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  • 151.
    Wang, Chunliang
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    de Geer, Jakob
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology.
    Björkholm, Anders
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Czekierda, Waldemar
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Fransson, Sven Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Can segmented 3D images be used for stenosis evaluation in coronary CT angiography?2012In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 53, no 8, p. 845-851Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of coronary CT angiography (CCTA) using segmented 3D data for the detection of significant stenoses with catheter angiography (CA) as the reference standard.

    Method: CCTA data sets from 30 patients were acquired with a 64-slice dual source CT scanner and segmented by an independent observer using the region growing (RG) method and the “virtual contrast injection” (VC) method. For every examination, each of the three types of images was  then reviewed by one of three reviewers in a blinded fashion for the presence of stenoses with diameter reduction of 50% or more. For the original series, the reviewer was allowed to use all the 2D or 3D visualization tools available (mixed method). For the segmented results (from RG and VC), the reviewer only used the 3D maximum intensity projection. Evaluation results were compared with CA for each artery.

    Results: Overall, 34 arteries with significant stenosis were identified by CA. The percentage of evaluable arteries, accuracy and negative predictive value (NPV) for detecting stenosis were, respectively, 86%, 74% and 93% for the mixed method, 83%, 71% and 92% for VC, and 64%, 56% and 93% for RG. Accuracy was significantly lower for the RG method than for the other two methods (p<0.01), whereas there was no significant difference in accuracy between the VC method and the mixed method (p = 0.22). Excluding vessels with heavy calcification, all three methods had similar accuracy.

    Conclusion: Diagnostic accuracy when using segmented 3D data was lower than with access to 2D images. However, the high NPV of the 3D methods suggests a potential of using them as an initial step, with access to 2D reviewing techniques for suspected lesions and cases with heavy calcification. The VC method, which generates more evaluable arteries and has higher accuracy, seems more promising for this purpose than the RG method.

  • 152.
    Warntjes, Marcel Jan Bertus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). SyntheticMR AB, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Berge, J.
    Institute Forens Med, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Zech, Wolf-Dieter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Institute Forens Med, Linkoping, Sweden; University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Myelin Detection Using Rapid Quantitative MR Imaging Correlated to Macroscopically Registered Luxol Fast Blue-Stained Brain Specimens2017In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, ISSN 0195-6108, E-ISSN 1936-959X, Vol. 38, no 6, p. 1096-1102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Myelin detection is of great value in monitoring diseases such as multiple sclerosis and dementia. However, most MR imaging methods to measure myelin are challenging for routine clinical use. Recently, a novel method was published, in which the presence of myelin is inferred by using its effect on the intra- and extracellular water relaxation rates and proton density, observable by rapid quantitative MR imaging. The purpose of this work was to validate this method further on the brains of 12 fresh, intact cadavers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The 12 brains were scanned with a quantification sequence to determine the longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates and proton density as input for the myelin estimations. Subsequently, the brains were excised at postmortem examination, and brain slices were stained with Luxol fast blue to verify the presence of myelin. The optical density values of photographs of the stained brain slices were registered with the MR images and correlated with the myelin estimation performed by quantitative MR imaging. RESULTS: A correlation was found between the 2 methods with a mean Spearman for all subjects of 0.74 0.11. Linear regression showed a mean intercept of 1.50% +/- 2.84% and a mean slope of 4.37% +/- 1.73%/%. A lower correlation was found for the separate longitudinal relaxation rates and proton density ( = 0.63 +/- 0.12 and -0.73 +/- 0.09, respectively). For transverse relaxation rates, the was very low (0.11 +/- 0.28). CONCLUSIONS: The observed correlation supports the validity of myelin measurement by using the MR imaging quantification method.

  • 153.
    Woisetschläger, Mischa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Singh, S
    Boston, MA/US.
    Choy, G
    Boston, MA/US.
    O´connor, O
    Boston, MA/US.
    Blake, M A
    Boston, MA/US.
    Kalra, Manudeep
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Radiation dose reduction with Sinogram Affirmed Iterative REconstruction (Safire) technique for abdominal CT2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 154.
    Woisetschläger, Mischa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lussi, Adrian
    University of Zürich.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jackowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fire victim identification by post-mortem dental CT: Radiologic evaluation of restorative materials after exposure to high temperatures2011In: European Journal of Radiology, ISSN 0720-048X, E-ISSN 1872-7727, Vol. 80, no 2, p. 432-440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of high resolution CT to radiologically define teeth filling material properties in terms of Hounsfield units after high temperature exposure.

    METHODS: 122 human molars with 10 different filling materials at defined filling diameters were examined. The teeth were CT scanned both before and after the exposure to different temperatures. After image reconstruction, the teeth and filling materials were analyzed regarding their morphology and Hounsfield units (HU) using an extended HU scale.

    RESULTS: The majority of filling materials diminished in size at temperatures >/=400 degrees C. HU values were stable for all materials up till 200 degrees C, and only slightly changed up to 600 degrees C. Cerec, Dyract and dentin showed only minor changes in HU at all temperatures. The other materials, inclusive enamel, showed specific patterns, either increasing or decreasing in HU with increasing temperatures over 600 degrees C.

    CONCLUSIONS: Over 600 degrees C the filling materials show specific patterns that can be used to discriminate filling materials. Ultra high resolution CT may improve the identification processes in fire victims. Existing 3D visualization presets for the dentition can be used until 600 degrees C and have to be optimized for bodies exposed to higher temperatures.

  • 155.
    Ynnerman, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Norrkoping Visualizat Centre C, Sweden.
    Rydell, Thomas
    Interspectral AB, Sweden; Interact Institute Swedish ICT, Sweden.
    Antoine, Daniel
    British Museum, England; UCL, England.
    Hughes, David
    Interspectral AB, Sweden; Interact Institute Swedish ICT, Sweden.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ljung, Patric
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Norrkoping Visualizat Centre C, Sweden.
    Interactive Visualization of 3D Scanned Mummies at Public Venues2016In: Communications of the ACM, ISSN 0001-0782, E-ISSN 1557-7317, Vol. 59, no 12, p. 72-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BY COMBINING VISUALIZATION techniques with interactive multi-touch tables and intuitive user interfaces, visitors to museums and science centers can conduct self-guided tours of large volumetric image data. In an interactive learning experience, visitors become the explorers of otherwise invisible interiors of unique artifacts and subjects. Here, we take as our starting point the state of the art in scanning technologies, then discuss the latest research on high-quality interactive volume rendering and how it can be tailored to meet the specific demands

  • 156.
    Ynnerman, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Rydell, Thomas
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Ernvik, Aron
    Forsell, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ljung, Patric
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lundström, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Multi-Touch Table System for Medical Visualization2015In: Eurographics 2015: Dirk Bartz Prize, Eurographics - European Association for Computer Graphics, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Medical imaging plays a central role in a vast range of healthcare practices. While the usefulness of 3D visualizations is well known, the adoption of such technology has previously been limited in many medical areas. This paper, awarded the Dirk Bartz Prize for Visual Computing in Medicine 2015, describes the development of a medical multi-touch visualization table that successfully has reached its aim to bring 3D visualization to a wider clinical audience. The descriptions summarize the targeted clinical scenarios, the key characteristics of the system, and the user feedback obtained.

  • 157.
    Zachrisson, Helene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engström, E
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Soft tissue discrimination ex vivo by dual energy computed tomography2010In: European Journal of Radiology, ISSN 0720-048X, E-ISSN 1872-7727, Vol. 75, no 2, p. E124-E128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Dual Energy Computed Tomography (DECT) may provide additional information about the chemical composition of tissues compared to examination with a single X-ray energy. The aim of this in vitro study was to test whether combining two energies may significantly improve the detection of soft tissue components commonly present in arterial plaques. METHODS: Tissue samples of myocardial and psoas muscle, venous and arterial thrombus as well as fat from different locations were scanned using a SOMATOM Definition Dual Source CT system (Siemens AG, Medical Solutions, Forchheim, Germany) with simultaneous tube voltages of 140 and 80kV. The attenuation (Hounsfield units, HU) at 80 and 140kV was measured in representative regions of interest, and the association between measured HU values and tissue types was tested with logistic regression. RESULTS: The combination of two energy levels (80 and 140kV) significantly improved (p<0.001) the ability to correctly classify venous thrombus vs arterial thrombus, myocardium or psoas; arterial thrombus vs myocardium or psoas; myocardium vs psoas; as well as the differentiation between fat tissue from various locations. Single energy alone was sufficient for distinguishing fat from other tissues. CONCLUSION: DECT offers significantly improved in vitro differentiation between soft tissues occurring in plaques. If this corresponds to better tissue discrimination in vivo needs to be clarified in future studies.

  • 158.
    Zachrisson, Helene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology UHL. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Stenestrand, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    CT angiography - clinical experience from Linköping University Hospital2008In: X Svenska Kardiovaskulära Vårmötet,2008, 2008, p. 40-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 159.
    Zech, Wolf-Dieter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Hottinger, Anna-Lena
    Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
    Schwendener, Nicole
    Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
    Schuster, Frederick
    Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland; Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, University of Bern, Inselspital, Bern, Switzerland.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Warntjes, Marcel Jan Bertus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Jackowski, Christian
    Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
    Post-mortem 1.5T MR quantification of regular anatomical brain structures2016In: International journal of legal medicine (Print), ISSN 0937-9827, E-ISSN 1437-1596, Vol. 130, no 4, p. 1071-1080Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, post-mortem MR quantification has been introduced to the field of post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging. By usage of a particular MR quantification sequence, T1 and T2 relaxation times and proton density (PD) of tissues and organs can be quantified simultaneously. The aim of the present basic research study was to assess the quantitative T1, T2, and PD values of regular anatomical brain structures for a 1.5T application and to correlate the assessed values with corpse temperatures. In a prospective study, 30 forensic cases were MR-scanned with a quantification sequence prior to autopsy. Body temperature was assessed during MR scans. In synthetically calculated T1, T2, and PD-weighted images, quantitative T1, T2 (both in ms) and PD (in %) values of anatomical structures of cerebrum (Group 1: frontal gray matter, frontal white matter, thalamus, internal capsule, caudate nucleus, putamen, and globus pallidus) and brainstem/cerebellum (Group 2: cerebral crus, substantia nigra, red nucleus, pons, cerebellar hemisphere, and superior cerebellar peduncle) were assessed. The investigated brain structures of cerebrum and brainstem/cerebellum could be characterized and differentiated based on a combination of their quantitative T1, T2, and PD values. MANOVA testing verified significant differences between the investigated anatomical brain structures among each other in Group 1 and Group 2 based on their quantitative values. Temperature dependence was observed mainly for T1 values, which were slightly increasing with rising temperature in the investigated brain structures in both groups. The results provide a base for future computer-aided diagnosis of brain pathologies and lesions in post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging.

  • 160.
    Zech, Wolf-Dieter
    et al.
    Institute of Forensic Medicine University of Bern Switzerland.
    Schwendener, Nicole
    Institute of Forensic Medicine University of Bern Switzerland.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Bertus Warntjes, Marcel, Jan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Jackowski, Christian
    Institute of Forensic Medicine University of Bern Switzerland.
    Temperature dependence of postmortem MR quantification for soft tissue discrimination2015In: European Radiology, ISSN 0938-7994, E-ISSN 1432-1084, Temperature dependence of postmortem MR quantification for soft tissue discrimination, Vol. 25, no 8, p. 2381-2389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To investigate and correct the temperature dependence of postmortem MR quantification used for soft tissue characterization and differentiation in thoraco-abdominal organs. Material and methods Thirty-five postmortem short axis cardiac 3-T MR examinations were quantified using a quantification sequence. Liver, spleen, left ventricular myocardium, pectoralis muscle and subcutaneous fat were analysed in cardiac short axis images to obtain mean T1, T2 and PD tissue values. The core body temperature was measured using a rectally inserted thermometer. The tissue-specific quantitative values were related to the body core temperature. Equations to correct for temperature differences were generated. Results In a 3D plot comprising the combined data of T1, T2 and PD, different organs/tissues could be well differentiated from each other. The quantitative values were influenced by the temperature. T1 in particular exhibited strong temperature dependence. The correction of quantitative values to a temperature of 37 °C resulted in better tissue discrimination. Conclusion Postmortem MR quantification is feasible for soft tissue discrimination and characterization of thoracoabdominal organs. This provides a base for computer-aided diagnosis and detection of tissue lesions. The temperature dependence of the T1 values challenges postmortem MR quantification. Equations to correct for the temperature dependence are provided.

  • 161.
    Zech, Wolf-Dieter
    et al.
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Schwendener, Nicole
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Warntjes, Marcel Jan Bertus
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Jackowski, Christian
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Postmortem MR quantification of the heart for characterization and differentiation of ischaemic myocardial lesions2015In: European Radiology, ISSN 0938-7994, E-ISSN 1432-1084, Vol. 25, no 7, p. 2067-2073Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, an MRI quantification sequence has been developed which can be used to acquire T1- and T2-relaxation times as well as proton density (PD) values. Those three quantitative values can be used to describe soft tissue in an objective manner. The purpose of this study was to investigate the applicability of quantitative cardiac MRI for characterization and differentiation of ischaemic myocardial lesions of different age. Fifty post-mortem short axis cardiac 3 T MR examinations have been quantified using a quantification sequence. Myocardial lesions were identified according to histology and appearance in MRI images. Ischaemic lesions were assessed for mean T1-, T2- and proton density values. Quantitative values were plotted in a 3D-coordinate system to investigate the clustering of ischaemic myocardial lesions. A total of 16 myocardial lesions detected in MRI images were histologically characterized as acute lesions (n = 8) with perifocal oedema (n = 8), subacute lesions (n = 6) and chronic lesions (n = 2). In a 3D plot comprising the combined quantitative values of T1, T2 and PD, the clusters of all investigated lesions could be well differentiated from each other. Post-mortem quantitative cardiac MRI is feasible for characterization and discrimination of different age stages of myocardial infarction. aEuro cent MR quantification is feasible for characterization of different stages of myocardial infarction. aEuro cent The results provide the base for computer-aided MRI cardiac infarction diagnosis. aEuro cent Diagnostic criteria may also be applied for living patients.

  • 162.
    Zech, Wolf-Dieter
    et al.
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Schwendener, Nicole
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Warntjes, Marcel Jan Bertus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Riva, Fabiano
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Schuster, Frederick
    University of Bern, Switzerland; Hospital and University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Jackowski, Christian
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Postmortem quantitative 1.5-T MRI for the differentiation and characterization of serous fluids, blood, CSF, and putrefied CSF2015In: International journal of legal medicine (Print), ISSN 0937-9827, E-ISSN 1437-1596, Vol. 129, no 5, p. 1127-1136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether serous fluids, blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and putrefied CSF can be characterized and differentiated in synthetically calculated magnetic resonance (MR) images based on their quantitative T (1), T (2), and proton density (PD) values. Images from 55 postmortem short axis cardiac and 31 axial brain 1.5-T MR examinations were quantified using a quantification sequence. Serous fluids, fluid blood, sedimented blood, blood clots, CSF, and putrefied CSF were analyzed for their mean T (1), T (2), and PD values. Body core temperature was measured during the MRI scans. The fluid-specific quantitative values were related to the body core temperature. Equations to correct for temperature differences were generated. In a 3D plot as well as in statistical analysis, the quantitative T (1), T (2) and PD values of serous fluids, fluid blood, sedimented blood, blood clots, CSF, and putrefied CSF could be well differentiated from each other. The quantitative T (1) and T (2) values were temperature-dependent. Correction of quantitative values to a temperature of 37 A degrees C resulted in significantly better discrimination between all investigated fluid mediums. We conclude that postmortem 1.5-T MR quantification is feasible to discriminate between blood, serous fluids, CSF, and putrefied CSF. This finding provides a basis for the computer-aided diagnosis and detection of fluids and hemorrhages.

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