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  • 151.
    Pereira Caldas, Célia
    et al.
    Rio de Janeiro State University, Brazil.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Health Promotion and Life Course Dynamics: Transitions of Brazilian Elderly2014In: Health, ISSN 1949-4998, E-ISSN 1949-5005, Vol. 6, no 7, p. 616-624Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Understanding life transitions is important to help people to achieve their developmental needs. No studies have examined the patterns of responses to life transitions, eliciting the experiences of growing old of retired Brazilian older adults. Aim: To identify and describe the patterns of responses to life transitions of retired Brazilian older adults. Design: Using a theoretical perspective of transition as a guide, a qualitative, secondary narrative research design was incorporated to obtain data from 11 interviews. Method: Initial data collection took place during a broader study on the influence of people’s working life history. Eleven autonomous and independent persons, 64 - 82 years old, were interviewed at a geriatric outpatient unit in Rio de Janeiro to obtain their perceptions of old age. The secondary, narrative holistic-content analysis focused on the patterns of responses to life transitions. Results: The first turning point was a childhood event and the next was their first job. The third turning point was moving to another place/house or another city, the fourth starting a family, and retirement was the last turning point. Conclusions: While older people may feel environmentally disconnected throughout life, their patterns of response, together with the available resources and prevention/interventions influence the transition process. Health Promotion actions are needed at vulnerable points during the transition process, thereby facilitating the health outcomes.

  • 152.
    Pereira Caldas, Célia
    et al.
    Nursing Faculty, Rio de Janeiro State University, Brazil.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science.
    Taking the responsibility in dementia care: A concept analysis about facticity2018In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 310-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    The aim of this study is to develop a comprehensive definition of facticity, applicable to dementia nursing.

    Methods

    Walker and Avant's Concept Analysis was used to analyse facticity. Published literature found in PubMed, CINAHL, PsycInfo, and Scopus using the search term facticity and nursing, as well as books and dictionaries and empirical data was used to clarify the concept.

    Results

    Facticity in nursing dementia care is being in reality taking on responsibility to truth. Antecedents of facticity include persons occupied with caring a demented older person including full‐time duties, often accompanied by resistive behaviours. They are overloaded both physically and psychologically. Being present and feeling compassion and nurturing the relationship with the demented older persons and in that way strengthen the caregiving process.

    Conclusion

    Nurses need to be aware that all human beings are living with facticity.

  • 153.
    Pettersson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Onkologisk vårdenhet, Ryhovs länssjukhus, Jönköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Symptom prevalence, frequency, severity, and distress during chemotherapy for patients with colorectal cancer2014In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 1171-1179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Early detection and improvements in treatment have increased survival after colorectal cancer (CRC), but studies investigating the multidimensional nature of treatment-related symptoms are rare. The aim of this study was therefore to describe the prevalence, frequency, and severity of symptoms and the distress they cause during the early treatment of patients with CRC undergoing chemotherapy.

    Methods

    Consecutive outpatients were asked to rate their symptoms during cycle 2 or 3 of chemotherapy, using the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale.

    Results

    A total of 104 patients, 58 men and 46 women, evaluated their symptoms of the preceding week at one point during the treatment. The mean number of symptoms was 10.3 (SD, 7.7; range, 0–32). Highly prevalent symptoms were numbness/tingling in the hands/feet (64 %), lack of energy (62 %), feeling drowsy (49 %), and nausea (45 %). Symptoms with the highest scores for frequency, severity, and distress were lack of energy followed by difficulty in sleeping and numbness in the hands/feet. Lack of energy was noted as occurring almost constantly by 26 % and was rated as being severe or very severe by 12 % and as quite distressing or very distressing by 15 %.

    Conclusions

    This study shows that patients with CRC receiving chemotherapy experience several distressing symptoms early in the treatment phase. In order to provide symptom control, oncology staff should consider evaluating the patient’s symptoms early during treatment and plan adequate measures to minimize the impact of treatment-induced toxicity.

     

  • 154.
    Peyrovi, H.
    et al.
    Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, Doctoral Students' Department, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Rashid Yasami St., Vali-Asr Ave., Tehran, 19395-4798, Iran.
    Yadavar-Nikravesh, M.
    Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Oskouie, S.F.
    Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Iranian student nurses' experiences of clinical placement2005In: International Nursing Review, ISSN 0020-8132, E-ISSN 1466-7657, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 134-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nursing as a practice-based profession requires that student nurses learn how to become professional in the clinical environment. Many studies have addressed student nurses' clinical learning and related problems, but few have explored the whole clinical experience of being a student nurse. Aim: To understand and gain deeper insight into Iranian student nurses' lived experience of clinical placement. Method: Five student nurses were interviewed about their clinical experience during clinical placement. The researchers analysed the verbatim transcripts using van Manen's phenomenological methodology, keeping in mind the recommended six research activities. Findings: Five themes emerged by which the phenomenon of clinical experience could be illustrated. These themes were: caring-orientated relationships, attractive aspects of clinical experience, finding oneself in the clinical milieu, being supportive to classmates, and actualizing potential. Fourteen subthemes expanded and clarified the meaning of these themes. Conclusion: The attention paid and acknowledgement given to 'caring' and 'knowledge' by the student nurses showed that they are progressing toward their ultimate goal of being professional nurses. The student nurses' awareness of 'what is going on there?' and also support from other significant people facilitates the students' adaptation process and guarantees this progress. © 2005 International Council of Nurses.

  • 155.
    Ranheim, Albertine Elisabeth
    et al.
    Department of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Division of Caring Sciences, University of Mälardalen, Eskilstuna.
    Kärner, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eliciting reflections on caring theory in elderly caring practice2011In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 7296-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Caring theories are the description and conceptualization of the care that is given in caring practise by nurses and othe rprofessional caregivers with the aim of verbalizing and communicating caring phenomena. Intermittently, a theory-practice gap is given expression- that theory does not go along with clinical practice in caring. The aim of this study was an investigation into the possible disparity between theory and practice in caring by analysingnurses’ lived experience of the understanding of caring theory in practice in the context of municipal elderly care. Hermeneutical phenomenology was the research approach used to explore the lived experience of caring science theories in caring practice from the perspective of 12 nurses working in municipal care for elderly. The findings shows that the nurses Impulsively described their experience of detachment to caring theory, but when describing their caring intentions, the relationship to theory became apparent, and even confirmed their practice. As such, a seedbed exists for caring theory to be reflected on and cultivated in caring praxis. However, as the nurses describe, the caring theory must be sensitive enough for the nursing practitioners to accept. The gap revealed itself on an organisational level, as the nurses’ commission in municipal care did not correspond with their caring intention. We believe it is important to seriously consider what we want to achieve as a caring profession. We have to reflect on our responsibility as culture carriers and knowledge developers. We must make the disparate forces of intention and organisation become one intertwining force.

  • 156.
    Ranheim, Albertine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kärner, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arman, Maria
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm. Sweden.
    Rehnsfeldt, Arne Wilhelm
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Embodied reflection in practice-Touching the core of caring2010In: International Journal of Nursing Practice, ISSN 1322-7114, E-ISSN 1440-172X, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 241-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A study was performed with the aim of clarifying the integration of the caring act of touch with reflection on caring theory. Seven participant nurses in elderly care volunteered as coresearchers and performed a caring act called Rhythmical Embrocation, together with reflective dialogues on caring theory. The project lasted for 6 months and at the end qualitative interviews with participants were used to evaluate the study. The findings showed an opening of awareness, embodied moments of presence and an extended ability to act creatively in caring. In this study, the movement between theory and practice was the integration of the caring act with reflection on basic caring concepts. Implications for praxis development are that implementation and reflection by teams over certain caring acts might open the door to an expanded view of ones own caring ability that in the long run will benefit the patient.

  • 157.
    Ranheim, Albertine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kärner, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Caring Theory and Practice - Entering a Simultaneous Concept Analysis2012In: Nursing Forum, ISSN 0029-6473, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 78-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PROBLEM.  To better understand the approach of caring in nursing and the role of theory in practice, we wanted to consolidate the caring theory of Watson with the empirical findings from the three studies performed to reveal nurses' caring intentions and their lived experience of reflecting caring theory in practice.

    METHOD.  Through a simultaneous concept analysis of nine concepts, caring science theory was consolidated with the findings of the three empirical studies to reveal the dynamics of caring theory and caring practice.

    FINDINGS AND CONCLUSION.  These nine concepts were found to be interrelated with the advanced concept of mediating care, which emphasizes that mediating care calls for an authenticity of being and ability—an ability to be present to self and others in the dynamism of openness and frames of thought.

  • 158.
    Ranheim, Albertine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kärner, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Caring Theory and Practice: entering a Simultaneous Concept AnalysisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To better understand the approach of caring in nursing and the role of theory in practice, we wanted to consolidate the empirical findings from three studies performed to reveal nurses’ caring intentions, their lived experience of reflecting caring theory in practice, with caring theory by Watson (1979, 2008).

    Through a simultaneous concept analysis (SCA) of nine concepts, caring theory was consolidated with the findings of three empirical studies – to reveal the dynamics of caring theory and practice. In conclusion these nine concepts interrelate to the advanced concept mediating care. Mediating care is the visualized outcome or evidence for the intertwining of theory and practice in caring.

  • 159.
    Ranheim, Albertine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kärner, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Challenge for theory and practice in elderly care: intertwining forcesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Investigating into the possible disparity between theory and practice in caring by analysing nurses’ lived experience of the understanding of caring theory in practice in the context of municipal elderly care.

    Background: Caring theories are the description and conceptualization of the care that is given in caring practise by nurses and other professional caregivers with the aim of verbalizing and communicating caring phenomena. Intermittently, a theory –practice gap is given expression- that theory does not go along with clinical practice in caring.

    Method: Hermeneutical phenomenology was the research approach used to explore the lived experience of caring science theories in caring practice from the perspective of 12 nurses working in municipal care for elderly.

    Findings: A detachment to caring theory was enunciated, but when describing their caring intentions, the nurses’ relationship to theory became apparent, and even confirmed their practice. As such, a seedbed exists for caring theory to be reflected on and cultivated in caring praxis. However, as the nurses describe, the caring theory must be sensitive enough for the nursing practitioners to accept. The gap revealed itself on an organisational level, as the nurses’ commission in municipal care did not correspond with their caring intention.

    Conclusion: We believe it is important to seriously consider what we want to achieve as a caring profession. We have to reflect on our responsibility as culture carriers and knowledge developers. We must make the disparate forces of intention and organisation become one intertwining force.

  • 160.
    Salomonsson, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alehagen, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Self-efficacy in pregnant women with severe fear of childbirth2013In: Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic and Neonatal Nursing, ISSN 0884-2175, E-ISSN 1552-6909, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 191-202Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To apply and test the concept of childbirth self-efficacy to expectations of the upcoming birth in the context of severe fear of childbirth (SFOC).

    Design: Qualitative study using semi-structured interviews.

    Setting: A region in the southeast of Sweden

    Participants: Nulliparous pregnant women (n=17) with SFOC.

    Method: The interviews were analysed according to content analysis, using deductive and inductive approaches. The seven domains of the childbirth self-efficacy inventory (CBSEI) made up the matrix for the deductive analysis.

    Results: Behaviours for coping with labour and childbirth were related to six domains of childbirth self-efficacy; “concentration”, “support”, “control”, “ motor/relaxation”, “selfencouragement” and “breathing”. Most of these behaviours referred to capabilities to carry out (self-efficacy expectancy) rather than to beliefs in effectiveness (outcome expectancy). Five additional sub-domains representing defined childbirth self-efficacy were identified; “guidance”, “the body controls”, “the professionals´ control”, “reliance” and ‘fatalism’.

    Conclusion: The domains of childbirth self-efficacy have been deepened and expanded in relation to SFOC. It is imperative to identify pregnant women with SFOC and their efficacy beliefs in order to help them find appropriate coping behaviours prior to the onset of labour, and furthermore these behaviours must be supported by healthcare professionals during labour and childbirth. Support in the form of verbal persuasion emanating from the subdomains of childbirth self-efficacy ought to be added.

  • 161.
    Siwe, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pugh, C.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Use of clinical simulations for patient education: targeting an untapped audience.2009In: Medicine Meets Virtual Reality 17 / [ed] James D. Westwood, Susan W. Westwood, Randy S. Haluck, Helene M. Hoffman, Greg T. Mogel, Roger Phillips, Richard A. Robb, Kirby G. Vosburgh, Amsterdam, Netherlands: IOS Press, 2009, Vol. 142, p. 325-330Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In most cases, the health professional has been the target for simulation based learning curricula. We have developed a simulation based curriculum for patient education. In our curriculum lay-women learn how to perform the clinical female pelvic examination using a manikin-based trainer. Learner assessments show that prior negative expectations turned into positive expectations regarding future pelvic examinations.

  • 162.
    Siwe, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Gynecological patients learning to perform the pelvic examination: A win-win concept2013In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 73-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study explored gynecological patient perceptions of previous pelvic examinations (PE), a learning session about PE prior to a scheduled PE consultation, and the impact of the learning session on the PE during the consultation. Study design: Twelve informants were purposefully sampled from women with scheduled gynecologist appointments at a Swedish University Hospital. The learning session preceded the consultation and provided information on female genital anatomy and the PE, and the informant performed a PE on a mannequin. Individual qualitative interviews followed the consultation. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using a constant comparative analysis to acquire a deeper understanding of the womens experiences of the learning session and the subsequent PE. Results: Three categories were identified in the analysis: Harmonizing the bad with the good category, which primarily concerned the informants previous experiences of the PE. Gaining self-confidence through knowledge, which depicted the informants experiences of the learning session. Mental preparation enables bodily recapture, which was the summarizing category of informant experiences of the scheduled PE. The core category, active involvement triggers empowerment, was created from the categories, and constitutes the core of the empirical material. Conclusion: The informants active participation during the learning session increased their knowledge, generated self-confidence, triggered an empowering process, and promoted interaction with the examiner during their subsequent PE.

  • 163.
    Siwe, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Unexpected enlightening of a "female world". Male medical students experiences of learning and performing the first pelvic examination2012In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 123-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To gain a deeper understanding of how undergraduate male medical students experience a pelvic examination learning concept and performing the first pelvic examination (PE) on a professional patient. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanStudy design: A qualitative study. In-depth interviews with 12 male medical students after their involvement in a learning session about the PE, with professional patients and a supervising gynecologist as instructors. The interviews were analyzed according to the constant comparative method, a variety of content analysis, to acquire a deeper understanding of the students experiences and the ongoing social processes. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: The essence of the entire analysis was "Unexpected enlightening of a female world" and was identified from the three categories; "Not just any exam", "Professional supportive interaction" and "Humble awareness". The male students most prominent concern was how to establish a professional rapport with the patient in the PE situation. Beneficial active support from the professional patient and the gynecologist assisted the students to overcome inherent barriers and facilitated the examination procedure. The informants gained "inside information" from the patients perspective of being examined leading to a new awareness about an earlier unknown "female world" that is what women might go through before and during a PE and an humble understanding of how vulnerable it is to be placed in the examination position. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: The beneficial PE learning concept promoted an unexpected insight in what a woman might experience during a PE, creating a humble awareness of this vulnerable intimate situation and ideas for how to establish professional rapport.

  • 164.
    Siwe, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A Stronger and Clearer Perception of Self Womens Experience of Being Professional Patients in Teaching the Pelvic Examination: a qualitative study2006In: BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ISSN 1470-0328, Vol. 113, no 8, p. 890-895Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To identify and describe the experience of being a professional patient (PP) in teaching the pelvic examination (PE).

    Design Qualitative study using in-depth interviews.

    Setting Participant's home, place of work or other place of choice.

    Population Thirteen female PPs who teach the PE to medical students and student midwives.

    Method Semi-structured interviews analysed with an interpretive phenomenological approach.

    Main outcome measures Five themes were identified during the analysis: 'embodied knowledge', 'promoting a proper approach', 'redrawing private boundaries', 'feeling confident' and 'doing something meaningful'. The essence 'experience of stronger and clearer perception of self' emerged from the themes and is the described structure of the lived experience of the women who are PP.

    Conclusions Being a PP in this setting was beneficial for the women. They acquired increased knowledge about their bodies and PE procedure, which led to a new awareness of their own body. Contributing to students' learning in such an intimate examination procedure was rewarding and increased self-esteem.

  • 165.
    Siwe, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Female patients learning to perform the pelvic examination"Active involvement triggers empowerment": a qualitative study2007Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 166.
    Siwe, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Silén, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Performing the First Pelvic Examination: Female Medical Students’ Transition to Examiners2007In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, Vol. 69, no 1-3, p. 55-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To gain a deeper understanding of how female medical students perceive and experience performing their first pelvic examination (PE).

    Methods: A qualitative study. In-depth interviews after the students’ involvement in a learning session about the PE, with professional patients (PPs) as instructors and a gynaecologist as supervisor. The interviews were analysed according to the constant comparative method to acquire a deeper understanding of the students’ experiences and the ongoing social processes.

    Results: “Transcending unspoken boundaries and taboos, a prerequisite for learning” was the essence of the entire material and was identified from two categories: “A didactic design facilitates the transition to examiner” and “Interactive support enables creative learning of interpersonal and palpation skills”.

    Conclusion: Through interactive guidance from the PPs, the students overcame affective obstacles and achieved the aim of becoming an examiner. The favourable learning experience heightened their awareness of their own bodies and promoted a deeper interest in PEs, both as examiners and as patients.

    Practice implications: Engaging voluntary, healthy and knowledgeable women as instructors in the PE situation creates a safe learning environment and promotes interaction with students. Immediate feedback teaches students to integrate communicative and behavioural skills in a professional manner and to palpate the uterus.

  • 167.
    Sjölander, Catarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    The significance of social support and social networks among newly diagnosed lung cancer patients in Sweden2008In: Nursing and Health Sciences, ISSN 1441-0745, E-ISSN 1442-2018, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 182-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purposes of this study were to identify and describe the impact that social support and a social network has for adult people recently diagnosed with lung cancer in Sweden. Ten lung cancer patients participated. The data were collected using qualitative interviews based on an interview guide and were analyzed using constant comparative analysis. This led to a core category, "receiving confirmation as a person", which was grounded via four categories: "good relationships within a social network", "conversation enables support", "confidence in the situation", and "to manage by oneself". These categories were all related to each other. How these categories might have a positive influence on a person and give them the strength to move on were also clarified. The social network identified comprised of a few people who were close to the patient. The knowledge gained from this study can be used when developing care guidelines at different levels for use by health-care professionals. © Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  • 168.
    Steinvall, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Helena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Balancing a Changed Life Situation: The Lived Experience From Next of Kin to Persons With Inoperable Lung Cancer2011In: AMERICAN JOURNAL OF HOSPICE and PALLIATIVE MEDICINE, ISSN 1049-9091, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 82-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to identify and describe the experiences of quality of life/life situation among those who were next of kin to persons with inoperable lung cancer. Data were collected in qualitative interviews, where 11 next of kin articulated their lived experiences, and were interpreted through interpretive phenomenology. Four themes were identified: changed life situation, experiences of uncertainty due to awareness of the ill persons changed health status, interpersonal relationships, and false hopes due to health care professionals treatment. These four themes gave a structure presenting the essence: balancing a changed life situation. The findings of the study point out the importance of promoting support for the next of kin, because they are significantly affected by the changed life situation. There is a need to identify their needs and to support them.

  • 169.
    Svärd-Andersson, Siv
    et al.
    Hälsohögskolan Jönköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Living with an ostomy: Women's long term experiences2009In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 29, p. 19-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 170.
    Swahnberg, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Minimizing human dignity: staff perception of abuse in health care2012In: Clinical Ethics, ISSN 1477-7509, E-ISSN 1758-101X, Vol. 7, p. 33-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In earlier studies we have shown that abuse in health care (AHC) is commonly reported among both male and female patients. In this study, we present an evaluation of an intervention against AHC based on Forum Play. The evaluation was conducted by means of pre- and postintervention interviews with the staff at a woman's clinic. The interviews were analysed using the constant comparative method. The results of this postintervention study stand out in loud contrast to the results of the preintervention studies. Staff had moved from a distant and fluctuating awareness of AHC to a standpoint characterized by both moral imagination and a sense of responsibility.

  • 171.
    Swahnberg, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gender and Medicine.
    Thapar-Björkert, Suruchi
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Nullified: Women's perceptions of being abused in health care2007In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ISSN 0167-482X, E-ISSN 1743-8942, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 161-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. In a study performed with The NorVold Abuse Questionnaire (NorAQ) among Nordic gynecological patients, the prevalence of lifetime abuse in health care (AHC) was 13 - 28%. In the present study we chose a qualitative approach. Our aim was to develop a more in-depth understanding of AHC, as experienced by female Swedish patients. Study design. Qualitative interviews with 10 Swedish gynecological patients who had experienced AHC. The interviews were analyzed through Grounded Theory. Results. Saturation was reached after six interviews. In the analyses four categories emerged which explain what AHC meant to the participating women: felt powerless, felt ignored, experienced carelessness, and experienced non-empathy. To be nullified is the core category that theoretically binds the four categories together. The women's narratives described intensive current suffering even though the abusive event had taken place several years ago. Conclusions. The fact that AHC exists is a critical dilemma for an institution that has the society's commission to cure and/or to alleviate pain and suffering. In their narratives, women described the experience of 'being nullified', a core category that embodies AHC. © 2007 Informa UK Ltd.

  • 172.
    Swahnberg, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Thapar Björkert, Suruchi
    University of Bristol, UK.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mentally pinioned: Men's perceptions of being abused in health care.2009In: International Journal of Men's Health, ISSN 1532-6306, E-ISSN 1933-0278, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 60-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to deepen the understanding of male patients' experiences of abuse in health care (AHC). Thirteen patients who had experienced AHC were interviewed using a Grounded Theory methodology. Three categories, "Crises of Confidence," "Ignored" and "Frustration," intersected to form the core category "Mentally Pinioned." This last category referred to patients not being able to act in accordance with their own conviction and interests. This study shows that men's experience of AHC go far beyond what earlier research had suggested, which generally limited it to disagreements and misunderstandings in health care or hospital errors. In this study, AHC was shown to have a profound impact at a deep personal level, leaving the men concerned "mentally pinioned."

  • 173.
    Vargens, O
    et al.
    Faculty of Nursing, Rio de Janeiro State University, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Caring with difficulty: Brazilian nurses' experiences of gynaecological surgery care.2010In: International Journal of Nursing Practice, ISSN 1322-7114, E-ISSN 1440-172X, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 159-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was made by a qualitative approach based on symbolic interactionism and grounded theory. The subject was defined as what mutilation means for nurses who take care of women submitted to gynaecological surgery. The aim was to identify the interaction relationship of nurses as female with the phenomenon of mutilation in gynaecological surgeries and how it affects their relationship with female patients in this situation. Data were obtained by interviews with 16 nurses who work in gynaecology units. The findings present two core categories: speaking as a professional and speaking as female. When they spoke as professional nurses they defined mutilation technically. As females they verbalized their conflict and difficulty in working with mutilation and redefined it as being the loss of something very important for themselves. We conclude that female nurses when confronting female surgery distances themselves behind the professional nurse and performs nursing care as a daily routine. It means that these nurses live a personal conflict that influences directly on how they supply care. They care for but do not care about, the ethos of biomedicine leads carers on to a technical path from which it is difficult to get off.

  • 174.
    Wikström, Eva
    et al.
    Barnsjukhuset Huddinge/Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset.
    Fägerskiöld, Astrid
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Firm handling; the information exchange interaction by parents in paediatric care - An observational study2011In: International Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 1791-5201, E-ISSN 1792-037X, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 32-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Information exchange is fundamental in the paediatric care encounter. Health care professionals need further background knowledge to encounter the parents/guardians from their perspective in their minors’ paediatric care. The parents’/guardians’ ability to manage the situation is dependent on their receiving optimal information, which is why it is important to study how information is exchanged.

    Aim

    The aim of this study was to identify, describe and conceptualize how parents/guardians resolved their main concern in information exchange with health care professionals in paediatric care situations involving their minors.

    Methodology

    Glaser’s grounded theory method was used and all data were analysed using constant comparative analysis. The observational study took place at three paediatric outpatient units at a university hospital and 24 parents/guardians participated. Data sources were field notes from 37 observations of paediatric care situations and five adherent excerpts from the minors’ medical records. Grounded theory is a method of conceptualising behaviour, which is why an observational study of parents’/guardians’ information exchange and social interaction in the context of nursing care is relevant as research design.

    Results

    Firm handling was revealed as the way the parents/guardians resolved their main concerns when they were exchanging information about their minors’ paediatric care. Firm handling is built on five inter-related categories: representative advocating, collaborating, aim sharing, supportive resourcing and minor bypassing.

    Conclusions

    This knowledge suggests possible ways for health care professionals to design paediatric care that supports, facilitates, strengthens and improves the parents’/guardians’ firm handling. The key issue is to find ways to support parents/guardians and minors so they can participate in health care encounters according to their preferences. Firm handling gives an opportunity to both reinforce parenthood in paediatric care and invite minors to participate.

  • 175.
    Ängarne-Lindberg, Teresia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wadsby, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Young adults with childhood experience of parental divorce: Disappointment and contentment2009In: Journal of Divorce and Remarriage, ISSN 1050-2556, E-ISSN 1540-4811, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 172-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to use in-depth interviews to identify and describe experiences of parental divorce among adult children whose parents divorced 15 years earlier. Ten out of 76 interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim, and data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Two categories of experiences were identified: disappointment and contentment. Two subcategories of disappointment were distinguished: disappointment toward mother, father, or both, and disappointment with relatives and other surrounding persons. Four subcategories of contentment were distinguished: contentment in the belief that the members of the original family received a good or even better life after the divorce, contentment with how the divorce was handled by the parents, contentment and inner strength as a part of the child's own personality, and contentment with receiving adequate help during and after the parental divorce.

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