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  • 201.
    Engert, Andreas
    et al.
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Balduini, Carlo
    IRCCS Policlin San Matteo Fdn, Italy.
    Brand, Anneke
    Leids University, Netherlands.
    Coiffier, Bertrand
    University of Lyon 1, France.
    Cordonnier, Catherine
    Hop University of Henri Mondor, France.
    Doehner, Hartmut
    University of Klinikum Ulm, Germany.
    Duyvene de Wit, Thom
    European Hematol Assoc, Netherlands.
    Eichinger, Sabine
    Medical University of Wien, Austria.
    Fibbe, Willem
    Leids University, Netherlands.
    Green, Tony
    Cambridge Institute Medical Research, England.
    de Haas, Fleur
    European Hematol Assoc, Netherlands.
    Iolascon, Achille
    University of Naples Federico II, Italy.
    Jaffredo, Thierry
    University of Paris 06, France.
    Rodeghiero, Francesco
    Osped San Bortolo, Italy.
    Salles, Gilles
    University of Lyon, France.
    Jacob Schuringa, Jan
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Andre, Marc
    Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium.
    Andre-Schmutz, Isabelle
    University of Paris 05, France.
    Bacigalupo, Andrea
    Osped San Martino Genova, Italy.
    Bochud, Pierre-Yves
    University of Lausanne, Switzerland.
    den Boer, Monique
    Erasmus MC, Netherlands.
    Bonini, Chiara
    University of Milan, Italy.
    Camaschella, Clara
    San Raffaele Institute, Italy.
    Cant, Andrew
    Great North Childrens Hospital, England.
    Domenica Cappellini, Maria
    University of Milan, Italy.
    Cazzola, Mario
    University of Pavia, Italy.
    Lo Celso, Cristina
    Imperial Coll London, England.
    Dimopoulos, Meletios
    University of Athens, Greece.
    Douay, Luc
    University of Paris 06, France.
    Dzierzak, Elaine
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Einsele, Hermann
    University of Wurzburg, Germany.
    Ferreri, Andres
    Ist Science San Raffaele, Italy.
    De Franceschi, Lucia
    University of Verona, Italy.
    Gaulard, Philippe
    Hop Henri Mondor, France.
    Gottgens, Berthold
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Greinacher, Andreas
    University of Medical Greifswald, Germany; Ernst Moritz Arndt University of Greifswald, Germany.
    Gresele, Paolo
    University of Perugia, Italy.
    Gribben, John
    Queen Mary University of London, England.
    de Haan, Gerald
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Hansen, John-Bjarne
    University of Tromso, Norway.
    Hochhaus, Andreas
    University of Klinikum Jena, Germany.
    Kadir, Rezan
    Royal Free Hospital, England.
    Kaveri, Srini
    Institute National Sante and Rech Med, France.
    Kouskoff, Valerie
    University of Manchester, England.
    Kuehne, Thomas
    University of Kinderspital Beider Basel, Switzerland.
    Kyrle, Paul
    Medical University of Wien, Austria.
    Ljungman, Per
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Maschmeyer, Georg
    Klinikum Ernst Von Bergmann, Germany.
    Mendez-Ferrer, Simon
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Milsom, Michael
    Deutsch Krebsforschungszentrum Neuenheimer Feld, Germany.
    Mummery, Christine
    Leids University, Netherlands.
    Ossenkoppele, Gert
    Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre, Netherlands.
    Pecci, Alessandro
    University of Pavia, Italy.
    Peyvandi, Flora
    University of Milan, Italy.
    Philipsen, Sjaak
    Erasmus MC, Netherlands.
    Reitsma, Pieter
    Leids University, Netherlands.
    Maria Ribera, Jose
    Institute Catala Oncol, Spain.
    Risitano, Antonio
    University of Naples Federico II, Italy.
    Rivella, Stefano
    Weill Medical Coll, NY USA.
    Ruf, Wolfram
    Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Germany.
    Schroeder, Timm
    Swiss Federal Institute Technology, Switzerland.
    Scully, Marie
    University of Coll London Hospital, England.
    Socie, Gerard
    Hop St Louis, France.
    Staal, Frank
    Leids University, Netherlands.
    Stanworth, Simon
    John Radcliffe Hospital, England.
    Stauder, Reinhard
    Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria.
    Stilgenbauer, Stephan
    University of Klinikum Ulm, Germany.
    Tamary, Hannah
    Schneider Childrens Medical Centre Israel, Israel.
    Theilgaard-Monch, Kim
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Lay Thein, Swee
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Tilly, Herve
    University of Rouen, France.
    Trneny, Marek
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic.
    Vainchenker, William
    Institute Gustave Roussy, France.
    Maria Vannucchi, Alessandro
    University of Florence, Italy.
    Viscoli, Claudio
    University of Genoa, Italy.
    Vrielink, Hans
    Sanquin Research, Netherlands.
    Zaaijer, Hans
    Sanquin Research, Netherlands.
    Zanella, Alberto
    Osped Maggiore Policlin, Italy.
    Zolla, Lello
    University of Tuscia, Italy.
    Jan Zwaginga, Jaap
    Leids University, Netherlands.
    Aguilar Martinez, Patricia
    Hop St Eloi, France.
    van den Akker, Emile
    Sanquin Research, Netherlands.
    Allard, Shubha
    Barts Health NHS Trust and NHS Blood and Transplant, England.
    Anagnou, Nicholas
    University of Athens, Greece.
    Andolfo, Immacolata
    University of Naples Federico II, Italy.
    Andrau, Jean-Christophe
    Institute Genet Molecular Montpellier, France.
    Angelucci, Emanuele
    Osp A Businco, Italy.
    Anstee, David
    NHSBT Blood Centre, England.
    Aurer, Igor
    University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Avet-Loiseau, Herve
    Centre Hospital University of Toulouse, France.
    Aydinok, Yesim
    Ege University, Turkey.
    Bakchoul, Tamam
    University of Medical Greifswald, Germany.
    Balduini, Alessandra
    IRCCS Policlin San Matteo Fdn, Italy.
    Barcellini, Wilma
    Osped Maggiore Policlin, Italy.
    Baruch, Dominique
    University of Paris 05, France.
    Baruchel, Andre
    Hop University of Robert Dabre, France.
    Bayry, Jagadeesh
    Institute National Sante and Rech Med, France.
    Bento, Celeste
    Centre Hospital and University of Coimbra, Portugal.
    van den Berg, Anke
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Bernardi, Rosa
    Ist Science San Raffaele, Italy.
    Bianchi, Paola
    Osped Maggiore Policlin, Italy.
    Bigas, Anna
    Institute Hospital del Mar Investgac Med, Spain.
    Biondi, Andrea
    University of Milano Bicocca, Italy.
    Bohonek, Milos
    Central Mil Hospital, Czech Republic.
    Bonnet, Dominique
    Francis Crick Institute, England.
    Borchmann, Peter
    University Hospital Cologne Int, Germany.
    Borregaard, Niels
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Braekkan, Sigrid
    University of Tromso, Norway.
    van den Brink, Marcel
    Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10021 USA.
    Brodin, Ellen
    University of Sykehuset Nordic Norge, Norway.
    Bullinger, Lars
    University of Klin Ulm, Germany.
    Buske, Christian
    University of Klinikum Ulm, Germany.
    Butzeck, Barbara
    European Federat Assoc Patients Haemochromatosis, France.
    Cammenga, Jörg
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Campo, Elias
    University of Barcelona, Spain.
    Carbone, Antonino
    Centre Riferimento Oncol, Italy.
    Cervantes, Francisco
    University of Barcelona, Spain.
    Cesaro, Simone
    Policlin GB Rossi, Italy.
    Charbord, Pierre
    University of Paris 06, France.
    Claas, Frans
    Leids University, Netherlands.
    Cohen, Hannah
    Imperial Coll London, England.
    Conard, Jacqueline
    Hop Hotel Dieu, France.
    Coppo, Paul
    Hop St Antoine, France.
    Vives Corrons, Joan-Lluis
    University of Barcelona, Spain.
    da Costa, Lydie
    Hop Robert Debre, France.
    Davi, Frederic
    University of Paris 06, France.
    Delwel, Ruud
    Erasmus MC, Netherlands.
    Dianzani, Irma
    University of Turin, Italy.
    Domanovic, Dragoslav
    European Centre Disease Prevent and Control, Sweden.
    Donnelly, Peter
    Radboud University of Nijmegen Medical Centre, Netherlands.
    Dovc Drnovsek, Tadeja
    Zavod RS Transfuzijsko Med, Slovenia.
    Dreyling, Martin
    University of Munich, Germany.
    Du, Ming-Qing
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Dufour, Carlo
    Ist Giannina Gaslini, Italy.
    Durand, Charles
    University of Paris 06, France.
    Efremov, Dimitar
    Int Centre Genet Engn and Biotechnol, Italy.
    Eleftheriou, Androulla
    Thalassaemia Int Fed, Cyprus.
    Elion, Jacques
    University of Paris Diderot, France.
    Emonts, Marieke
    Great North Childrens Hospital, England.
    Engelhardt, Monika
    University of Klinikum Freiburg, Germany.
    Ezine, Sophie
    University of Paris 05, France.
    Falkenburg, Fred
    Leids University, Netherlands.
    Favier, Remi
    Hop Enfants A Trousseau, France.
    Federico, Massimo
    University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy.
    Fenaux, Pierre
    Hop St Louis, France.
    Fitzgibbon, Jude
    Queen Mary University of London, England.
    Flygare, Johan
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Foa, Robin
    University of Roma La Sapienza, Italy.
    Forrester, Lesley
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Galacteros, Frederic
    Hop University of Henri Mondor, France.
    Garagiola, Isabella
    University of Milan, Italy.
    Gardiner, Chris
    University of Oxford, England.
    Garraud, Olivier
    University of St Etienne, France.
    van Geet, Christel
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Geiger, Hartmut
    University of Klinikum Ulm, Germany.
    Geissler, Jan
    CML Advocates Network, Switzerland.
    Germing, Ulrich
    University of Klinikum Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Ghevaert, Cedric
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Girelli, Domenico
    Institute Cochin, France.
    Godeau, Bertrand
    Hop University of Henri Mondor, France.
    Goekbuget, Nicola
    University of Klinikum Frankfurt, Germany.
    Goldschmidt, Hartmut
    University of Klinikum Heidelberg, Germany.
    Goodeve, Anne
    University of Sheffield, England.
    Graf, Thomas
    Centre Genom Regulat, Spain.
    Graziadei, Giovanna
    University of Milan, Italy.
    Griesshammer, Martin
    Muhlenkreisklin, Germany.
    Gruel, Yves
    Hop Trousseau, France.
    Guilhot, Francois
    University of Poitiers, France.
    von Gunten, Stephan
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Gyssens, Inge
    University of Hasselt, Belgium.
    Halter, Jorg
    University of Spital Basel, Switzerland.
    Harrison, Claire
    Guys and St Thomas, England.
    Harteveld, Cornelis
    Leids University, Netherlands.
    Hellstrom-Lindberg, Eva
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hermine, Olivier
    University of Paris 05, France.
    Higgs, Douglas
    University of Oxford, England.
    Hillmen, Peter
    University of Leeds, England.
    Hirsch, Hans
    University of Basel, Switzerland.
    Hoskin, Peter
    Mt Vernon Hospital, England.
    Huls, Gerwin
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Inati, Adlette
    Lebanese American University, Lebanon.
    Johnson, Peter
    University of Southampton, England.
    Kattamis, Antonis
    University of Athens, Greece.
    Kiefel, Volker
    University of Medical Rostock, Germany.
    Kleanthous, Marina
    Cyprus School Molecular Med, Cyprus.
    Klump, Hannes
    University of Klinikum Essen, Germany.
    Krause, Daniela
    Georg Speyer Haus Institute Tumorbiol and Expt Therapy, Germany.
    Kremer Hovinga, Johanna
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Lacaud, Georges
    University of Manchester, England.
    Lacroix-Desmazes, Sebastien
    Institute National Sante and Rech Med, France.
    Landman-Parker, Judith
    Hop Armand Trousseau, France.
    LeGouill, Steven
    University of Nantes, France.
    Lenz, Georg
    University of Klinikum Munster, Germany.
    von Lilienfeld-Toal, Marie
    University of Klinikum Jena, Germany.
    von Lindern, Marieke
    Sanquin Research, Netherlands.
    Lopez-Guillermo, Armando
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Lopriore, Enrico
    Leiden University of Medical Centre, Netherlands.
    Lozano, Miguel
    University of Barcelona, Spain.
    MacIntyre, Elizabeth
    University of Paris 05, France.
    Makris, Michael
    Royal Hallamshire Hospital, England; University of Sheffield, England.
    Mannhalter, Christine
    Medical University of Wien, Austria.
    Martens, Joost
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Mathas, Stephan
    Charite University of Medical Berlin, Germany.
    Matzdorff, Axel
    Caritasclin Saarbrucken, Germany.
    Medvinsky, Alexander
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Menendez, Pablo
    University of Barcelona, Spain.
    Rita Migliaccio, Anna
    Mt Sinai Hospital, NY 10029 USA.
    Miharada, Kenichi
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Mikulska, Malgorzata
    University of Genoa, Italy.
    Minard, Veronique
    Institute Gustave Roussy, France.
    Montalban, Carlos
    MD Anderson Cancer Centre Madrid, Spain.
    de Montalembert, Mariane
    Necker Enfants Malades University Hospital, France.
    Montserrat, Emili
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel
    Aix Marseille University, France.
    Mountford, Joanne
    University of Glasgow, Scotland.
    Muckenthaler, Martina
    University of Klinikum Heidelberg, Germany.
    Mueller-Tidow, Carsten
    University of Klinikum Halle, Germany.
    Mumford, Andrew
    University of Bristol, England.
    Nadel, Bertrand
    University of Mediterranee, France.
    Navarro, Jose-Tomas
    Institute Catala Oncol, Spain.
    el Nemer, Wassim
    INSERM, France.
    Noizat-Pirenne, France
    Etab Francais Sang, France.
    OMahony, Brian
    European Haemophilia Consortium, Belgium.
    Oldenburg, Johannes
    University of Klinikum Bonn, Germany.
    Olsson, Martin
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Oostendorp, Robert
    Technical University of Munich, Germany.
    Palumbo, Antonio
    University of Turin, Italy.
    Passamonti, Francesco
    Osp Circolo and Fdn Macchi, Italy.
    Patient, Roger
    University of Oxford, England.
    Peffault de Latour, Regis
    NIH, MD 20892 USA.
    Pflumio, Francoise
    Institute Rech Radiobiol Cellulaire and Molecular IRCM, France.
    Pierelli, Luca
    University of Roma La Sapienza, Italy.
    Piga, Antonio
    University of Turin, Italy.
    Pollard, Debra
    Royal Free Hospital, England.
    Raaijmakers, Marc
    Erasmus MC, Netherlands.
    Radford, John
    University of Manchester, England.
    Rambach, Ralf
    DLH, Germany.
    Koneti Rao, A.
    Temple University of School Med, PA USA.
    Raslova, Hana
    University of Paris Sud, France.
    Rebulla, Paolo
    Ops Maggiore, Italy.
    Rees, David
    Kings Coll Hospital London, England.
    Ribrag, Vincent
    Institute Gustave Roussy, France.
    Rijneveld, Anita
    Erasmus MC, Netherlands.
    Rinalducci, Sara
    University of Tuscia, Italy.
    Robak, Tadeusz
    University of Medical Lodz, Poland.
    Roberts, Irene
    University of Oxford, England.
    Rodrigues, Charlene
    Great North Childrens Hospital, England.
    Rosendaal, Frits
    Leids University, Netherlands.
    Rosenwald, Andreas
    University of Wurzburg, Germany.
    Rule, Simon
    Derriford Hospital, England.
    Russo, Roberta
    University of Naples Federico II, Italy.
    Saglio, Guiseppe
    University of Turin, Italy.
    Sanchez, Mayka
    IJC, Spain.
    Scharf, Ruediger E.
    University of Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Schlenke, Peter
    Medical University of Graz, Austria.
    Semple, John
    St Michaels Hospital, Canada.
    Sierra, Jorge
    Hospital Santa Creu I Sant Pau, Spain.
    So-Osman, Cynthia
    Sanquin Research, Netherlands.
    Manuel Soria, Jose
    Hospital Santa Creu I Sant Pau, Spain.
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    Institute Appl Bioscience, Greece.
    Stegmayr, Bernd
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Stunnenberg, Henk
    Radboud University of Nijmegen Medical Centre, Netherlands.
    Swinkels, Dorine
    Radboud University of Nijmegen Medical Centre, Netherlands.
    Pedro Taborda Barata, Joao
    University of Lisbon, Portugal.
    Taghon, Tom
    University of Ghent, Belgium.
    Taher, Ali
    Amer University of Beirut Medical Centre, Lebanon.
    Terpos, Evangelos
    National and Kapodistrian University of Athes, Greece.
    Daniel Tissot, Jean
    University of Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Touw, Ivo
    Erasmus MC, Netherlands.
    Toye, Ash
    University of Bristol, England.
    Trappe, Ralf
    Charite University of Medical Berlin, Germany.
    Unal, Sule
    Hacettepe University, Turkey.
    Vaulont, Sophie
    Institute Cochin, France.
    Viprakasit, Vip
    Mahidol University, Thailand.
    Vitolo, Umberto
    University of Turin, Italy.
    van Wijk, Richard
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Wojtowicz, Agnieszka
    CHU Vaudois, Switzerland.
    Zeerleder, Sacha
    Sanquin Research, Netherlands.
    Zieger, Barbara
    University of Klinikum Freiburg, Germany.
    The European Hematology Association Roadmap for European Hematology Research: a consensus document2016In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 101, no 2, p. 115-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Hematology Association (EHA) Roadmap for European Hematology Research highlights major achievements in diagnosis and treatment of blood disorders and identifies the greatest unmet clinical and scientific needs in those areas to enable better funded, more focused European hematology research. Initiated by the EHA, around 300 experts contributed to the consensus document, which will help European policy makers, research funders, research organizations, researchers, and patient groups make better informed decisions on hematology research. It also aims to raise public awareness of the burden of blood disorders on European society, which purely in economic terms is estimated at (sic)23 billion per year, a level of cost that is not matched in current European hematology research funding. In recent decades, hematology research has improved our fundamental understanding of the biology of blood disorders, and has improved diagnostics and treatments, sometimes in revolutionary ways. This progress highlights the potential of focused basic research programs such as this EHA Roadmap. The EHA Roadmap identifies nine sections in hematology: normal hematopoiesis, malignant lymphoid and myeloid diseases, anemias and related diseases, platelet disorders, blood coagulation and hemostatic disorders, transfusion medicine, infections in hematology, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These sections span 60 smaller groups of diseases or disorders. The EHA Roadmap identifies priorities and needs across the field of hematology, including those to develop targeted therapies based on genomic profiling and chemical biology, to eradicate minimal residual malignant disease, and to develop cellular immunotherapies, combination treatments, gene therapies, hematopoietic stem cell treatments, and treatments that are better tolerated by elderly patients.

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  • 202.
    Enne, Marcelo
    et al.
    Ipanema Federal Hospital, Brazil.
    Schadde, Erik
    Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, Switzerland; Rush University, IL 60612 USA.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Hernandez Alejandro, Roberto
    University of Rochester, NY USA.
    Steinbruck, Klaus
    Bonsucesso Federal Hospital, Brazil.
    Viana, Eduardo
    Ipanema Federal Hospital, Brazil.
    Robles Campos, Ricardo
    Virgen Arrixaca University Hospital, Spain.
    Malago, Massimo
    Royal Free Hospital, England.
    Clavien, Pierre-Alain
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    De Santibanes, Eduardo
    Hospital Italiano Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Gayet, Brice
    Institute Mutualiste Montsouris, France.
    ALPPS as a salvage procedure after insufficient future liver remnant hypertrophy following portal vein occlusion2017In: HPB, ISSN 1365-182X, E-ISSN 1477-2574, Vol. 19, no 12, p. 1126-1129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A minimum future liver remnant (FLR) of 30% is required to avoid post hepatectomy liver failure (PHLF). Portal vein occlusion (PVO) is the main strategy to induce hypertrophy of the FLR, but some patients will not reach sufficient FLR hypertrophy to enable resection. Recently ALPPS has emerged as a "Salvage Procedure" for PVO failure. The aim of this study was to report the short term outcomes of ALPPS following PVO failure. Methods: A retrospective analysis of patients enrolled within the international ALPPS Registry between October 2012 and November 2015 (NCT01924741) was performed. Patients with documented PVO failure were included. The outcomes reported included feasibility, FLR growth rate and safety of ALPPS. Complications were recorded as per Clavien-Dindo classification. Results: From 510 patients enrolled in the Registry there were 22 patients with previous PVO failure. Two patients were excluded due to missing data and twenty patients were analysed. All of them completed the proposed ALPPS with a medium FLR increase of 88% (23-115%) between two stages and no 90-day mortality. Conclusion: In experienced centers, ALPPS following PVO failure is feasible and safe. The FLR hypertrophy was similar to other ALPPS series. ALPPS is a potential rescue strategy after PVO failure.

  • 203.
    Eriksson, Carl
    et al.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Marsal, Jan
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Bergemalm, Daniel
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Vigren, Lina
    Ystad Hospital, Sweden.
    Bjork, Jan
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Eberhardson, Michael
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Soderman, Charlotte
    St Goran Hospital, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro University, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Thorn, Mari
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Karlen, Per
    Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
    Hertervig, Erik
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Strid, Hans
    Södra Älvsborgs Sjukhus, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Almer, Sven
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Long-term effectiveness of vedolizumab in inflammatory bowel disease: a national study based on the Swedish National Quality Registry for Inflammatory Bowel Disease (SWIBREG)2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 52, no 6-7, p. 722-729Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of vedolizumab in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, these findings may not reflect the clinical practice. Therefore, we aimed to describe a vedolizumab-treated patient population and assess long-term effectiveness.Materials and methods: Patients initiating vedolizumab between 1 June 2014 and 30 May 2015 were identified through the Swedish National Quality Registry for IBD. Prospectively collected data on treatment and disease activity were extracted. Clinical remission was defined as Patient Harvey Bradshaw indexamp;lt;5 in Crohns disease (CD) and Patient Simple Clinical Colitis Activity indexamp;lt;3 in ulcerative colitis (UC).Results: Two-hundred forty-six patients (147CD, 92 UC and 7 IBD-Unclassified) were included. On study entry, 86% had failed TNF-antagonist and 48% of the CD patients had undergone1 surgical resection. After a median follow-up of 17 (IQR: 14-20) months, 142 (58%) patients remained on vedolizumab. In total, 54% of the CD- and 64% of the UC patients were in clinical remission at the end of follow-up, with the clinical activity decreasing (pamp;lt;.0001 in both groups). Faecal-calprotectin decreased in CD (pamp;lt;.0001) and in UC (p=.001), whereas CRP decreased in CD (p=.002) but not in UC (p=.11). Previous anti-TNF exposure (adjusted HR: 4.03; 95% CI: 0.96-16.75) and elevated CRP at baseline (adjusted HR: 2.22; 95% CI: 1.10-4.35) seemed to be associated with discontinuation because of lack of response. Female sex was associated with termination because of intolerance (adjusted HR: 2.75; 95% CI: 1.16-6.48).Conclusion: Vedolizumab-treated patients represent a treatment-refractory group. A long-term effect can be achieved, even beyond 1 year of treatment.

  • 204.
    Eriksson, Mia
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Genetics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Peña-Martínez, Pablo
    Department of Clinical Genetics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Ramakrishnan, Ramprasad
    Department of Clinical Genetics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Chapellier, Marion
    Department of Clinical Genetics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Högberg, Carl
    Department of Clinical Genetics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Glowacki, Gabriella
    Department of Clinical Genetics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Orsmark-Pietras, Christina
    Department of Clinical Genetics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Velasco-Hernández, Talía
    Department of Molecular Hematology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Lazarevic, Vladimir Lj
    Department of Hematology, Oncology and Radiation Physics, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Juliusson, Gunnar
    Department of Hematology, Oncology and Radiation Physics, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Cammenga, Jörg
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Mulloy, James C
    Division of Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, Cincinnati Childrens Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA.
    Richter, Johan
    Department of Hematology, Oncology and Radiation Physics, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Fioretos, Thoas
    Department of Clinical Genetics, Lund, Sweden.
    Ebert, Benjamin L.
    Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Womens Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA.
    Järås, Marcus
    Department of Clinical Genetics, Lund, Sweden.
    Agonistic targeting of TLR1/TLR2 induces p38 MAPK-dependent apoptosis and NF?B-dependent differentiation of AML cells2017In: Blood advances, ISSN 2473-9529, Vol. 1, no 23, p. 2046-2057Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with poor survival, and there is a strong need to identify disease vulnerabilities that might reveal new treatment opportunities. Here, we found that Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1) and TLR2 are upregulated on primary AML CD34+CD38-cells relative to corresponding normal bone marrow cells. Activating the TLR1/TLR2 complex by the agonist Pam3CSK4 inMLL-AF9-driven human AML resulted in induction of apoptosis by p38 MAPK-dependent activation of Caspase 3 and myeloid differentiation in a NF?B-dependent manner. By using murineTrp53 -/- MLL-AF9AML cells, we demonstrate that p53 is dispensable for Pam3CSK4-induced apoptosis and differentiation. Moreover, murineAML1-ETO9a-driven AML cells also were forced into apoptosis and differentiation on TLR1/TLR2 activation, demonstrating that the antileukemic effects observed were not confined toMLL-rearranged AML. We further evaluated whether Pam3CSK4 would exhibit selective antileukemic effects. Ex vivo Pam3CSK4 treatment inhibited murine and human leukemia-initiating cells, whereas murine normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) were relatively less affected. Consistent with these findings, primary human AML cells across several genetic subtypes of AML were more vulnerable for TLR1/TLR2 activation relative to normal human HSPCs. In theMLL-AF9AML mouse model, treatment with Pam3CSK4 provided proof of concept for in vivo therapeutic efficacy. Our results demonstrate that TLR1 and TLR2 are upregulated on primitive AML cells and that agonistic targeting of TLR1/TLR2 forces AML cells into apoptosis by p38 MAPK-dependent activation of Caspase 3, and differentiation by activating NF?B, thus revealing a new putative strategy for therapeutically targeting AML cells.

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  • 205.
    Eriksson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Segelmark, Mårten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Frequency, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Outcome of Gastrointestinal Disease in Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis and Microscopic Polyangiitis2018In: Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0315-162X, E-ISSN 1499-2752, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 529-537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Involvement of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a rare complication of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) and microscopic polyangiitis (MPA). The aim was to describe frequency, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of GI disease in a large series of patients in a single center. Methods. A database that includes all patients with GPA and MPA diagnosed since 1997 in a defined area of southeastern Sweden as well as prevalent older cases and tertiary referral patients was screened for patients with GI disease. Data were retrieved from the patients medical records, and GI manifestations of vasculitis were defined as proposed by Pagnoux, et al in 2005. Results. Fourteen (6.5%) of 216 consecutive patients with GPA/MPA had GI manifestations. Abdominal pain and GI bleeding were the most common symptoms. Radiology was important for detection of GI disease, while endoscopy failed to support the diagnosis in many patients. Because of perforation, 5 patients underwent hemicolectomy or small intestine resection. Primary anastomosis was created in 2/5 and enterostomy in 3/5 patients. One patient had a hemicolectomy because of lower GI bleeding. One sigmoid abscess was treated with drainage, and 1 intraabdominal bleeding condition with arterial coiling. Two patients died from GI disease. GPA and MPA patients with and without GI disease exhibited a similar overall survival. Conclusion. GI disease was found in 6.5% among 216 patients with GPA or MPA. Surgery was judged necessary only in cases with GI perforation or severe bleeding. Multidisciplinary engagement is strongly recommended.

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  • 206.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Holm, Torbjörn
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Pettersson, David
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Norrtalje Hospital, Sweden.
    Berglund, Åke
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Cedermark, Björn
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Radu, Calin
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Johansson, Hemming
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Machado, Mikael
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hjern, Fredrik
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Syk, Ingvar
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Glimelius, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Martling, Anna
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Optimal fractionation of preoperative radiotherapy and timing to surgery for rectal cancer (Stockholm III): a multicentre, randomised, non-blinded, phase 3, non-inferiority trial2017In: The Lancet Oncology, ISSN 1470-2045, E-ISSN 1474-5488, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 336-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Radiotherapy reduces the risk of local recurrence in rectal cancer. However, the optimal radiotherapy fractionation and interval between radiotherapy and surgery is still under debate. We aimed to study recurrence in patients randomised between three different radiotherapy regimens with respect to fractionation and time to surgery. Methods In this multicentre, randomised, non-blinded, phase 3, non-inferiority trial (Stockholm III), all patients with a biopsy-proven adenocarcinoma of the rectum, without signs of non-resectability or distant metastases, without severe cardiovascular comorbidity, and planned for an abdominal resection from 18 Swedish hospitals were eligible. Participants were randomly assigned with permuted blocks, stratified by participating centre, to receive either 5 x 5 Gy radiation dose with surgery within 1 week (short-course radiotherapy) or after 4-8 weeks (short-course radiotherapy with delay) or 25 x 2 Gy radiation dose with surgery after 4-8 weeks (long-course radiotherapy with delay). After a protocol amendment, randomisation could include all three treatments or just the two short-course radiotherapy treatments, per hospital preference. The primary endpoint was time to local recurrence calculated from the date of randomisation to the date of local recurrence. Comparisons between treatment groups were deemed non-inferior if the upper limit of a double-sided 90% CI for the hazard ratio (HR) did not exceed 1.7. Patients were analysed according to intention to treat for all endpoints. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00904813. Findings Between Oct 5, 1998, and Jan 31, 2013, 840 patients were recruited and randomised; 385 patients in the three-arm randomisation, of whom 129 patients were randomly assigned to short-course radiotherapy, 128 to short-course radiotherapy with delay, and 128 to long-course radiotherapy with delay, and 455 patients in the two-arm randomisation, of whom 228 were randomly assigned to short-course radiotherapy and 227 to short-course radiotherapy with delay. In patients with any local recurrence, median time from date of randomisation to local recurrence in the pooled short-course radiotherapy comparison was 33.4 months (range 18.2-62.2) in the short-course radiotherapy group and 19.3 months (8.5-39.5) in the short-course radiotherapy with delay group. Median time to local recurrence in the long-course radiotherapy with delay group was 33.3 months (range 17.8-114.3). Cumulative incidence of local recurrence in the whole trial was eight of 357 patients who received short-course radiotherapy, ten of 355 who received short-course radiotherapy with delay, and seven of 128 who received long-course radiotherapy (HR vs short-course radiotherapy: short-course radiotherapy with delay 1.44 [95% CI 0.41-5.11]; long-course radiotherapy with delay 2.24 [0.71-7.10]; p=0.48; both deemed non-inferior). Acute radiation-induced toxicity was recorded in one patient (amp;lt;1%) of 357 after short-course radiotherapy, 23 (7%) of 355 after short-course radiotherapy with delay, and six (5%) of 128 patients after long-course radiotherapy with delay. Frequency of postoperative complications was similar between all arms when the three-arm randomisation was analysed (65 [50%] of 129 patients in the short-course radiotherapy group; 48 [38%] of 128 patients in the short-course radiotherapy with delay group; 50 [39%] of 128 patients in the long-course radiotherapy with delay group; odds ratio [OR] vs short-course radiotherapy: short-course radiotherapy with delay 0.59 [95% CI 0.36-0.97], long-course radiotherapy with delay 0.63 [0.38-1.04], p=0.075). However, in a pooled analysis of the two short-course radiotherapy regimens, the risk of postoperative complications was significantly lower after short-course radiotherapy with delay than after short-course radiotherapy (144 [53%] of 355 vs 188 [41%] of 357; OR 0.61 [95% CI 0.45-0.83] p=0.001). Interpretation Delaying surgery after short-course radiotherapy gives similar oncological results compared with short-course radiotherapy with immediate surgery. Long-course radiotherapy with delay is similar to both short-course radiotherapy regimens, but prolongs the treatment time substantially. Although radiation-induced toxicity was seen after short-course radiotherapy with delay, postoperative complications were significantly reduced compared with short-course radiotherapy. Based on these findings, we suggest that short-course radiotherapy with delay to surgery is a useful alternative to conventional short-course radiotherapy with immediate surgery.

  • 207.
    Esserman, Laura J.
    et al.
    University of Calif San Francisco, CA 94115 USA.
    Yau, Christina
    University of Calif San Francisco, CA 94115 USA; Buck Institute Research Aging, CA USA.
    Thompson, Carlie K.
    University of Calif San Francisco, CA 94115 USA.
    vant Veer, Laura J.
    University of Calif San Francisco, CA 94115 USA.
    Borowsky, Alexander D.
    University of Calif Davis, CA 95616 USA.
    Hoadley, Katherine A.
    University of N Carolina, NC USA.
    Tobin, Nicholas P.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; University Hospital, Sweden.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; University Hospital, Sweden.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Benz, Christopher C.
    University of Calif San Francisco, CA 94115 USA; Buck Institute Research Aging, CA USA.
    Lindstrom, Linda S.
    University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Use of Molecular Tools to Identify Patients With Indolent Breast Cancers With Ultralow Risk Over 2 Decades2017In: JAMA Oncology, ISSN 2374-2437, E-ISSN 2374-2445, Vol. 3, no 11, p. 1503-1510Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMPORTANCE The frequency of cancers with indolent behavior has increased with screening. Better tools to identify indolent tumors are needed to avoid overtreatment. OBJECTIVE To determine if a multigene classifier is associated with indolent behavior of invasive breast cancers in women followed for 2 decades. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This is a secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial of tamoxifen vs no systemic therapy, with more than 20-year follow-up. An indolent threshold (ultralow risk) of the US Food and Drug Administration-cleared MammaPrint 70-gene expression score was established above which no breast cancer deaths occurred after 15 years in the absence of systemic therapy. Immunohistochemical markers (n = 727 women) and Agilent microarrays, for MammaPrint risk scoring (n = 652 women), were performed from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded primary tumor blocks. Participants were postmenopausal women with clinically detected node-negative breast cancers treated with mastectomy or lumpectomy and radiation enrolled in the Stockholm tamoxifen (STO-3) trial, 1976 to 1990. EXPOSURES After 2 years of tamoxifen vs no systemic therapy, regardless of hormone receptor status, patients without relapse who reconsented were further randomized to 3 additional years or none. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Breast cancer-specific survival assessed by Kaplan-Meier analyses and multivariate Cox proportional hazard modeling, adjusted for treatment, patient age, year of diagnosis, tumor size, grade, hormone receptors, and ERBB2/HER2 and Ki67 status. RESULTS In this secondary analysis of node-negative postmenopausal women, conducted in the era before mammography screening, among the 652 women with MammaPrint scoring available (median age, 62.8 years of age), 377 (58%) and 275 (42%) were MammaPrint low and high risk, respectively, while 98 (15%) were ultralow risk. At 20 years, women with 70-gene high and low tumors but not ultralow tumors had a significantly higher risk of disease-specific death compared with ultralow-risk patients by Cox analysis (hazard ratios, 4.73 [95% CI, 1.38-16.22] and 4.54 [95% CI, 1.40-14.80], respectively). There were no deaths in the ultralow-risk tamoxifen-treated arm at 15 years, and these patients had a 20-year disease-specific survival rate of 97%, whereas for untreated patients the survival rate was 94%. Recursive partitioning identified ultralow risk as the most significant predictor of good outcome. In tumors "not ultralow risk," tumor size greater than 2 cm was the most predictive of outcome. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The ultralow-risk threshold of the 70-gene MammaPrint assay can identify patients whose long-term systemic risk of death from breast cancer after surgery alone is exceedingly low.

  • 208.
    Everhov, Asa H.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro Univ, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sachs, Michael C.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nordenvall, Caroline
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Söderling, Jonas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ekbom, Anders
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Neovius, Martin
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Orebro Univ, Sweden; Univ Nottingham, England; Columbia Univ Coll Phys and Surg, NY USA.
    Askling, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Olen, Ola
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Sachs Children and Youth Hosp, Sweden.
    Incidence and Treatment of Patients Diagnosed With Inflammatory Bowel Diseases at 60 Years or Older in Sweden2018In: Gastroenterology, ISSN 0016-5085, E-ISSN 1528-0012, Vol. 154, no 3, p. 518-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND amp; AIMS: Diagnosis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) is increasing among elderly persons (60 years or older). We performed a nationwide population-based study to estimate incidence and treatment of IBD. METHODS: We identified all incident IBD cases in Sweden from 2006 through 2013 using national registers and up to 10 matched population comparator subjects. We collected data on the patients health care contacts and estimated incidence rates, health service burden, pharmacologic treatments, extra-intestinal manifestations, and surgeries in relation to age of IBD onset (pediatric, amp;lt;18 years; adults, 18-59 years; elderly, amp;gt;= 60 years). RESULTS: Of 27,834 persons diagnosed with incident IBD, 6443 (23%) had a first diagnosis of IBD at 60 years or older, corresponding to an incidence rate of 35/100,000 person-years (10/100,000 person-years for Crohns disease, 19/100,000 person-years for ulcerative colitis, and 5/100,000 person-years for IBD unclassified). During a median follow-up period of 4.2 years (range, 0-9 years), elderly patients had less IBD-specific outpatient health care but more IBD-related hospitalizations and overall health care use than adult patients with IBD. Compared with patients with pediatric or adult-onset IBD, elderly patients used fewer biologics and immunomodulators but more systemic corticosteroids. Occurrence of extra-intestinal manifestations was similar in elderly and adult patients, but bowel surgery was more common in the elderly (13% after 5 years vs 10% in adults) (Pamp;lt;.001). The absolute risk of bowel surgery was higher in the elderly than in the general population, but in relative terms, the risk increase was larger in younger age groups. CONCLUSIONS: In a nationwide cohort study in Sweden, we associated diagnosis of IBD at age 60 years or older with a lower use of biologics and immunomodulators but higher absolute risk of bowel surgery, compared with diagnosis at a younger age. The large differences in pharmacologic treatment of adults and elderly patients are not necessarily because of a milder course of disease and warrant further investigation.

  • 209.
    Everhov, Asa H.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Khalili, Hamed
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Harvard Med Sch, MA 02115 USA.
    Askling, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Orebro Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Nordenvall, Caroline
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Neovius, Martin
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Soderling, Jonas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Olen, Ola
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Sachs Children and Youth Hosp, Sweden.
    Work Loss Before and After Diagnosis of Crohns Disease2019In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, ISSN 1078-0998, E-ISSN 1536-4844, Vol. 25, no 7, p. 1237-1247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The aim of this study was to examine work loss in patients with Crohns disease. Methods Using nationwide registers, we identified incident patients with Crohns disease (2007-2010) and population comparator subjects without inflammatory bowel disease, matched by age, sex, calendar year, health care region, and education level. We assessed the number of lost workdays due to sick leave and disability pension from 5 years before to 5 years after first diagnosis of Crohns disease or end of follow-up (September 30, 2015). Results Among the 2015 incident Crohns disease patients (median age, 35 years; 50% women), both the proportion with work loss and the mean annual number of lost workdays were larger 5 years before diagnosis (25%; mean, 45 days) than in the 10,067 comparators (17%; mean, 29 days). Increased work loss was seen during the year of diagnosis, after which it declined to levels similar to before diagnosis. Of all patients, 75% had no work loss 24-12 months before diagnosis. Of them, 84% had full work ability also 12-24 months after diagnosis. In patients with total work loss (8.3% of all) before diagnosis, 83% did not work after. Among those with full work ability before diagnosis, the absolute risk of having total work loss after diagnosis was 1.4% (0.43% in the comparators). Our results were consistent across several sensitivity analyses using alternative definitions for date of diagnosis. Conclusions Patients with Crohns disease had increased work loss several years before diagnosis, possibly explained by comorbidity or by diagnostic delay.

  • 210.
    Everhov, Asa H.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Sachs, Michael C.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Malmborg, Petter
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nordenvall, Caroline
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Khalili, Hamed
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Harvard Med Sch, MA 02115 USA.
    Elmberg, Maria
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ekbom, Anders
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Askling, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Jakobsson, Gustav
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Orebro Univ, Sweden; Orebro Univ, Sweden; Univ Nottingham, England; Columbia Univ Coll Phys and Surg, NY USA.
    Olen, Ola
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Sachs Children and Youth Hosp, Sweden.
    Changes in inflammatory bowel disease subtype during follow-up and over time in 44,302 patients2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 55-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To investigate inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) register-based subtype classifications over a patients disease course and over time. Methods: We examined International Classification of Diseases coding in patients with amp;gt;= 2 IBD diagnostic listings in the National Patient Register 2002-2014 (n = 44,302). Results: 18% of the patients changed diagnosis (17% of adults, 29% of children) during a median follow-up of 3.8 years. Of visits with diagnoses of Crohns disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC), 97% were followed by the same diagnosis, whereas 67% of visits with diagnosis IBD-unclassified (IBD-U) were followed by another IBD-U diagnosis. Patients with any diagnostic change changed mostly once (47%) or twice (31%), 39% from UC to CD, 33% from CD to UC and 30% to or from IBD-U. Using a classification algorithm based on the first two diagnoses (incident classification), suited for prospective cohort studies, the proportion adult patients with CD, UC, and IBD-U 2002-2014 were 29%, 62%, and 10% (43%, 45%, and 12% in children). A classification model incorporating additional information from surgeries and giving weight to the last 5 years of visits (prevalent classification), suited for description of a study population at end of follow-up, classified 31% of adult cases as CD, 58% as UC and 11% as IBD-U (44%, 38%, and 18% in children). Conclusions: IBD subtype changed in 18% during follow-up. The proportion with CD increased and UC decreased from definition at start to end of follow-up. IBD-U was more common in children.

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  • 211.
    Everhov, Asa
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Sachs, Michael
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Khalili, Hamed
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Harvard Med Sch, MA 02115 USA.
    Askling, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Neovius, Martin
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Nordenvall, Caroline
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Soderling, Jonas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Olen, Ola
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Sachs Children and Youth Hosp, Sweden.
    Work Loss in Relation to Pharmacological and Surgical Treatment for Crohns Disease: A Population-Based Cohort Study2020In: Clinical Epidemiology, ISSN 1179-1349, E-ISSN 1179-1349, Vol. 12, p. 273-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Patients with Crohns disease have increased work loss. We aimed to describe changes in work ability in relation to pharmacological and surgical treatments. Patients and Methods: We linked data from the Swedish National Patient Register, The Swedish Quality Register for Inflammatory Bowel Disease SWIBREG, The Prescribed Drug Register, The Longitudinal Integrated Database for Health Insurance and Labour Market Studies, and the Social Insurance Database. We identified working-age (19-59 years) patients with incident Crohns disease 2006-2013 and population comparator subjects matched by sex, birth year, region, and education level. We assessed the number of lost workdays due to sick leave and disability pension before and after treatments. Results: Of 3956 patients (median age 34 years, 51% women), 39% were treated with aminosalicylates, 52% with immunomodulators, 22% with TNF inhibitors, and 18% with intestinal surgery during a median follow-up of 5.3 years. Most patients had no work loss during the study period (median=0 days). For all treatments, the mean number of lost workdays increased during the months before treatment initiation, peaked during the first month of treatment and decreased thereafter, and was heavily influenced by sociodemographic factors and amount of work loss before first Crohns disease diagnosis. The mean increase in work loss days compared to pre-therapeutic level was similar to 3 days during the first month of treatment for all pharmacological therapies and 11 days for intestinal surgery. Three months after treatment initiation, 88% of patients treated surgically and 90-92% of patients treated pharmacologically had the same amount of work loss as before treatment start. Median time to return to work was 2 months for all treatments. Conclusion: In this regular clinical setting, patients treated surgically had more lost workdays than patients treated pharmacologically, but return to work was similar between all treatments.

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  • 212.
    Everhov, Åsa H.
    et al.
    Soder Sjukhuset, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Khalili, Hamed
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Harvard Med Sch, MA USA.
    Askling, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Univ Orebro, Sweden.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Univ Orebro, Sweden.
    Nordenvall, Caroline
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Soderling, Jonas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Olen, Ola
    Soder Sjukhuset, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Sachs Children and Youth Hosp, Sweden.
    Neovius, Martin
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Sick Leave and Disability Pension in Prevalent Patients With Crohns Disease2018In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 12, no 12, p. 1418-1428Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aims: Crohns disease may affect the ability to work and lead to permanent disability. We aimed to investigate work loss in prevalent patients. Methods: We identified patients with Crohns disease and general population comparators matched by sex, birth year, healthcare region and education. We assessed days of sick leave and disability pension retrieved from the Swedish Social Insurance Agency and estimated the absolute and relative risk of receiving disability pension [minimum 25% work impairment]. Results: In 2014, the 20 638 Crohns disease patients [median age 44 years] had more than twice as many mean lost workdays [disability pension: 44; sick leave: 19] as the 102 038 comparators [disability pension: 20; sick leave: 8], mean difference 35 days [95% confidence interval 33-37]. However, the majority had no lost workdays [68% of patients and 85% of comparators]. The proportion of patients receiving disability pension was 15% (6.5% in the comparators, risk ratio 2.34 [2.25-2.43]) and was higher in all subgroups, especially in female patients [28% vs 13% in the comparators], in those with amp;lt;= 9 years of education [41% vs 23%] and in ages 60-64 years [46% vs 25%]. The relative risk of disability pension within the patient cohort [adjusted for age, sex, region and education] was higher in patients with complicated disease behaviour, extraintestinal manifestations, need of surgery or treatment with biologics. The differences between patients and comparators remained when comparing other calendar years [2006-2013]. Conclusion: Work loss was found in approximately one-third of patients. The mean number of lost workdays was twice as high as in the comparators.

  • 213.
    Evert, Jasmine
    et al.
    School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Pathak, Surajit
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Chettinad Academy of Research and Education, Kelambakkam, India.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Zhang, Hong
    School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    A Study on Effect of Oxaliplatin in MicroRNA Expression in Human Colon Cancer2018In: Journal of Cancer, ISSN 1837-9664, E-ISSN 1837-9664, Vol. 9, no 11, p. 2046-2053Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Colorectal cancer is a commonly diagnosed malignancy and also the major cause of death worldwide. Chemotherapy is the primary therapy for advanced colorectal cancer. Although oxaliplatin has potential effect in colorectal cancer therapy, the molecular mechanisms involved in its cytotoxic effects are not well elucidated. This study outlines the regulatory effects of oxaliplatin on miRNAs expression in colon cancer cells and correlates it with the changing microRNA expression with p53 and p73 expression status in cells. HCT116(p53+/+) and HCT116(p53-/-) cells were exposed to oxaliplatin, and the cellular viability was determined by XTT. p73 was knocked down using siRNA and the tumor cells were then treated with oxaliplatin. The expression profile of 384 miRNAs was determined by TaqMan (R) human miRNA array and calculated by the Delta Delta C-t method. Cellular viability was found to decrease after the treatment with oxaliplatin in a dose-dependent manner. The wild-type p53 cells were found to be more sensitive than the null-p53 derivatives. A selective set of miRNAs were either up-regulated or down-regulated in response to the oxaliplatin treatment with a presumable role of p53 and p73 proteins. The miRNAs expression is known to influence the pharmacodynamic mechanisms of oxaliplatin and these effects have been observed to be regulated by p53 and p73. Our results may therefore provide more evidence for identifying a suitable biomarker for the diagnosis of colon cancer.

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  • 214.
    Falk, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Patient Safety.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis.
    Lagerfelt, Marie
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Woisetschläger, Mischa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Ahlström, Ulla
    Vårdcentralen Kungsgatan Linköping, Sweden Region Östergötland, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Modifierad brittisk modell kortade ledtid till datortomografi av kolon2015In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The British national Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has presented guidelines based on signs and symptoms which should raise a suspicion of colorectal cancer. A slightly modified version of these guidelines, adapted to Swedish conditions, named Swedish NICE (sNICE) criteria, was implemented at eight primary care centres. By following the sNICE criteria, cases with higher degree of suspicion of colorectal cancer were advised for computer tomography (CT) of the colon, whereas cases of low degree of suspicion were advised for the considerably less time and patient demanding CT of the abdomen. For patients with isolated anal symptoms without presence of sNICE criteria, active expectancy for six weeks was recommended, followed by renewed consideration. Results showed that the ratio between CT colon and CT abdomen was reduced from 2.2 to 1.1 after introduction of the sNICE criteria. Also, the proportion of patients undergoing CT colon within two weeks from admittance was increased from 3 to 25 %. We conclude that the sNICE criteria may be a useful supportive tool for the primary care physician.

  • 215.
    Fan, Chuanwen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Sichuan Univ, Peoples R China; Collaborat Innovat Ctr Biotherapy, Peoples R China.
    Kopsida, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Liu, Youbin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Sichuan Univ, Peoples R China; Collaborat Innovat Ctr Biotherapy, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Hong
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Gao, Jingfang
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Arbman, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping.
    Cao, Si-Yu-Wei
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Li, Yuan
    Sichuan Univ, Peoples R China; Collaborat Innovat Ctr Biotherapy, Peoples R China.
    Zhou, Zong-Guang
    Sichuan Univ, Peoples R China; Collaborat Innovat Ctr Biotherapy, Peoples R China.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Prognostic Heterogeneity of MRE11 Based on the Location of Primary Colorectal Cancer Is Caused by Activation of Different Immune Signals2020In: Frontiers in Oncology, ISSN 2234-943X, E-ISSN 2234-943X, Vol. 9, article id 1465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: MRE11 plays an important role in DNA damage response for the maintenance of genome stability, and is becoming a prognostic marker for cancers, including colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the correlations of MRE11 to prognosis and tumor-infiltrating inflammatory cells (TIICs) in different locations of CRC remains unclear. Methods: Among Swedish and TCGA-COREAD patients, we investigated the association of MRE11 expression, tumor-infiltrating inflammatory cells (TIICs) and microsatellite status with survival in right-sided colon cancer (RSCC) and left-sided colon and rectal cancer (LSCRC). The signaling of MRE11-related was further analyzed using weighted gene co-expression network analysis and ClueGO. Results: High MRE11 expression alone or combination of high MRE11 expression with high TIICs was related to favorable prognosis in LSCRC. Moreover, high MRE11 expression was associated with favorable prognosis in LSCRC with microsatellite stability. The relationships above were adjusted for tumor stage, differentiation, and/or TIICs. However, no such evidence was observed in RSCC. Several signaling pathways involving MRE11 were found to be associated with cell cycle and DNA repair in RSCC and LSCRC, whereas, the activation of the immune response and necrotic cell death were specifically correlated with LSCRC. Conclusions: High MRE11 expression is an independent prognostic marker in LSCRC and enhanced prognostic potency of combining high MRE11 with high TIICs in LSCRC, mainly due to differential immune signaling activated by MRE11 in RSCC and LSCRC, respectively.

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  • 216. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Flejmer, Anna M.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Radiation burden from modern radiation therapy techniques including proton therapy for breast cancer treatment - clinical implications2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this thesis was to study the clinical implications of modern radiotherapy techniques for breast cancer treatment. This was investigated in several individual studies.

    Study I investigated the implications of using the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) from the perspective of clinical recommendations for breast cancer radiotherapy. Pencil beam convolution plans of 40 breast cancer patients were recalculated with AAA. The latter plans had a significantly worse coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) with the 93% isodose, higher maximum dose in hotspots, higher volumes of the ipsilateral lung receiving doses below 25 Gy and smaller volumes with doses above 25 Gy. AAA also predicted lower doses to the heart.

    Study II investigated the implications of using the irregular surface compensator (ISC), an electronic compensation algorithm, in comparison to three‐dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D‐CRT) for breast cancer treatment. Ten breast cancer patients were planned with both techniques. The ISC technique led to better coverage of the clinical target volume of the tumour bed (CTV‐T) and PTV in almost all patients with significant improvement in homogeneity.

    Study III investigated the feasibility of using scanning pencil beam proton therapy for regional and loco‐regional breast cancer with comparison of ISC photon planning. Ten patients were included in the study, all with dose heterogeneity in the target and/or hotspots in the normal tissues outside the PTV. The proton plans showed comparable or better CTV‐T and PTV coverage, with large reductions in the mean doses to the heart and the ipsilateral lung.

    Study IV investigated the added value of enhanced inspiration gating (EIG) for proton therapy. Twenty patients were planned on CT datasets acquired during EIG and freebreathing (FB) using photon 3D‐CRT and scanning proton therapy. Proton spot scanning has a high potential to reduce the irradiation of organs‐at‐risk for most patients, beyond what could be achieved with EIG and photon therapy, especially in terms of mean doses to the heart and the left anterior descending artery.

    Study V investigated the impact of physiological breathing motion during proton radiotherapy for breast cancer. Twelve thoracic patients were planned on CT datasets during breath‐hold at inhalation phase and breath‐hold at exhalation phase. Between inhalation and exhalation phase there were very small differences in dose delivered to the target and cardiovascular structures, with very small clinical implication.

    The results of these studies showed the potential of various radiotherapy techniques to improve the quality of life for breast cancer patients by limiting the dose burden for normal tissues.

    List of papers
    1. Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm versus Pencil Beam Convolution for treatment planning of breast cancer: implications for target coverage and radiation burden of normal tissue
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm versus Pencil Beam Convolution for treatment planning of breast cancer: implications for target coverage and radiation burden of normal tissue
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    2015 (English)In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 2841-2848Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The present study aimed to investigate the implications of using the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) for calculation of target coverage and radiation burden of normal tissues. Most model parameters, recommendations and planning guidelines associated with a certain outcome are from the era of pencil beam convolution (PBC) calculations on relatively simple assumptions of energy transport in media. Their relevance for AAA calculations that predict more realistic dose distributions needs to be evaluated. Patients and Methods: Forty patients with left-sided breast cancer receiving 3D conformal radiation therapy were planned using PBC with a standard protocol with 50 Gy in 25 fractions according to existing re-commendations. The plans were subsequently recalculated with the AAA and relevant dose parameters were determined and compared to their PBC equivalents. Results: The majority of the AAA-based plans had a significantly worse coverage of the planning target volume and also a higher maximum dose in hotspots near sensitive structures, suggesting that these criteria could be relaxed for AAA-calculated plans. Furthermore, the AAA predicts higher volumes of the ipsilateral lung will receive doses below 25 Gy and smaller volume doses above 25 Gy. These results indicate that lung tolerance criteria might also have to be relaxed for AAA planning in order to maintain the level of normal tissue toxicity. The AAA also predicts lower doses to the heart, thus indicating that this organ might be more sensitive to radiation than thought from PBC-based calculations. Conclusion: The AAA should be preferred over the PBC algorithm for breast cancer radiotherapy as it gives more realistic dose distributions. Guidelines for plan acceptance might have to be re-evaluated to account for differences in dose predictions in order to maintain the current levels of control and complication rates. The results also suggest an increased radiosensitivity of the heart, thus indicating that a revision of the current models for cardiovascular complications may be needed.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    International Institute of Anticancer Research, 2015
    Keywords
    breast radiotherapy, dose calculation algorithm, analytical anisotropic algorithm, pencil beam convolution, planning guidelines
    National Category
    Cancer and Oncology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117854 (URN)000354267200045 ()25964565 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2015-05-11 Created: 2015-05-11 Last updated: 2017-12-04
    2. Clinical implications of the ISC technique for breast cancer radiotherapy and comparison with clinical recommendations
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clinical implications of the ISC technique for breast cancer radiotherapy and comparison with clinical recommendations
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    2014 (English)In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 34, no 7, p. 3563-3568Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The project studied the implications of using the irregular surface compensator (ISC) technique in comparison to three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for breast cancer treatment. ISC is an electronic compensation algorithm that modulates the fluence across the radiation fields to compensate for irregularly shaped surfaces and deliver a homogeneous dose to a compensation plane. Methods: Ten breast cancer patients (five left- and five right-sided) were planned with both techniques. The planning was done for 50 Gy in 25 fractions with 2 Gy per fraction in all patients. Physical parameters such as doses to the clinical target volume (CTV-T) and the planned target volume (PTV), heterogeneity index and doses to lung and heart were determined and compared for the treatment plans. Results: The ISC technique led to significantly better coverage of the CTV-T and PTV in almost all patients with statistically significant better homogeneity of the dose distribution. The contralateral lung and the heart receive the same doses with both ISC and 3D-CRT plans. However, ISC showed a trend towards decreasing the volumes of the ipsilateral lung irradiated with high doses. Consequently this led to better compliance with the national recommendations for breast radiotherapy. Conclusion: The ISC technique leads to an improvement of the target coverage and the radiation burden of the ipsilateral lung thus allowing better compliance with the national recommendations and increasing the potential for improved quality of life for breast cancer patients. It should therefore be preferred over 3D-CRT for breast cases with difficult dose homogeneity to the PTV or CTV-T.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    International Institute of Anticancer Research, 2014
    Keywords
    breast radiotherapy, irregular surface compensator, fractionated radiotherapy, irradiation technique
    National Category
    Cancer and Oncology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-106944 (URN)000338780300044 ()24982370 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2014-05-28 Created: 2014-05-28 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    3. Potential benefit of scanned proton beam versus photons as adjuvant radiation therapy in breast cancer
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Potential benefit of scanned proton beam versus photons as adjuvant radiation therapy in breast cancer
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    2015 (English)In: International Journal of Particle Therapy, ISSN 2331-5180, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 845-855Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using scanned proton beams as adjuvant radiation therapy for breast cancer. Long-term cardiopulmonary complications may worsen the quality of life and reduce the positive contribution of radiation therapy, which has been known to improve long-term control of locoregional disease as well as the long-term survival for these patients.

    Materials and Methods: Ten patients with stage I-III cancer (either after mastectomy or lumpectomy, left- or right-sided) were included in the study. The patients were identified from a larger group where dose heterogeneity in the target and/or hotspots in the normal tissues qualified them for irregular surface compensator planning with photons. The patients underwent planning with 2 scanned proton beam planning techniques, single-field uniform dose and intensity-modulated proton therapy, and the results were compared with those from irregular surface compensator. All volumes of interest were delineated and reviewed by experienced radio-oncologists. The patients were prescribed 50 GyRBE in 25 fractions. Dosimetric parameters of interest were compared with a paired, 2-tailed Student t test.

    Results: The proton plans showed comparable or better target coverage than the original photon plans. There were also large reductions with protons in mean doses to the heart (0.2 versus 1.3 GyRBE), left anterior descending artery (1.4 versus 6.4 GyRBE), and the ipsilateral lung (6.3 versus 7.7 GyRBE). This reduction is important from the point of view of the quality of life of the patients after radiation therapy. No significant differences were found between single-field uniform dose and intensity-modulated proton therapy plans.

    Conclusion: Spot scanning technique with protons may improve target dose homogeneity and further reduce doses to the organs at risk compared with advanced photon techniques. The results from this study indicate a potential for protons as adjuvant radiation therapy in breast cancer and a further step toward the individualization of treatment based on anatomic and comorbidity characteristics.

    Keywords
    breast radiation therapy, proton radiation therapy, pencil beam scanning, irregular surface compensator, fractionated radiation therapy
    National Category
    Cancer and Oncology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-112949 (URN)10.14338/IJPT-14-00013.1 (DOI)
    Available from: 2014-12-31 Created: 2014-12-31 Last updated: 2016-04-27
    4. Respiratory gating for proton beam scanning versus photon 3D-CRT for breast cancer radiotherapy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Respiratory gating for proton beam scanning versus photon 3D-CRT for breast cancer radiotherapy
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    2016 (English)In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 55, no 5, p. 577-583Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background Respiratory gating and proton therapy have both been proposed to reduce the cardiopulmonary burden in breast cancer radiotherapy. This study aims to investigate the additional benefit of proton radiotherapy for breast cancer with and without respiratory gating.

    Material and methods Twenty left-sided patients were planned on computed tomography (CT)-datasets acquired during enhanced inspiration gating (EIG) and free-breathing (FB), using photon three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and scanned proton beams. Ten patients received treatment to the whole breast only (WBO) and 10 were treated to the breast and the regional lymph nodes (BRN). Dosimetric parameters characterizing the coverage of target volumes and the cardiopulmonary burden were compared using a paired, two-tailed Student’s t-test.

    Results Protons ensured comparable or better target coverage than photons in all patients during both EIG and FB. The heterogeneity index decreased from 12% with photons to about 5% with protons. The mean dose to the ipsilateral lung was reduced in BRN patients from 12 Gy to 7 Gy (RBE) in EIG and from 14 Gy to 6-7 Gy (RBE) in FB, while for WBO patients all values were about 5-6 Gy (RBE). The mean dose to heart decreased by a factor of four in WBO patients [from 1.1 Gy to 0.3 Gy (RBE) in EIG and from 2.1 Gy to 0.5 Gy (RBE) in FB] and 10 in BRN patients [from 2.1 Gy to 0.2 Gy (RBE) in EIG and from 3.4 Gy to 0.3 Gy (RBE) in FB]. Similarly, the mean and the near maximum dose to left anterior descending artery (LAD) were significantly lower (p<0.05) with protons in comparison with photons.

    Conclusion Proton spot scanning has a high potential to reduce the irradiation of organs at risk and other normal tissues for most patients, beyond what could be achieved with EIG and photon therapy. The largest dose sparing has been seen for BRN patients, both in terms of cardiopulmonary burden and integral dose.

    National Category
    Cancer and Oncology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123274 (URN)10.3109/0284186X.2015.1120883 (DOI)000375566700008 ()
    Note

    Funding agencies:  LiU Cancer research network at Linkoping University; Region Ostergotland; ALF Grants from Region Ostergotland (Sweden)

    Available from: 2015-12-09 Created: 2015-12-09 Last updated: 2017-04-24
    5. Impact of physiological breathing motion for breast cancer radiotherapy with proton beam scanning: An in silico study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of physiological breathing motion for breast cancer radiotherapy with proton beam scanning: An in silico study
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    2017 (English)In: Physica medica (Testo stampato), ISSN 1120-1797, E-ISSN 1724-191X, Vol. 39, p. 88-94Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the impact of breathing motion on proton breast treatment plans. Twelve patients with CT datasets acquired during breath-hold-at-inhalation (BHI), breath-hold-at-exhalation (BHE) and in free-breathing (FB) were included in the study. Proton plans were designed for the left breast for BHI and subsequently recalculated for BHE or designed for FB and recalculated for the extreme breath-hold phases. The plans were compared from the point of view of their target coverage and doses to organs-at-risk. The median amplitude of breathing motion determined from the positions of the sternum was 4.7 mm (range 0.5-14.6 mm). Breathing motion led to a degradation of the dose coverage of the target (heterogeneity index increased from 4-7% to 8-11%), but the degraded values of the dosimetric parameters of interest fulfilled the clinical criteria for plan acceptance. Exhalation decreased the lung burden [average dose 3.1-4.5 Gy (RBE)], while inhalation increased it [average dose 5.8-6.8 Gy (RBE)]. The individual values depended on the field arrangement. Smaller differences were seen for the heart [average dose 0.1-0.2 Gy (RBE)] and the LAD [1.9-4.6 Gy (RBE)]. Weak correlations were generally found between changes in dosimetric parameters and respiratory motion. The differences between dosimetric parameters for various breathing phases were small and their expected clinical impact is consequently quite small. The results indicated that the dosimetric parameters of the plans corresponding to the extreme breathing phases are little affected by breathing motion, thus suggesting that this motion might have little impact for the chosen beam orientations with scanned proton beams.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2017
    National Category
    Cancer and Oncology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127369 (URN)10.1016/j.ejmp.2017.06.001 (DOI)000405493200012 ()28606833 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: LiU Cancer research network at Linkoping University and Region Ostergotland (Sweden)

    Available from: 2016-04-23 Created: 2016-04-23 Last updated: 2018-05-02Bibliographically approved
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  • 217.
    Flejmer, Anna M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Chehrazi, Behnaz
    Department of Physics, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Josefsson, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Toma-Dasu, Iuliana
    Medical Radiation Physics, Stockholm University and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. The Skandion Clinic, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Impact of physiological breathing motion for breast cancer radiotherapy with proton beam scanning: An in silico study2017In: Physica medica (Testo stampato), ISSN 1120-1797, E-ISSN 1724-191X, Vol. 39, p. 88-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the impact of breathing motion on proton breast treatment plans. Twelve patients with CT datasets acquired during breath-hold-at-inhalation (BHI), breath-hold-at-exhalation (BHE) and in free-breathing (FB) were included in the study. Proton plans were designed for the left breast for BHI and subsequently recalculated for BHE or designed for FB and recalculated for the extreme breath-hold phases. The plans were compared from the point of view of their target coverage and doses to organs-at-risk. The median amplitude of breathing motion determined from the positions of the sternum was 4.7 mm (range 0.5-14.6 mm). Breathing motion led to a degradation of the dose coverage of the target (heterogeneity index increased from 4-7% to 8-11%), but the degraded values of the dosimetric parameters of interest fulfilled the clinical criteria for plan acceptance. Exhalation decreased the lung burden [average dose 3.1-4.5 Gy (RBE)], while inhalation increased it [average dose 5.8-6.8 Gy (RBE)]. The individual values depended on the field arrangement. Smaller differences were seen for the heart [average dose 0.1-0.2 Gy (RBE)] and the LAD [1.9-4.6 Gy (RBE)]. Weak correlations were generally found between changes in dosimetric parameters and respiratory motion. The differences between dosimetric parameters for various breathing phases were small and their expected clinical impact is consequently quite small. The results indicated that the dosimetric parameters of the plans corresponding to the extreme breathing phases are little affected by breathing motion, thus suggesting that this motion might have little impact for the chosen beam orientations with scanned proton beams.

  • 218.
    Flejmer, Anna M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Dohlmar, Frida
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Futurum - Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping.
    Stenmarker, Margaretha
    Futurum - Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm versus Pencil Beam Convolution for treatment planning of breast cancer: implications for target coverage and radiation burden of normal tissue2015In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 2841-2848Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The present study aimed to investigate the implications of using the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) for calculation of target coverage and radiation burden of normal tissues. Most model parameters, recommendations and planning guidelines associated with a certain outcome are from the era of pencil beam convolution (PBC) calculations on relatively simple assumptions of energy transport in media. Their relevance for AAA calculations that predict more realistic dose distributions needs to be evaluated. Patients and Methods: Forty patients with left-sided breast cancer receiving 3D conformal radiation therapy were planned using PBC with a standard protocol with 50 Gy in 25 fractions according to existing re-commendations. The plans were subsequently recalculated with the AAA and relevant dose parameters were determined and compared to their PBC equivalents. Results: The majority of the AAA-based plans had a significantly worse coverage of the planning target volume and also a higher maximum dose in hotspots near sensitive structures, suggesting that these criteria could be relaxed for AAA-calculated plans. Furthermore, the AAA predicts higher volumes of the ipsilateral lung will receive doses below 25 Gy and smaller volume doses above 25 Gy. These results indicate that lung tolerance criteria might also have to be relaxed for AAA planning in order to maintain the level of normal tissue toxicity. The AAA also predicts lower doses to the heart, thus indicating that this organ might be more sensitive to radiation than thought from PBC-based calculations. Conclusion: The AAA should be preferred over the PBC algorithm for breast cancer radiotherapy as it gives more realistic dose distributions. Guidelines for plan acceptance might have to be re-evaluated to account for differences in dose predictions in order to maintain the current levels of control and complication rates. The results also suggest an increased radiosensitivity of the heart, thus indicating that a revision of the current models for cardiovascular complications may be needed.

  • 219.
    Flejmer, Anna M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Edvardsson, Anneli
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Dohlmar, Frida
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Josefsson, Dan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Futurum - Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Witt Nyström, Petra
    Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Respiratory gating for proton beam scanning versus photon 3D-CRT for breast cancer radiotherapy2016In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 55, no 5, p. 577-583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Respiratory gating and proton therapy have both been proposed to reduce the cardiopulmonary burden in breast cancer radiotherapy. This study aims to investigate the additional benefit of proton radiotherapy for breast cancer with and without respiratory gating.

    Material and methods Twenty left-sided patients were planned on computed tomography (CT)-datasets acquired during enhanced inspiration gating (EIG) and free-breathing (FB), using photon three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and scanned proton beams. Ten patients received treatment to the whole breast only (WBO) and 10 were treated to the breast and the regional lymph nodes (BRN). Dosimetric parameters characterizing the coverage of target volumes and the cardiopulmonary burden were compared using a paired, two-tailed Student’s t-test.

    Results Protons ensured comparable or better target coverage than photons in all patients during both EIG and FB. The heterogeneity index decreased from 12% with photons to about 5% with protons. The mean dose to the ipsilateral lung was reduced in BRN patients from 12 Gy to 7 Gy (RBE) in EIG and from 14 Gy to 6-7 Gy (RBE) in FB, while for WBO patients all values were about 5-6 Gy (RBE). The mean dose to heart decreased by a factor of four in WBO patients [from 1.1 Gy to 0.3 Gy (RBE) in EIG and from 2.1 Gy to 0.5 Gy (RBE) in FB] and 10 in BRN patients [from 2.1 Gy to 0.2 Gy (RBE) in EIG and from 3.4 Gy to 0.3 Gy (RBE) in FB]. Similarly, the mean and the near maximum dose to left anterior descending artery (LAD) were significantly lower (p<0.05) with protons in comparison with photons.

    Conclusion Proton spot scanning has a high potential to reduce the irradiation of organs at risk and other normal tissues for most patients, beyond what could be achieved with EIG and photon therapy. The largest dose sparing has been seen for BRN patients, both in terms of cardiopulmonary burden and integral dose.

  • 220.
    Flejmer, Anna M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Witt Nyström, Petra
    Uppsala University Hospital.
    Dohlmar, Frida
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Josefsson, Dan
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Potential benefit of scanned proton beam versus photons as adjuvant radiation therapy in breast cancer2015In: International Journal of Particle Therapy, ISSN 2331-5180, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 845-855Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using scanned proton beams as adjuvant radiation therapy for breast cancer. Long-term cardiopulmonary complications may worsen the quality of life and reduce the positive contribution of radiation therapy, which has been known to improve long-term control of locoregional disease as well as the long-term survival for these patients.

    Materials and Methods: Ten patients with stage I-III cancer (either after mastectomy or lumpectomy, left- or right-sided) were included in the study. The patients were identified from a larger group where dose heterogeneity in the target and/or hotspots in the normal tissues qualified them for irregular surface compensator planning with photons. The patients underwent planning with 2 scanned proton beam planning techniques, single-field uniform dose and intensity-modulated proton therapy, and the results were compared with those from irregular surface compensator. All volumes of interest were delineated and reviewed by experienced radio-oncologists. The patients were prescribed 50 GyRBE in 25 fractions. Dosimetric parameters of interest were compared with a paired, 2-tailed Student t test.

    Results: The proton plans showed comparable or better target coverage than the original photon plans. There were also large reductions with protons in mean doses to the heart (0.2 versus 1.3 GyRBE), left anterior descending artery (1.4 versus 6.4 GyRBE), and the ipsilateral lung (6.3 versus 7.7 GyRBE). This reduction is important from the point of view of the quality of life of the patients after radiation therapy. No significant differences were found between single-field uniform dose and intensity-modulated proton therapy plans.

    Conclusion: Spot scanning technique with protons may improve target dose homogeneity and further reduce doses to the organs at risk compared with advanced photon techniques. The results from this study indicate a potential for protons as adjuvant radiation therapy in breast cancer and a further step toward the individualization of treatment based on anatomic and comorbidity characteristics.

  • 221.
    Floodeen, H.
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden; University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Hagberg, L. A.
    Örebro County Council, Sweden.
    Matthiessen, P.
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden; University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Costs and resource use following defunctioning stoma in low anterior resection for cancer - A long-term analysis of a randomized multicenter trial2017In: European Journal of Surgical Oncology, ISSN 0748-7983, E-ISSN 1532-2157, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 330-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Defunctioning stoma in low anterior resection (LAR) for rectal cancer can prevent major complications, but overall cost-effectiveness for the healthcare provider is unknown. This study compared inpatient healthcare resources and costs within 5 years of LAR between two randomized groups of patients undergoing LAR with and without defunctioning stoma. Method: Five-year follow-up of a randomized, multicenter trial on LAR (NCT 00636948) with (stoma; n = 116) or without (no stoma; n = 118) defunctioning stoma comparing inpatient healthcare resources and costs. Unplanned stoma formation, days with stoma, length of hospital stay, reoperations, and total associated inpatient costs were analyzed. Results: Average costs were (sic) 21.663 per patient with defunctioning stoma and (sic) 15.922 per patient without defunctioning stoma within 5 years of LAR, resulting in an average cost-saving of (sic) 5.741. There was no difference between groups regarding the total number of days with any stoma (stoma = 33 398 vs. no stoma = 34 068). The total number of unplanned reoperations were 70 (no stoma) and 32 (stoma); p amp;lt; 0.001. In the group randomized to no stoma at LAR, 30.5% (36/118) required an unplanned stoma later. Conclusion: Randomization to defunctioning stoma in LAR was more expensive than no stoma, despite the cost-savings associated with a reduced frequency of anastomotic leakage. Both groups required the same total number of days with a stoma within five years of LAR. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd, BASO similar to The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  • 222.
    Fohlin, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Regional Cancer Center.
    Bekkhus, Tove
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Sandström, Josefine
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    RAB6C is an independent prognostic factor of estrogen receptor-positive/progesterone receptor-negative breast cancer2020In: Oncology Letters, ISSN 1792-1074, E-ISSN 1792-1082, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 52-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The majority of breast cancer tumors are estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) and can be treated with endocrine therapy. However, certain patients may exhibit a good prognosis without systemic treatment. The aim of the present study was to identify novel prognostic factors for patients with ER breast cancer tumors using gene copy data, and to investigate if these factors have prognostic value in subgroups categorized by progesterone receptor status (PR). Public data, including the whole genome gene copy data of 199 systemically untreated patients with ER+ tumors, were utilized in the present study. To assess prognostic value, patients were divided into two groups using the median gene copy number as a cut-off for the SNPs that were the most variable. One SNP was identified, which indicated that the Ras-related protein Rab-6C (RAB6C) gene may exhibit prognostic significance. Therefore, RAB6C protein expression was subsequently investigated in a second independent cohort, consisting of 469 systematically untreated patients (of which 310 were ER+) who received long term follow-up. In the public data set, a distant recurrence risk reduction of 55% was determined for copy numbers above the median value of RAB6C compared with numbers below [multivariable adjusted hazard ratio (HR), 0.45; 95% CI 0.28-0.72; P=0.001)]. It was also more pronounced in the ER+/PR- subgroup (HR, 0.15; 95% CI, 0.05-0.46; P=0.001). In the second cohort, patients of the ER+/PR- subgroup who exhibited high RAB6C expression had a reduced distant recurrence risk (HR, 0.17; 95% CI, 0.05-0.60; P=0.006). However, this was not identified among ER+/PR- tumors (HR, 1.31; 95% CI, 0.69-2.48; P=0.41). The results of the present study indicated that RAB6C serves as an independent prognostic factor of distant recurrence risk in systemically untreated patients with an ER+/PR- tumor.

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  • 223.
    Fornander, Lotta
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Norrköping. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Brismar, Tom
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hansson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wikstroem, Heidi
    Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Cortical plasticity in patients with median nerve lesions studied with MEG2016In: Somatosensory & motor research, ISSN 0899-0220, E-ISSN 1369-1651, Vol. 33, no 3-4, p. 178-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have previously shown age- and time-dependent effects on brain activity in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study of patients with median nerve injury. Whereas fMRI measures the hemodynamic changes in response to increased neural activity, magnetoencephalography (MEG) offers a more concise way of examining the evoked response, with superior temporal resolution. We therefore wanted to combine these imaging techniques to gain additional knowledge of the plasticity processes in response to median nerve injury. Nine patients with median nerve trauma at the wrist were examined with MEG. The N1 and P1 responses at stimulation of the injured median nerve at the wrist were lower in amplitude compared to the healthy side (pamp;lt;.04). Ulnar nerve stimulation of the injured hand resulted in larger N1 amplitude (pamp;lt;.04). The amplitude and latency of the response did not correlate with the sensory discrimination ability. There was no correlation between N1 amplitude and size of cortical activation in fMRI. There was no significant difference in N1 latency between the injured and healthy median nerve. N1 latency correlated positively with age in both the median and ulnar nerve, and in both the injured and the healthy hand (pamp;lt;.02 or pamp;lt;.001). It is concluded that conduction failure in the injured segment of the median nerve decreases the amplitude of the MEG response. Disinhibition of neighboring cortical areas may explain the increased MEG response amplitude to ulnar nerve stimulation. This can be interpreted as a sign of brain plasticity.

  • 224.
    Fornander, Lotta
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Norrköping. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nyman, Torbjörn
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Hansson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Brismar, Tom
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Inter-hemispheric plasticity in patients with median nerve injury2016In: Neuroscience Letters, ISSN 0304-3940, E-ISSN 1872-7972, Vol. 628, p. 59-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Peripheral nerve injuries result in reorganization within the contralateral hemisphere. Furthermore, recent animal and human studies have suggested that the plastic changes in response to peripheral nerve injury also include several areas of the ipsilateral hemisphere. The objective of this study was to map the inter-hemispheric plasticity in response to median nerve injury, to investigate normal differences in contra- and ipsilateral activation, and to study the impact of event-related or blocked functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) design on ipsilateral activation. Four patients with median nerve injury at the wrist (injured and epineurally sutured amp;gt;2 years earlier) and ten healthy volunteers were included. 3T fMRI was used to map the hemodynamic response to brain activity during tactile stimulation of the fingers, and a laterality index (LI) was calculated. Stimulation of Digits II-III of the injured hand resulted in a reduction in contralateral activation in the somatosensory area SI. Patients had a lower LI (0.21 +/- 0.15) compared to healthy controls (0.60 +/- 0.26) indicating greater ipsilateral activation of the primary somatosensory cortex. The spatial dispersion of the coordinates for areas SI and SII was larger in the ipsilateral than in the contralateral hemisphere in the healthy controls, and was increased in the contralateral hemisphere of the patients compared to the healthy controls. There was no difference in LI between the event-related and blocked paradigms. In conclusion, patients with median nerve injury have increased ipsilateral SI area activation, and spatially more dispersed contralateral SI activation during tactile stimulation of their injured hand. In normal subjects ipsilateral activation has larger spatial distribution than the contralateral. Previous findings in patients performed with the blocked fMRI paradigm were confirmed. The increase in ipsilateral SI activation may be due to an interhemispheric disinhibition associated with changes in the afferent signal inflow to the contralateral primary somatosensory cortex.

  • 225.
    Fors, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Abbott, Allan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Enthoven, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Effects of pre-surgery physiotherapy on walking ability and lower extremity strength in patients with degenerative lumbar spine disorder: Secondary outcomes of the PREPARE randomised controlled trial2019In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 1article id 468Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Degenerative lumbar spine disorders are common among musculoskeletal disorders. When disabling pain and radiculopathy persists after adequate course of rehabilitation and imaging confirms compressive pathology, surgical decompression is indicated. Prehabilitation aiming to augment functional capacity pre-surgery may improve physical function and activity levels pre and post-surgery. This study aims to evaluate the effect and dose-response of pre-surgery physiotherapy on quadriceps femoris strength and walking ability in patients with degenerative lumbar spine disorders compared to waiting-list controls and their association with postoperative physical activity level.

    Method

    In this single blinded, 2-arm randomised controlled trial, 197 patients were consecutively recruited. Inclusion criteria were: MRI confirmed diagnosis and scheduled for surgery due to disc herniation, lumbar spinal stenosis, degenerative disc disease or spondylolisthesis, ages 25-80 years. Patients were randomised to 9 weeks of pre-surgery physiotherapy or to waiting-list. Patient reported physical activity level, walking ability according to Oswestry Disability Index item 4, walking distance according to the SWESPINE national register and physical outcome measures including the timed ten-meter walk test, maximum voluntary isometric quadriceps femoris muscle strength, patient-rated were collected at baseline and follow-up. Parametric or non-parametric within and between group comparisons as well as multivariate regression was performed.

    Results

    Patients who received pre-surgery physiotherapy significantly improved in all variables from baseline to follow-up (p < 0.001 – p < 0.05) and in comparison to waiting-list controls (p < 0.001 – p < 0.028). Patients adhering to ≥12 treatment sessions significantly improved in all variables (p < 0.001 – p < 0.032) and those receiving 0-11 treatment session in only normal walking speed (p0.035) but there were no significant differences when comparing dosages. Physical outcome measures after pre-surgery physiotherapy together significantly explain 27.5% of the variation in physical activity level 1 year after surgery with pre-surgery physical activity level having a significant multivariate association.

    Conclusion

    Pre-surgery physiotherapy increased walking ability and lower extremity strength in patients with degenerative lumbar spine disorders compared to waiting-list controls. A clear treatment dose-response response relationship was not found. These results implicate that pre-surgery physiotherapy can influence functional capacity before surgical treatment and has moderate associations with maintained postoperative physical activity levels mostly explained by physical activity level pre-surgery.

    Trial registration

    NCT02454400. Trial registration date: August 31st 2015, retrospectively registered.

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  • 226.
    Forsare, Carina
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Bak, Martin
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Falck, Anna-Karin
    Helsingborg Hosp, Sweden.
    Grabau, Dorthe
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Killander, Fredrika
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Malmstrom, Per
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Ryden, Lisa
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Sundqvist, Marie
    Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Bendahl, Par-Ola
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Ferno, Marten
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Non-linear transformations of age at diagnosis, tumor size, and number of positive lymph nodes in prediction of clinical outcome in breast cancer2018In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 18, article id 1226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundPrognostic factors in breast cancer are often measured on a continuous scale, but categorized for clinical decision-making. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate if accounting for continuous non-linear effects of the three factors age at diagnosis, tumor size, and number of positive lymph nodes improves prognostication. These factors will most likely be included in the management of breast cancer patients also in the future, after an expected implementation of gene expression profiling for adjuvant treatment decision-making.MethodsFour thousand four hundred forty seven and 1132 women with primary breast cancer constituted the derivation and validation set, respectively. Potential non-linear effects on the log hazard of distant recurrences of the three factors were evaluated during 10years of follow-up. Cox-models of successively increasing complexity: dichotomized predictors, predictors categorized into three or four groups, and predictors transformed using fractional polynomials (FPs) or restricted cubic splines (RCS), were used. Predictive performance was evaluated by Harrells C-index.ResultsUsing FP-transformations, non-linear effects were detected for tumor size and number of positive lymph nodes in univariable analyses. For age, non-linear transformations did, however, not improve the model fit significantly compared to the linear identity transformation. As expected, the C-index increased with increasing model complexity for multivariable models including the three factors. By allowing more than one cut-point per factor, the C-index increased from 0.628 to 0.674. The additional gain, as measured by the C-index, when using FP- or RCS-transformations was modest (0.695 and 0.696, respectively). The corresponding C-indices for these four models in the validation set, based on the same transformations and parameter estimates from the derivation set, were 0.675, 0.700, 0.706, and 0.701.ConclusionsCategorization of each factor into three to four groups was found to improve prognostication compared to dichotomization. The additional gain by allowing continuous non-linear effects modeled by FPs or RCS was modest. However, the continuous nature of these transformations has the advantage of making it possible to form risk groups of any size.

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  • 227.
    Forsberg, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Sectra AB, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lindblom, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Quick, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Gauffin, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Quantitative analysis of the patellofemoral motion pattern using semi-automatic processing of 4D CT data2016In: International Journal of Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery, ISSN 1861-6410, E-ISSN 1861-6429, Vol. 11, no 9, p. 1731-1741Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To present a semi-automatic method with minimal user interaction for quantitative analysis of the patellofemoral motion pattern. 4D CT data capturing the patellofemoral motion pattern of a continuous flexion and extension were collected for five patients prone to patellar luxation both pre- and post-surgically. For the proposed method, an observer would place landmarks in a single 3D volume, which then are automatically propagated to the other volumes in a time sequence. From the landmarks in each volume, the measures patellar displacement, patellar tilt and angle between femur and tibia were computed. Evaluation of the observer variability showed the proposed semi-automatic method to be favorable over a fully manual counterpart, with an observer variability of approximately 1.5 for the angle between femur and tibia, 1.5 mm for the patellar displacement, and 4.0-5.0 for the patellar tilt. The proposed method showed that surgery reduced the patellar displacement and tilt at maximum extension with approximately 10-15 mm and 15-20 for three patients but with less evident differences for two of the patients. A semi-automatic method suitable for quantification of the patellofemoral motion pattern as captured by 4D CT data has been presented. Its observer variability is on par with that of other methods but with the distinct advantage to support continuous motions during the image acquisition.

  • 228. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Forsgren, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    The Non-Invasive Liver Biopsy: Determining Hepatic Function in Diffuse and Focal LiverDisease2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The liver is one of the largest organs within the human body and it handles many vital tasks such as nutrient processing, toxin removal, and synthesis of important proteins. The number of people suffering from chronic liver disease is on the rise, likely due to the present ‘western’ lifestyle. As disease develops in the liver there are pathophysiological manifestations within the liver parenchyma that are both common and important to monitor. These manifestations include inflammation, fatty infiltration (steatosis), excessive scar tissue formation (fibrosis and cirrhosis), and iron loading. Importantly, as the disease progresses there is concurrent loss of liver function. Furthermore, postoperative liver function insufficiency is an important concern when planning surgical treatment of the liver, because it is associated with both morbidity and mortality. Liver function can also be hampered due to drug-induced injuries, an important aspect to consider in drug-development.

    Currently, an invasive liver needle biopsy is required to determine the aetiology and to stage or grade the pathophysiological manifestations. There are important limitations with the biopsy, which include, risk of serious complications, mortality, morbidity, inter- and intra-observer variability, sampling error, and sampling variability. Cleary, it would be beneficial to be able investigate the pathophysiological manifestations accurately, non-invasively, and on regional level.

    Current available laboratory liver function blood panels are typically insufficient and often only indicate damage at a late stage. Thus, it would be beneficial to have access to biomarkers that are both sensitive and responds to early changes in liver function in both clinical settings and for the pharmaceutical industry and regulatory agencies.

    The main aim of this thesis was to develop and evaluate methods that can be used for a ‘non-invasive liver biopsy’ using magnetic resonance (MR). We also aimed to develop sensitive methods for measure liver function based on gadoxetate-enhanced MR imaging (MRI).

    The presented work is primarily based on a prospective study on c. 100 patients suffering from chronic liver disease of varying aetiologies recruited due to elevated liver enzyme levels, without clear signs of decompensated cirrhosis. Our results show that the commonly used liver fat cut-off for diagnosing steatosis should be lowered from 5% to 3% when using MR proton-density fat fraction (PDFF). We also show that MR elastography (MRE) is superior in staging fibrosis.

    Finally we presented a framework for quantifying liver function based on gadoxetate-enhanced MRI. The method is based on clinical images and a clinical approved contrast agent (gadoxetate). The framework consists of; state-of the-art image reconstruction and correction methods, a mathematical model, and a precise model parametrization method. The model was developed and validated on healthy subjects. Thereafter the model was found applicable on the chronic liver disease cohort as well as validated using gadoxetate levels in biopsy samples and blood samples. The liver function parameters correlated with clinical markers for liver function and liver fibrosis (used as a surrogate marker for liver function).

    In summary, it should be possible to perform a non-invasive liver biopsy using: MRI-PDFF for liver fat and iron loading, MRE for liver fibrosis and possibly also inflammation, and measure liver function using the presented framework for analysing gadoxetate-enhanced MRI. With the exception of an MREtransducer no additional hardware is required on the MR scanner. The liver function method is likely to be useful both in a clinical setting and in pharmaceutical trials.

    List of papers
    1. Separation of advanced from mild hepatic fibrosis by quantification of the hepatobiliary uptake of Gd-EOB-DTPA
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Separation of advanced from mild hepatic fibrosis by quantification of the hepatobiliary uptake of Gd-EOB-DTPA
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: European Radiology, ISSN 0938-7994, E-ISSN 1432-1084, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 174-181Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    To apply dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI on patients presenting with elevated liver enzymes without clinical signs of hepatic decompensation in order to quantitatively compare the hepatocyte-specific uptake of Gd-EOB-DTPA with histopathological fibrosis stage.

    Methods

    A total of 38 patients were prospectively examined using 1.5-T MRI. Data were acquired from regions of interest in the liver and spleen by using time series of single-breath-hold symmetrically sampled two-point Dixon 3D images (non-enhanced, arterial and venous portal phase; 3, 10, 20 and 30 min) following a bolus injection of Gd-EOB-DTPA (0.025 mmol/kg). The signal intensity (SI) values were reconstructed using a phase-sensitive technique and normalised using multiscale adaptive normalising averaging (MANA). Liver-to-spleen contrast ratios (LSC_N) and the contrast uptake rate (KHep) were calculated. Liver biopsy was performed and classified according to the Batts and Ludwig system.

    Results

    Area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUROC) values of 0.71, 0.80 and 0.78, respectively, were found for KHep, LSC_N10 and LSC_N20 with regard to severe versus mild fibrosis. Significant group differences were found for KHep (borderline), LSC_N10 and LSC_N20.

    Conclusions

    Liver fibrosis stage strongly influences the hepatocyte-specific uptake of Gd-EOB-DTPA. Potentially the normalisation technique and KHep will reduce patient and system bias, yielding a robust approach to non-invasive liver function determination.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer, 2013
    Keywords
    Quantification, Gd-EOB-DTPA, Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, Pharmacokinetics, Liver
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-87242 (URN)10.1007/s00330-012-2583-2 (DOI)000312324500022 ()
    Projects
    NILB
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council|VR/M 2007-2884|Medical Research Council of South-east Sweden|FORSS 12621|Linkoping University, Linkoping University Hospital Research Foundations||County Council of Ostergotland||

    Available from: 2013-01-14 Created: 2013-01-14 Last updated: 2019-06-14
    2. Physiologically Realistic and Validated Mathematical Liver Model Revels Hepatobiliary Transfer Rates for Gd-EOB-DTPA Using Human DCE-MRI Data
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physiologically Realistic and Validated Mathematical Liver Model Revels Hepatobiliary Transfer Rates for Gd-EOB-DTPA Using Human DCE-MRI Data
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 0095700-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Diffuse liver disease (DLD), such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NASH) and cirrhosis, is a rapidly growing problem throughout the Westernized world. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), based on uptake of the hepatocyte-specific contrast agent (CA) Gd-EOB-DTPA, is a promising non-invasive approach for diagnosing DLD. However, to fully utilize the potential of such dynamic measurements for clinical or research purposes, more advanced methods for data analysis are required. Methods: A mathematical model that can be used for such data-analysis was developed. Data was obtained from healthy human subjects using a clinical protocol with high spatial resolution. The model is based on ordinary differential equations and goes beyond local diffusion modeling, taking into account the complete system accessible to the CA. Results: The presented model can describe the data accurately, which was confirmed using chi-square statistics. Furthermore, the model is minimal and identifiable, meaning that all parameters were determined with small degree of uncertainty. The model was also validated using independent data. Conclusions: We have developed a novel approach for determining previously undescribed physiological hepatic parameters in humans, associated with CA transport across the liver. The method has a potential for assessing regional liver function in clinical examinations of patients that are suffering of DLD and compromised hepatic function.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Public Library of Science, 2014
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-106962 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0095700 (DOI)000335226500139 ()
    Available from: 2014-06-04 Created: 2014-06-02 Last updated: 2019-06-14
    3. Using a 3% Proton Density Fat Fraction as a Cut-off Value Increases Sensitivity of Detection of Hepatic Steatosis, Based on Results from Histopathology Analysis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using a 3% Proton Density Fat Fraction as a Cut-off Value Increases Sensitivity of Detection of Hepatic Steatosis, Based on Results from Histopathology Analysis
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: Gastroenterology, ISSN 0016-5085, E-ISSN 1528-0012, Vol. 153, no 1, p. 53-+Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    It is possible to estimate hepatic triglyceride content by calculating the proton density fat fraction (PDFF), using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (less thansuperscriptgreater than1less than/superscriptgreater thanH-MRS), instead of collecting and analyzing liver biopsies to detect steatosis. However, the current PDFF cut-off value (5%) used to define steatosis by magnetic resonance was derived from studies that did not use histopathology as the reference standard. We performed a prospective study to determine the accuracy of less thansuperscriptgreater than1less than/superscriptgreater thanH-MRS PDFF in measurement of steatosis using histopathology analysis as the standard. We collected clinical, serologic, less thansuperscriptgreater than1less than/superscriptgreater thanH-MRS PDFF, and liver biopsy data from 94 adult patients with increased levels of liver enzymes (6 months or more) referred to the Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at Linköping University Hospital in Sweden from 2007 through 2014. Steatosis was graded using the conventional histopathology method and fat content was quantified in biopsy samples using stereological point counts (SPCs). We correlated less thansuperscriptgreater than1less than/superscriptgreater thanH-MRS PDFF findings with SPCs (r = 0.92; P less than.001). less thansuperscriptgreater than1less than/superscriptgreater thanH-MRS PDFF results correlated with histopathology results (ρ = 0.87; P less than.001), and SPCs correlated with histopathology results (ρ = 0.88; P less than.001). All 25 subjects with PDFF values of 5.0% or more had steatosis based on histopathology findings (100% specificity for PDFF). However, of 69 subjects with PDFF values below 5.0% (negative result), 22 were determined to have steatosis based on histopathology findings (53% sensitivity for PDFF). Reducing the PDFF cut-off value to 3.0% identified patients with steatosis with 100% specificity and 79% sensitivity; a PDFF cut-off value of 2.0% identified patients with steatosis with 94% specificity and 87% sensitivity. These findings might be used to improve non-invasive detection of steatosis.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2017
    National Category
    Gastroenterology and Hepatology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-136544 (URN)10.1053/j.gastro.2017.03.005 (DOI)000403918300022 ()
    Note

    Funding agencies: Swedish Research Council/Medicine and Health [VR/M 2007-2884, VR/M 2012-3199]; Swedish Research Council/Natural and Engineering Sciences [VR/NT 2014-6157]; Swedish Innovation Agency VINNOVA [2013-01314]; Region Ostergotland (ALF)

    Available from: 2017-04-19 Created: 2017-04-19 Last updated: 2019-09-25Bibliographically approved
    4. Model-inferred mechanisms of liver function from magnetic resonance imaging data: Validation and variation across a clinically relevant cohort
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Model-inferred mechanisms of liver function from magnetic resonance imaging data: Validation and variation across a clinically relevant cohort
    Show others...
    2019 (English)In: PloS Computational Biology, ISSN 1553-734X, E-ISSN 1553-7358, Vol. 15, no 6, article id e1007157Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Estimation of liver function is important to monitor progression of chronic liver disease (CLD). A promising method is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) combined with gadoxetate, a liver-specific contrast agent. For this method, we have previously developed a model for an average healthy human. Herein, we extended this model, by combining it with a patient-specific non-linear mixed-effects modeling framework. We validated the model by recruiting 100 patients with CLD of varying severity and etiologies. The model explained all MRI data and adequately predicted both timepoints saved for validation and gadoxetate concentrations in both plasma and biopsies. The validated model provides a new and deeper look into how the mechanisms of liver function vary across a wide variety of liver diseases. The basic mechanisms remain the same, but increasing fibrosis reduces uptake and increases excretion of gadoxetate. These mechanisms are shared across many liver functions and can now be estimated from standard clinical images.

    Author summary

    Being able to accurately and reliably estimate liver function is important when monitoring the progression of patients with liver disease, as well as when identifying drug-induced liver injury during drug development. A promising method for quantifying liver function is to use magnetic resonance imaging combined with gadoxetate. Gadoxetate is a liver-specific contrast agent, which is taken up by the hepatocytes and excreted into the bile. We have previously developed a mechanistic model for gadoxetate dynamics using averaged data from healthy volunteers. In this work, we extended our model with a non-linear mixed-effects modeling framework to give patient-specific estimates of the gadoxetate transport-rates. We validated the model by recruiting 100 patients with liver disease, covering a range of severity and etiologies. All patients underwent an MRI-examination and provided both blood and liver biopsies. Our validated model provides a new and deeper look into how the mechanisms of liver function varies across a wide variety of liver diseases. The basic mechanisms remain the same, but increasing fibrosis reduces uptake and increases excretion of gadoxetate.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    San Francisco, CA, United States: Public Library of Science, 2019
    National Category
    Pharmaceutical Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-159165 (URN)10.1371/journal.pcbi.1007157 (DOI)000474703000068 ()31237870 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85069296906 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [2014-6157, 2007-2884]; Medical Research council of Southeast Sweden [12621]; Vinnova [2013-01314]; Linkoping University, CENIIT [15.09]; Swedish fund for research without animal experiments [Nytank2015]

    Available from: 2019-07-30 Created: 2019-07-30 Last updated: 2019-12-12Bibliographically approved
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    The Non-Invasive Liver Biopsy: Determining Hepatic Function in Diffuse and Focal LiverDisease
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  • 229.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Karlsson, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ignatova, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Cedersund, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Model-inferred mechanisms of liver function from magnetic resonance imaging data: Validation and variation across a clinically relevant cohort2019In: PloS Computational Biology, ISSN 1553-734X, E-ISSN 1553-7358, Vol. 15, no 6, article id e1007157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Estimation of liver function is important to monitor progression of chronic liver disease (CLD). A promising method is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) combined with gadoxetate, a liver-specific contrast agent. For this method, we have previously developed a model for an average healthy human. Herein, we extended this model, by combining it with a patient-specific non-linear mixed-effects modeling framework. We validated the model by recruiting 100 patients with CLD of varying severity and etiologies. The model explained all MRI data and adequately predicted both timepoints saved for validation and gadoxetate concentrations in both plasma and biopsies. The validated model provides a new and deeper look into how the mechanisms of liver function vary across a wide variety of liver diseases. The basic mechanisms remain the same, but increasing fibrosis reduces uptake and increases excretion of gadoxetate. These mechanisms are shared across many liver functions and can now be estimated from standard clinical images.

    Author summary

    Being able to accurately and reliably estimate liver function is important when monitoring the progression of patients with liver disease, as well as when identifying drug-induced liver injury during drug development. A promising method for quantifying liver function is to use magnetic resonance imaging combined with gadoxetate. Gadoxetate is a liver-specific contrast agent, which is taken up by the hepatocytes and excreted into the bile. We have previously developed a mechanistic model for gadoxetate dynamics using averaged data from healthy volunteers. In this work, we extended our model with a non-linear mixed-effects modeling framework to give patient-specific estimates of the gadoxetate transport-rates. We validated the model by recruiting 100 patients with liver disease, covering a range of severity and etiologies. All patients underwent an MRI-examination and provided both blood and liver biopsies. Our validated model provides a new and deeper look into how the mechanisms of liver function varies across a wide variety of liver diseases. The basic mechanisms remain the same, but increasing fibrosis reduces uptake and increases excretion of gadoxetate.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Model-inferred mechanisms of liver function from magnetic resonance imaging data: Validation and variation across a clinically relevant cohort
  • 230.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Wolfram MathCore AB, Linköping, Sweden.
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Comparing hepatic 2D and 3D magnetic resonance elastography methods in a clinical setting – Initial experiences2015In: European Journal of Radiology Open, E-ISSN 2352-0477, Vol. 2, p. 66-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Continuous monitoring of liver fibrosis progression in patients is not feasible with the current diagnostic golden standard (needle biopsy). Recently, magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has emerged as a promising method for such continuous monitoring. Since there are different MRE methods that could be used in a clinical setting there is a need to investigate whether measurements produced by these MRE methods are comparable. Hence, the purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate whether the measurements of the viscoelastic properties produced by 2D (stiffness) and 3D (elasticity and ‘Gabs,Elastic’) MRE are comparable.

    Materials and methods

    Seven patients with diffuse or suspect diffuse liver disease were examined in the same day with the two MRE methods. 2D MRE was performed using an acoustic passive transducer, with a 1.5 T GE 450 W MR system. 3D MRE was performed using an electromagnetic active transducer, with a 1.5 T Philips Achieva MR system. Finally, mean viscoelastic values were extracted from the same anatomical region for both methods by an experienced radiologist.

    Results

    Stiffness correlated well with the elasticity, R2 = 0.96 (P < 0.001; slope = 1.08, intercept = 0.61 kPa), as well as with ‘Gabs,ElasticR2 = 0.96 (P < 0.001; slope = 0.95, intercept = 0.28 kPa).

    Conclusion

    This pilot study shows that different MRE methods can produce comparable measurements of the viscoelastic properties of the liver. The existence of such comparable measurements is important, both from a clinical as well as a research perspective, since it allows for equipment-independent monitoring of disease progression.

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    fulltext
  • 231.
    Forss, Anders
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Olen, Ola
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm South Gen Hosp, Sweden.
    Everhov, Asa H.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; South Gen Hosp, Sweden.
    Nordenvall, Caroline
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Orebro Univ Hosp, Sweden; Univ Nottingham, England; Columbia Univ Coll Phys and Surg, NY USA.
    Validating surgical procedure codes for inflammatory bowel disease in the Swedish National Patient Register2019In: BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making, ISSN 1472-6947, E-ISSN 1472-6947, BMC MEDICAL INFORMATICS AND DECISION MAKING, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    About 50% of patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) and about 20% of those with ulcerative colitis (UC) undergo surgery at some point during the course of the disease. The diagnostic validity of the Swedish National Patient Register (NPR) has previously been shown to be high for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but there are little data on the validity of IBD-related surgical procedure codes.

    Methods

    Using patient chart data as the gold standard, surgical procedure codes registered between 1966 and 2014 in the NPR were abstracted and validated in 262 randomly selected patients with a medical diagnosis of IBD. Of these, 53 patients had reliable data about IBD-related surgery. The positive predictive value (PPV), sensitivity and specificity of the surgical procedure codes were calculated.

    Results

    In total, 158 surgical procedure codes were registered in the NPR. One hundred fifty-five of these, representing 60 different procedure codes, were also present in the patient charts and validated using a standardized form. Of the validated codes 153/155 were concordant with the patient charts, corresponding to a PPV of 96.8% (95%CI = 93.9–99.1). Stratified in abdominal, perianal and other surgery, the corresponding PPVs were 94.1% (95%CI = 88.7–98.6), 100% (95%CI = 100–100) and 98.1% (95%CI = 93.1–100), respectively. Of 164 surgical procedure codes in the validated patient charts, 155 were registered in the NPR, corresponding to a sensitivity of the surgical procedure codes of 94.5% (95%CI = 89.6–99.3). The specificity of the NPR was 98.5% (95%CI = 97.6–100).

    Conclusions

    Data on IBD-related surgical procedure codes are reliable, with the Swedish National Patient Register showing a high sensitivity and specificity for such surgery.

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    fulltext
  • 232.
    Fowler, Jack F.
    et al.
    University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI, USA.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Toma-Dasu, Iuliana
    Stockholm University and Karolinska Institutet.
    Optimum overall treatment time in radiation oncology2015Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    John "Jack" Fowler has been a busy radiation biology researcher and teacher. He has written 581 papers over the last 65 plus years. He has also received nearly every honor the medical physics field can bestow. But Jack is not done. He says it is time he wrote a book. Jack's new book, Optimum overall treatment time in radiation oncology, sums up the key concepts relating to optimum fractionation in radiation therapy that have interested him all these years.

  • 233.
    Franzen, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping.
    Tibbling, Lita Ingrid
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Hagg, Mary Karin
    Hudiksvall Hosp, Sweden.
    Oral neuromuscular training relieves hernia-related dysphagia and GERD symptoms as effectively in obese as in non-obese patients2018In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, ISSN 0001-6489, E-ISSN 1651-2251, Vol. 138, no 11, p. 1004-1008Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Many physicians insist patients lose weight before their hiatal hernia (HH) condition and related symptoms including intermittent esophageal dysphagia (IED) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can be treated, but it is not proven that body mass index (BMI) has an impact on exercise-based treatment of HH-related symptoms. Aims/Objectives: To investigate whether BMI has significance on IQoro (R) neuromuscular training (IQNT) effectiveness in treating HH-related symptoms. Material and Methods: Eighty-six patients with sliding HH and enduring IED and GERD symptoms, despite proton pump inhibitor medication, were consecutively referred for 6 months IQNT comprising 11/2 minutes daily. They were grouped by BMI which was recorded before and after IQNT, as were their symptoms of IED, reflux, heartburn, chest pain, globus sensation, non-productive cough, hoarseness, and misdirected swallowing. They were also assessed on food swallowing ability, water swallowing capacity and lip force both before and after treatment. Results: After IQNT, all BMI groups showed significant improvement (p amp;lt; .001) of all assessments and symptoms; and heartburn, cough and misdirected swallowing were significantly more reduced in the severely obese. Conclusions and significance: IQNT can treat HH-related IED and GERD symptoms as successfully in moderately or severely obese patients as in those with normal bodyweight.

  • 234.
    Fritzell, Peter
    et al.
    Lanssjukhuset Ryhov, Sweden.
    Welinder-Olsson, Christina
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Joensson, Bodil
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Melhus, Asa
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Andersson, Siv G. E.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Bergstrom, Tomas
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tropp, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Gerdhem, Paul
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Hagg, Olle
    Spine Ctr Goteborg, Sweden.
    Laestander, Hans
    Spine Ctr Goteborg, Sweden.
    Knutsson, Bjorn
    Sundsvall Hosp, Sweden.
    Lundin, Anders
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Ekman, Per
    Soder Sjukhuset, Sweden.
    Rydman, Eric
    Soder Sjukhuset, Sweden.
    Skorpil, Mikael
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Correction: Bacteria: back pain, leg pain and Modic sign-a surgical multicenter comparative study (vol 28, pg 2981, 2019)2020In: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 196-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 235.
    Fritzell, Peter
    et al.
    Futurum Acad, Sweden.
    Welinder-Olsson, Christina
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Bodil
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Melhus, Asa
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Andersson, Siv
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Bergstrom, Tomas
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tropp, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Gerdhem, Paul
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Hagg, Olle
    Spine Ctr Goteborg, Sweden.
    Laestander, Hans
    Spine Ctr Goteborg, Sweden.
    Knutsson, Bjorn
    Sundsvall Hosp, Sweden.
    Lundin, Anders
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Ekman, Per
    Soder Sjukhuset, Sweden.
    Rydman, Eric
    Soder Sjukhuset, Sweden.
    Skorpil, Mikael
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Bacteria: back pain, leg pain and Modic sign-a surgical multicentre comparative study2019In: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 28, p. 2981-2989Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose To compare bacterial findings in pain-generating degenerated discs in adults operated on for lumbar disc herniation (LDH), and mostly also suffering from low back pain (LBP), with findings in adolescent patients with non-degenerated non-pain-generating discs operated on for scoliosis, and to evaluate associations with Modic signs on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cutibacterium acnes (Propionibacterium acnes) has been found in painful degenerated discs, why it has been suggested treating patients with LDH/LBP with antibiotics. As multidrug-resistant bacteria are a worldwide concern, new indications for using antibiotics should be based on solid scientific evidence. Methods Between 2015 and 2017, 40 adults with LDH/LBP (median age 43, IQR 33-49) and 20 control patients with scoliosis (median age 17, IQR 15-20) underwent surgery at seven Swedish hospitals. Samples were cultured from skin, surgical wound, discs and vertebrae. Genetic relatedness of C. acnes isolates was investigated using single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis. DNA samples collected from discs/vertebrae were analysed using 16S rRNA-based PCR sequencing. MRI findings were assessed for Modic changes. Results No bacterial growth was found in 6/40 (15%) LDH patients, compared with 3/20 (15%) scoliosis patients. Most positive samples in both groups were isolated from the skin and then from subcutis or deep within the wound. Of the four disc and vertebral samples from each of the 60 patients, 235/240 (98%) were DNA negative by bacterial PCR. A single species, C. acnes, was found exclusively in the disc/vertebra from one patient in each group. In the LDH group, 29/40 (72%) patients had at least one sample with growth of C. acnes, compared to 14/20 (70%) in the scoliosis group. Bacterial findings and Modic changes were not associated. Conclusions Cutibacterium acnes found in discs and vertebrae during surgery for disc herniation in adults with degenerated discs may be caused by contamination, as findings in this group were similar to findings in a control group of young patients with scoliosis and non-degenerated discs. Furthermore, such findings were almost always combined with bacterial findings on the skin and/or in the wound. There was no association between preoperative Modic changes and bacterial findings. Antibiotic treatment of lumbar disc herniation with sciatica and/or low back pain, without signs of clinical discitis/spondylitis, should be seriously questioned.

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  • 236.
    Frödin, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Lotfi, Kourosh
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Fomichov, Victoria
    Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Juliusson, G.
    Lund University, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Frequent and long-term follow-up of health-related quality of life following allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation2015In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 898-910Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Health-related quality of life (HRQL) was evaluated in 94 patients undergoing allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) after myeloablative (MAC, n=18) or reduced intensity conditioning (RIC, n=76). HRQL was assessed with the EORTC QLQ C-30 during the inpatient period as well as during the following 3years, i.e. at baseline and 12 times thereafter. Functional status and global quality of life decreased from baseline to weeks 2 and 3, especially role and social functions. Symptoms increased significantly during the first 3weeks, particularly appetite loss, nausea and vomiting, diarrhoea and fatigue. It took at least 1year for HRQL to return to the baseline level. The only function that improved significantly 3years after HSCT was role function. Patients treated with MAC experienced significantly worse HRQL at baseline than patients treated with RIC, as well as more pain, sleep disturbance and appetite loss in weeks 3 and 4. Patients with extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease experienced reduced HRQL. These results provide a clinically useful overview of patients HRQL during and after HSCT and indicate when they require increased support. The results demonstrate the importance of close follow-ups during the first year after HSCT to improve preventive or supportive interventions.

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  • 237.
    Fuglsang, Katrine
    et al.
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Haldorsen, Ingfrid S.
    Haukeland Hosp, Norway.
    Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Lindahl, Gabriel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Roed, Henrik
    Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Woie, Kathrine
    Haukeland Hosp, Norway.
    Pakarinen, Paivi
    Univ Helsinki, Finland.
    Thoroddsen, Asgeir
    Reykjavik Univ Hosp, Iceland.
    Anttila, Maarit
    Kuopio Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Blaakaer, Jan
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Cervical cancer staging, pretreatment planning, and surgical treatment in the Nordic countriesSurvey from the Surgical Subcommittee of the Nordic Society of Gynecological Oncology2018In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 97, no 10, p. 1178-1184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IntroductionWomen with cervical cancer in the Nordic countries are increasingly undergoing pretreatment imaging by ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) or computed tomography, or sentinel lymph node procedure. The present survey reports the influence of pretreatment imaging findings on the recorded clinical International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage in Nordic countries and its impact on treatment planning and preferred surgical approach in cervical cancer. Material and methodsThe Nordic Society of Gynecological Oncology Surgical Subcommittee developed a questionnaire-based survey that was conducted from 1 January to 31 March 2017. All the 22 Nordic Gynecological Oncology Centers (Denmark 5, Finland 5, Iceland 1, Norway 4, and Sweden 7) were invited to participate. ResultsThe questionnaires were returned by 19 of 22 (86.3%) centers. The median number (range) of women with cervical cancer treated at each center annually was 32 (15-120). In 58% (11/19) of the centers, imaging findings were reported to influence the clinical staging. MRI in combination with PET-CT was the preferred imaging method and the results influenced treatment planning. Robotic-assisted radical hysterectomy was the preferred surgical method in 72% (13/18) of the centers. Sentinel lymph node procedure was not routinely implemented in the majority of the Nordic centers. ConclusionMore than half of the Nordic Gynecological Oncology Centers already report a clinical FIGO stage influenced by pretreatment imaging findings. The trend in preferred treatment is robotic-assisted radical hysterectomy and the sentinel lymph node procedure is gradually being introduced.

  • 238.
    Fältström, Anne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gauffin, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Female Soccer Players With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Have a Higher Risk of New Knee Injuries and Quit Soccer to a Higher Degree Than Knee-Healthy Controls2019In: American Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0363-5465, E-ISSN 1552-3365, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 31-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Many patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction who return to sport suffer new ACL injuries or quit sports soon after returning.

    Purpose:

    To prospectively follow a cohort of female soccer players with primary unilateral ACL reconstruction and matched knee-healthy controls from the same soccer teams to compare (1) the rate of new traumatic and nontraumatic knee injuries and other injuries, (2) the proportion of players who quit soccer, and (3) player-reported activity level and satisfaction with activity level and knee function.

    Study Design:

    Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2.

    Methods:

    A total of 117 active female soccer players (mean ± SD age, 19.9 ± 2.5 years) 18.9 ± 8.7 months after ACL reconstruction and 119 knee-healthy female soccer players (19.5 ± 2.5 years) matched from the same teams were prospectively followed for 2 years for new knee injuries, other injuries, soccer playing level, activity level according to the Tegner Activity Scale, and satisfaction with activity level and knee function.

    Results:

    Players with ACL reconstruction had a higher rate of new ACL injuries (n = 29 vs 8; 19 vs 4 per 100 player years; rate ratio [RR], 4.82; 95% CI, 2.20-10.54; P < .001), other traumatic knee injuries (29 vs 16 per 100 player years; RR, 1.84; 95% CI, 1.16-2.93; P < .01), and nontraumatic knee injuries (33 vs 9 per 100 player years; RR, 3.62; 95% CI, 2.11-6.21; P < .001) as compared with controls. There was no difference in the rate of other (not knee) injuries (43 vs 48 per 100 player years; RR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.65-1.23; P = .494). During the 2-year follow-up, 72 (62%) players with ACL reconstruction quit soccer, as opposed to 43 (36%) controls (P = .001). The median Tegner Activity Scale score decreased in both groups (P < .001) but more for the ACL-reconstructed group (P < .015).

    Conclusion:

    Female soccer players with ACL reconstruction had nearly a 5-fold-higher rate of new ACL injuries and a 2- to 4-fold-higher rate of other new knee injuries, quit soccer to a higher degree, and reduced their activity level to a greater extent as compared with knee-healthy controls.

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    Female Soccer Players With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Have a Higher Risk of New Knee Injuries and Quit Soccer to a Higher Degree Than Knee-Healthy Controls
  • 239.
    Gabrielson, Marike
    et al.
    University of Örebro, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Reizer, Edwin
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Tina, Elisabet
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Mitochondrial regulation of cell cycle progression through SLC25A432016In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 469, no 4, p. 1090-1096Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]