tau, while in PD, α-synuclein (α-syn) make up the characteristic lewy pathology. 

       The general aim of this thesis was to investigate mechanisms associated with neurotoxic peptide activity by Aβ, tau and α-syn in relation to cellular degradation and transfer with a cell-to-cell transfer model system.

       We found that intercellular transfer of oligomeric Aβ occurs independently of isoform. However, the amount of transfer correlates with each isoforms ability to resist degradation or cellular clearance. The Aβ1-42 isoform showed particular resistance to clearance, which resulted in higher levels of cell-to-cell transfer of the isoform and lysosomal stress caused by accumulation.

       As Aβ accumulations can inhibit the proteasomal degradation we investigated how reduced proteasomal degradation affected neuron-like cells. We found increased levels of phosphorylated tau protein, disturbed microtubule stability and impaired neuritic transport after reduced proteasomal activity. These changes was partly linked to c-Jun and ERK 1/2 kinase activity.

       We could also show that α-syn transferred from cell-to-cell in our model system, with a higher degree of transfer for the larger oligomer and fibrillar species. Similar to Aβ, α-syn mainly colocalized with lysosomes, before and after transfer.

        Lastly, we have developed our cell-to-cell transfer system into a model suitable for high throughput screening (HTS). The type of cells have been upgraded from SH-SY5Y cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), with a differentiation profile more similar to mature neurons. The next step will be screening a small molecular library for substances with inhibitory effect on cell-to-cell transfer of Aβ peptides. 

       The importance of the degradative systems in maintaining protein homeostasis and prevent toxic accumulations in general is well known. Our findings shows the importance of these systems for neurodegenerative diseases and also highlight the link between degradation and cell-to-cell transfer. To restore or enhance the degradative systems would be an interesting avenue to treat neurodegenerative diseases. Another way would be to inhibit the transfer of misfolded protein aggregates. By using the HTS model we developed, a candidate substance with good inhibitory effect on transfer can hopefully be found.

    List of papers
    1. Spreading of Amyloid-β Peptides via Neuritic Cell-to-cell Transfer Is Dependent on Insufficient Cellular Clearance
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spreading of Amyloid-β Peptides via Neuritic Cell-to-cell Transfer Is Dependent on Insufficient Cellular Clearance
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: Neurobiology of Disease, ISSN 0969-9961, E-ISSN 1095-953X, Vol. 65, p. 82-92Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The spreading of pathology through neuronal pathways is likely to be the cause of the progressive cognitive loss observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative diseases. We have recently shown the propagation of AD pathology via cell-to-cell transfer of oligomeric amyloid beta (Aβ) residues 1-42 (oAβ1-42) using our donor-acceptor 3-D co-culture model. We now show that different Aβ-isoforms (fluorescently labeled 1-42, 3(pE)-40, 1-40 and 11-42 oligomers) can transfer from one cell to another. Thus, transfer is not restricted to a specific Aβ-isoform. Although different Aβ isoforms can transfer, differences in the capacity to clear and/or degrade these aggregated isoforms result in vast differences in the net amounts ending up in the receiving cells and the net remaining Aβ can cause seeding and pathology in the receiving cells. This insufficient clearance and/or degradation by cells creates sizable intracellular accumulations of the aggregation-prone Aβ1-42 isoform, which further promotes cell-to-cell transfer; thus, oAβ1-42 is a potentially toxic isoform. Furthermore, cell-to-cell transfer is shown to be an early event that is seemingly independent of later appearances of cellular toxicity. This phenomenon could explain how seeds for the AD pathology could pass on to new brain areas and gradually induce AD pathology, even before the first cell starts to deteriorate, and how cell-to-cell transfer can act together with the factors that influence cellular clearance and/or degradation in the development of AD.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2014
    Keywords
    Alzheimer's disease, Amyloid-β oligomers, Cell-to-cell transfer, Intracellular accumulation, Prion-like propagation
    National Category
    Cell Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-103179 (URN)10.1016/j.nbd.2013.12.019 (DOI)000333546300008 ()24412310 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2014-01-14 Created: 2014-01-14 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    2. Proteasome Inhibition Induces Stress Kinase Dependent Transport Deficits – Implications for Alzheimer’s Disease
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Proteasome Inhibition Induces Stress Kinase Dependent Transport Deficits – Implications for Alzheimer’s Disease
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    2014 (English)In: Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, ISSN 1044-7431, E-ISSN 1095-9327, Vol. 58, p. 29-39Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by accumulation of two misfolded and aggregated proteins, β-amyloid and hyperphosphorylated tau. Both cellular systems responsible for clearance of misfolded and aggregated proteins, the lysosomal and the proteasomal, have been shown to be malfunctioning in the aged brain and more so in AD patients. This malfunction could be the cause of β-amyloid and tau accumulation, eventually aggregating in plaques and tangles. We have investigated how decreased proteasome activity affects AD related pathophysiological changes of microtubule transport and stability, as well as tau phosphorylation. To do this, we used our recently developed neuronal model where human SH-SY5Y cells obtain neuronal morphology and function through differentiation. We found that exposure to low doses of the proteasome inhibitor MG-115 caused disturbed neuritic transport, together with microtubule destabilization and tau phosphorylation. Furthermore, reduced proteasome activity activated several kinases implicated in AD pathology, including JNK, c-Jun and ERK 1/2. Restoration of the microtubule transport was achieved by inhibiting ERK 1/2 activation, and simultaneous inhibition of both ERK 1/2 and c-Jun reversed the proteasome inhibition-induced tau phosphorylation. Taken together, this study suggests that a decrease in proteasome activity can, through activation of c-Jun and ERK 1/2, result in several events contributing to AD pathology. Restoring proteasome function or inhibiting ERK 1/2 and c-Jun could therefore be used as novel treatments against AD.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2014
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-81339 (URN)10.1016/j.mcn.2013.11.001 (DOI)000331853600004 ()
    Available from: 2012-09-12 Created: 2012-09-12 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    3. Aggregated Alpha-Synuclein Transfer Efficiently between Cultured Human Neuron-Like Cells and Localize to Lysosomes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aggregated Alpha-Synuclein Transfer Efficiently between Cultured Human Neuron-Like Cells and Localize to Lysosomes
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    2016 (English)In: PLOS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 12, article id e0168700Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Parkinsons disease and other alpha-synucleinopathies are progressive neurodegenerative diseases characterized by aggregates of misfolded alpha-synuclein spreading throughout the brain. Recent evidence suggests that the pathological progression is likely due to neuron-to-neuron transfer of these aggregates between neuroanatomically connected areas of the brain. As the impact of this pathological spreading mechanism is currently debated, we aimed to investigate the transfer and subcellular location of alpha-synuclein species in a novel 3D co-culture human cell model based on highly differentiated SH-SY5Y cells. Fluorescently-labeled monomeric, oligomeric and fibrillar species of alpha-synuclein were introduced into a donor cell population and co-cultured with an EGFP-expressing acceptor-cell population of differentiated neuron-like cells. Subsequent transfer and colocalization of the different species were determined with confocal microscopy. We could confirm cell-to-cell transfer of all three alpha-synuclein species investigated. Interestingly the level of transferred oligomers and fibrils and oligomers were significantly higher than monomers, which could affect the probability of seeding and pathology in the recipient cells. Most alpha-synuclein colocalized with the lysosomal/endosomal system, both pre- and postsynaptically, suggesting its importance in the processing and spreading of alpha-synuclein.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 2016
    National Category
    Neurosciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-134306 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0168700 (DOI)000391222000063 ()28030591 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [MH: 523-2013-2735]; Swedish Brain Power Program; Research Foundation of the Swedish Parkinsons Disease Association; Ostergotland Research Foundation for Parkinsons Disease; Parkinson Research Foundation; Hans-Gabriel and Alice Trolle-Wachtmeister Foundation for Medical Research; Gustav V and Queen Victorias Foundation; Swedish Dementia Foundation; Linkoping University Neurobiology Centre; County Council of Ostergotland; Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation

    Available from: 2017-02-06 Created: 2017-02-03 Last updated: 2018-01-13
  • 200.
    Domert, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sackmann, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Severinsson, Emelie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Agholme, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bergstrom, Joakim
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Ingelsson, Martin
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Aggregated Alpha-Synuclein Transfer Efficiently between Cultured Human Neuron-Like Cells and Localize to Lysosomes2016In: PLOS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 12, article id e0168700Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parkinsons disease and other alpha-synucleinopathies are progressive neurodegenerative diseases characterized by aggregates of misfolded alpha-synuclein spreading throughout the brain. Recent evidence suggests that the pathological progression is likely due to neuron-to-neuron transfer of these aggregates between neuroanatomically connected areas of the brain. As the impact of this pathological spreading mechanism is currently debated, we aimed to investigate the transfer and subcellular location of alpha-synuclein species in a novel 3D co-culture human cell model based on highly differentiated SH-SY5Y cells. Fluorescently-labeled monomeric, oligomeric and fibrillar species of alpha-synuclein were introduced into a donor cell population and co-cultured with an EGFP-expressing acceptor-cell population of differentiated neuron-like cells. Subsequent transfer and colocalization of the different species were determined with confocal microscopy. We could confirm cell-to-cell transfer of all three alpha-synuclein species investigated. Interestingly the level of transferred oligomers and fibrils and oligomers were significantly higher than monomers, which could affect the probability of seeding and pathology in the recipient cells. Most alpha-synuclein colocalized with the lysosomal/endosomal system, both pre- and postsynaptically, suggesting its importance in the processing and spreading of alpha-synuclein.

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