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  • 151.
    Alabas, Oras A.
    et al.
    University of Leeds, England.
    Gale, Chris P.
    University of Leeds, England; York Teaching Hospital NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Hall, Marlous
    University of Leeds, England.
    Rutherford, Mark J.
    University of Leicester, England.
    Szummer, Karolina
    Department Med, Sweden.
    Sederholm Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sex Differences in Treatments, Relative Survival, and Excess Mortality Following Acute Myocardial Infarction: National Cohort Study Using the SWEDEHEART Registry2017In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 6, no 12, article id e007123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background-This study assessed sex differences in treatments, all-cause mortality, relative survival, and excess mortality following acute myocardial infarction. Methods and Results-A population-based cohort of all hospitals providing acute myocardial infarction care in Sweden (SWEDEHEART [Swedish Web System for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-Based Care in Heart Disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies]) from 2003 to 2013 was included in the analysis. Excess mortality rate ratios (EMRRs), adjusted for clinical characteristics and guideline-indicated treatments after matching by age, sex, and year to background mortality data, were estimated. Although there were no sex differences in all-cause mortality adjusted for age, year of hospitalization, and comorbidities for ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non-STEMI at 1 year (mortality rate ratio: 1.01 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.96-1.05] and 0.97 [95% CI, 0.95-.99], respectively) and 5 years (mortality rate ratio: 1.03 [95% CI, 0.99-1.07] and 0.97 [95% CI, 0.95-.99], respectively), excess mortality was higher among women compared with men for STEMI and non-STEMI at 1 year (EMRR: 1.89 [95% CI, 1.66-2.16] and 1.20 [95% CI, 1.16-1.24], respectively) and 5 years (EMRR: 1.60 [95% CI, 1.48-1.72] and 1.26 [95% CI, 1.21-1.32], respectively). After further adjustment for the use of guideline-indicated treatments, excess mortality among women with non-STEMI was not significant at 1 year (EMRR: 1.01 [95% CI, 0.97-1.04]) and slightly higher at 5 years (EMRR: 1.07 [95% CI, 1.02-1.12]). For STEMI, adjustment for treatments attenuated the excess mortality for women at 1 year (EMRR: 1.43 [95% CI, 1.26-1.62]) and 5 years (EMRR: 1.31 [95% CI, 1.19-1.43]). Conclusions-Women with acute myocardial infarction did not have statistically different all-cause mortality, but had higher excess mortality compared with men that was attenuated after adjustment for the use of guideline-indicated treatments. This suggests that improved adherence to guideline recommendations for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction may reduce premature cardiovascular death among women.

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  • 152.
    Al-Amiry, Bariq
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Pantelakis, Georgios
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Mahmood, Sarwar
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Kadum, Bakir
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Brismar, Torkel B.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Sayed-Noor, Arkan S.
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Does body mass index affect restoration of femoral offset, leg length and cup positioning after total hip arthroplasty?: A prospective cohort study2019In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, BMC MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 422Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    In obese patients, total hip arthroplasty (THA) can be technically demanding with increased perioperative risks. The aim of this prospective cohort study is to evaluate the effect of body mass index (BMI) on radiological restoration of femoral offset (FO) and leg length as well as acetabular cup positioning.

    Methods

    In this prospective study, patients with unilateral primary osteoarthritis (OA) treated with THA between September 2010 and December 2013 were considered for inclusion. The perioperative plain radiographs were standardised and used to measure the preoperative degree of hip osteoarthritis, postoperative FO, leg length discrepancy (LLD), acetabular component inclination and anteversion.

    Results

    We included 213 patients (74.5% of those considered for inclusion) with a mean BMI of 27.7 (SD 4.5) in the final analysis. The postoperative FO was improper in 55% and the LLD in 15%, while the cup inclination and anteversion were improper in 13 and 23% of patients respectively. A multivariable logistic regression model identified BMI as the only factor that affected LLD. Increased BMI increased the risk of LLD (OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.25). No other factors included in the model affected any of the primary or secondary outcomes.

    Conclusion

    Increased BMI showed a negative effect on restoration of post-THA leg length but not on restoration of FO or positioning of the acetabular cup. Age, gender, OA duration or radiological severity and surgeon’s experience showed no relation to post-THA restoration of FO, leg length or cup positioning.

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  • 153.
    Alarcon, E I
    et al.
    Bio-nanomaterials Chemistry and Engineering Laboratory, Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Rm H5229, Ottawa, Canada.
    Vulesevic, B
    Bio-nanomaterials Chemistry and Engineering Laboratory, Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Rm H5229, Ottawa, Canada.
    Argawal, A
    Bio-nanomaterials Chemistry and Engineering Laboratory, Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Rm H5229, Ottawa, Canada.
    Ross, A
    Bio-nanomaterials Chemistry and Engineering Laboratory, Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Rm H5229, Ottawa, Canada.
    Bejjani, P
    Bio-nanomaterials Chemistry and Engineering Laboratory, Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Rm H5229, Ottawa, Canada.
    Podrebarac, J
    Bio-nanomaterials Chemistry and Engineering Laboratory, Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Rm H5229, Ottawa, Canada.
    Ravichandran, Ranjithkumar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Phopase, Jaywant
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Suuronen, E J
    Bio-nanomaterials Chemistry and Engineering Laboratory, Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Rm H5229, Ottawa, Canada.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Coloured cornea replacements with anti-infective properties: expanding the safe use of silver nanoparticles in regenerative medicine.2016In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 8, no 12, p. 6484-6489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the broad anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory properties of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), their use in bioengineered corneal replacements or bandage contact lenses has been hindered due to their intense yellow coloration. In this communication, we report the development of a new strategy to pre-stabilize and incorporate AgNPs with different colours into collagen matrices for fabrication of corneal implants and lenses, and assessed their in vitro and in vivo activity.

  • 154.
    Alarcon, Emilio I.
    et al.
    University of Ottawa, Canada; University of Ottawa, Canada; University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Udekwu, Klas I.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Noel, Christopher W.
    University of Ottawa, Canada; .
    Gagnon, Luke B. -P.
    University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Taylor, Patrick K.
    University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Vulesevic, Branka
    University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Simpson, Madeline J.
    University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Gkotzis, Spyridon
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Islam, Mohammed Mirazul
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lee, Chyan-Jang
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Mah, Thien-Fah
    University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Suuronen, Erik J.
    University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Scaiano, Juan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Safety and efficacy of composite collagen-silver nanoparticle hydrogels as tissue engineering scaffolds2015In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 7, no 44, p. 18789-18798Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing number of multidrug resistant bacteria has revitalized interest in seeking alternative sources for controlling bacterial infection. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), are amongst the most promising candidates due to their wide microbial spectrum of action. In this work, we report on the safety and efficacy of the incorporation of collagen coated AgNPs into collagen hydrogels for tissue engineering. The resulting hybrid materials at [AgNPs] less than0.4 mu M retained the mechanical properties and biocompatibility for primary human skin fibroblasts and keratinocytes of collagen hydrogels; they also displayed remarkable anti-infective properties against S. aureus, S. epidermidis, E. coli and P. aeruginosa at considerably lower concentrations than silver nitrate. Further, subcutaneous implants of materials containing 0.2 mu M AgNPs in mice showed a reduction in the levels of IL-6 and other inflammation markers (CCL24, sTNFR-2, and TIMP1). Finally, an analysis of silver contents in implanted mice showed that silver accumulation primarily occurred within the tissue surrounding the implant.

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  • 155.
    Albertsson-Wikland, Kerstin
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, Anton
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Stat Konsultgrp, Sweden.
    Savendahl, Lars
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Niklasson, Aimon
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bang, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahlgren, Jovanna
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Kriström, Berit
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Norgren, Svante
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Pehrsson, Nils-Gunnar
    Stat Konsultgrp, Sweden.
    Oden, Anders
    Stat Konsultgrp, Sweden; Chalmers, Sweden.
    Mortality Is Not Increased in Recombinant Human Growth Hormone-treated Patients When Adjusting for Birth Characteristics2016In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 101, no 5, p. 2149-2159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate whether reported high mortality in childhood recombinant human GH (rhGH)-treated patients was related to birth-characteristics and/or rhGH treatment. Design and Setting: We sought to develop a mortality model of the Swedish general population born between 1973 and 2010, using continuous-hazard functions adjusting for birth characteristics, sex, age intervals, and calendar year to estimate standardized mortality ratio (SMR) and to apply this model to assess expected deaths in Swedish rhGH-treated patients with idiopathic isolated GH deficiency (IGHD), idiopathic short stature (155) or born small for gestational age (SGA). Participants:The general population: Swedish Medical Birth Register (1973-2010: 1 880 668 males; 1 781 131 females) and Cause of Death Register (1985-2010). Intervention Population: Three thousand eight hundred forty-seven patients starting rhGH treatment between 1985 and 2010 and followed in the National GH Register and/or in rhGH trials diagnosed with IGHD (n = 1890), ISS (n = 975), or SGA (n=982). Main Outcome Measures: Death. Results: Using conventional models adjusting for age, sex, and calendar-year, the SMR was 1.43 (95% confidence interval, 0.89-2.19), P = .14, observed/expected deaths 21/14.68. The rhGH population differed (P amp;lt; .001) from the general population regarding birth weight, birth length, and congenital malformations. Application of an Advanced Model: When applying the developed mortality model of the general population, the ratio of observed/expected deaths in rhGH-treated patients was 21/21.99; SMR = 0.955 (0.591-1.456)P = .95. Model Comparison: Expected number of deaths were 14.68 (14.35-14.96) using the conventional model, and 21.99 (21.24-22.81) using the advanced model, P amp;lt; .001, which had at all ages a higher gradient of risk per SD of the model, 24% (range, 18-42%; P amp;lt; .001). Conclusions: Compared with the general Swedish population, the ratio of observed/expected deaths (21/21.99) was not increased in childhood rhGH-treated IGHD, ISS, and SGA patients when applying an advanced sex-specific mortality model adjusting for birth characteristics.

  • 156.
    Albinsson-Stenholm, Erina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bergsen, Johannes
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ingues, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Vilhelmsson, Nathalie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Guldbrand, Hans
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, "Primary Health Care in Motala". Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Cityhälsan Centrum, Norrköping.
    Subjects with high fasting insulin also have higher postprandial GLP-1 and glucagon levels than controls with lower insulin2019In: Nutrition Research, ISSN 0271-5317, E-ISSN 1879-0739, Vol. 72, p. 111-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about postprandial release of serum ghrelin, glucagon, and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) in relation with differing fasting insulin levels. We hypothesized that these hormones are affected by insulin resistance, and hence, we compared different postprandial responses of GLP-1, glucagon, and ghrelin in subjects with relatively high (RHI) or relatively low (RLI) fasting insulin levels. The trial was a randomized crossover study with 4 different meal conditions. Fourteen nonobese or obese, healthy, men and 14 women were randomly assigned to the order of supervised intake of a 750 kcal drink with the same protein contents but with 20 energy-percent (E%) or 55 E% from carbohydrates, and the remaining energy from fat. Participants were also randomized to consume the drinks as 1 large beverage or as five 150-kcal portions every 30 minutes. The 28 subjects were divided into 2 equally sized groups based on fasting insulin levels. Statistics were done with general linear mixed model. Fasting insulin levels were 3-fold higher in the group with RHI compared with the RLI group (RHI: 1004 +/- 510 pg/mL, RLI: 324 +/- 123 pg/mL, P amp;lt; .0005). Serum GLP-1 was highest in the RHI group after both single meals and after 5 drinks and following high- and low-carbohydrate meals (both P amp;lt;= .002), and this was the case also for glucagon levels (both P amp;lt;= .018), whereas ghrelin levels did not differ between groups. Thus, subjects with RHI displayed both higher postprandial serum GLP-1 and glucagon than the participants with RLI, suggesting that glucagon could play a role in the advent of dysglycemia by insulin resistance. (C) 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-10-27 15:08
  • 157.
    Albonico, Andrea
    et al.
    Human Vision and Eye Movement Laboratory, Departments of Medicine (Neurology), Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
    Furubacke, Amanda
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Human Vision and Eye Movement Laboratory, Departments of Medicine (Neurology), Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
    Barton, Jason J. S.
    Human Vision and Eye Movement Laboratory, Departments of Medicine (Neurology), Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
    Oruc, Ipek
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of British Columbia, Canada; Program in Neuroscience, University of British Columbia, Canada.
    Perceptual efficiency and the inversion effect for faces, words and houses2018In: Vision Research, ISSN 0042-6989, E-ISSN 1878-5646, Vol. 153, p. 91-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Face and visual word recognition are two key forms of expert visual processing. In the domain of object recognition, it has been suggested that expert processing is characterized by the use of different mechanisms from the ones involved in general object recognition. It has been suggested that one traditional marker of expert processing is the inversion effect. To investigate whether face and word recognition differ from general object recognition, we compared the effect of inversion on the perceptual efficiency of face and visual word recognition as well as on the recognition of a third, non-expert object category, houses. From the comparison of identification contrast thresholds to an ideal observer, we derived the efficiency and equivalent input noise of stimulus processing in both upright and inverted orientations. While efficiency reflects the efficacy in sampling the available information, equivalent input noise is associated with the degradation of the stimulus signal within the visual system. We hypothesized that large inversion effects for efficiency and/or equivalent input noise should characterize expert high-level processes, and asked whether this would be true for both faces and words, but not houses. However, we found that while face recognition efficiency was profoundly reduced by inversion, the efficiency of word and house recognition was minimally influenced by the orientation manipulation. Inversion did not affect equivalent input noise. These results suggest that even though faces and words are both considered expert processes, only the efficiency of the mechanism involved in face recognition is sensitive to orientation.

  • 158.
    Albrecht, Inka
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Wick, Cecilia
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hallgren, Asa
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Tjarnlund, Anna
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Nagaraju, Kanneboyina
    Childrens National Medical Centre, DC 20010 USA.
    Andrade, Felipe
    Johns Hopkins University, MD 21205 USA.
    Thompson, Kathryn
    Childrens National Medical Centre, DC 20010 USA.
    Coley, William
    Childrens National Medical Centre, DC 20010 USA.
    Phadke, Aditi
    Childrens National Medical Centre, DC 20010 USA.
    Diaz-Gallo, Lina-Marcela
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bottai, Matteo
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Nennesmo, Inger
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Chemin, Karine
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Herrath, Jessica
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Johansson, Karin
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Wikberg, Anders
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Jimmy Ytterberg, A.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Zubarev, Roman A.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Krystufkova, Olga
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic; Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic.
    Vencovsky, Jiri
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic; Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic.
    Landegren, Nils
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Wahren-Herlenius, Marie
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Padyukov, Leonid
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Kampe, Olle
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Ingrid E.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Development of autoantibodies against muscle-specific FHL1 in severe inflammatory myopathies2015In: Journal of Clinical Investigation, ISSN 0021-9738, E-ISSN 1558-8238, Vol. 125, no 12, p. 4612-4624Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mutations of the gene encoding four-and-a-half LIM domain 1 (FHL1) are the causative factor of several X-linked hereditary myopathies that are collectively termed FHL1-related myopathies. These disorders are characterized by severe muscle dysfunction and damage. Here, we have shown that patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs) develop autoimmunity to FHL1, which is a muscle-specific protein. Anti-FHL1 autoantibodies were detected in 25% of IIM patients, while patients with other autoimmune diseases or muscular dystrophies were largely anti-FHL1 negative. Anti-FHL1 reactivity was predictive for muscle atrophy, dysphagia, pronounced muscle fiber damage, and vasculitis. FHL1 showed an altered expression pattern, with focal accumulation in the muscle fibers of autoantibody-positive patients compared with a homogeneous expression in anti-FHL1-negative patients and healthy controls. We determined that FHL1 is a target of the cytotoxic protease granzyme B, indicating that the generation of FHL1 fragments may initiate FHL1 autoimmunity. Moreover, immunization of myositis-prone mice with FHL1 aggravated muscle weakness and increased mortality, suggesting a direct link between anti-FHL1 responses and muscle damage. Together, our findings provide evidence that FHL1 may be involved in the pathogenesis not only of genetic FHL1-related myopathies but also of autoimmune IIM. Importantly, these results indicate that anti-FHL1 autoantibodies in peripheral blood have promising potential as a biomarker to identify a subset of severe IIM.

  • 159.
    Al-Chalabi, Ammar
    et al.
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Andersen, Peter M.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Chandran, Siddharthan
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Chio, Adriano
    University of Torino, Italy.
    Corcia, Philippe
    CHU Tours, France.
    Couratier, Philippe
    CHU Limoges, France.
    Danielsson, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    de Carvalho, Mamede
    University of Lisbon, Portugal; H Santa Maria CHLN, Portugal.
    Desnuelle, Claude
    CHU Nice, France.
    Grehl, Torsten
    Alfried Krupp Hospital, Germany.
    Grosskreutz, Julian
    Jena University Hospital, Germany.
    Holmoy, Trygve
    Kershus University of Lorenskog, Norway.
    Ingre, Caroline
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Karlsborg, Merete
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Denmark.
    Kleveland, Grethe
    Sykehuset Innlandet, Norway.
    Christoph Koch, Jan
    University of Medical Gottingen, Germany.
    Koritnik, Blaz
    University of Medical Centre Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    KuzmaKozakiewicz, Magdalena
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Laaksovirta, Hannu
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Ludolph, Albert
    University of Ulm, Germany.
    McDermott, Christopher
    University of Sheffield, England.
    Meyer, Thomas
    University of Medical Berlin, Germany.
    Mitre Ropero, Bernardo
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Mora Pardina, Jesus
    Hospital San Rafael, Spain.
    Nygren, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Petri, Susanne
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany.
    Povedano Panades, Monica
    University of Bellvitge, Spain.
    Salachas, Francois
    Hop Salptriere, France.
    Shaw, Pamela
    University of Sheffield, England.
    Silani, Vincenzo
    University of Milan, Italy; University of Milan, Italy.
    Staaf, Gert
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Svenstrup, Kirsten
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Denmark.
    Talbot, Kevin
    University of Oxford, England.
    Tysnes, Ole-Bjorn
    Haukeland University of Sjukehus, Norway.
    Van Damme, Philip
    University of Leuven, Belgium; VIB Centre Brain and Disease Research, Belgium; University Hospital Leuven, Belgium.
    van der Kooi, Anneke
    University of Amsterdam Centre, Netherlands.
    Weber, Markus
    Kantonssp St Gallen, Switzerland.
    Weydt, Patrick
    University of Bonn, Germany.
    Wolf, Joachim
    Diakonissen Hospital, Germany.
    Hardiman, Orla
    Trinity Coll Dublin, Ireland.
    van den Berg, Leonard H.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    July 2017 ENCALS statement on edaravone2017In: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Degeneration, ISSN 2167-8421, E-ISSN 2167-9223, Vol. 18, no 7-8, p. 471-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 160.
    Al-Dury, Nooraldeen
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Rawshani, Araz
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Israelsson, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden; Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Stromsoe, Anneli
    School Health Care and Social Welf, Sweden.
    Aune, Solveig
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Agerstrom, Jens
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ravn-Fischer, Annica
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden; University of Boras, Sweden.
    Characteristics and outcome among 14,933 adult cases of in-hospital cardiac arrest: A nationwide study with the emphasis on gender and age2017In: American Journal of Emergency Medicine, ISSN 0735-6757, E-ISSN 1532-8171, Vol. 35, no 12, p. 1839-1844Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To investigate characteristics and outcome among patients suffering in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) with the emphasis on gender and age. Methods: Using the Swedish Register of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, we analyzed associations between gender, age and co-morbidities, etiology, management, 30-day survival and cerebral function among survivors in 14,933 cases of IHCA. Age was divided into three ordered categories: young (18-49 years), middle-aged (5064 years) and older (65 years and above). Comparisons between men and women were age adjusted. Results: The mean age was 72.7 years and women were significantly older than men. Renal dysfunction was the most prevalent co-morbidity. Myocardial infarction/ischemia was the most common condition preceding IHCA, with men having 27% higher odds of having MI as the underlying etiology. A shockable rhythm was found in 31.8% of patients, with men having 52% higher odds of being found in VT/VF. After adjusting for various confounders, it was found that men had a 10% lower chance than women of surviving to 30 days. Older individuals were managed less aggressively than younger patients. Increasing age was associated with lower 30-day survival but not with poorer cerebral function among survivors. Conclusion: When adjusting for various confounders, it was found that men had a 10% lower chance than women of surviving to 30 days after in-hospital cardiac arrest. Older individuals were managed less aggressively than younger patients, despite a lower chance of survival. Higher age was, however, not associated with poorer cerebral function among survivors. (C) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 161.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Aaseth, Jan
    Innlandet Hosp Trust, Norway; Inland Norway Univ Appl Sci, Norway.
    Alexander, Jan
    Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Norway.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Still reduced cardiovascular mortality 12 years after supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10 for four years: A validation of previous 10-year follow-up results of a prospective randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial in elderly2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 4, article id e0193120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Selenium and coenzyme Q10 are both necessary for optimal cell function in the body. The intake of selenium is low in Europe, and the endogenous production of coenzyme Q10 decreases as age increases. Therefore, an intervention trial using selenium and coenzyme Q10 for four years as a dietary supplement was performed. The main publication reported reduced cardiovascular mortality as a result of the intervention. In the present sub-study the objective was to determine whether reduced cardiovascular (CV) mortality persisted after 12 years, in the supplemented population or in subgroups with diabetes, hypertension, ischemic heart disease or reduced functional capacity due to impaired cardiac function. Methods From a rural municipality in Sweden, four hundred forty-three healthy elderly individuals were included. All cardiovascular mortality was registered, and no participant was lost to the follow-up. Based on death certificates and autopsy results, mortality was registered. Findings After 12 years a significantly reduced CV mortality could be seen in those supplemented with selenium and coenzyme Q10, with a CV mortality of 28.1% in the active treatment group, and 38.7% in the placebo group. A multivariate Cox regression analysis demonstrated a reduced CV mortality risk in the active treatment group (HR: 0.59; 95% CI 0.42-0.81; P = 0.001). In those with ischemic heart disease, diabetes, hypertension and impaired functional capacity we demonstrated a significantly reduced CV mortality risk. Conclusions This is a 12-year follow-up of a group of healthy elderly participants that were supplemented with selenium and coenzyme Q10 for four years. Even after twelve years we observed a significantly reduced risk for CV mortality in this group, as well as in subgroups of patients with diabetes, hypertension, ischemic heart disease or impaired functional capacity. The results thus validate the results obtained in the 10-year evaluation. The protective action was not confined to the intervention period, but persisted during the follow-up period. The mechanisms behind this effect remain to be fully elucidated, although various effects on cardiac function, oxidative stress, fibrosis and inflammation have previously been identified. Since this was a small study, the observations should be regarded as hypothesis-generating.

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  • 162.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Aaseth, Jan
    Innlandet Hosp, Norway; Hedmark Univ Coll, Norway.
    Alexander, Jan
    Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Norway.
    Svensson, Erland
    Swedish Def Res Agcy, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Less fibrosis in elderly subjects supplemented with selenium and coenzyme Q10A mechanism behind reduced cardiovascular mortality?2018In: Biofactors, ISSN 0951-6433, E-ISSN 1872-8081, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 137-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In an intervention study where 221 healthy elderly persons received selenium and coenzyme Q10 as a dietary supplement, and 222 received placebo for 4 years we observed improved cardiac function and reduced cardiovascular mortality. As fibrosis is central in the aging process, we investigated the effect of the intervention on biomarkers of fibrogenic activity in a subanalysis of this intervention study. Material and Methods: In the present subanalysis 122 actively treated individuals and 101 controls, the effect of the treatment on eight biomarkers of fibrogenic activity were assessed. These biomarkers were: Cathepsin S, Endostatin, Galectin 3, Growth Differentiation Factor-15 (GDF-15), Matrix Metalloproteinases 1 and 9, Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP 1) and Suppression of Tumorigenicity 2 (ST-2). Blood concentrations of these biomarkers after 6 and 42 months were analyzed by the use of T-tests, repeated measures of variance, and factor analyses. Results: Compared with placebo, in those receiving supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10, all biomarkers except ST2 showed significant decreased concentrations in blood. The changes in concentrations, that is, effects sizes as given by partial eta(2) caused by the intervention were considered small to medium. Conclusion: The significantly decreased biomarker concentrations in those on active treatment with selenium and coenzyme Q10 compared with those on placebo after 36 months of intervention presumably reflect less fibrogenic activity as a result of the intervention. These observations might indicate that reduced fibrosis precedes the reported improvement in cardiac function, thereby explaining some of the positive clinical effects caused by the intervention. (c) 2017 BioFactors, 44(2):137-147, 2018

  • 163.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Aaseth, Jan
    Research Department, Innlandet Hospital Trust and Hedmark University College, Norway.
    Johansson, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Less increase of copeptin and MR-proADM due to intervention with selenium and coenzyme Q10 combined: Results from a 4-year prospective randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial among elderly Swedish citizens.2015In: Biofactors, ISSN 0951-6433, E-ISSN 1872-8081, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 443-452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intervention with selenium and coenzyme Q10 have recently been found to reduce mortality and increase cardiac function. The mechanisms behind these effects are unclear. As selenium and coenzyme Q10 is involved in the anti-oxidative defence, the present study aimed to evaluate effects of selenium and coenzyme Q10 on copeptin and adrenomedullin as oxidative stress biomarkers. Therefore 437 elderly individuals were included and given intervention for 4 years. Clinical examination and blood samples were undertaken at start and after 18 and 48 months. Evaluations of copeptin and MR-proADM changes were performed using repeated measures of variance. Cardiovascular mortality was evaluated using a 10-year-period of follow-up, and presented in Kaplan-Meier plots. A significant increase in copeptin level could be seen in the placebo group during the intervention period (from 9.4 pmol/L to 15.3 pmol/L), compared to the active treatment group. The difference between the groups was confirmed in the repeated measurement of variance analyses (P = 0.031) with less copeptin increase in the active treatment group. Furthermore, active treatment appeared to protect against cardiovascular death both in those with high and with low copeptin levels at inclusion. Less increase of MR-proADM could also be seen during the intervention in the active treatment group compared to controls (P=0.026). Both in those having an MR-proADM level above or below median level, significantly less cardiovascular mortality could be seen in the active treatment group (P=0.0001, and P=0.04 respectively). In conclusion supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10 during four years resulted in less concentration of both copeptin and MR-proADM. A cardioprotective effect of the supplementation was registered, irrespective of the initial levels of these biomarkers, and this protection was recognized also after 10 years of observation. © 2015 BioFactors, 41(6):443-452, 2015.

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  • 164.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Aaseth, Jan
    Innlandet Hospital Trust, Norway; Hedmark University of Coll, Norway.
    Johansson, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Reduced Cardiovascular Mortality 10 Years after Supplementation with Selenium and Coenzyme Q10 for Four Years: Follow-Up Results of a Prospective Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Trial in Elderly Citizens2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 12, p. e0141641-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Selenium and coenzyme Q10 are important antioxidants in the body. As the intake of selenium is low in Europe, and the endogenous production of coenzyme Q10 decreases as age increases, an intervention trial using selenium and coenzyme Q10 for four years was performed. As previously reported, the intervention was accompanied by reduced cardiovascular mortality. The objective of the present study was to analyze cardiovascular mortality for up to 10 years after intervention, to evaluate if mortality differed in subgroups differentiated by gender, diabetes, ischemic heart disease (IHD), and functional class. Methods Four-hundred forty-three healthy elderly individuals were included from a rural municipality in Sweden. All cardiovascular mortality was registered, and no participant was lost to the follow-up. Based on death certificates and autopsy results mortality was registered. Findings Significantly reduced cardiovascular mortality could be seen in those on selenium and coenzyme Q10 intervention. A multivariate Cox regression analysis demonstrated a reduced cardiovascular mortality risk in the active treatment group (HR: 0.51; 95% CI 0.36-0.74; P = 0.0003). The reduced mortality could be seen to persist during the 10-year period. Subgroup analysis showed positive effects in both genders. An equally positive risk reduction could be seen in those with ischemic heart disease (HR: 0.51; 95% CI 0.27-0.97; P = 0.04), but also in the different functional classes. Conclusions In a 10-year follow-up of a group of healthy elderly participants given four years of intervention with selenium and coenzyme Q10, significantly reduced cardiovascular mortality was observed. The protective action was not confined to the intervention period, but persisted during the follow-up period. The mechanism explaining the persistency remains to be elucidated. Since this was a small study, the observations should be regarded as hypothesis-generating.

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  • 165.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alexander, J.
    Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Norway.
    Aaseth, J.
    Innlandet Hosp Trust, Norway.
    Larsson, A.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Significant decrease of von Willebrand factor and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 by providing supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10 to an elderly population with a low selenium status2020In: European Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 1436-6207, E-ISSN 1436-6215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Endothelial dysfunction and inflammation are conditions which fuel atherosclerosis and ischaemic heart disease. We have previously reported reduced cardiovascular (CV) mortality following supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10 to 443 elderly individuals with low selenium status (mean 67 mu g/L) for 4 years. Here, we wanted to evaluate a possible association between the supplementation and the plasma concentrations of the von Willebrand factor (vWf), and the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), as they, besides other functions, are also strongly associated with endothelial function. Methods In this sub-study, 308 individuals (active substance: 157, placebo: 151) were included. Blood samples were drawn after 6 and 36 months and vWf and PAI-1 were determined in plasma by ELISA. Changes in concentrations of the biomarkers were evaluated by the use of T tests, repeated measures of variance, and ANCOVA analyses. Results The active treatment group presented a lower level of vWf after 36 months compared with the placebo group (1.08 U/mL vs. 5.10 U/mL; p = 0.0007). The results were validated through the repeated measures of variance evaluation. The PAI-1 levels showed an equally significant decrease in the active group (26.2 ng/mL vs. 49.2 ng/mL; p = 0.0002) and were also validated through repeated measures of variance evaluation. Conclusion In this sub-study on elderly receiving selenium and coenzyme Q10, or placebo we found significantly lower levels of vWf and PAI-1 in the active treatment group as compared to the placebo group. We interpret this as a better endothelial function because of the intervention, which accords with a previous finding of reduced CV mortality.

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  • 166.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Alexander, Jan
    Norwegian Institute Public Heatlh, Norway; Norwegian University of Life Science NMBU, Norway.
    Aaseth, Jan
    Innlandet Hospital Trust, Norway; Hedmark University of Coll, Norway.
    Supplementation with Selenium and Coenzyme Q10 Reduces Cardiovascular Mortality in Elderly with Low Selenium Status. A Secondary Analysis of a Randomised Clinical Trial2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 7, article id e0157541Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Selenium is needed by all living cells in order to ensure the optimal function of several enzyme systems. However, the selenium content in the soil in Europe is generally low. Previous reports indicate that a dietary supplement of selenium could reduce cardiovascular disease but mainly in populations in low selenium areas. The objective of this secondary analysis of a previous randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial from our group was to determine whether the effects on cardiovascular mortality of supplementation with a fixed dose of selenium and coenzyme Q10 combined during a four-year intervention were dependent on the basal level of selenium. Methods In 668 healthy elderly individuals from a municipality in Sweden, serum selenium concentration was measured. Of these, 219 individuals received daily supplementation with selenium (200 mu g Se as selenized yeast) and coenzyme Q10 (200 mg) combined for four years. The remaining participants (n = 449) received either placebo (n = 222) or no treatment (n = 227). All cardiovascular mortality was registered. No participant was lost during a median follow-up of 5.2 years. Based on death certificates and autopsy results, all mortality was registered. Findings The mean serum selenium concentration among participants at baseline was low, 67.1 mu g/L. Based on the distribution of selenium concentration at baseline, the supplemented group was divided into three groups; amp;lt;65 mu g/L, 65-85 mu g/L, and amp;gt;85 mu g/L (45 and 90 percentiles) and the remaining participants were distributed accordingly. Among the non-treated participants, lower cardiovascular mortality was found in the high selenium group as compared with the low selenium group (13.0% vs. 24.1%; P = 0.04). In the group with the lowest selenium basal concentration, those receiving placebo or no supplementation had a mortality of 24.1%, while mortality was 12.1% in the group receiving the active substance, which was an absolute risk reduction of 12%. In the middle selenium concentration group a mortality of 14.0% in the non-treated group, and 6.0% in the actively treated group could be demonstrated; thus, there was an absolute risk reduction of 8.0%. In the group with a serum concentration of amp;gt;85 mu g/L, a cardiovascular mortality of 17.5% in the non-treated group, and 13.0% in the actively treated group was observed. No significant risk reduction by supplementation could thus be found in this group. Conclusions In this evaluation of healthy elderly Swedish municipality members, two important results could be reported. Firstly, a low mean serum selenium concentration, 67 mu g/L, was found among the participants, and the cardiovascular mortality was higher in the subgroup with the lower selenium concentrations amp;lt; 65 mu g/L in comparison with those having a selenium concentration amp;gt; 85 mu g/L. Secondly, supplementation was cardio-protective in those with a low selenium concentration, amp;lt;= 85 at inclusion. In those with serum seleniumamp;gt; 85 mu g/L and no apparent deficiency, there was no effect of supplementation. This is a small study, but it presents interesting data, and more research on the impact of lower selenium intake than recommended is therefore warranted.

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  • 167.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alexander, Jan
    Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Norway.
    Aaseth, Jan
    Innlandet Hosp Trust, Norway; Inland Norway Univ Appl Sci, Norway.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Decrease in inflammatory biomarker concentration by intervention with selenium and coenzyme Q10: a subanalysis of osteopontin, osteoprotergerin, TNFr1, TNFr2 and TWEAK2019In: Journal of Inflammation, ISSN 1476-9255, E-ISSN 1476-9255, Vol. 16, article id 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Inflammation is central to the pathogenesis of many diseases. Supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10 has been shown to reduce cardiovascular mortality, and increase cardiac function in elderly persons with a low intake of selenium. There are indications that one of the mechanisms of this positive effect is a decrease in inflammation. Methods: Osteopontin, osteoprotegerin, sTNF receptor 1, sTNF receptor 2 and the tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis called TWEAK, were determined in plasma after 6 months and 42months in 219 community-living elderly persons, of whom 119 received supplements of selenium (200g/day) and coenzyme Q10 (200mg/day), and 101 received a placebo. Repeated measures of variance were used to evaluate the levels, and the results were validated through ANCOVA analyses with adjustments for important covariates. Results: Significantly lower concentrations of four of the five biomarkers for inflammation were observed as a result of the intervention with the supplements. Only TWEAK did not show significant differences. Conclusion: In this sub-analysis of the intervention with selenium and coenzyme Q10 or placebo in an elderly community-living population, biomarkers for inflammation were evaluated. A significantly lower concentration in four of the five biomarkers tested could be demonstrated as a result of the supplementation, indicating a robust effect on the inflammatory system. The decrease in inflammation could be one of the mechanisms behind the positive clinical results on reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality reported earlier as a result of the intervention. The study is small and should be regarded as hypothesis-generating, but nonetheless adds important data about mechanisms presently known to increase the risk of clinical effects such as reduced cardiovascular mortality, increased cardiac function and better health-related quality of life scoring, as previously demonstrated in the active treatment group.

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  • 168.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Benson, Lina
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Edner, Magnus
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lund, Lars H.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Association Between Use of Statins and Mortality in Patients With Heart Failure and Ejection Fraction of greater than= 50%2015In: Circulation Heart Failure, ISSN 1941-3289, E-ISSN 1941-3297, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 862-870Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The pathophysiology of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction is poorly understood, but may involve a systemic proinflammatory state. Therefore, statins might improve outcomes in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction defined as 50%. Methods and Results Of 46 959 unique patients in the prospective Swedish Heart Failure Registry, 9140 patients had heart failure and ejection fraction 50% (age 7711 years, 54.0% women), and of these, 3427 (37.5%) were treated with statins. Propensity scores for statin treatment were derived from 40 baseline variables. The association between statin use and primary (all-cause mortality) and secondary (separately, cardiovascular mortality, and combined all-cause mortality or cardiovascular hospitalization) end points was assessed with Cox regressions in a population matched 1:1 based on age and propensity score. In the matched population, 1-year survival was 85.1% for statin-treated versus 80.9% for untreated patients (hazard ratio, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.72-0.89; Pless than0.001). Statins were also associated with reduced cardiovascular death (hazard ratio, 0.86; 95% confidence interval, 0.75-0.98; P=0.026) and composite all-cause mortality or cardiovascular hospitalization (hazard ratio, 0.89; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-0.96; P=0.003). Conclusions In heart failure with ejection fraction 50%, the use of statins was associated with improved outcomes. The mechanisms should be evaluated and the effects tested in a randomized trial.

  • 169.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Benson, Lina
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Edner, Magnus
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lund, Lars H.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Association Between Use of Statins and Outcomes in Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction Prospective Propensity Score Matched Cohort Study of 21 864 Patients in the Swedish Heart Failure Registry2015In: Circulation Heart Failure, ISSN 1941-3289, E-ISSN 1941-3297, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 252-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background-In heart failure (HF) with reduced ejection fraction, randomized trials of statins did not demonstrate improved outcomes. However, randomized trials may not always be generalizable. The aim was to determine whether statins are associated with improved outcomes in an unselected nationwide population of patients with HF with reduced ejection fraction overall and in relation to ischemic heart disease (IHD). Methods and Results-In the Swedish Heart Failure Registry, 21 864 patients with HF with reduced ejection fraction (age +/- SD, 72+/-12 years; 29% women), of whom 10 345 (47%) were treated with statins, were studied. Propensity scores for statin use were derived from 42 baseline variables. The associations between statin use and outcomes were assessed with Cox regressions in a population matched 1: 1 based on propensity score and age and in the overall population with adjustment for propensity score and age. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality; secondary outcomes were cardiovascular mortality; HF hospitalization; and combined all-cause mortality or cardiovascular hospitalization. Survival at 1 year in the matched population was 83% for statin-treated versus 79% for untreated patients (hazard ratio, 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.76-0.86; Pless than0.001). In the unmatched population, 1-year survival was 85% for statin-treated versus 79% for untreated patients, hazard ratio after adjustment for propensity score and age was 0.84 (95% confidence interval, 0.80-0.89; Pless than0.001). No examined baseline variables interacted with statin use except for IHD (P=0.001), with a hazard ratio of 0.76 (95% confidence interval, 0.70-0.82, Pless than0.001) with IHD and 0.95 (95% confidence interval, 0.85-1.07; P=0.430 without IHD. Statin use was also associated with reduced risk for all 3 secondary outcomes. Conclusions-In an unselected nationwide population of patients with HF with reduced ejection fraction, statins were associated with improved outcomes, specifically in the presence of IHD. This contrasts with previous randomized controlled trials. Additional randomized controlled trials with more generalized inclusion or focused on IHD may be warranted.

  • 170.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Aaseth, Jan
    Innlandet Hospital Trust, Norway; Hedmark University of Appl Science, Norway.
    Alexander, Jan
    Norwegian Institute Public Heatlh, Norway; Norwegian University of Life Science NMBU, Norway.
    Brismar, Kerstin
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Increase in insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 after supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10. A prospective randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial among elderly Swedish citizens2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 6, article id e0178614Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Insulin-like growth factor-1(IGF-1) has a multitude of effects besides cell growth and metabolism. Reports also indicate anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects. The concentrations of IGF-1 decrease with age and during inflammation. As selenium and coenzyme Q10 are involved in both the antioxidative defense and the inflammatory response, the present study aimed to examine the effects of supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10 on concentrations of IGF-1 and its binding protein IGFBP-1 in a population showing reduced cardiovascular mortality following such supplementation. Methods 215 elderly individuals were included and given the intervention for four years. A clinical examination was performed and blood samples were taken at the start and after 48 months. Evaluations of IGF-1, the age adjusted IGF-1 SD score and IGFBP-1 were performed using group mean values, and repeated measures of variance. Findings After supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10, applying group mean evaluations, significantly higher IGF-1 and IGF-1 SD scores could be seen in the active treatment group, whereas a decrease in concentration could be seen of the same biomarkers in the placebo group. Applying the repeated measures of variance evaluations, the same significant increase in concentrations of IGF-1 (F = 68; P amp;gt; 0.0001), IGF-1 SD score (F = 29; P amp;lt; 0.0001) and of IGFBP-1 (F = 6.88; P = 0.009) could be seen, indicating the effect of selenium and coenzyme Q10 also on the expression of IGF-1 as one of the mechanistic effects of the intervention. Conclusion Supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10 over four years resulted in increased levels of IGF-1 and the postprandial IGFBP-1, and an increase in the age-corrected IGF-1 SD score, compared with placebo. The effects could be part of the mechanistic explanation behind the surprisingly positive clinical effects on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality reported earlier. However, as the effects of IGF-1 are complex, more research on the result of intervention with selenium and coenzyme Q10 is needed.

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  • 171.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Aaseth, Jan
    Innlandet Hosp Trust, Norway.
    Alexander, Jan
    Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Norway.
    Surowiec, Izabella
    AcureOmics AB, Sweden.
    Lundstedt-Enkel, Katrin
    AcureOmics AB, Sweden.
    Lundstedt, Torbjorn
    AcureOmics AB, Sweden.
    Significant Changes in Metabolic Profiles after Intervention with Selenium and Coenzyme Q10 in an Elderly Population2019In: BIOMOLECULES, ISSN 2218-273X, Vol. 9, no 10, article id 553Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Selenium and coenzyme Q10 (SeQ10) are important for normal cellular function. Low selenium intake leads to increased cardiovascular mortality. Intervention with these substances with healthy elderly persons over a period of four years in a double-blind, randomised placebo-controlled prospective study showed reduced cardiovascular mortality, increased cardiac function, and a lower level of NT-proBNP. Therefore, we wanted to evaluate changes in biochemical pathways as a result of the intervention with SeQ10 using metabolic profiling. From a population of 443 healthy elderly individuals that were given 200 µg selenium and 200 mg coenzyme Q10, or placebo daily for four years, we selected nine males on active intervention and nine males on placebo for metabolic profiling in the main study. To confirm the results, two validation studies (study 1 n = 60 males, study 2 n = 37 males) were conducted. Principal component analyses were used on clinical and demographic data to select representative sets of samples for analysis and to divide the samples into batches for analysis. Gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry-based metabolomics was applied. The metabolite data were evaluated using univariate and multivariate approaches, mainly T-tests and orthogonal projections to latent structures (OPLS) analyses. Out of 95 identified metabolites, 19 were significantly decreased due to the intervention after 18 months of intervention. Significant changes could be seen in the pentose phosphate, the mevalonate, the beta-oxidation and the xanthine oxidase pathways. The intervention also resulted in changes in the urea cycle, and increases in the levels of the precursors to neurotransmitters of the brain. This adds information to previous published results reporting decreased oxidative stress and inflammation. This is the first-time metabolic profiling has been applied to elucidate the mechanisms behind an intervention with SeQ10. The study is small and should be regarded as hypothesis-generating; however, the results are interesting and, therefore, further research in the area is needed.

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  • 172.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Aaseth, Jan
    Innlandet Hospital Trust, Norway; Hedmark University of Coll, Norway.
    Alexander, Jan
    Norwegian Institute Public Heatlh, Norway; Norwegian University of Life Science NMBU, Norway.
    Wågsäter, Dick
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Significant changes in circulating microRNA by dietary supplementation of selenium and coenzyme Q10 in healthy elderly males. A subgroup analysis of a prospective randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial among elderly Swedish citizens2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 4, article id e0174880Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Selenium and coenzyme Q10 is essential for important cellular functions. A low selenium intake is reported from many European countries, and the endogenous coenzyme Q10 production is decreasing in the body with increasing age. Supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10 in elderly have shown reduced cardiovascular mortality and reduced levels of markers of inflammation. However, microRNA analyses could give important information on the mechanisms behind the clinical effects of supplementation. Methods Out of the 443 healthy elderly participants that were given supplementation with 200 mu g Se/ day as organic selenium yeast tablets, and 200 mg/day of coenzyme Q10 capsules, or placebo for 4 years, 25 participants from each group were randomized and evaluated regarding levels of microRNA. Isolation of RNA from plasma samples and quantitative PCR analysis were performed. Volcano- and principal component analyses (PCA)-plots were used to illustrate the differences in microRNA expression between the intervention, and the placebo groups. Serum selenium concentrations were measured before intervention. Findings On average 145 different microRNAs out of 172 were detected per sample. In the PCA plots two clusters could be identified indicating significant difference in microRNA expression between the two groups. The pre-treatment expression of the microRNAs did not differ between active treatment and the placebo groups. When comparing the post- treatment microRNAs in the active and the placebo groups, 70 microRNAs exhibited significant differences in expression, also after adjustment for multiple measurements. For the 20 microRNAs with the greatest difference in expression the difference was up to more than 4 fold and with a P-value that were less than 4.4e(-8). Conclusions Significant differences were found in expression of more than 100 different microRNAs with up to 4 fold differences as a result of the intervention of selenium and coenzyme Q10 combined. The changes in microRNA could be a part of mechanisms underlying the clinical effects earlier reported that reduced cardiovascular mortality, gave better cardiac function, and showed less signs of inflammation and oxdative stress following the intervention. However, more research is needed to understand biological mechanisms of the protective effects of selenium and Q10 supplementation.

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  • 173.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Johansson, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Björnstedt, Mikael
    Division of Pathology F42, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rosén, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Post, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Aaseth, Jan
    Research Department, Innlandet Hospital Trust and Hedmark University College, Norway.
    Relatively high mortality risk in elderly Swedish subjects with low selenium status2016In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0954-3007, E-ISSN 1476-5640, Vol. 70, no 1, p. 91-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Objectives: 

    The daily dietary intake of selenium (Se), an essential trace element, is still low in Sweden in spite of decades of nutritional information campaigns and the effect of this on the public health is presently not well known. The objective of this study was to determine the serum Se levels in an elderly Swedish population and to analyze whether a low Se status had any influence on mortality.

    Subjects/Methods: 

    Six-hundred sixty-eight (n=668) elderly participants were invited from a municipality and evaluated in an observational study. Individuals were followed for 6.8 years and Se levels were re-evaluated in 98 individuals after 48 months. Clinical examination of all individuals included functional classification, echocardiography, electrocardiogram and serum Se measurement. All mortality was registered and endpoints of mortality were assessed by Kaplan–Meier plots, and Cox proportional hazard ratios adjusted for potential confounding factors were calculated.

    Results: 

    The mean serum Se level of the study population (n=668) was 67.1 μg/l, corresponding to relatively low Se intake. After adjustment for male gender, smoking, ischemic heart disease, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and impaired heart function, persons with serum Se in the lowest quartile had 43% (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02–2.00) and 56% (95% CI: 1.03–2.36) increased risk for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, respectively. The result was not driven by inflammatory effects on Se concentration in serum.

    Conclusion: 

    The mean serum Se concentration in an elderly Swedish population was 67.1 μg/l, which is below the physiological saturation level for several selenoprotein enzymes. This result may suggest the value of modest Se supplementation in order to improve the health of the Swedish population.

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  • 174.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Aaseth, Jan
    Innlandet Hospital Trust, Norway; Hedmark University of Coll, Norway.
    Svensson, Erland
    Swedish Def Research Agency, Sweden.
    Johansson, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Levels of sP-selectin and hs-CRP Decrease with Dietary Intervention with Selenium and Coenzyme Q10 Combined: A Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 9, p. e0137680-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Objectives Inflammation and oxidative stress are central in many disease states. The major anti-oxidative enzymes contain selenium. The selenium intake in Europe is low, and supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q(10) , important anti-oxidants, was evaluated in a previous study. The aim of this study was to evaluate response on the inflammatory biomarkers C-reactive protein, and sP-selectin, and their possible impact on cardiovascular mortality. Subjects/Methods 437 elderly individuals were included in the study. Clinical examination, echocardiography, electrocardiography and blood samples were drawn. The intervention time was 48 months, and median follow-up was 5.2 years. The effects on inflammation/atherosclerosis were evaluated through analyses of CRP and sP-selectin. Evaluations of the effect of the intervention was performed using repeated measures of variance. All mortality was registered, and endpoints of mortality were assessed by Kaplan-Meier plots. Results The placebo group showed a CRP level of 4.8 ng/mL at the start, and 5.1 ng/mL at the study end. The active supplementation group showed a CRP level of 4.1 ng/mL at the start, and 2.1 ng/mL at the study end. SP-selectin exhibited a level of 56.6mg/mL at the start in the placebo group and 72.3 mg/mL at the study end, and in the active group the corresponding figures were 55.9 mg/mL and 58.0 mg/mL. A significantly smaller increase was demonstrated through repeated measurements of the two biomarkers in those on active supplementation. Active supplementation showed an effect on the CRP and sP-selectin levels, irrespective of the biomarker levels. Reduced cardiovascular mortality was demonstrated in both those with high and low levels of CRP and sP-selectin in the active supplementation group. Conclusion CRP and sP-selectin showed significant changes reflecting effects on inflammation and atherosclerosis in those given selenium and coenzyme Q(10) combined. A reduced cardiovascular mortality could be demonstrated in the active group, irrespective of biomarker level. This result should be regarded as hypothesis-generating, and it is hoped it will stimulate more research in the area.

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  • 175.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Slind Olsen, Renate
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Matussek, Andreas
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Wågsäter, Dick
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    PDGF-D gene polymorphism is associated with increased cardiovascular mortality in elderly men2016In: BMC Medical Genetics, ISSN 1471-2350, E-ISSN 1471-2350, Vol. 17, no 62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) D has been reported to be active in fibroblasts, and in areas of myocardial infarction. In this longitudinal study we evaluated the association between PDGF-D polymorphism and cardiovascular mortality, and attempted to discover whether specific genotype differences regarding risk could be observed, and if gender differences could be seen. Methods: Four hundred seventy-six elderly community participants were included in this study. All participants underwent a clinical examination, echocardiography, and blood sampling including PDGF-D single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analyses of the rs974819 A/A, G/A and G/G SNP. The follow-up time was 6.7 years. Results: No specific genotype of rs974819 demonstrated increased cardiovascular mortality in the total population, however, the male group with genotypes A/A and G/A demonstrated an increased risk that persisted in a multivariate evaluation where adjustments were made for well-known cardiovascular risk factors (2.7 fold compared with the G/G genotype). No corresponding finding was observed in the female group. Conclusion: We report here for the first time that the genotypes G/A or A/A of the SNP rs974819 near PDGF-D exhibited a 2.7 fold increased cardiovascular mortality risk in males. Corresponding increased risk could not be observed in either the total population and thus not in the female group. However, the sample size is was small and the results should be regarded as hypothesis-generating, and thus more research in the field is recommended.

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  • 176.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Vorkapic, Emina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ljungberg, Liza
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Wågsäter, Dick
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gender difference in adiponectin associated with cardiovascular mortality2015In: BMC Medical Genetics, ISSN 1471-2350, E-ISSN 1471-2350, Vol. 16, no 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: It is important to identify cardiovascular diseases in patients at high risk. To include genetics into routine cardiological patients has therefore been discussed recently. We wanted to evaluate the association between high-molecular weight adiponectin and cardiovascular risk, and secondly in the same population evaluate if specific genotype differences regarding risk could be observed, and thirdly if gender differences could be seen. Method: Four hundred seventy-six elderly participants recruited from a rural community were included. All participants underwent a clinical examination, echocardiography, and blood sampling and the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (rs266729) of adiponectin was analysed. Follow-up time was 6.7 years. Results: Those with high serum concentration of adiponectin had a more 2 fold increased cardiovascular risk, and it might be that females exhibits even higher risk where a more than 5 fold increased risk could be seen. The result could be demonstrated even in a multivariate model adjusting for well-known clinical risk factors. However, as the sample size was small the gender differences should be interpreted with caution. In the genotype evaluation the C/C carriers of the female group had a more than 9-fold increased risk of cardiovascular mortality, however the confidence interval was wide. Such genotype difference could not be found in the male group. Conclusion: High level of adiponectin was associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Also a gender difference in the genotype evaluation could be seen where the C/C carriers obtained higher risk in the female group but not in the male group. Thus, in order to identify patients at risk early, genetic analyses may add to the armamentarium used in the clinical routine. However, information should be regarded as hypothesis generating as the sample size was small and should stimulate further research in individualized cardiovascular prevention and treatment.

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  • 177.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Wågsäter, Dick
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Gender difference and genetic variance in lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 is associated with mortality2019In: BIOMEDICAL REPORTS, ISSN 2049-9434, Vol. 11, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiovascular diseases are an important health resource problem and studies have shown a genetic association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and cardiovascular diseases. According to the literature, lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is associated with coronary artery disease. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a possible association between different genotypes of LRP1 and all-cause and cardiovascular mortality from a gender perspective. In the present study, 489 elderly community-living people were invited to participate. Clinical examination, echocardiography and blood sampling including SNP analyses of LRP1 (rs1466535) were performed, including the T/T, C/T and C/C genotypes, and the participants were followed for 6.7 years. During the follow-up period, 116 (24%) all-cause and 75 (15%) cardiovascular deaths were registered. In the female population, the LRP1 of the T/T or C/T genotype exhibited a 5.6-fold increased risk of cardiovascular mortality and a 2.8-fold increased risk of all-cause mortality compared with the C/C genotype. No such genotype differences could be seen in the male population. Gender differences could be seen regarding the risk of mortality in the different genotypes. Females with the LRP1 T/T or C/T genotypes exhibited a significantly increased risk of both all-cause and cardiovascular mortality compared with the C/C genotypes. Therefore, more individualized cardiovascular prevention and treatment should be prioritized. However, since this was a small study, the observations should only be regarded as hypothesis-generating.

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  • 178.
    Alenljung, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Larsson Ranada, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Liedberg, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Struggling with everyday life after mild stroke with cognitive impairments - The experiences of working age women2019In: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0308-0226, E-ISSN 1477-6006, Vol. 82, no 4, p. 227-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction The aim of this study was to explore how women of working age who have had a mild stroke resulting in cognitive impairment experience and manage their everyday lives. Method Data were collected using semi-structured interviews. The participants consisted of 10 women of working age who had sustained cognitive impairment after a mild stroke. The interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results Three main categories appeared: The everyday is affected by the symptoms, Living strategies, and The social environment effects and changes. Participants feel insecure about their abilities and capabilities, experience anxiety and fear in relation to work, and find it hard to live up to demands and expectations. They are required to plan their daily activities in a new way and to prioritise chores that benefit the family, rather than follow their own interests and social activities. In order to cope with everyday life, they need to allocate chores to other family members. Conclusions The constant impact of fatigue and cognitive impairments affects everyday life. The women said that they had to learn to continuously manage their limitations through their experience of everyday life, something that can be facilitated with occupational therapy.

  • 179.
    Alevronta, Eleftheria
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Sahlgrens Acad, Sweden.
    Åvall Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    al-Abany, Massoud
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Nyberg, Tommy
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lind, Helena
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Waldenstrom, Ann-Charlotte
    Sahlgrens Acad, Sweden; Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Olsson, Caroline
    Sahlgrens Acad, Sweden; Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Dunberger, Gail
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Ersta Skondal University of Coll, Sweden.
    Bergmark, Karin
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Sahlgrens Acad, Sweden; Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Sahlgrens Acad, Sweden.
    Lind, Bengt K.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Time-dependent dose-response relation for absence of vaginal elasticity after gynecological radiation therapy2016In: Radiotherapy and Oncology, ISSN 0167-8140, E-ISSN 1879-0887, Vol. 120, no 3, p. 537-541Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose: To investigate the dose-response relation between the dose to the vagina and the patient-reported symptom absence of vaginal elasticity and how time to follow-up influences this relation. Material and methods: The study included 78 long-term gynecological cancer survivors treated between 1991 and 2003 with external beam radiation therapy. Of those, 24 experienced absence of vaginal elasticity. A normal tissue complication model is introduced that takes into account the influence of time to follow-up on the dose-response relation and the patients age. The best estimates of the dose-response parameters were calculated using Probit, Probit-Relative Seriality (RS) and Probit-time models. Log likelihood (LL) values and the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) were used to evaluate the model fit. Results: The dose-response parameters for absence of vaginal elasticity according to the Probit and Probit-time models with the 68% Confidence Intervals (CI) were: LL = 39.8, D-50 = 49.7 (47.2-52.4) Gy, gamma(50) =1.40 (1.12-1.70) and LL = 37.4, D-50 = 46.9 (43.5-50.9) Gy, gamma(50) = 1.81 (1.17-2.51) respectively. Conclusions: The proposed model, which describes the influence of time to follow-up on the dose response relation, fits our data best. Our data indicate that the steepness of the dose-response curve of the dose to the vagina and the symptom absence of vaginal elasticity increases with time to follow-up, while D-50 decreases. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 180.
    Alexandre, Campos
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Apraiz, Itzaso
    Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    da Fonseca, Rute R
    The Bioinformatics Centre, Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Cristobal, Susana
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Shotgun analysis of the marine mussel Mytilus edulis hemolymph proteome and mapping the innate immunity elements.2015In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 15, no 23-24, p. 4021-4029Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The marine mussel innate immunity provides protection to pathogen invasion and inflammation.In this regard, the mussel hemolymph takes a main role in the animal innate response.Despite the importance of this body fluid in determining the physiological condition of theanimal, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular and humoralresponses. In this work, we have applied aMS (nano-LC-MS/MS) strategy integrating genomicand transcriptomic data with the aim to: (i) identify the main protein functional groups thatcharacterize hemolymph and (ii) to map the elements of innate immunity in the marine musselMytilus edulis hemolymph proteome. After sample analysis and first protein identificationbased onMS/MS data comparison, proteins with unknown functions were annotated with blastusing public database (nrNCBI) information. Overall 595 hemolymph proteins were identifiedwith high confidence and annotated. These proteins encompass primary cellular metabolicprocesses: energy production and metabolism of biomolecules, as well as processes related tooxidative stress defence, xenobiotic detoxification, drug metabolism, and immune response.A group of proteins was identified with putative immune effector, receptor, and signalingfunctions in M. edulis. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001951(http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001951).

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  • 181.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Duke University, NC 27710 USA.
    Alexander, Karen P.
    Duke University, NC 27710 USA.
    Multiple Chronic Conditions in Older Adults with Acute Coronary Syndromes2016In: Clinics in Geriatric Medicine, ISSN 0749-0690, E-ISSN 1879-8853, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 291-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Older adults presenting with acute coronary syndromes (ACSs) often have multiple chronic conditions (MCCs). In addition to traditional cardiovascular (CV) risk factors (ie, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes), common CV comorbidities include heart failure, stroke, and atrial fibrillation, whereas prevalent non-CV comorbidities include chronic kidney disease, anemia, depression, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The presence of MCCs affects the presentation (eg, increased frequency of type 2 myocardial infarctions [MIs]), clinical course, and prognosis of ACS in older adults. In general, higher comorbidity burden increases mortality following MI, reduces utilization of ACS treatments, and increases the importance of developing individualized treatment plans.

  • 182.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Duke Univ, NC USA.
    Green, Jennifer B.
    Duke Univ, NC USA.
    Stevens, Susanna R.
    Duke Univ, NC USA.
    Reed, Shelby D.
    Duke Univ, NC USA.
    Armstrong, Paul W.
    Univ Alberta, Canada.
    Bethel, M. Angelyn
    Univ Oxford, England.
    Engel, Samuel S.
    Merck and Co Inc, NJ USA.
    McGuire, Darren K.
    Univ Texas Southwestern Med Ctr Dallas, TX 75390 USA.
    Van de Werf, Frans
    Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Hramiak, Irene
    Univ Western Ontario, Canada.
    White, Harvey D.
    Auckland City Hosp, New Zealand.
    Peterson, Eric D.
    Duke Univ, NC USA.
    Holman, Rury R.
    Univ Oxford, England.
    Sex differences in management and outcomes of patients with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease: A report from TECOS2018In: Diabetes, obesity and metabolism, ISSN 1462-8902, E-ISSN 1463-1326, Vol. 20, no 10, p. 2379-2388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To examine sex differences in baseline characteristics and outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic vascular disease. Materials and methods: Cox models were used to analyse the association between sex and outcomes in the Trial Evaluating Cardiovascular Outcomes with Sitagliptin (TECOS), a randomized, placebo-controlled trial assessing the impact of sitagliptin on cardiovascular (CV) outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic vascular disease. Results: A total of 4297 women and 10 374 men were followed for a median of 3.0 years. Women were slightly older and more often had cerebrovascular disease and peripheral arterial disease but less often coronary heart disease than men. At baseline, women were less likely to use aspirin or statins. The primary composite outcome of CV death, myocardial infarction, stroke, or hospitalization for unstable angina occurred in 418 women (9.7%) and 1272 men (12.3%; 3.48 vs 4.38 events/100 participant-years, crude hazard ratio [HR] 0.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.71-0.89, adjusted HR 0.64, 95% CI 0.55-0.74; P amp;lt; .0001). Women also had a significantly lower risk of secondary CV outcomes and all-cause death. Conclusions: In this large prospective study of people with type 2 diabetes and CV disease, women had different CV disease burden, worse CV risk factor profiles, and less use of indicated medications than men. Despite this, women had significantly lower risk of CV events, suggesting that the cardioprotective effects of female sex extend to populations with type 2 diabetes.

  • 183.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lindahl, Tomas L
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Gustafsson, Kerstin M
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Logander, Elisabeth
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Large early variation of residual platelet reactivity in Acute Coronary Syndrome patients treated with clopidogrel: Results from Assessing Platelet Activity in Coronary Heart Disease (APACHE).2015In: Thrombosis Research, ISSN 0049-3848, E-ISSN 1879-2472, Vol. 136, no 2, p. 335-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: There is a large inter-individual variation in response to clopidogrel treatment and previous studies have indicated higher risk of thrombotic events in patients with high residual platelet reactivity (HRPR), but the optimal time-point for testing is not established. The aim of this study was to investigate the optimal time-point for aggregometry testing and the risk of major adverse cardiac events associated with HRPR.

    METHOD AND RESULTS: We included 125 patients with ACS (73 with STEMI, and 71 received abciximab). The prevalence of HRPR varied substantially over time. The rate of HRPR in patients treated and not treated with abciximab were 43% vs 67% (p=0.01) before, 2% vs 23% (p=0.001) 6-8h after, 8% vs 9% (p=0.749) 3days after, and 23% vs 12% (p=0.138) 7-9 days after loading dose of clopidogrel. We found HRPR in 18% of the patients but only four ischemic events during 6months follow-up, with no significant difference between HRPR patients compared to the rest of the population. There were 3 TIMI major bleedings, all of which occurred in the low residual platelet reactivity (LRPR) group.

    CONCLUSION: There is a large variation in platelet reactivity over time, also depending on adjunctive therapy, which has a large impact on optimal time-point for assessment. We found HRPR in almost 1 in 5 patients, but very few MACE, and not significantly higher in HRPR patients. In a contemporary ACS population, with low risk for stent thrombosis, the predictive value of HRPR for ischemic events will probably be low.

  • 184.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Duke Clin Research Institute, NC USA.
    Neely, Benjamin
    Duke Clin Research Institute, NC USA.
    Neely, Megan L.
    Duke Clin Research Institute, NC USA.
    Bhatt, Deepak L.
    Brigham and Womens Hospital, MA 02115 USA; Harvard Medical Sch, MA USA.
    Goodman, Shaun G.
    St Michaels Hospital, Canada; University of Alberta, Canada; University of Alberta, Canada.
    Tricoci, Pierluigi
    Duke Clin Research Institute, NC USA; Duke University, NC 27706 USA.
    Mahaffey, Kenneth W.
    Stanford University, CA 94305 USA.
    Cornel, Jan H.
    Medical Centre Alkmaar, Netherlands.
    White, Harvey D.
    Auckland City Hospital, New Zealand.
    Fox, Keith A. A.
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Prabhakaran, Dorairaj
    Centre Chron Disease Control and Public Health Fdn India, India.
    Winters, Kenneth J.
    Eli Lilly and Co, IN 46285 USA.
    Armstrong, Paul W.
    University of Alberta, Canada; University of Alberta, Canada.
    Magnus Ohman, E.
    Duke Clin Research Institute, NC USA; Duke University, NC 27706 USA.
    Roe, Matthew T.
    Duke Clin Research Institute, NC USA; Duke University, NC 27706 USA.
    Predicting the risk of bleeding during dual antiplatelet therapy after acute coronary syndromes2017In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, E-ISSN 1468-201X, Vol. 103, no 15, p. 1168-1176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) with aspirin + a P2Y12 inhibitor is recommended for at least 12 months for patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), with shorter durations considered for patients with increased bleeding risk. However, there are no decision support tools available to predict an individual patients bleeding risk during DAPT treatment in the post-ACS setting. Methods To develop a longitudinal bleeding risk prediction model, we analysed 9240 patients with unstable angina/non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) from the Targeted Platelet Inhibition to Clarify the Optimal Strategy to Medically Manage Acute Coronary Syndromes (TRILOGY ACS) trial, who were managed without revascularisation and treated with DAPT for a median of 14.8 months. Results We identified 10 significant baseline predictors of non-coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG)-related Global Use of Strategies to Open Occluded Arteries (GUSTO) severe/life-threatening/moderate bleeding: age, sex, weight, NSTEMI (vs unstable angina), angiography performed before randomisation, prior peptic ulcer disease, creatinine, systolic blood pressure, haemoglobin and treatment with beta-blocker. The five significant baseline predictors of Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) major or minor bleeding included age, sex, angiography performed before randomisation, creatinine and haemoglobin. The models showed good predictive accuracy with Therneaus C-indices: 0.78 (SE=0.024) for the GUSTO model and 0.67 (SE=0.023) for the TIMI model. Internal validation with bootstrapping gave similar C-indices of 0.77 and 0.65, respectively. External validation demonstrated an attenuated C-index for the GUSTO model (0.69) but not the TIMI model (0.68). Conclusions Longitudinal bleeding risks during treatment with DAPT in patients with ACS can be reliably predicted using selected baseline characteristics. The TRILOGY ACS bleeding models can inform riskbenefit considerations regarding the duration of DAPT following ACS.

  • 185.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Roe, Matthew T
    Duke Clinical Research Institute, Durham, NC.
    Balancing the risks and benefits of long-term antiplatelet therapies for cardiovascular disease: clinical, research, and regulatory implications.2015In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 4, no 3, article id e001897Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 186.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Roe, Matthew T.
    Duke University of School Med, NC USA.
    Risks and Benefits of Triple Oral Anti-Thrombotic Therapies After Acute Coronary Syndromes and Percutaneous Coronary Intervention2015In: Drug Safety, ISSN 0114-5916, E-ISSN 1179-1942, Vol. 38, no 5, p. 481-491Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The key pathophysiological process underlying symptomatic coronary artery disease, including acute coronary syndromes (ACS), is usually a rupture or an erosion of an atherosclerotic plaque, followed by platelet activation and subsequent thrombus formation. Early clinical trials showed benefit with long-term aspirin treatment, and later-based on large clinical trials-dual anti-platelet therapy (DAPT), initially with clopidogrel, and more recently with prasugrel or ticagrelor, has become the established treatment in the post-ACS setting and after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Treatment with DAPT is recommended for both ST-elevation myocardial infarction and non-ST-elevation ACS, as well as after PCI with stenting, in American and European clinical guidelines. Notwithstanding the benefits observed with DAPT, including third-generation P2Y(12) receptor inhibitors plus aspirin, ACS patients remain at high risk for a recurrent cardiovascular event, suggesting that other treatment strategies, including the addition of a third oral anti-platelet agent or a novel oral anticoagulant (NOAC) to standard DAPT regimens, may provide additional benefit for post-ACS patients and for patients undergoing PCI. Adding a third anti-thrombotic agent to DAPT after an ACS event or a PCI procedure has been shown to have modest benefit in terms of ischemic event reduction, but has consistently been associated with increased bleeding complications. Therefore, the quest to optimize anti-thrombotic therapies post-ACS and post-PCI continues unabated but is tempered by the historical experiences to date that indicate that careful patient and dose selection will be critical features of future randomized trials.

  • 187.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Duke Clin Research Institute, NC 27705 USA.
    Stebbins, Amanda
    Duke Clin Research Institute, NC 27705 USA.
    Brennan, J. Matthew
    Duke University, NC USA.
    Matsouaka, Roland
    Duke University, NC USA.
    Afilalo, Jonathan
    McGill University, Canada.
    Peterson, Eric D.
    Duke Clin Research Institute, NC 27705 USA; Duke University, NC USA.
    Vemulapalli, Sreekanth
    Duke University, NC USA.
    Rumsfeld, John S.
    University of Colorado, CO USA.
    Shahian, David
    Massachusetts Gen Hospital, MA 02114 USA.
    Mack, Michael J.
    Baylor Scott and White Heatlh, TX USA.
    Alexander, Karen P.
    Duke Clin Research Institute, NC 27705 USA; Duke University, NC USA.
    Gait Speed Predicts 30-Day Mortality After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Results From the Society of Thoracic Surgeons/American College of Cardiology Transcatheter Valve Therapy Registry2016In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 133, no 14, p. 1351-1359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Surgical risk scores do not include frailty assessments (eg, gait speed), which are of particular importance for patients with severe aortic stenosis considering transcatheter aortic valve replacement. Methods and Results We assessed the association of 5-m gait speed with outcomes in a cohort of 8039 patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement (November 2011-June 2014) and were included in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons/American College of Cardiology Transcatheter Valve Therapy Registry. We evaluated the association between continuous and categorical gait speed and 30-day all-cause mortality before and after adjustment for Society of Thoracic Surgeons-predicted risk of mortality score and key variables. Secondary outcomes included in-hospital mortality, bleeding, acute kidney injury, and stroke. The overall median gait speed was 0.63 m/s (25th-75th percentile, 0.47-0.79 m/s), with the slowest walkers (<0.5 m/s) constituting 28%, slow walkers (0.5-0.83 m/s) making up 48%, and normal walkers (>0.83 m/s) constituting 24% of the population. Thirty-day all-cause mortality rates were 8.4%, 6.6%, and 5.4% for the slowest, slow, and normal walkers, respectively (P<0.001). Each 0.2-m/s decrease in gait speed corresponded to an 11% increase in 30-day mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 1.11; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.22). The slowest walkers had 35% higher 30-day mortality than normal walkers (adjusted odds ratio, 1.35; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.80), significantly longer hospital stays, and a lower probability of being discharged to home. Conclusions Gait speed is independently associated with 30-day mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement. Identification of frail patients with the slowest gait speeds facilitates preprocedural evaluation and anticipation of a higher level of postprocedural care. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01737528.

  • 188.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Gustafsson, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Logander, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry.
    Individual long-term variation of platelet reactivity in patients with dual antiplatelet therapy after myocardial infarction.2019In: Platelets, ISSN 0953-7104, E-ISSN 1369-1635, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 572-578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a large inter-individual variation in response to clopidogrel treatment, and previous studies have indicated higher risk of thrombotic events in those with high residual platelet reactivity (HPR). Less is known about individual variation over time. The aim of this prospective cohort study was to investigate intra-individual variation in platelet reactivity. Platelet aggregation in whole blood was assessed in 77 patients, at 3 days, 8 days and 6 months after admission for acute myocardial infarction and loading dose of clopidogrel. All patients were treated with aspirin and clopidogrel through 6-month follow-up. We found a significant increase in median ADP-stimulated aggregation from third to eighth day (195 vs. 250 AU*min, p-value = 0.001) but not from day 8 to 6 months (250 vs. 223 AU*min, p-value = 0.666). There was no significant change in the overall rate of HPR (15.6% vs 20.8%, p-value 0.503) or low platelet reactivity (LPR) (37.7% vs 33.8%, p-value = 0.609) from day 8 to 6-month follow-up. In contrast, more than one in four changed HPR status, 15.6% from non-HPR to HPR and 10.4% HPR to non-HPR. A shift in LPR status appeared even more frequent, occurring in about one of three patients. In spite of similar median aggregation and rate of HPR during 6-month follow-up, about one in four of the patients changed HPR status and one in three changed LPR status. This may be important information for a concept of risk stratification based on a single aggregation value early after an acute coronary syndromes.

  • 189.
    Alfredsson Ågren, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Access to and Use of the Internet among Adolscents and Young Adults with Intellectual Disabilities in Everyday Settings.2020In: Journal of Intellectual & Developmental Disability, ISSN 1366-8250, E-ISSN 1469-9532, no 1, p. 89-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim is to explore and describe access to the internet and how it is used among adolescents and young adults with mild and moderate intellectual disabilities in their everyday settings. Method: Data were collected through observations of and interviews with 15 participants with intellectual disabilities, aged 13-25, on access and use of the internet in school or work and at home or in their free time. A qualitative content analysis was used. Results: Main findings were categorised into: Access to the internet in different settings, Challenges when using the internet and Strategies to handle the digital environment and take part in internet activities.Conclusions: This study revealed that participants had access to internet connections and to a high number of internet-enabled devices. Participants use the internet through strategies when doing internet activities, for example using pictures and reducing the number of internet-enabled devices used in their everyday settings.

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  • 190.
    Alfredsson Ågren, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Internet use among adolescents with intellectual disabilities at home and school2016In: Abstract book: International Conference on Cerebral Palsy and other Childhood-onset Disabilities Stockholm 1–4 June 2016, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Today everyday life depends on having access to, understand and use internet inorder to participate and take part in societal resources. This understanding can be complex forpersons with intellectual disabilities (ID) due to their cognitive impairments. It is even statedthat internet-use can be yet another part of daily life activities they are excluded from. Internet-use is claimed to involve risks, but also benefits for persons with ID, but there is a shortage inempirical studies with the target group ́s own opinion regarding this. Broader knowledge isacquired of internet-use in everyday life for adolescents with ID, as a precondition toparticipation. 

    Aim: This study aims to explore and describe internet-use and doing internet activities at homeand at school among adolescents with mild and moderate intellectual disabilities. Method: The study has a qualitative inductive design using observations and interviews in thetwo settings; at home and at school. Participants are six adolescents with mild and moderate ID,from special schools in the middle-region of Sweden, between the ages 13-20, that use internetto some extent. Data was collected at 2 occasions/participant for about 2hours/participant/setting. The analysis was done using a qualitative content analysis.

    Result: Preliminary results show that adolescents with mild and moderate ID use internet both athome and in school, to a greater extent than was expected, but the doings of internet-activitiesvaries in the different settings. Both facilitating and hindering aspects are described by theparticipants. Pictures on the internet seem to be of support when using and navigating theinternet.

    Conclusion: Deeper knowledge regarding internet-use from the target groups own perspectivehas been gained. The results can be used in the different occupational settings and in furtherresearch to survey internet use and participation in internet-activities

  • 191.
    Alfredsson Ågren, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Holstein, Jane
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    How can an entrepreneurial mind-set be encouraged among occupational therapy students? An example from Linköping University, Sweden.2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    The structures of social and health care are changing, and public health related problems in Western Europe are increasing, such as an increased elderly population, obesity and mental health problems in young people. In order to meet the need of the clients in occupational therapy practice we have to look into new ways to approach the changing times. A way to support the students’ preparedness for action in the field is to encourage the use of an entrepreneurial mindset through different learning methods. An entrepreneurial mindset is defined as “a way to see the possibilities and make something out of them”.

    Objectives

    To describe learning methods to raise awareness and promote an entrepreneurialmind-set among OT students and teachers.Description/ReportThe learning methods for the students varies from working with a specific design problem in groups, discussing literature about entrepreneurship in seminars and get supervision from Innovation office. To enhance the teachers awareness about entrepreneurial mind-set workshops about how to find new non-traditional fieldwork placements in a creative way was conducted.

    Results/Discussion

    Our experiences of how the entrepreneurial mind-set can be encouraged are that entrepreneurship can be looked upon in different ways and should be seen close to the reality that one work in. Follow-up from workshops with teachersas well evaluations from the students about the entrepreneurial mind set will be presented. Primary results show that students feel more prepared for a new and creative way of thinking and that teachers have more entrepreneurial mind-set than they think in the beginning.

    Conclusion

    An increased entrepreneurial mindset can be learned/trained and used as a way of dealing with the future challengesin the health care sector for occupational therapists.

  • 192.
    Alfredsson Ågren, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Holstein, Jane
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hur kan ett entreprenöriellt förhållningssätt främjas hos studenter på arbetsterapeutprogrammet?2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: Strukturerna för den offentliga sektorn och hälso- och sjukvården förändras ständigt, och folkhälsorelaterade problem ökar. Exempel på detta är en ökad andel äldre i befolkningen, eller fetma och psykisk ohälsa hos unga människor. För att möta dessa förändringar och behoven hos klienter i arbetsterapeutisk verksamhet måste nya förhållningssätt användas. Ett sätt att under utbildningen utveckla studenters handlingsberedskap inför framtida insatser kan vara att medvetandegöra och främja ett entreprenöriellt förhållningssättgenom olika lärmoment. Entreprenöriellt förhållningssätt definieras som"ett sätt att se möjligheterna och göra något av dem".

    Syfte: Syftet är att beskriva och utvärdera lärmoment för att främja entreprenöriellt förhållningssätt hos studenter på Arbetsterapeutprogrammet.

    Metod: Två huvudsakliga lärmoment användes för studenterna, och uppföljande utvärderingar genomfördes via enkät med öppna och slutna frågor. Utöver detta anordnades workshop för lärare, som följdes av utvärdering.

    Resultat/preliminärt resultat: Lärmomenten för studenter innebar att arbeta i projektform i gruppmed ett aktivitetsproblem för en specifik målgrupp utifrån Design för alla under handledning. Uppföljande seminarium utifrån specifik litteratur genomfördes. Studenternas utvärdering visar vikten av att ha lärmoment om design och entreprenörskap i utbildningen. Många studenteruppgav att de kunde använda denna kunskap i arbetsterapeutisk verksamhet. Workshop genomfördes med lärare där begrepp inom entreprenörskap diskuterades och kreativa sätt att utveckla lärmoment för studenter inom detta lyftes. I utvärderingen uppgav merparten av lärarna entreprenöriellt förhållningssätt som viktigt inom utbildningen.

    Slutsats: Vikten av lärares förståelse för entreprenöriellt förhållningssätt identifierades. Entreprenöriellt förhållningssätt kan främjas genom att kombinera fler lärmoment för studenter. Genom detta kan studenter utveckla handlingsberedskap gällande utmaningar i ett föränderligt samhälle.

  • 193.
    Alfredsson Ågren, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    A comparartive study on internet usage in adolescents with intellectual disabilities and a reference group in Sweden.2019In: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, JIDR: Future4All; Comparative Policy and Practice, John Wiley & Sons, 2019, Vol. 63, p. 710-726, article id 7Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 194.
    Alfredsson Ågren, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Digital participation? Internet use among adolescents with and without intellectual disabilities: A comparative study2019In: New Media and Society, ISSN 1461-4448, E-ISSN 1461-7315, article id UNSP 1461444819888398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Internet use is an integrated part of everyday life, especially among young people. However, knowledge of this for young people with disabilities is scarce. This study investigates digital participation of adolescents with intellectual disabilities by comparing aspects of Internet use among adolescents with and without intellectual disabilities. Cross-sectional comparative design was used and a national survey from the Swedish Media Council was cognitively adapted for adolescents with intellectual disabilities aged 13-20 years. The results reveal that a significantly lower proportion of the 114 participating adolescents with intellectual disabilities had access to Internet-enabled devices and performed Internet activities, except for playing games, than the reference group (n = 1161). The greatest difference was found in searching for information. Analyses indicate that adolescents with intellectual disabilities are following a similar pattern of Internet use as the reference group, but a digital lag is prevalent, and a more cognitively accessible web could be beneficial.

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  • 195.
    Alfredsson Ågren, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Internet use among adolescents with intellectual disabilities in Sweden2018In: 18th International WFOT18 Congress on Occupational Therapy Connected in Diversity, Positioned for Impact, Cape Town, South Africa, 21-25 May 2018, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Internet is an integral part of everyday life today. In Sweden 98% of adolescents are reported using internet. However, adolescents with intellectual disabilities are often excluded in national surveys, since questions are not adapted for the target group. Statistics remain therefore limited regarding internet-use among adolescents with intellectual disabilities. Objectives: To investigate and describe internet-use among adolescents with intellectual disabilities through an adapted version of a nationwide survey in Sweden. Method: A cross-sectional study was conducted using an adapted version of a survey from the Swedish Media Council on media-use among adolescents. Cognitive adaptations were included and it was accessible through the web and in paper. The sample was drawn from three municipalities using a total-selection of pupils in secondary- and upper secondary special schools. 265 surveys were sent out and the response rate was approximately 32%. Data was analyzed through descriptive statistics. Results: The result gives demographic data on the participants and descriptive statistics on the access to devices for internet-connection. Further, data are provided on activities done in leisure time and whether internet is used or not, together with perceptions of doings on internet from the participants. Conclusion: Stepwise adaptations of the survey with different levels of cognitive support enabled the participation of adolescents with intellectual disabilities and the result gives increased knowledge of internet-use among adolescents with intellectual disabilities. Finally, future comparative analysis are possible due to the national survey being used implying the voices of adolescents with intellectual disabilities being heard.

  • 196.
    Alftberg, Åsa
    et al.
    Department of Social Work, Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Sweden.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Behm, Lina
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Sweden.
    Sandgren, Anna
    Center for Collaborative Palliative Care, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Benzein, Eva
    Center for Collaborative Palliative Care, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University,Växjö, Sweden.
    Wallerstedt, Birgitta
    Center for Collaborative Palliative Care, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Rasmussen, Birgit H.
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, P.O. Box 157, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden. Birgit.Rasmussen@med.lu.se; The Institute for Palliative Care, Region Skane and Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Conversations about Death and Dying with Older People: An Ethnographic Study in Nursing Homes2018In: Healthcare, E-ISSN 2227-9032, Vol. 6, no 2, article id 63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nursing homes are often places where older persons amp;ldquo;come to die.amp;rdquo; Despite this, death and dying are seldom articulated or talked about. The aim of this study was to explore assistant nursesamp;rsquo; experiences of conversations about death and dying with nursing home residents. This study is part of an implementation project through a knowledge-based educational intervention based on palliative care principles. An ethnographic study design was applied in seven nursing homes, where eight assistant nurses were interviewed and followed in their daily assignments through participant observations. The assistant nurses stated that they had the knowledge and tools to conduct such conversations, even though they lacked the time and felt that emotional strain could be a hinder for conversations about death and dying. The assistant nurses used the strategies of distracting, comforting, and disregarding either when they perceived that residentsamp;rsquo; reflections on death and dying were part of their illness and disease or when there was a lack of alignment between the residentsamp;rsquo; contemplations and the concept of dying well. They indicated that ambivalence and ambiguity toward conversations about death and dying should be taken into consideration in future implementations of knowledge-based palliative care that take place in nursing homes after this project is finalized.

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  • 197.
    Alföldi, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Wiklund, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    SPREADING OF PAIN AND INSOMNIA IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC PAIN: RESULTS FROM A NATIONAL QUALITY REGISTRY (SQRP)2017In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 63-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore how demographics, pain, psychosocial factors and insomnia relate to the spread of chronic pain. Methods: The study included 708 patients (68% women; median age 46 years; interquartile range 3557 years) with chronic pain who were referred to a multidisciplinary pain centre. Spreading of pain was assessed using a questionnaire covering 36 anatomically predefined pain regions. Data were collected on demographics, pain symptoms, psychological distress, and insomnia (Insomnia Severity Index). Four sub-categories of chronic pain were established: chronic local pain, chronic regional pain medium, chronic regional pain heavy, and chronic widespread pain. Results: The median number of pain regions was 10 (interquartile range 6-18). Prevalence of chronic pain was as follows: chronic local pain 9%, chronic regional pain medium 21%, chronic regional pain heavy 39%, and chronic widespread pain 31%. In the regression models, being a woman and persistent pain duration had the strongest associations with spreading of pain, but anxiety, pain interference, and insomnia were also important factors. Conclusion: Spreading of chronic pain can only partly be explained by the simultaneous levels of insomnia. Female sex, pain duration, pain interference and anxiety appear to have more significant relationships with the spread of pain. Targeting these factors may lead to improvements in treatment and prevention strategies.

  • 198.
    Alhede, Christina
    et al.
    Herlev Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Johannessen, Arne
    Herlev Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Dixen, Ulrik
    Hvidovre University Hospital, Denmark.
    Jensen, Jan S.
    Herlev Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Raatikainen, Pekka
    Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Hindricks, Gerhard
    Leipzig University Hospital, Germany.
    Walfridsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Kongstad, Ole
    Lund University Hospital, Sweden.
    Pehrson, Steen
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Englund, Anders
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hartikainen, Juha
    Kupio University Hospital, Finland.
    Hansen, Peter S.
    Varde Heart Centre, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Jens C.
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Jons, Christian
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Higher burden of supraventricular ectopic complexes early after catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation is associated with increased risk of recurrent atrial fibrillation2018In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 50-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims Early identification of patients who could benefit from early re-intervention after catheter ablation is highly warranted. Our aim was to investigate the association between post-procedural burden of supraventricular ectopic complexes (SVEC) and the risk of long-term atrial fibrillation (AF) recurrence. Methods and results A total of 125 patients undergoing catheter ablation for AF were included. Patients underwent 7-day Holter recordings immediately post-procedural. The number of SVEC in post-procedural Holter recordings was categorized into quartiles: 0-72, 73-212, 213-782 and amp;gt;= 783 SVEC/day. Long-term AF recurrence was defined as a combined endpoint of AF amp;gt;= 1 min during follow-up Holter recordings, cardioversion or hospitalization for AF after a 3-month blanking period and within 24 months of follow-up. High post-procedural supraventricular ectopy burden was associated with an increased risk of long-term AF recurrence in a dose-dependent manner (amp;gt;= 783 SVEC: HR 4.6 [1.9-11.5], P amp;lt; 0.001) irrespective of AF recurrence during the blanking period or other risk factors. In patients with early AF recurrence amp;lt; 90 days after catheter ablation ectopy burden was also highly predictive of long-term AF recurrence (SVEC amp;gt;= 213: HR 3.0 [1.3-6.7], P = 0.007). Correspondingly, patients with early AF recurrence but low ectopy burden remained at low risk of long-term AF recurrence after the blanking period. Conclusion Our results indicate that post-procedural ectopy burden is highly associated with long-term AF recurrence and could be a potent risk marker for selection of patients for early re-ablation. Development of future ablation risk stratification and strategies should include focus on post-procedural ectopy burden.

  • 199.
    Alhede, Christina
    et al.
    Herlev Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Lauridsen, Trine K.
    Herlev Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Johannessen, Arne
    Herlev Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Dixen, Ulrik
    Hvidovre University Hospital, Denmark.
    Jensen, Jan S.
    Herlev Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Raatikainen, Pekka
    Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Hindricks, Gerhard
    Leipzig University Hospital, Germany.
    Walfridsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Kongstad, Ole
    Lund University Hospital, Sweden.
    Pehrson, Steen
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Englund, Anders
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hartikainen, Juha
    Kupio University Hospital, Finland.
    Hansen, Peter S.
    Varde Heart Centre, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Jens C.
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Jons, Christian
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Antiarrhythmic medication is superior to catheter ablation in suppressing supraventricular ectopic complexes in patients with atrial fibrillation2017In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 244, p. 186-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Supraventricular ectopic complexes (SVEC) originating in the pulmonary veins are known triggers of atrial fibrillation (AF) which led to the development of pulmonary vein isolation for AF. However, the long-term prevalence of SVEC after catheter ablation (CA) as compared to antiarrhythmic medication (AAD) is unknown. Our aims were to compare the prevalence of SVEC after AAD and CA and to estimate the association between baseline SVEC burden and AF burden during 24 months of follow-up. Methods: Patients with paroxysmal AF (N = 260) enrolled in the MANTRA PAF trial were treated with AAD (N = 132) or CA (N = 128). At baseline and 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months follow-up patients underwent 7-day Holter monitoring to assess SVEC and AF burden. We compared SVEC burden between treatments with Wilcoxon sum rank test. Results: Patients treated with AAD had significantly lower daily SVEC burden during follow-up as compared to CA (AAD: 19 [6-58] versus CA: 39 [14-125], p = 0.003). SVEC burden increased post-procedurally followed by a decrease after CA whereas after AAD SVEC burden decreased and stabilized after 3 months of follow-up. Patients with low SVEC burden had low AF burden after both treatments albeit this was more pronounced after CA at 24 months of follow-up. Conclusion: AAD was superior to CA in suppressing SVEC burden after treatment of paroxysmal AF. After CA SVEC burden increased immediately post-procedural followed by a decrease whereas after AAD an early decrease was observed. Lower SVEC burden was highly associated with lower AF burden during follow-up especially after CA. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 200.
    Alhede, Christina
    et al.
    Herlev Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Lauridsen, Trine K.
    Herlev Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Johannessen, Arne
    Herlev Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Dixen, Ulrik
    Hvidovre University Hospital, Denmark.
    Jensen, Jan S.
    Herlev Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Raatikainen, Pekka
    Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Hindricks, Gerhard
    Leipzig University Hospital, Germany.
    Walfridsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Kongstadf, Ole
    Lund University Hospital, Sweden.
    Pehrson, Steen
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Englund, Anders
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hartikainen, Juha
    Kupio University Hospital, Finland.
    Hansen, Peter S.
    Varde Heart Centre, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Jens C.
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Jons, Christian
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    The impact of supraventricular ectopic complexes in different age groups and risk of recurrent atrial fibrillation after antiarrhythmic medication or catheter ablation2018In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 250, p. 122-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Supraventricular ectopic complexes (SVEC) are known risk factors of recurrent atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the impact of SVEC in different age groups is unknown. We aimed to investigate the risk of AF recurrence with higher SVEC burden in patients +/- 57 years, respectively, after treatment with antiarrhythmic medication (AAD) or catheter ablation (CA). Methods: In total, 260 patients with LVEF amp;gt;40% and age amp;lt;= 70 years were randomized to AAD (N = 132) or CA (N = 128) as first-line treatment for paroxysmal AF. All patients underwent 7-day Holter monitoring at baseline, and after 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months and were categorized according to median age +/- 57 years. We used multi-variate Cox regression analyses and we defined high SVEC burden at 3 months of follow-up as the upper 75th percentile amp;gt;195 SVEC/day. AF recurrence was defined as AF amp;gt;= 1 min, AF-related cardioversion or hospitalization. Results: Age amp;gt;57 years were significantly associated with higher AF recurrence rate after CA (58% vs 36%, p = 0.02). After CA, we observed a higher SVEC burden during follow-up in patients amp;gt;57 years which was not observed in the younger age group treatedwith CA (p = 0.006). High SVEC burden at 3 months after CA was associated with AF recurrence in older patients but not in younger patients (amp;gt;57 years: HR 3.4 [1.4-7.9], p = 0.005). We did not find any age-related differences after AAD. Conclusion: We found that younger and older patients respond differently to CA and that SVEC burden was only associated with AF recurrence in older patients. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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