liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1234 151 - 155 of 155
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 151.
    Vikström, Olena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology.
    Tafazoli, Farideh
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology.
    Magnusson, Karl-Eric
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology.
    Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing molecule N-(3 oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone disrupts epithelial barrier integrity of Caco-2 cells2006In: FEBS Letters, ISSN 0014-5793, E-ISSN 1873-3468, Vol. 580, no 30, p. 6921-6928Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acyl-homoserine lactone (HSL) quorum sensing molecules play an important role in regulation of virulence gene expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here, we show that 3O-C12-HSL can disrupt barrier integrity in human epithelial Caco-2 cells as evidenced by decreased transepithelial electrical resistance (TER), increased paracellular flux, reduction in the expression and distribution of ZO-1 and occludin, and reorganization of F-actin. P. aeruginosa 3O-C12-HSL activate p38 and p42/44 kinases, and inhibition of these kinases partly prevented 3O-C12-HSL-induced changes in TER, paracellular flux and expression of occludin and ZO-1. These findings demonstrate that P. aeruginosa 3O-C12-HSL can modulate tight junction integrity of Caco-2 cells. © 2006 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  • 152.
    Wetterö, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Hellerstedt, T.
    Nygren, Patrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics.
    Broo, K.
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics.
    Magnusson, Karl-Eric
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology.
    Immobilized chemoattractant peptides mediate adhesion and distinct calcium-dependent cell signaling in human neutrophils2008In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 24, no 13, p. 6803-6811Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemotaxis is the stimulated directional migration of cells in response to chemotactic factors, manifested for instance during leukocyte interaction with chemoattractants in inflammation. The N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF) bacterial peptide family is particularly potent in attracting and activating neutrophilic granulocytes. To accomplish defined circumstances for recruitment and activation of cells, we fabricated semitransparent gold-coated glass coverslips functionalized with chemoattractant fMLF receptor peptide agonist analogues. Peptides based on a common leading four-amino-acid sequence Gly-Gly-Gly-Cys were thus coupled to two potent fMLF receptor agonists, N-formyl-Tyr-Nle-Phe-Leu- Nle-Gly-Gly-Gly-Cys and N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe-Gly-Gly-Gly-Cys, and a formylated control peptide, N-formyl-Gly-Gly-Gly-Cys. They were anchored via the SH group of Cys either directly to the gold surface or a mixed self-assembled monolayer composed of maleimide- and hydroxyl-terminated oligo(ethylene glycol) alkyldisulfides. The overall peptide immobilization procedure was characterized with ellipsometry, contact angle measurement, and infrared spectroscopy. When exposed to granulocytes, the agonist surface rapidly recruited neutrophils and the cells responded with extensive spreading and intracellular calcium transients within minutes. The reference peptide generated no such activation, and the cells maintained a more spherical morphology, suggesting that we have been able to immobilize chemoattractant receptor agonist peptides with retained bioactivity. This is a crucial step in designing surfaces with specific effects on cellular behavior. © 2008 American Chemical Society.

  • 153.
    Winberg Tinnerfelt, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Holm, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Särndahl, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vinet, Adrien F
    INRS, Canada.
    Descoteaux, Albert
    INRS, Canada.
    Magnusson, Karl-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rasmusson, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lerm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Leishmania donovani lipophosphoglycan inhibits phagosomal maturation via action on membrane rafts2009In: Microbes and infection, ISSN 1286-4579, E-ISSN 1769-714X, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 215-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lipophosphoglycan (LPG), the major surface glycoconjugate on Leishmania donovani promastigotes, is crucial for the establishment of infection inside macrophages. LPG comprises a polymer of repeating Gal beta 1,4Man alpha-PO4 attached to a lysophosphatidylinositol membrane anchor. LPG is transferred from the parasite to the host macrophage membrane during phagocytosis and induces periphagosomal F-actin accumulation correlating with an inhibition of phagosomal maturation. The biophysical properties of LPG suggest that it may be intercalated into membrane rafts of the host-cell membrane. The aim of this study was to investigate if the effects of LPG on phagosomal maturation are mediated via action on membrane rafts. We show that LPG accumulates in rafts during phagocytosis of L. donovani and that disruption of membrane rafts abolished the effects of LPG on periphagosomal F-actin and phagosomal maturation, indicating that LPG requires intact membrane rafts to manipulate host-cell functions. We conclude that LPG associates with membrane rafts in the host cell and exert its actions on host-cell actin and phagosomal maturation through subversion of raft function.

  • 154.
    Wu, Z
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology.
    Nybom, P
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology.
    Magnusson, Karl-Eric
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology.
    Distinct effects of Vibrio cholerae haemagglutinin/protease on the structure and localization of the tight junction-associated proteins occludin and ZO-12000In: Cellular Microbiology, ISSN 1462-5814, E-ISSN 1462-5822, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 11-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vibrio cholerae produces a little-studied cytotoxin, haemagglutinin/protease (HA/P), in addition to several better-characterized enterotoxins, i.e. cholera toxin (CT), zonula occludens toxin (ZOT) and accessory cholera enterotoxin (Ace). We have found recently that HA/P perturbs the barrier function of Mardin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cell line (MDCK-I) by affecting the intercellular tight junctions (TJs) and the F- actin cytoskeleton. In the present study we have assessed more specifically how TJs are affected by HA/P by investigating the cellular localization and biochemical integrity of two well-characterized TJ-associated proteins, occludin and ZO-1. Western blot analysis showed that occludin bands of 66-85 kDa were digested by HA/P to two predominant bands of around 50 kDa and 35 kDa, and that this degradation was greatly attenuated when the specific bacterial metalloproteinase inhibitor Zincov was co-administered. Trypsin, on the other hand, did not degrade occludin when it was applied in the same way, suggesting that the degradation of occludin by HA/P is an early and specific event. The other TJ-associated protein ZO-1 was not degraded by HA/P in parallel experiments, suggesting the selectivity of HA/P-associated protein degradation. Moreover, immunofluorescence labelling and confocal microscopy showed that ZO-1, but not occludin, around cell-cell boundaries was rearranged by HA/P treatment. Since ZO-1 is located on the inside of the plasma membrane and is directly associated with occludin, the results indicate that breakdown of occludin may send signals to ZO-1 that affect its organization and the structure of the F-actin cytoskeleton. Our finding that the zinc-containing metalloprotease of V. cholerae specifically degraded occludin suggests that specific degradation of important host proteins by bacterial zinc-containing metalloproteases may be an important mechanism in microbial pathogenesis.

  • 155.
    Zhang, Jing-Ping
    et al.
    Sun Yat Sen University.
    Zheng, Limin
    Sun Yat Sen University.
    Wang, Jiang-Hai
    Sun Yat Sen University.
    Magnusson, Karl-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Liu, Xin
    Sun Yat Sen University.
    Lipid Extract from Completely Sporoderm-broken Germinating Ganoderma sinensis Spores Elicits Potent Antitumor Immune Responses in Human Macrophages2009In: PHYTOTHERAPY RESEARCH, ISSN 0951-418X, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 844-850Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ganoderma sinensis has been used widely in Oriental countries for the prevention and treatment of various diseases including cancer. Previous studies have shown that the lipid extract from Ganoderma exhibits direct cytotoxicity against tumor cells. Here, it is reported that the lipid extract from germinating G. sinensis spores, at lower concentrations that have no direct tumoricidal activity, induce potent antitumor immune responses in human monocytes/macrophages. Upon stimulation with the lipid extract, monocytes/macrophages exhibited markedly increased production of proinflammatory cytokines and surface expression of costimulatory molecules. Conditioned medium from stimulated cells effectively suppressed the growth of tumor cells. Apparently, the lipid extract triggered macrophage activation via a mechanism different from that associated with LPS. Moreover, it was observed that the lipid extract could partially re-establish the antitumor activity of the immunosuppressive tumor-associated macrophages. These results indicated that in addition to its direct tumoricidal activity, the lipid extract from G. sinensis spores could exert antitumor activity by stimulating the activation of human monocytes/macrophages.

1234 151 - 155 of 155
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf