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  • 201.
    Amadori, Kristian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundström, David
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Fluid and Mechatronic Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Krus, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Fluid and Mechatronic Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Automated Design and Fabrication of Micro Air Vehicles2011In: Journal of Aerospace Engineering, ISSN 0893-1321, E-ISSN 1943-5525, Vol. 226, no 10, p. 1271-1282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A methodology for an automated design and fabrication of micro-air vehicles (MAVs) is presented. A design optimization framework has been developed that interfaces several software systems to generate MAVs to optimally fulfil specific mission requirements. By means of amulti-objective genetic algorithm, families of MAVs are tailored with respect to objectives such as weight and endurance. The framework takes into consideration the airframe and aerodynamic design as well as the selection and positioning of internal components. The selection of propulsion system components is made from a database of off-the-shelf components. In combination with a three-dimensional printer, physical prototypes can be quickly manufactured. A validation of the framework results from flight tests of a real MAV is also presented.

  • 202.
    Amadori, Kristian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundström, David
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Fluid and Mechanical Engineering Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Krus, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Fluid and Mechanical Engineering Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Evaluation of Automatically Designed Micro Air Vehicles and Flight Testing2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presented work is centered on the evaluation of Micro or Mini Air Vehicles (MAV) that have been automatically designed and manufactured. An in-house developed design framework uses several coupled computer software’s to generate the geometric design in CAD, a well as list of off the shelf components for the propulsion system, and computer code for autonomous flight ready to upload in the intended autopilot. The paper describes the experiences made so far regarding automation of the design process and of manufacturing. Furthermore, it presents results from evaluation and analysis of the optimization algorithm and flight testing, and from continuing work with the framework to achieve deeper understanding of the process and to fine-tune the design automation performance. The flight data is correlated to the predicted performances to validate the models and design process.

  • 203.
    Amadori, Kristian
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design .
    Lundén, Björn
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Machine Design.
    Krus, Petter
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Machine Design.
    Using CAD-Tools and Aerodynamic Codes in a Distributed Conceptual Design Framework2007In: Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit,2007, USA: AIAA , 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aircraft design is an inherently multi-disciplinary activity that requires different models and tools for various aspects of the design. At Linköping University a novel design framework is being developed to support the initial conceptual design phase of a new aircraft. Different modules are included, each one addressed to analyze and evaluate different aspects of the airplane, such as its aerodynamics, its weight and structure, its sub systems and its performances. All modules are easily accessible from a user-friendly interface based on an Excel spreadsheet. The link between all modules is based on Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) and allows both distribution and integration of all functions. This paper will present the framework, give an overview of its development status and give an indication on the future work.

  • 204.
    Amadori, Kristian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Melin, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Fluid and Mechatronic Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Staack, Ingo
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Fluid and Mechatronic Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Krus, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Fluid and Mechatronic Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Multidisciplinary Optimization of Wing Structure Using Parametric Models2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aircraft design is an inherently multidisciplinary activity that requires integrating different models and tools to reach a well-balanced and optimized product. At Linköping University a design framework is being developed to support the initial design space exploration and the conceptual design phase. Main characteristics of the framework are its flexible database in XML format, together with close integration of automated CAD and other tools, which allows the developed geometry to be directly used in the subsequent preliminary design phase. In particular, the aim of the proposed work is to test the framework by designing, optimizing and studying a transport aircraft wing with respect to aerodynamic, geometry, structural and accessability constraints. The project will provide an initial assessment of the capability of the framework, both in terms of processing speed and accuracy of the results.

  • 205.
    Amadori, Kristian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tarkian, Mehdi
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ölvander, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Krus, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Fluid and Mechatronic Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Flexible and Robust CAD Models for Design Automation2012In: Advanced Engineering Informatics, ISSN 1474-0346, E-ISSN 1873-5320, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 180-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores novel methodologies for enabling Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) of complex engineering products. To realize MDO, Knowledge Based Engineering (KBE) is adopted with the aim of achieving design reuse and automation. The aim of the on-going research at Linköping University is to shift from manual modelling of disposable geometries to Computer Aided Design (CAD) automation by introducing generic high-level geometry templates. Instead of repeatedly modelling similar instances of objects, engineers should be able to create more general models that can represent entire classes of objects. The proposed methodology enables utilization of commercial design tools, hence taking industrial feasibility into consideration. High Level CAD templates (HLCt) will be proposed and discussed as the building blocks of flexible and robust CAD models, which in turn enables high-fidelity geometry in the MDO loop. Quantification of the terms flexibility and robustness is also presented, providing a means to measure the quality of the geometry models. Finally, application examples are presented in which the outlined framework is evaluated. The applications have been chosen from three ongoing research projects aimed at automating the design of transport aircraft, industrial robots, and micro air vehicles.

  • 206.
    Amankwah-Amoah, Joseph
    et al.
    Kent Business School, University of Kent, UK.
    Sjögren, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ottosson, Jan
    Department of Economic History, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    United We Stand, Divided We Fall.: Historical Trajectory of Strategic Renewal Activities at Scandinavian Airlines System, 1946-2012.2017In: Business History, ISSN 0007-6791, E-ISSN 1743-7938, Vol. 59, no 4, p. 572-606Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the second half of the twentieth century saw the rise and fall of ‘multi-flag companies’ (MFCs) in the civil aviation industry, our understanding of how some managed to buck the trend and achieve longevity remains limited. This article advances business history and strategic management research by examining the strategic renewal activities of Scandinavian Airlines (formerly Scandinavian Airlines System [SAS]) during the period 1946–2012. The study sheds light on the key roles of private and state owners, rivals as well as banks, in critical financial phases are discussed in terms of longevity in the company. The longevity of the business stems from the leaders’ ability to develop as anticipated and respond to change in their competitive arena in close interaction with the owners. Thus, incumbent firms that strategically renew themselves prior to or during market reform, such as deregulation, enhance their chances of developing the size of their networks and revenue streams. Our main contribution to business history and strategic management literatures is the development of context-specific stages, which shed light on the evolution of strategic renewal activities and shifts from older processes and routines towards customer service and efficiency.

  • 207.
    Ambrutytė, Zita
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Management Control: Linking Strategy with Inter‐Organisational Relationships2008Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The alignment of strategies and control systems is believed to affect the chances for firms to successfully achieve competitive edge. Contemporary business trends like globalization, vertical disintegration, the reduction in supplier bases, the focusing of operations and outsourcing of non-core activities, have caused companies to rely increasingly on relationships with other firms. These trends strengthen the awareness of the fact that a company’s success is also built upon the contribution from other players in the total supply network. It is recognised that management control systems play an important role in the management of interdependencies between organisations; yet, there has not been much research into strategy and control systems in interorganisational relationships. The relationship between strategy and control systems in purchasing as an interface towards interorganisational relationships has not received attention in the strategy-management control literature either. Moreover, discussions on inter-organisational control seem often to be divorced from the internal process in the companies concerned.

    In this thesis, an attempt is made to relate strategy with intra- and inter-organisational controls. The overall purpose is to describe and analyse the effects of strategy on those management control systems used within the purchasing function and to control relationships with suppliers, and further, to propose a framework for understanding how strategy impacts purchasing management control systems and the control of inter-organisational relationships. Two research questions are developed for this purpose, i.e. to examine 1) how a business unit strategy affects management control in purchasing, and 2) how a business unit strategy affects the pattern of management control for inter-organisational relationships. The ideas behind the strategy-structure paradigm are thus extended towards understanding the effects of strategy on the use of controls in inter-organisational relationships. The fieldwork is based on twenty nine interviews with employees at two manufacturing and ten supplier companies, and the data was collected during two periods of time, i.e. 2002-2003 and 2006-2007.

    This thesis began with the assumption that two companies pursue different business strategies which could be classified by using Porter’s (1980) typologies. It was expected that these different strategies would result in the different use of management control systems in purchasing and in controlling relationships with suppliers. The contribution of this thesis is twofold: firstly, it establishes the pattern of the alignment of business strategy, functional strategy, functional control systems and control of interorganisational relationships, and secondly, it suggests the possible directions towards the refinement of this pattern.

  • 208.
    Amiri, Shahnaz
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Economic and Environmental Benefits of CHP-based District Heating Systems in Sweden2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Future energy systems and thus the climate are affected by many factors, such as energy resources, energy demand, energy policy and the choice of energy technologies. Energy systems of the future are facing three main challenges; the steady growth of global energy demand, the energy resource depletion, as well as the increasing emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases and their impact on climate change. To meet the mentioned challenges with sustainability in mind, actions that increase energy efficiency and choosing an energy-efficient energy system which is cost efficient will be essential. Combined heat and power (CHP) plants and district heating and cooling could contribute greatly to increased system efficiency by using energy otherwise wasted.

    The aim of this study is to increase the understanding of how CHP-based district heating and cooling systems using different primary energy sources can contribute to more cost-efficient energy systems, which reduce global CO2 emissions, and to highlight the impact of some important parameters and measures on Swedish municipal district heating systems. An important assumption in this study is the estimation of CO2 emissions from electricity production, which is based on marginal electricity perspectives. In the short term, the marginal electricity is assumed to come from coal-fired condensing power plants while in the long term it consists of electricity produced by natural gas-fired combined cycle condensing power plants. This means that the local electricity production will replace the marginal electricity production. The underlying assumption is an ideal fully deregulated European electricity market where trade barriers are removed and there are no restrictions on transfer capacity.

    The results show that electricity generation in CHP plants, particularly in higher efficiency combined steam and gas turbine heat and power plants using natural gas, can reduce the global environmental impact of energy usage to a great extent. The results confirm, through the scenarios presented in this study, that waste as a fuel in CHP-based district heating systems is fully utilised since it has the lowest operational costs. The results also show how implementation of a biogas-based CHP plant in a biogas system contributes to an efficient system, as well as lowering both CO2 emissions and system costs. The results show that replacing electricity-driven (e.g. compression) cooling by heat-driven cooling using district heating (e.g. absorption chillers) in a CHP system is a cost-effective and climate friendly technology as electricity consumption is reduced while at the same time the electricity generation will be increased. The results of the study also show that there is potential to expand district heating systems to areas with lower heat density, with both environmental and economic benefits for the district heating companies.

    The results reveal that the operation of a studied CHP-based district heating system with an imposed emission limit is very sensitive to the way CO2 emissions are accounted, i.e., local CO2 emissions or emissions from marginal electricity production. The results show how the electricity production increases in the marginal case compared with the local one in order to reduce global CO2 emissions. The results also revealed that not only electricity and fuel prices but also policy instruments are important factors in promoting CHP-based district heating and cooling systems. The use of electricity certificates has a large influence for the introduction of biogas-based cogeneration. Another conclusion from the modelling is that present Swedish policy instruments are strong incentives for cogeneration with similar impact as applying external costs.

    List of papers
    1. Modelling and optimisation of electricity, steam and district heating production for a local Swedish utility
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modelling and optimisation of electricity, steam and district heating production for a local Swedish utility
    2006 (English)In: European Journal of Operational Research, ISSN 0377-2217, E-ISSN 1872-6860, Vol. 175, no 2, p. 1224-1247Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    District heating may help reduce environmental impact and energy costs, but policy instruments and waste management may influence operations. The energy system optimisation model MODEST has been used for 50 towns, regions and a nation. Investments and operation that satisfy energy demand at minimum cost are found through linear programming. This paper describes the application of MODEST to a municipal utility, which uses several fuels and cogeneration plants. The model reflects diurnal and monthly demand fluctuations. Several studies of the Linköping utility are reviewed. These indicate that the marginal heat cost is lower in summer, a new waste or wood fired cogeneration plant is more profitable than a natural-gas-fired combined cycle, material recycling of paper and hard plastics is preferable to waste incineration from an energy-efficiency viewpoint, and considering external costs enhances wood fuel use. Here, an emission limit is used to show how fossil-fuel cogeneration displaces CO2 from coal-condensing plants. © 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-43950 (URN)10.1016/j.ejor.2005.06.026 (DOI)75220 (Local ID)75220 (Archive number)75220 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    2. Internalising external costs of electricity and heat production in a municipal energy system
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internalising external costs of electricity and heat production in a municipal energy system
    2007 (English)In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 35, no 10, p. 5242-5253Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Both energy supply and waste treatment give rise to negative effects on the environment, so-called external effects. In this study, monetary values on external costs collected from the EU′s ExternE project are used to evaluate inclusion of these costs in comparison with an energy utility perspective including present policy instruments. The studied object is a municipal district heating system with a waste incineration plant as the base supplier of heat. The evaluation concerns fuels used for heat production and total electricity production, for scenarios with external costs included and for a scenario using the present policy instrument.

    Impacts of assumptions on marginal power producers (coal or natural gas power plants) are investigated, since locally produced electricity is assumed to replace marginal power and thus is credited for the avoided burden. Varying levels of external costs for carbon dioxide emissions are analysed. The method used is an economic optimisation model, MODEST.

    The conclusion is that present policy instruments are strong incentives for cogeneration, even when external costs are included. Waste is fully utilised in all scenarios. In cases where coal is the marginal power producer, more electricity is produced; when natural gas is the marginal power producer, less is produced. There are several uncertainties in the data for external costs, both methodological and ethical. In the ExternE data, not all environmental impacts are included. For waste incineration, ashes are not included, and another difficulty is how to treat the avoided burden of other waste treatment methods.

    Keywords
    External costs, Combined heat and power, Waste incineration
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14206 (URN)10.1016/j.enpol.2007.04.026 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-01-04 Created: 2007-01-04 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    3. European perspective on absorption cooling in a combined heat and power system: A case study of energy utility and industries in Sweden
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>European perspective on absorption cooling in a combined heat and power system: A case study of energy utility and industries in Sweden
    2007 (English)In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 84, no 12, p. 1319-1337Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Mankind is facing an escalating threat of global warming and there is increasing evidence that this is due to human activity and increased emissions of carbon dioxide. Converting from vapour compression chillers to absorption chillers in a combined heat and power (CHP) system is a measure towards sustainability as electricity consumption is replaced with electricity generation. This electricity produced in Swedish CHP-system will substitute marginally produced electricity and as result lower global emissions of carbon dioxide. The use of absorption chillers is limited in Sweden but the conditions are in fact most favourable. Rising demand of cooling and increasing electricity prices in combination with a surplus of heat during the summer in CHP system makes heat driven cooling extremely interesting in Sweden. In this paper we analyse the most cost-effective technology for cooling by comparing vapour compression chillers with heat driven absorption cooling for a local energy utility with a district cooling network and for industries in a Swedish municipality with CHP. Whilst this case is necessarily local in scope, the results have global relevance showing that when considering higher European electricity prices, and when natural gas is introduced, absorption cooling is the most cost-effective solution for both industries and for the energy supplier. This will result in a resource effective energy system with a possibility to reduce global emissions of CO2 with 80%, a 300% lower system cost, and a 170% reduction of the cost of producing cooling due to revenues from electricity production. The results also show that, with these prerequisites, a decrease in COP of the absorption chillers will not have a negative impact on the cost-effectiveness of the system, due to increased electricity production.

    Keywords
    Absorption cooling, European electricity prices, Natural gas, Carbon dioxide, Global emissions
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14161 (URN)10.1016/j.apenergy.2006.09.016 (DOI)
    Available from: 2006-11-27 Created: 2006-11-27 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    4. Assessment of the natural gas potential for heat and power generation in the County of Ostergotland in Sweden
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessment of the natural gas potential for heat and power generation in the County of Ostergotland in Sweden
    2009 (English)In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 496-506Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to investigate the potential use of natural gas for heat and power production for the municipality of Linkoping, Norrkoping and Finspang in the County of Ostergotland, Sweden.

    The results of the study revealed that these three municipalities with the present heating demand can convert 2030 GWh/year of the present fuel mixed to natural gas. The expansion of natural gas provides the possibility to increase the electricity generation with approximately 800 GWh annually in the County of Ostergotland. The global emissions of CO2 reduce also by approximately 490 ktonne/year by assuming the coal condensing power plant as the marginal power plant. The total system cost decreases by 76 Mkr/year with the present electricity price which varies between 432 and 173 SEK/MWh and with 248 Mkr/year if the present electricity price increases to 37% which is approximately corresponding to European electricity prices.

    Sensitivity analysis is done with respect to the different factors such as price of electricity, natural gas, etc. The findings show that increased price of electricity and increased district heating demand increases the profitability to convert to natural gas using CHP plant.

    Keywords
    Natural gas, CO2 emissions, Combined heat and power
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-16971 (URN)10.1016/j.enpol.2008.09.080 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-03-01 Created: 2009-02-27 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    5. Possibilities and consequences of deregulation of the European electricity market for connection of heat sparse areas to district heating systems
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Possibilities and consequences of deregulation of the European electricity market for connection of heat sparse areas to district heating systems
    2010 (English)In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 87, no 7, p. 2401-2410Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of the study is to analyse the conditions for connection of residential buildings in heat sparse areas to district heating systems in order to increase electricity production in municipal combined heat and power plants. The European electricity market has been assumed to be fully deregulated. The relation between connection of heat sparse areas, increased electricity and heat production as well as electricity prices, fuel prices and emissions rights is investigated. The results of the study show that there is potential to expand the district heating market to areas with lower heat concentrations in the cities of Gavle, Sandviken and Borlange in Sweden, with both economic and environmental benefits. The expansion provides a substantial heat demand of approximately 181 GWh/year, which results in an electricity power production of approximately 43 GWh/year. Since the detached and stand-alone houses in the studied heat sparse areas have been heated either by oil boiler or by direct electricity, connection to district heating also provides a substantial reduction in emissions of CO2. The largest reductions in CO2 emissions are found to be 211 ktonnes/year assuming coal-fired condensing power as marginal electricity production. Connection of heat sparse areas to district heating decrease the system costs and provide a profitability by approximately 22 million EURO/year for the studied municipalities if the price of electricity is at a European level, i.e. 110 EURO/MWh. Sensitivity analysis shows, among other things, that a strong relation exists between the price of electricity and the profitability of connecting heat sparse areas to district heating systems.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam., 2010
    Keywords
    Combined heat and power; Heat sparse areas; CO2 emissions; District heating; Deregulated electricity market
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-58385 (URN)10.1016/j.apenergy.2010.02.002 (DOI)000278675100034 ()
    Note
    Original Publication: Shahnaz Amiri and Bahram Moshfegh, Possibilities and consequences of deregulation of the European electricity market for connection of heat sparse areas to district heating systems, 2010, Applied Energy, (87), 7, 2401-2410. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2010.02.002 Copyright: Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. http://www.elsevier.com/ Available from: 2010-08-13 Created: 2010-08-11 Last updated: 2017-12-12
    6. Simulation and introduction of a CHP plant in a Swedish biogas system
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Simulation and introduction of a CHP plant in a Swedish biogas system
    2013 (English)In: Renewable energy, ISSN 0960-1481, E-ISSN 1879-0682, Vol. 49, no SI, p. 242-249Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The objectives of this study are to present a model for biogas production systems to help achieve a more cost-effective system, and to analyse the conditions for connecting combined heat and power (CHP) plants to the biogas system. The European electricity market is assumed to be fully deregulated. The relation between connection of CHP. increased electricity and heat production, electricity prices, and electricity certificate trading is investigated. A cost-minimising linear programming model (MODEST) is used. MODEST has been applied to many energy systems, but this is the first time the model has been used for biogas production. The new model, which is the main result of this work, can be used for operational optimisation and evaluating economic consequences of future changes in the biogas system. The results from the case study and sensitivity analysis show that the model is reliable and can be used for strategic planning. The results show that implementation of a biogas-based CHP plant result in an electricity power production of approximately 39 GW h annually. Reduced system costs provide a profitability of 46 MSEK/year if electricity and heat prices increase by 100% and electricity certificate prices increase by 50%. CO2 emission reductions up to 32,000 ton/year can be achieved if generated electricity displaces coal-fired condensing power.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2013
    Keywords
    Biogas system, CO2 emissions, Energy systems optimisation, Combined heat and power plant, Marginal electricity
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-85624 (URN)10.1016/j.renene.2012.01.022 (DOI)000309902000051 ()
    Available from: 2012-11-26 Created: 2012-11-26 Last updated: 2017-12-07
  • 209.
    Amiri, Shahnaz
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center.
    Henning, Dag
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center.
    Karlsson, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center.
    Simulation and introduction of a CHP plant in a Swedish biogas system2013In: Renewable energy, ISSN 0960-1481, E-ISSN 1879-0682, Vol. 49, no SI, p. 242-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objectives of this study are to present a model for biogas production systems to help achieve a more cost-effective system, and to analyse the conditions for connecting combined heat and power (CHP) plants to the biogas system. The European electricity market is assumed to be fully deregulated. The relation between connection of CHP. increased electricity and heat production, electricity prices, and electricity certificate trading is investigated. A cost-minimising linear programming model (MODEST) is used. MODEST has been applied to many energy systems, but this is the first time the model has been used for biogas production. The new model, which is the main result of this work, can be used for operational optimisation and evaluating economic consequences of future changes in the biogas system. The results from the case study and sensitivity analysis show that the model is reliable and can be used for strategic planning. The results show that implementation of a biogas-based CHP plant result in an electricity power production of approximately 39 GW h annually. Reduced system costs provide a profitability of 46 MSEK/year if electricity and heat prices increase by 100% and electricity certificate prices increase by 50%. CO2 emission reductions up to 32,000 ton/year can be achieved if generated electricity displaces coal-fired condensing power.

  • 210.
    Amiri, Shahnaz
    et al.
    University of Gävle.
    Moshfegh, Bahram
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Possibilities and consequences of deregulation of the European electricity market for connection of heat sparse areas to district heating systems2010In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 87, no 7, p. 2401-2410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of the study is to analyse the conditions for connection of residential buildings in heat sparse areas to district heating systems in order to increase electricity production in municipal combined heat and power plants. The European electricity market has been assumed to be fully deregulated. The relation between connection of heat sparse areas, increased electricity and heat production as well as electricity prices, fuel prices and emissions rights is investigated. The results of the study show that there is potential to expand the district heating market to areas with lower heat concentrations in the cities of Gavle, Sandviken and Borlange in Sweden, with both economic and environmental benefits. The expansion provides a substantial heat demand of approximately 181 GWh/year, which results in an electricity power production of approximately 43 GWh/year. Since the detached and stand-alone houses in the studied heat sparse areas have been heated either by oil boiler or by direct electricity, connection to district heating also provides a substantial reduction in emissions of CO2. The largest reductions in CO2 emissions are found to be 211 ktonnes/year assuming coal-fired condensing power as marginal electricity production. Connection of heat sparse areas to district heating decrease the system costs and provide a profitability by approximately 22 million EURO/year for the studied municipalities if the price of electricity is at a European level, i.e. 110 EURO/MWh. Sensitivity analysis shows, among other things, that a strong relation exists between the price of electricity and the profitability of connecting heat sparse areas to district heating systems.

  • 211.
    Amiri, Shahnaz
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Trygg, Louise
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Moshfegh , Bahram
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Assessment of the natural gas potential for heat and power generation in the County of Ostergotland in Sweden2009In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 496-506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to investigate the potential use of natural gas for heat and power production for the municipality of Linkoping, Norrkoping and Finspang in the County of Ostergotland, Sweden.

    The results of the study revealed that these three municipalities with the present heating demand can convert 2030 GWh/year of the present fuel mixed to natural gas. The expansion of natural gas provides the possibility to increase the electricity generation with approximately 800 GWh annually in the County of Ostergotland. The global emissions of CO2 reduce also by approximately 490 ktonne/year by assuming the coal condensing power plant as the marginal power plant. The total system cost decreases by 76 Mkr/year with the present electricity price which varies between 432 and 173 SEK/MWh and with 248 Mkr/year if the present electricity price increases to 37% which is approximately corresponding to European electricity prices.

    Sensitivity analysis is done with respect to the different factors such as price of electricity, natural gas, etc. The findings show that increased price of electricity and increased district heating demand increases the profitability to convert to natural gas using CHP plant.

  • 212.
    Amiri, Shahnaz
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Gavle, Sweden.
    Weinberger, Gottfried
    University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Increased cogeneration of renewable electricity through energy cooperation in a Swedish district heating system - A case study2018In: Renewable energy, ISSN 0960-1481, E-ISSN 1879-0682, Vol. 116, p. 866-877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study of the district heating (DH) system in the city of Kisa, Sweden, shows how, through energy cooperation with a nearby sawmill and paper mill, a local energy company contributes to energy efficient DH and cost-effective utilization of a new biofuel combined heat and power (CHP) plant. Cases of stand-alone and integrated energy systems are optimized with the linear program MODEST. The European power market is assumed to be fully deregulated. The results show clear advantages for the energy company to cooperate with these industries to produce heat for DH and process steam for industry. The cooperating industries gain advantages from heat and/or biofuel by-product supply as well. The opening to use a biofuel CHP plant for combined heat supply results in cogenerated electricity of almost 29 GWh/a with an increased biofuel use of 13 GWhia, zero fuel oil use and CO2 emission reductions of 25,800 tons CO2/a with coal-condensing power plant on the margin and biofuel as limited resource. The total system cost decreases by -2.18 MEUR/a through extended cooperation and renewable electricity sales. The sensitivity analysis shows that the profitability of investing in a biofuel CHP plant increases with higher electricity and electricity certificate prices. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 213.
    Ammenberg, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Environmental management systems and environmental performance2007In: Strategic sustainability: the state of the art in corporate environmental management systems / [ed] Robert Sroufe and Joseph Sarkis, Sheffield: Greenleaf Publishing Ltd, 2007, p. 242-257Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental management systems (EMSs) are tools that can be used to steer and controlan organisation’s environmental efforts. This chapter focuses on standardisedEMSs, those that deal with fulfilling the requirements of the international standard ISO14001 (ISO 1996) and/or the EU Eco-Management and Audit Scheme (EMAS) (EC 2001).These standardised EMSs have been applied for about a decade; the number of organisationsthat are certified in accordance with them worldwide is steadily rising and nowhas reached over 100,000 (ISO World 2007).Early EMS work focused on issues relating to implementation. Often, positive environmentaleffects were taken for granted. More recently, however, questions addressingthe effects of standardised EMSs have become more popular in the research literature.The extent and types of effects of a standardised system are critical issues from anenvironmental perspective. The information presented within this chapter will helpuncover and capture some of the nuances of the connection between EMSs and environmentalperformance. Important lessons learned as a result of this study include arelative lack of understanding of EMSs even after more than a decade of practical application.Additional insights include the extent to which EMSs are useful tools in achievingbetter organisational environmental conditions and identification of the importantfactors influencing the effectiveness and efficiency of such systems. While the focus ofthis chapter is on the use of standardised EMSs to reduce environmental impacts, themethods used in this study build on the author’s findings from several earlier studies—a meta-analytic perspective—and are summarised where appropriate. Some key strategicEMS issues addressed here include:

    ● Environmental aspects, their identification, formulation and assessment

    ● The scope of EMSs, including their relationship with product development

    ● Environmental policy, targets and objectives

    ● External environmental auditing

    ● Continual improvement in environmental performance

    ● EMSs and the supply chain

  • 214.
    Ammenberg, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Miljömanagement: miljö- och hållbarhetsarbete i företag och andra organisationer2012 (ed. 2 [rev.])Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Boken ger läsaren kunskap om viktiga förutsättningar när det gällerföretags, och andra typer av organisationers, arbete med miljö- och hållbar utveckling. Det gäller både förutsättningar utanför och inom organisationer. Boken behandlar även relevanta strategier, metoder och koncept inom området.

    I den första delen – Omvärlden – behandlas områden som främst påverkar företag och andra typer av organisationer utifrån. Inledningsvis beskrivs exempelvis miljöproblematiken och ”hållbar utveckling”. Därefter behandlas miljöpolitik, miljölagstiftning, de ekonomiska systemen samt etiska frågor.

    I den andra delen – Hållbarhetsstrategiskt arbete med fokus på miljö – behandlas delar i miljö- och hållbarhetsarbetet som ofta berör hela organisationen. Först introduceras intressentperspektivet och därefter grunderna avseende strategiskt arbete. Vidare finns en kort introduktion till organisationsteori med en beskrivning av hur miljö- och hållbarhetsarbete kan organiseras och genomföras. Därefter följer två kapitel om ledningssystem, först ges en allmän introduktion för flera olika områden och sedan en mer ingående beskrivning. Den andra delen avslutas med ett kapitel om miljöarbete i olika typer av organisationer.

    I bokens tredje del – Viktiga delar i miljö- och hållbarhetsarbetet – berörs andra ”områden” i miljö- och hållbarhetsarbetet, som kan vara mycket viktiga men ofta inte är lika övergripande. Det innefattar miljörevision; miljöarbete med fokus på produkter; miljökonsekvensbeskrivningar; riskhantering; samt marknadsföring och extern kommunikation.

    Boken är i första hand skriven för kurser i miljömanagement eller miljöledning vid högskolor och universitet, men kan också användas för utbildningar på företag och inom andra typer av organisationer.

  • 215.
    Ammenberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center (BRC).
    Anderberg, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lönnqvist, Tomas
    Division of Energy Processes, Department of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Grönkvist, Stefan
    Division of Energy Processes, Department of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Thomas
    Department of Industrial Economics and Management, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Biogas in the transport sector: Actor and policy analysis focusing on the demand side in the Stockholm region2018In: Resources, Conservation and Recycling, ISSN 0921-3449, E-ISSN 1879-0658, Vol. 129, p. 70-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden has ambitions to phase out fossil fuels and significantly increase the share of biofuels it uses. This articlefocuses on Stockholm County and biogas, with the aim to increase the knowledge about regional preconditions.Biogas-related actors have been interviewed, focusing on the demand side. Biogas solutions play an essentialrole, especially regarding bus transports and taxis. Long-term development has created well-functioning sociotechnicalsystems involving collaboration. However, uncertainties about demand and policy cause hesitation andsigns of stagnating development.Public organizations are key actors regarding renewables. For example, Stockholm Public Transport procuresbiogas matching the production at municipal wastewater treatment plants, the state-owned company Swedaviasteers via a queuing system for taxis, and the municipalities have shifted to “environmental cars”.There is a large interest in electric vehicles, which is expected to increase significantly, partially due tosuggested national policy support. The future role of biogas will be affected by how such an expansion comesabout. There might be a risk of electricity replacing biogas, making it more challenging to reach a fossil-freevehicle fleet. Policy issues strongly influence the development. The environmental car definition is of importance,but its limited focus fails to account for several different types of relevant effects. The dynamic policylandscape with uncertainties about decision makers’ views on biogas seems to be one important reason behindthe decreased pace of development. A national, long-term strategy is missing. Both the European Union andSweden have high ambitions regarding a bio-based and circular economy, which should favor biogas solutions.

  • 216.
    Ammenberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Baas, Leo
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eklund, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Feiz, Roozbeh
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Helgstrand, Anton
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Marshall, Richard
    CEMEX Research Group AG, Switzerland.
    Improving the CO2 performance of cement, part III: The relevance of industrial symbiosis and how to measure its impact2015In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 98, p. 145-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cement production contributes to extensive CO2 emissions. However, the climate impact can vary significantly between different production systems and different types of cement products. The market is dominated by ordinary Portland cement, which is based on primary raw materials and commonly associated with combustion of vast amounts of fossil fuels. Therefore, the production of Portland cement can be described as a rather linear process. But there are alternative options, for example, involving large amounts of industrial byproducts and renewable energy which are more cyclic and thus can be characterized as relatively “synergistic”.

    The main purpose of this article is to study how relevant the leading ideas of industrial symbiosis are for the cement industry based on a quantitative comparison of the CO2 emissions from different cement production systems and products, both existing and hypothetical. This has been done by studying a group of three cement plants in Germany, denoted as ClusterWest, and the production of cement clinker and three selected cement products. Based on this analysis and literature, it is discussed to what extent industrial symbiosis options can lead to reduced CO2 emissions, for Cluster West and the cement industry in general.

    Utilizing a simplified LCA model (“cradle to gate”), it was shown that the CO2 emissions from Cluster West declined by 45% over the period 1997e2009, per tonne of average cement. This was mainly due to a large share of blended cement, i.e., incorporation of byproducts from local industries as supplementary cementitious materials. For producers of Portland cement to radically reduce the climate impact it is necessary to engage with new actors and find fruitful cooperation regarding byproducts, renewable energy and waste heat. Such a development is very much in line with the key ideas of industrial ecology and industrial symbiosis, meaning that it appears highly relevant for the cement industry to move further in this direction. From a climate perspective, it is essential that actors influencing the cement market acknowledge the big difference between different types of cement, where an enlarged share of blended cement products (substituting clinker with byproducts such as slag and fly ash) offers a great scope for future reduction of CO2 emissions.

  • 217.
    Ammenberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Baas, Leo
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eklund, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Feiz, Roozbeh
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Helgstrand, Anton
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Marshall, Richard
    Industrial symbiosis for improving the CO2-performance of cement2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Justification of the paper

    Cement production is one of the largest contributors to global CO2-emissions. However, the context and characteristics of the production and the cement products vary a lot. A significant part of the production must be characterized as rather linear, for example, to a large extent based on fossil fuels and involving material flows that are not closed. But there are also much more synergistic examples, involving industrial by-products, renewable energy, etc. Clearly, there are opportunities for improvement within the cement industry and it is interesting to analyze to what extent increased industrial symbiosis can lead to improved climate performance. This has been done by studying the production of cement clinker and three selected cement products produced within the Cluster West in Germany, consisting of three cement plants that are owned by the multinational company CEMEX. The methodology is mostly based on Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), from cradle-to-gate.

    Purpose

    The overall purpose is to contribute to a better understanding of the climate performance of different ways of producing cement, and different cement products. The climate impact is assessed for “traditional”, rather linear, ways of making cement, but also two more synergistic alternatives, where the by-product granulated blast furnace slag (GBFS) is utilized to a large extent, substituting cement clinker. It is also shown how the climate performance of the West Cluster has changed from 1997 until 2009 (the main year of study), and investigated how further industrial symbiosis measures could improve the performance.

    Theoretical framework

    To a large extent this project has been based on mapping and analysis of relevant flows of material and energy, where LCA methodology has played an important part. Theoretical and methodological aspects related to the fields of Industrial Ecology and Industrial Symbiosis have played an important role. The findings are discussed in relation to some of the key ideas within these fields. The paper generates insight into the methodological challenge of quantifying environmental performance of different production approaches and basically what CO2 improvement potential cement industry has by taking industrial symbiosis measures.

    Results

    The results showed that the cement clinker produced at Cluster West is competitive from a climate perspective, causing CO2-eq missions that are a couple of percent lower than the world average. During the twelve year period from 1997 to 2009 these emissions became about 12 percent lower, which was mainly achieved by production efficiency measures but also via changing fuels. However, the most interesting results concern the blended cement products. It was manifested that it is very advantageous from a climate perspective to substitute clinker with granulated blast furnace slag. For example, the CO2-eq emissions were estimated to be 65 percent lower for the best product compared to “ordinary cement”.

    Conclusions

    Information and measures at the plant level are not sufficient to compare products or to significantly reduce the climate impact related to cement. To achieve important reductions of the emissions, measures and knowledge at a higher industrial symbiosis level are needed.

  • 218.
    Ammenberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center.
    Bohn, Irene
    Den Kgl. Veterinær- og Landbohøjskole, Denmark.
    Feiz, Roozbeh
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center.
    Systematic assessment of feedstock for an expanded biogas production: A multi-criteria approach2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Biogas solutions can contribute to more renewable and local energy systems, and also involve other essential aspects such as nutrient recycling. From a theoretical feedstock perspective there is a great biogas potential in Sweden, but the development has been relatively slow as many biogas producers face challenges of different types. Among the many influencing factors, the choice of feedstocks (biomass) is of strategic importance. Within the Biogas Research Center (BRC), hosted by Linköping University in Sweden, a research project focused on feedstock has been ongoing for several years. It has involved researchers, biogas and biofertilizer producers, agricultural organizations and others. The main aim has been to develop a method to assess the suitability of feedstock for biogas and biofertilizer production, and to apply this method on a few selected feedstocks. A multi-criteria method has been developed that covers potential, feasibility and resource efficiency, operationalized via 17 indicators directed towards cost efficiency, technological feasibility, energy and environmental performance, accessibility, competition, policy and other issues. Thus the method it is relatively comprehensive, yet hopefully simple enough to be used by practitioners.

    The main ambition, applying the method, has been to collect and structure relevant information to facilitate strategic overviews, communication and informed decision making. This is relevant for development within the biogas and biofertilizer industry, for policymakers, to define and prioritize among essential research projects, etc. This report presents some essential parts of this project, focusing on the multi-criteria method and results regarding ley crops, straw, farmed blue mussels and food waste (and stickleback to some extent). It clarifies how the method can be applied and highlights barriers, drivers and opportunities for each feedstock. Comparisons are also made. The results indicate that biogas production from food waste and ley crops is the most straightforward, and for straw and farmed blue mussels there are more obstacles to overcome. For all of them, the dynamic and very uncertain policy landscape is a barrier. In the final chapter, some conclusions about the method and its application are drawn.

  • 219.
    Ammenberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Feiz, Roozbeh
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Assessment of Feedstocks for Biogas Production, Part II: Results for Strategic Decision Making2017In: Resources, Conservation and Recycling, ISSN 0921-3449, E-ISSN 1879-0658, Vol. 122, p. 388-404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biogas production is essentially based on organic materials and biological processes; hence it can contribute to the transition toward a biobased economy. Biogas is a biofuel that can contribute to a more renewable and local energy system. In comparison with other biofuels, biogas is more flexible and can be produced from many different types of feedstock, including biomass containing various shares of carbohydrates, lipids and, both from primary and secondary raw materials. However, a significantly expanded biogas production is dependent on good business conditions, in turn related to societal acceptance and support. There are many factors that can make a biogas solution more or less suitable for both producers and the broader society. Among the many influencing factors, the choice of feedstocks (biomass) for producing biogas and biofertilizer is of strategic importance. But, to assess the suitability is complicated, because it is linked to many different challenges such as cost, energy balance, environmental impacts, institutional conditions, available technologies, geographical conditions, alternative and competing interest, and so on. Suitability includes aspects related to feasibility for implementation, potential for renewable energy and nutrient recycling, and resource efficiency. In this article, a multi-criteria framework, which is proposed in a companion article (Part II), is used to assess the suitability of four types of feedstocks for producing biogas (considering Swedish conditions). The assessed feedstocks are ley crops, straw, farmed blue mussels, and source-sorted food waste. The results have synthesized and structured a lot of information, which facilitates considerably for those that want an overview and to be able to review several different areas simultaneously. Among the assessed feedstocks, biogas production from household food waste and ley is the most straightforward. For straw and farmed blue mussels, there are more obstacles to overcome including some significant barriers. For all feedstock there are challenges related to the institutional conditions. The assessment contributes to the knowledge about sustainable use of these feedstocks, and the limitations and opportunities for biogas development. It supports more informed decision making, both in industry and policy. Existing, or forthcoming, biogas and biofertilizer producers who are considering altering or expanding their production systems can benefit from a better understanding of different choices of feedstock that are or can be (potentially) at their disposal; thus, identify hotspots, weak points, and possible candidates for implementation in future. This research is performed within the Biogas Research Center (BRC), which is a transdisciplinary center of excellence with the overall goal of promoting resource-efficient biogas solutions in Sweden. The BRC is funded by the Energy Agency of Sweden, Linköping University, and more than 20 partners from academia, industry, municipalities and other several public and private organizations.

  • 220.
    Ammenberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Feizaghaii, Roozbeh
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Helgstrand, Anton
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eklund, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Baas, Leenard
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Industrial symbiosis for improving the CO2-performance of cement production: Final report of the CEMEX-Linköping University industrial ecology project, 20112011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report contains information about a research project lead by researchers from Environmental Technology and Management at Linköping University in Sweden. It has been conducted in cooperation with staff from the global cement company CEMEX. The study has been focused on three cement plants in the western parts of Germany, referred to as CEMEX Cluster West. They form a kind of work alliance, together producing several intermediate products and final products. One of the plants is a cement plant with a kiln, while the other two can be described as grinding and mixing stations.

    The overall aim has been to contribute to a better understanding of the climate performance of different ways of producing cement, and different cement products. An important objective was to systematically assess different cement sites, and production approaches, from a climate perspective, thereby making it easier for the company to analyze different options for improvements. Theoretical and methodological aspects related to the fields of Industrial Ecology (IE) and Industrial Symbiosis (IS) have played an important role.

    A common way of making cement is to burn limestone in a cement kiln. This leads to the formation of cement clinker, which is then grinded and composes the main component of Ordinary Portland Cement. One very important phase of the production of clinker is the process of calcination, which takes place in the kiln. In this chemical reaction calcium carbonate decomposes at high temperature and calcium oxide and carbon dioxide are produced. The calcination is of high importance since it implies that carbon bound in minerals is transformed to CO2. A large portion of the CO2 emissions related to clinker production is coming from the calcination process.

    Both clinker and Ordinary Portland Cement (CEM I 42.5) were studied. However, there are other ways of making cement, where the clinker can be substituted by other materials. Within Cluster West, granulated blast furnace slag from the iron and steel industry is used to a large extent as such a clinker substitute. This slag needs to be grinded, but an important difference compared to clinker is that it has already been treated thermally (during iron production) and therefore does not have to be burned in a kiln. With the purpose to include products with clearly different share of clinker substitutes, the project also comprised CEM III/A 42.5 (blended cement, about 50% clinker) and CEM III/B 42.5 N-. (blended cement, about 27% clinker). To sum up, this means that the study involved “traditional”, rather linear, ways of making cement, but also two more synergistic alternatives, where a byproduct is utilized to a large extent instead of clinker.

    The methodology is mostly based on Life Lycle Assessment (LCA), from cradle-to-gate, using the SimaPro software. This means that the cement products have been studied from the extraction of raw materials until they were ready for delivery at the “gate” of Cluster West. The functional unit was 1 tonne of product. A lot of data was collected regarding flows of material and energy for the year of 2009. In addition, some information concerning 1997 was also acquired. Most of the used data has been provided by CEMEX, but to be able to cover upstream parts of the life cycle data from the Ecoinvent database has also been utilized.

    The extensive data concerning 2009 formed the base for the project and made it possible to study the selected products thoroughly for this year. However, the intention was also to assess other versions of the product system – Cluster West in 1997 and also a possible, improved future case. For this purpose, a conceptual LCA method was developed that made it possible to consider different products as well as different conditions for the product system. Having conducted the baseline LCA, important results could be generated based on knowledge about six key performance indicators (KPIs) regarding overall information about materials, the fuel mix and the electricity mix. The conceptual LCA method could be used for other products and versions of Cluster West, without collecting large amounts of additional specific Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) data. The developed conceptual LCA method really simplified the rather complex Cluster West production system. Instead of having to consider hundreds of parameters, the information about the six KPIs was sufficient to estimate the emissions from different products produced in different versions of the production system (Cluster West).

    The results showed that the clinker produced at Cluster West is competitive from a climate perspective, causing CO2-eq missions that are a couple of percent lower than the world average. During the twelve year period from 1997 to 2009 these emissions became about 12 percent lower, which was mainly achieved by production efficiency measures but also via changing fuels. However, the most interesting results concern the blended cement products. It was manifested that it is very advantageous from a climate perspective to substitute clinker with granulated blast furnace slag, mainly since it reduces the emissions accounted related to calcination. For example, the CO2-eq emissions related to CEM III/B product were estimated to be 65 percent lower than those for CEM I.

    A framework for identifying and evaluating options for improvement has been developed and applied. Based on that framework the present production system was analyzed and illustrated, and different measures for reducing the climate impact were shown and evaluated. Two possible scenarios were defined and the conceptual LCA model used to estimate their climate performance.

    The authors’ recommendation is for CEMEX to continue to increase the share of CEM III (the share of good clinker substitutes), and to make efforts to shift the focus on the market from clinker and cement plants to different types of cement (or concrete) or even better to focus on the lifecycle of the final products such as buildings and constructions.

    Information and measures at the plant level are not sufficient to compare products or to significantly reduce the climate impact related to cement. To achieve important reductions of the emissions, measures and knowledge at a higher industrial symbiosis level are needed.

  • 221.
    Ammenberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hjelm, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Miljöteknik: För en hållbar utveckling2013Book (Other academic)
  • 222.
    Ammenberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hjelm, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gustafsson, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Thuresson, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eklund, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Krook, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Svensson, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ivner, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Miljöteknik: för en hållbar utveckling2011 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 223.
    Ammenberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jonsson, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Öberg, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Environmental management systems: scope assessment of environmental aspectsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to increase the understanding of how standardised environmental management systems (EMSs) affect environmental performance. Based on interviews with environmental managers from 18 different companies and two environmental consultants, we make clear how companies identify, formulate and assess their environmental aspects.

    The results show that consultants have an important role concerning EMSs. Many of the environmental managers have deficient knowledge concerning their own EMS, since they cannot explain central EMS procedures. This can probably be explained by too much external assistance, from consultants, in combination with internal barriers such as lack of competence, time and motivation.

    The characteristics of the companies’ assessment methods are presented, which among other things include which parameters are used and their relative weight. From an environmental point of view, it is positive that environmental parameters, in general, have a big influence. However it should also be noted that some of the companies use methods in which business parameters seem to dominate. Other important results show that most systems, overall, are facility oriented. In most cases it was difficult to understand the scope of individual aspects, for example, concerning what environmental impacts were considered. A majority of the environmental managers were rather uncertain about issues in relation to scope and system perspectives. Therefore, it is recommended that incentives be taken to increase environmental managers’ competence and to improve the standards, the guiding documents and the systems for their application.

  • 224.
    Ammenberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Products in environmental management systems: drivers, barriers and experiences2005In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 405-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Do standardised environmental management systems (EMS) lead to improved environmental performance? This depends on to what extent these systems lead to changes in important flows of material and energy, which for manufacturing companies, in turn, mean that the product development process is important. Consequently, it appears vital to investigate the connection between EMS and ‘Design for the Environment’ (DFE), i.e. the connection between these management systems and concepts that deal with environmental issues in product development.

    This paper presents product-oriented environmental management systems (POEMS), including characteristics of existing models, experiences from projects where these models have been tested and experiences concerning the product connection in ‘normal’ EMS. It includes a discussion of important factors influencing to what extent DFE activities are integrated into EMS and/or the outcome of such integration.

    There are many motives for integrating the two concepts. Firstly, DFE thinking might enrich EMS by contributing with a life-cycle perspective. If EMS encompassed products' life cycles to a greater extent, they would be a better complement to the often facility-oriented legal requirements and authority control. Secondly, EMS might remove the pilot project character of DFE activities and lead to continuous improvement. Thirdly, integration could lead to successful co-operation, both internally and externally. However, existing studies show that there is a mixed picture concerning the extent ‘normal’ EMS currently encompass products.

  • 225.
    Ammenberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Products in environmental management systems: the role of auditors2005In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 417-431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For standardized environmental management systems (EMS) to be environmentally effective tools, they should affect important environmental aspects related to flows of materials and energy, which for manufacturing companies are closely connected to their products. This paper presents how external environmental auditors interpret and apply important product-related requirements of ISO 14001 at manufacturing companies in Sweden.

    The results indicate that the link between EMS and products is rather weak. Products are seldom regarded as significant environmental aspects and are therefore not within the main scope of many EMS, which are mainly focused on sites. However, all of the interviewed auditors require that some kind of environmental considerations be incorporated into product development, but these considerations are to large extent site oriented; how they are prioritized in relation to other factors such as economics and other customer priorities appears to be up to the companies.

    The paper includes some recommendations to strengthen the role of products within the framework of standardized EMS.

  • 226.
    Ammenberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center.
    Svensson, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center.
    Svensson, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center.
    Björn, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center.
    Karlsson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center.
    Tonderski, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center.
    Eklund, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center.
    Biogas Research Center, BRC: Slutrapport för etapp 12015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Biogas Research Center (BRC) is a center of excellence in biogas research funded by the Swedish Energy Agency, Linköping University and a number of external organizations with one-third each. BRC has a very broad interdisciplinary approach, bringing together biogas-related skills from several areas to create interaction on many levels:

    • between industry, academia and society,
    • between different perspectives, and
    • between different disciplines and areas of expertise.

    BRC’s vision is:

    BRC contributes to the vision by advancing knowledge and technical development, as well as by facilitating development, innovation and business. Resource efficiency is central, improving existing processes and systems as well as establishing biogas solutions in new sectors and enabling use of new substrates.

    For BRC phase 1, the first two year period from 2012-2014, the research projects were organized in accordance with the table below showing important challenges for biogas producers and other stakeholders, and how these challenges were tackled in eight research projects. Five of the projects had an exploratory nature, meaning that they were broader, more future oriented and, for example, evaluated several different technology paths (EP1-5). Three projects focused more on technology and process development (DP6-8).

    This final report briefly presents the background and contains some information about competence centers in general. Thereafter follows more detailed information about BRC, for example, regarding the establishment, relevance, organization, vision, corner stones and development. The participating organizations are presented, both the research groups within Linköping University and the partners and members. Further on, there is a more detailed introduction to and description of the challenges mentioned in the table above and a short presentation from each of the research projects, followed by some sections dealing with fulfillment of objectives and an external assessment of BRC. Detailed, listed information is commonly provided in the appendices.

    Briefly, the fulfillment of objectives is good and it is very positive that so many scientific articles have been published (or are to be published) from the research projects and also within the wider center perspective. Clearly, extensive and relevant activities are ongoing within and around BRC. In phase 2 it essential to increase the share of very satisfied partners and members, where now half of them are satisfied and the other half is very satisfied. For this purpose, improved communication, interaction and project management are central. During 2015, at least two PhD theses are expected, to a large extent based on the research from BRC phase 1.

    In the beginning of 2014 an external assessment of BRC was carried out, with the main purpose to assess how well the center has been established and to review the conditions for a future, successful competence center. Generally, the outcome was very positive and the assessors concluded that BRC within a short period of time had been able to establish a well-functioning organization engaging a large share of the participants within relevant areas, and that most of the involved actors look upon BRC as a justifiable and well working investment that they plan to continue to support. The assessment also contributed with several relevant tips of improvements and to clarify challenges to address.

    This report is written in Swedish, but for each research project there will be reports and/or scientific papers published in English.

    The work presented in this report has been financed by the Swedish Energy Agency and the participating organizations.

  • 227.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Assessing the Contribution of Organic Agriculture: PovertyReduction and Employment Creation in Selected Value Chains2016In: Vulnerability of Agricultural Production Networks and Global Food Value Chainsdue to Natural Disasters: Book of Abstracts / [ed] Meinhard Breiling, Anbumozhi Venkatachalam, Vienna: TU Wien , 2016, p. 23-24Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organic agriculture (OA) is increasingly viewed as an economic opportunity for farmers allover the world. This paper addresses the effects of OA in terms of income, vulnerability andpoverty alleviation in rural areas in developing countries. It is based on a literature reviewwith emphasis on two value chains: cotton and coffee, which both involve smallholders indeveloping regions, and growing organic markets, but differ in terms of value chain structuresand geographical patterns.

  • 228.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hamnarna rustas för fartygens avloppsvatten2014In: Sjöfarten kring Sverige och dess påverkan på havsmiljön / [ed] Tina Johansen Lilja och Eva-Lotta Sundblad, Göteborg: Havsmiljöinstitutet , 2014, no 4, p. 10-11Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    När avloppsvatten från sjöfarten släpps ut i havet påverkar det miljön negativt genom att bakterier sprids och näringsämnen kommer ut i havet. Utsläppen är koncentrerade till farleder och hamnar och där kan effekterna vara tydliga, även om utsläppen är små i förhållande till de totala utsläppen till havet.

  • 229.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Urban green growth-myth or reality?2015In: URBACT II New Urban Economies : How can cities foster economic development and develop ‘new urban economies’ / [ed] Willem van Winden, Luis Carvalho, Saint-Denis, France: URBACT II Programme , 2015, p. 35-38Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    ‘To create the most resource-efficient region in the world’. This is the vision of Tekniska verken, the municipalityowned infrastructural company in Linköping, Sweden. It reflects the city’ s long-standing ambitions to be a ‘forerunner in climate and environmental initiatives’ and to support ‘business-driven’ environmental development, actively stimulating the development of a green economic sector. Linköping and the surrounding county of Östergötland are here used for discussing the development of the green economy in cities and regions.

  • 230.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Western harbor in Malmö2015In: Review 11. Re-inventing planning: examples from the Profession, Rotterdam, Nederländerna: International Society of City and Regional Planners , 2015, Vol. 11, p. 210-227Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    For the last 15 years Västra hamnen (Western Harbor) in Malmö, and Hammarby Sjöstad in Stockholm have been the major flagships of Swedish international eco-city ambitions. These city development projects are presented both as leading examples of the conversion of former industrial harbor areas and of environmental adaptation of densely built urban environments. Western Harbor is a centrally located former shipyard area which, since the end of the 1990s, has developed into a mixed city area for housing, schools, offices, shops and other workplaces as well as for recreational areas with beaches, parks and yacht harbors. Since its first phase, part of a housing expo in 2001, it has attracted international interest for its dense architecture, bold energy goals based on varied local renewable energy production, household waste systems, green and blue structures, and dialogue processes. By 2031, when the area is completed, it is expected to be the home for 25,000 people and 25,000 workplaces. In 2014, there were 7,300 inhabitants and more than 12,000 work places in Western Harbor, already twice of the work force of the former shipyard at its height.

  • 231.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kevin, Cullinane
    Företagsekonomiska institutionen, Handelshögskolan, Göteborgs universitet.
    Johansson Nikopolou, Zoi
    Företagsekonomiska institutionen, Handelshögskolan, Göteborgs universitet.
    Utsläppshandel kan vara en lönsam vägtill lägre utsläpp från sjöfarten2017In: Åtgärder för att minska sjöfartens påverkan på havsmiljön / [ed] Tina Johansen Lilja, Frida Lundberg och Eva-Lotta Sundblad., Göteborg: Havsmiljöinstitutet , 2017, p. 14-16Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Handel med utsläppsrätter under ett fastställt ”tak” av totalautsläpp som efterhand sänks, har i en del regioner i världenvisat sig vara en både kostnadseffektiv och framgångsrikstrategi för att minska luftföroreningarna. Frågan är om utsläppshandelskulle kunna vara ett effektivt sätt för att minskasjöfartens utsläpp i Europa eller Östersjöregionen?

  • 232.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wilewska Bien, Magda
    Sjöfart och marin teknik/maritim miljö och energisystem, Chalmers tekniska högskola, Göteborg.
    Billigare avfallshantering i hamnarna har inte gett förväntad effekt2017In: Åtgärder för att minska sjöfartens påverkan på havsmiljön / [ed] Tina Johansen Lilja, Frida Lundberg och Eva-Lotta Sundblad, Göteborg: Havsmiljöinstitutet , 2017, p. 26-27Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Hamnarna kan spela en viktig roll för att minska sjöfartensutsläpp i havet. Reglerna för fartygens avfallsdumpning harskärpts och i Östersjöområdet har det länge funnits en överenskommelseom att fartygen ska kunna lämna sitt avfall ihamn utan extra avgift. I praktiken låter dock de stora förbättringarnavänta på sig.

  • 233.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wilewska-Bien, Magda
    Sjöfart och marin teknik/maritim miljö och energisystem, Chalmers tekniska högskola, Göteborg.
    Expanderande kryssningsbransch ställer krav på Östersjöns hamnar2017In: Åtgärder för att minska sjöfartens påverkan på havsmiljön / [ed] Tina Johansen Lilja, Frida Lundberg och Eva-Lotta Sundblad, Göteborg: Havsmiljöinstitutet , 2017, p. 24-25Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Kryssningssjöfarten ger växande inkomster för kuststäderna,men innebär också ökad påverkan på miljön i Östersjön och dess hamnar. Trots att branschen åtagit sig att sluta släppa utavloppsvatten till sjöss lämnar bara var tredje kryssningsfartygsitt avfallsvatten vid hamnbesök. Dessutom är delar av fartygsflottani stort behov av förbättrad miljöprestanda.

  • 234.
    Anderbygd, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Toivanen, Kim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kultur, ett informellt styrmedel: En enkel fallstudie om organisationskultur som ett informellt styrmedel i ett mikroföretag2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate how culture can be used as a control tool and how a founder's cultural intentions are reflected in the organization. The study investigates a micro company where the founder is present in the daily business. We have analyzed how the control tools are shaped by cultural aspects by studying how culture has been implemented as a control tool.

    Method: The method consists of a multiple-choice method and takes the form of a simple case study. The empirical findings presented is collected through interviews, surveys and observation.

    Theoretical framework: The theoretical framework contains of theories about the structure of culture, the role of the founder in cultural control and theories of management control systems. Malmi and Brown's package (2008) will be used in conjunction with Andersson and Funcks (2017) control process to explain how the different controls can be used and how all of these are affected by organizational culture.

    Conclusion: The finding of this study shows how and that the founder has used culture as a control tool. It also appears that the values of the founder affect how the control tools are designed and used, and that the control tools are informal. The conclusion also shows that the founder's intentions are reflected to some extent in the organization.

  • 235.
    Anders, Signahl
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design .
    Nils, Hjerpe
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design .
    Deep Green i oceana strömmar - en konceptstudie2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    With growing economies and better living standards in many parts of the world today, there is a need of expanding the capacity of generating electricity. The alternatives for renewable energy technologies are not fully developed and have still some problems to conquer.

    The company Minesto has developed a technology that is called Deep Green. It is designed to gain electricity from tidal currents. Deep Green works in a similar way as a kite that is attached to the seafloor with a moving wire. It contains of a wing that moves due to the water current. The path of the movement is circular or a shape of an “8”. The turbine under the wing is powered by the water flow which in turn leads to generation of electricity by the generator.

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the potential of using the Deep Green technology in ocean currents with respect to construction and economy. The site for the investigation is off the east coast of Florida where the Florida current streams with a speed of about 1, 5 m/s close to the surface. The major difference compared to the use in tidal currents is the deep waters of about 300 m and a oneway current direction.

    A mooring construction was developed and optimized and with the use of carbon fiber ropes, buoys and foundations lets 9 Deep Greens operate between 20 and 79 m depth. The idea is to install 7 such clusters with a total of 63 Deep Greens on the site in Florida. This configuration generates a power of 24 MW and gives a production of 185 GWh/year.

    Economic accounts were made with support of earlier made calculations regarding a park of 60 Deep Greens in a tidal current application. The results for the clustered configuration in ocean currents indicated a cost of 0,67 SEK/kWh with a discount rate of 8%. The required capital for the installation is about 780 mSEK (CAPEX). The operating costs (OPEX) are 43,3 mSEK.

    The design seems reasonable in many respects and it operates in a continuous ocean current with good electricity generation. The use of Deep Green in ocean currents speaks for being a profitable application. Though, it will be a large‐scale economic project, mainly because installations in a small scale will not be profitable due to costs such as grid connection.

    Critical issues to look at in a further development was considered to be surveys of the installation site, the displacement and movements of the mooring, the buoyancy‐system and the installation procedure.

  • 236.
    Andersen, E. S.
    et al.
    BI Norwegian School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Söderlund, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. BI Norwegian School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Vaagaasar, A.
    BI Norwegian School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Projects and politics: exploring the duality between action and politics in complex projects2010In: International Journal of Management and Decision Making, ISSN 1462-4621, E-ISSN 1741-5187, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 121-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional research and literature on project management and organisation theory tend to view project organisations as non-political bodies and purely action-oriented endeavours. In contrast, this paper presents an alternative analysis drawing on the idea of projects as political and emergent processes. Based on in-depth, case-study findings of a complex development and implementation project, we suggest an analytical framework that focuses on the interrelatedness of action and political processes and which explains how project management deals with the two processes simultaneously. We identify and analyse three separate but nested organisational logics applied by the project management team to cope with the dual challenges of politics and action. The general idea is to illustrate the notion of projects as emergent processes involving both politics and action. The three logics are: 1) balancing openness and closure; 2) reformulating tasks to seek solutions; 3) relating to improve action capacity. Our findings add to the literature on the role and practice of project management in complex projects that entail both stakeholder and technological challenges.

  • 237.
    Andersen Söderbergh, Kim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Carl Malmsten - furniture studies. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Blästring av trä: Ett materialbibliotek av blästrade och ytbehandladeträytor2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10,5 credits / 16 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In my thesis I have sand blasted different type of woods - ring-porous and diffuseporous deciduous tree species and conifers - to show different results depending on the species, the direction of the grain and the effects of surface treatment of a blasted surface.

    The results of my tests were sometimes unexpected, such as that the sand from blasting almost completely disappeared, that all wood surfaces after blasting exhibited a much lighter or paler surface than before and that the diffuse-porous tree species showed differences in hardness between the beginning and end of annual rings.

    By creating a library of different kinds of wood and sandblasted surface treatment, I have created a reference bank that I will be able to use me in the manufacturing of interiors, furniture and other objects.

  • 238.
    Anderson, Brian S.
    et al.
    Univ Missouri, MO 64110 USA; Univ Ghent, Belgium.
    Wennberg, Karl
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    McMullen, Jeffery S.
    Indiana Univ, IN 47405 USA.
    Editorial: Enhancing quantitative theory-testing entrepreneurship research2019In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 34, no 5, article id UNSP 105928Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this editorial is to discuss methodological advancements to enhance quantitative theory-testing entrepreneurship research. As the impact of entrepreneurship scholarship accelerates and deepens, our methods must keep pace to continue shaping theory, policy, and practice. Like our sister fields in business, entrepreneurship is coming to terms with the replication and credibility crisis in the social sciences, forcing the field to revisit commonly-held assumptions that limit the promise and prospect of our scholarship. Thus, we provide suggestions for reviewers and editors to identify concerns in empirical work, and to guide authors in improving their analyses and research designs. We hope that our editorial provides useful and actionable guidance for entrepreneurship researchers submitting theory-testing papers to Journal of Business Venturing.

  • 239.
    Anderson, Helen
    et al.
    Jonköping International Business School.
    Holtström, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Oberg, Christina
    Lund University.
    Do Competition Authorities Consider Business Relationships?2012In: Journal of Business-to-Business Marketing, ISSN 1051-712X, E-ISSN 1547-0628, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 67-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Companies engage in business relationships for a variety of reasons, including specialization, product development, and building competitive networks. Research has demonstrated that mergers and acquisitions (Mandamp;As) may challenge ongoing business relationships. The purpose of this article is to investigate whether and how competition authorities consider business relationships when evaluating Mandamp;As. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethodology: The article uses the documentation from 450 Mandamp;As reported to the Swedish competition authority to capture the way in which an authority evaluates Mandamp;As. The Swedish competition authority evaluation corresponds to other national and international evaluation procedures. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanFindings: The findings indicate that the competition authorities neglect an important aspect of business life, namely companies forming business relationships. The competition authorities evaluate Mandamp;As on the basis of risk for price increases, and consequently disregard such issues as heterogeneity in demand and offerings, and values built into existing business relationships. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanOriginality/Value/Contribution: The article contributes to research on business relationships through exploring how a public authority deals with such relationships. It also contributes to research on mergers and acquisitions through examining how these activities are evaluated by competition authorities. Furthermore, the article contributes to competition research by reflecting on competition law concerning Mandamp;A regulations in relation to business relationships.

  • 240.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics .
    Havila, V.
    Salmi, A.
    Can You Buy a Business Relationship?: On The Importance of Customer and Supplier Relationships in Acquisitions2001In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 575-586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mergers and acquisitions have become a popular strategy for gaining growth. Studies show, however, high failure rates for acquisitions. Earlier literature concentrates on the strategic or organizational fit between companies and integration processes and fails to recognize the companies' external business relationships. An implicit assumption seems to be that through acquisition the market position of the target firm can be taken over. We argue that it is not always easy or even possible to take over a company's customer and supplier relationships. We elaborate on the various problems related to relationships that acquisitions may give rise to. Our conceptual discussion is illustrated with a case study from the graphics industry. © 2001 Elsevier Science Inc.

  • 241.
    Andersson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering.
    Cell för induktionshärdning: -En inledande studie för ett beslutsunderlag2008Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Magister), 20 points / 30 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This master´s thesis is performed by a student from the Master of Science program in mechanical engineering at Linköpings tekniska högskola. The scope of this thesis should be 30 points in the European scale. The content of the thesis is performed with and on behalf of AB Wahlquists Verkstäder in Linköping.

    Through collection from literature, verbal sources and visits to plants a short review of the technique behind induction hardening has been made. The review focuses on how it works, how it is developed, what limitations there are and the basics for the equipment. The scope of the review is based upon what the company desired to know initially about the subject.

    The underlying facts that were introduced in the review were used as a base for the discussions and ideas that have been presented as the proposals, for how the company can install induction hardening equipment in practice. These proposals are in line with the company´s desires. To make the final proposal more clear, calculations for investment costs, times in production and the stocking degree for the proposal have been presented.

    The important points of interest for the company to discuss in terms of synergy effects if they acquire the equipment have been introduced. These points are of greater or lesser importance depending on how this specific company chooses to set their value. However, the recommendation is that people with the correct knowledge reject or elucidates these points.

    The accomplished work has then been summarized and the final recommendations is, that the company needs to make further studies to be sure that they have enough work to put in the equipment. Otherwise it will be difficult to get a good pay off for the investment.

  • 242.
    Andersson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Demola East Sweden: The Innovation Intermediary: A study of the innovation project process and the user experience of Demola East Sweden2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation is a difficult, yet vital factor for any given organization. This has led to a new type of organizations; the intermediaries of open innovation. These provide a service offering by creating interchange between seekers with innovation problems, and third party problem solvers. This study focus on the specific case of one innovation intermediary; Demola East Sweden. They connect seekers of like big organizations or private persons, with student solvers from Linköping University. Demola East Sweden has grown quickly since the start in 2012, and now recognizes a need for evaluation. The purpose of this study is to examine the user experience of the Demola East Sweden innovation intermediary project process. This through the perspective of what adds values to it, and what could improve to the experience. The study was conducted as a case study in four phases of planning, mapping, analyzing, and conclusion. The planning phase defined the practical framework of the study, and three main areas of theory were chosen: the service of innovation intermediation, the structures behind innovation management, and the practical implementation of innovation. The mapping phase included observations and interviews for collecting data. As an initial step, insight on the context and operations of Demola East Sweden and the general project process was attained. Four project cases were then chosen to examine further. This included interviews with the seeker, the solvers, and the Demola East Sweden project facilitator of each case.

    The results were analyzed by answering specified research questions, defined by connecting the three theory areas to the purpose of the study. From this, conclusions for the study then could be drawn.The results generated an overview of the general project process of what happens before, during, and after the project conduct. Before project start, the process is mainly about screening the seekers and their projects ideas, and the solvers applying to participate. The analysis show that this initial screening process is important for assuring quality to the projects, and making sure the user expectations matches the service provided. During the projects the seekers are not involved much. The solvers on the other hand, are parallel to the project work also provided with mandatory events from Demola East Sweden and Linköping University. This e.g. includes pitch events where the solvers present and attain feedback on their projects, and coaching sessions on ethics and project goals. The analysis shows that the mandatory events are critical decision points, and are crucial for detecting problem areas in process. When the final results are presented and delivered to the seekers, they can choose if they want to buy it or not. If they choose not to, then they still own the initial project idea, but solvers own the generated results. The analysis shows that the results rarely go further than to concept solutions or prototypes, but also that these issues do not define the success rate of the projects. This is instead measured from the values attained from the experience of the project process. Regarding the expectations and the actual user experience, a common aspect for participation for both seekers and solvers, is the potential of recruitment. Otherwise, the seekers also expect the opportunity for low risk business investment, where they do not need to put in resources or commitment, but still maintain potential for innovation. For the solvers the expectations is also about attaining experience from real projects, where they at the same time gain course credits from the mandatory project events provided by the university. In general the expectations often match the actual experience. The issues on improvement is instead about e.g. the project process including too many mandatory events, lack of coordination between Demola East Sweden and Linköping University, and maintaining a balance of the important mutual interchange between the seekers and the solvers.

  • 243.
    Andersson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering.
    Wallin, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering.
    Modularised Passenger Seats2007Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Magister), 20 points / 30 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose with this master’s thesis, with Scania CV AB in Södertälje as job initiator, has been to develop three different passenger seat concepts with focus on modularisation, functionality and production. The different concepts are: a foldable passenger seat, which is possible to fold away completely, a bench for two passengers, and a resting seat for resting during breaks when the vehicle is parked.

    The main tools used during the search for concept solutions have been brainstorming, morphological analyses, and evaluation matrixes. Prototypes have been made in order to visualise the ideas but also for the possibility to test them in a real truck cabin and by that find advantages but also flaws. Final product specifications has been made and with that guidelines for a continued development work.

    Experiences gained during this thesis work has been that by using ergonomic data and theories, well thought through designs, and standardised interfaces a good result can be achieved, which fulfils the demands and wishes placed on the future product.

  • 244.
    Andersson, Ann-Christine
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Managers’ Views and Experiences of a Large-Scale County Council Improvement Program: Limitations and Opportunities2013In: Quality Management in Health Care, ISSN 1063-8628, E-ISSN 1550-5154, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 152-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore and evaluate managers’ views of a large-scale improvement program, including their experiences and opinions about improvement initiatives and drivers for change. The study is based on a survey used in 2 nationwide mappings of improvement initiatives and developmental trends in Swedish health care. The participants were all managers in a county council in Sweden. Data were analyzed descriptively, and statements were ranked in order of preferences. A majority of the respondents stated that they had worked with improvements since the county council improvement program started. The managers sometimes found it difficult to find data and measurements that supported the improvements, yet a majority considered that it was worth the effort and that the improvement work yielded results. The top-ranked driving forces were ideas from personnel and problems in the daily work. Staff satisfaction was ranked highest of the improvement potentials, but issues about patients’ experiences of their care and patient safety came second and third. The managers stated that no or only a few patients had been involved in their improvement initiatives. Large-scale county council improvement initiatives can illuminate quality problems and lead to increased interest in improvement initiatives in the health care sector.

  • 245.
    Andersson, Ann-Christine
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Practice-based Improvements in Healthcare2010Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A central problem for the healthcare sector today is how to manage change and improvements. In recent decades the county councils in Sweden have started various improvement initiatives and programs in order to improve their healthcare services. The improvement program of the Kalmar county council, which constitutes the empirical context for this thesis, is one of those initiatives.

    The purpose of this thesis is to contribute to a broader understanding of large-scale improvement program in a healthcare setting. This is done by analyzing practitioner’s improvement ideas, describing participants in the improvement projects, revising and testing a survey to measure the development of improvement ideas and describing the improvement program from a theoretical perspective. The theoretical change model used looks at change from two opposing directions in six dimensions; Goals, Leadership, Focus, Process, Reward system and Use of consultants.

    The aims of the county council improvement program are to become a learning organization, disseminate improvement methodologies and implement continuous quality improvements in the organization. All healthcare administrations and departments in the county council were invited to apply for funds to accomplish improvement projects. Another initiative invited staff teams to work with improvement ideas in a program with support from facilitators, using the breakthrough methodology. Now almost all ongoing developments, improvements, patient safety projects, manager and leader development initiatives are put together under the county council improvement program umbrella.

    In the appended papers both qualitative and quantitative research approach were used. The first study (paper I) analyzed which types of improvement projects practitioners are engaged in using qualitative content analysis. Five main categories were identified: Organizational Process; Evidence and Quality; Competence Development; Process Technology; and Proactive Patient Work. Most common was a focus on organizational changes and process, while least frequent was proactive patient work. Besides these areas of focus, almost all aimed to increase patient safety and increase effectiveness and availability.

    Paper II described the participants in two of the initiatives, the categorized improvement projects in paper I and the team members in the methodology guided improvement programs. Strong professions like physicians and nurses were well represented, but other staff groups were not as active. Managers were responsible for a majority of the projects. The gender perspective reflected the overall mix of employees in the county council.

    Paper III described a revision and test of a Minnesota Innovation Survey (MIS) that will be used to follow and measure how quality improvement ideas develop and improve over time. Descriptive statistics were presented. The respondents were satisfied with their work and what they had accomplished. The most common comment was about time, not having enough time to work with the improvement idea and the difficulty of finding time because of regular tasks. This was the first test of the revised survey and the high use of the answer alternative “Do not know” showed that the survey did not fit the context very well in its present version.

    Trying to connect the county council improvement program and the initiatives studied in papers I and II with the change model gave rise to some considerations. The county council improvement program has an effort to combine organizational changes and a culture that encourages continuous improvements. Top-down and bottom-up management approaches are used, through setting out strategies from above and at the same time encouraging practitioners to improve their day-to-day work. Whether this will be a successful way to implement and achieve a continuous improvement culture in the whole organization is one of the main issues remaining to find out in further studies.

    List of papers
    1. Practice-based improvement ideas in healthcare services
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Practice-based improvement ideas in healthcare services
    2010 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. The present study will contribute to knowledge of how practitioners in a healthcare region engage in quality improvement initiatives. The focus is on individual placement needs, problems/issues and the ability to organize work on the development, implementation and institutionalization of ideas for the healthcare sector.

    Design and settings. This study is based on the Kalmar county council Improvement Program. Healthcare departments and primary healthcare centers in the county council were invited to apply for money to accomplish improvement projects. The aim is to empirically identify and present the different kinds of practice-based improvement ideas developed in healthcare services. The 202 applications received from various healthcare departments and primary healthcare centers are analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

    Outcome and Results. Five types of improvement projects were identified: Organizational Process; Evidence and Quality; Competence Development; Process Technology; and Proactive Patient Work. This illustrates the range of strategies that encourage letting individual units define their own improvement needs. In addition, a common characteristic among the studied project applications is to increase patient safety, effectiveness and availability of care, and education/training. Those intentions are found in many of the applications and therefore give the impression of being most important to caregivers today.

    Conclusions. These projects point to the various problems and experiences healthcare professionals encounter in their day-to-day work. This paper provides valuable insights into the current state of improvement work in Swedish healthcare, and will serve as a foundation for further investigations in this quality program.

    Keywords
    Quality improvement initiatives, healthcare settings, improvement projects
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-63714 (URN)
    Conference
    12th International QMOD and Toulon-Verona Conference on Quality and Service Sciences (ICQSS) 27-29 August 2009, Verona, Italy
    Available from: 2010-12-30 Created: 2010-12-30 Last updated: 2010-12-30
    2. Who conducts quality improvement initiatives in healthcare services? An evaluation of an improvement program in acounty council in Sweden
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Who conducts quality improvement initiatives in healthcare services? An evaluation of an improvement program in acounty council in Sweden
    2010 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The aim of this paper is to contribute to the knowledge of who engages in quality improvement initiatives and to describe whether staff professions or gender are relevant variables.

    Design/methodology/approach – This paper contains an evaluation of the participants in a specific defined strategic improvement initiative program in one county council in southeast Sweden. The improvement program was initiated by county council politicians to encourage improvement initiatives and to spread improvement skills and knowledge in the organization. The program is driven both “top down” (teaching/convincing line managers to demand improvements) and “bottom up” through improvement programs using methodology to help teams identify, plan and adopt improvements in their daily work. Data was collected from special applications (called Free Applications, FA) and from participants in the education program (called Improvement Program, IP), both of which include information about profession and 2 gender. A content analysis was made. After the first categorization of which types of improvement projects practitioners engage in, further analysis of staff disciplines, professions (hierarchy) and gender was done. The results were compared to the overall structure of staff presence in the county council.

    Findings – Changes in participation occurred over time. The FA (Free Applications) part (n=202) shows a higher share of leaders and managers (35%), but their participation in the IP (Improvement Program) (n=477) fluctuated (8-26%). Physicians were more represented in the FA than in the IP. The largest single group was nurses. Overall the gender perspective reflects the conditions of the county council, but in FA the representation of women was lower. Five types of improvement projects were identified: 1) Organizational process focus; 2) Evidence and quality; 3) Competence development; 4) Process Technology; and 5) Proactive patient work. Managers were most represented in the category “Organizational process”. The largest difference was seen in the category “Proactive patient work” with the highest occurrence among women (86%) and less among men (17%) and managers (21%). The patient as a contributor taking active part was not found in either the FA or the IP.

    Research limitations/implications – This study shows differences in participation between free applications and methodology-guided programs when it comes to professions and gender in the country council improvement drive. It may be useful for further research regarding how to successfully work for and implement improvements and change in healthcare environments.

    Practical implications – The study will discuss and contribute to further knowledge of whether profession, hierarchy and gender have an impact (obstructive or as an asset) in performing improvement work in healthcare settings.

    Originality/value - Not much has been written about who is accomplishing quality improvements in terms of profession and gender. This paper provides some valuable insights into the differences between staff categories (professions) and gender in the improvement work in Swedish healthcare.

    Keywords
    quality improvement, improvement work, healthcare settings, nursing staff professions, gender
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-63715 (URN)
    Conference
    13th International QMOD Conference, August 30 - September 01, Cottbus, Germany
    Available from: 2010-12-30 Created: 2010-12-30 Last updated: 2010-12-30
    3. Adapting a survey to evaluate quality improvements in Swedish healthcare
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adapting a survey to evaluate quality improvements in Swedish healthcare
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Quality improvement initiatives, a concept with origins in the manufacturing sector, have increased within the Swedish healthcare sector in recent decades. These efforts to improve quality can be seen as a response to demands for more cost-effectiveness and better medical results. However, studies have shown that less than 40% of these initiatives are successful (Olsson et al. 2007). The reason why specific improvement initiatives in healthcare fail or succeed is, therefore, a central question in studies of change. To be able to manage, improve and implement quality initiatives and improvements it is necessary to observe, measure and evaluate. Batalden and Davidoff (2007) point out that if there are no mechanisms to measure the changes, there is no way to know whether they actually lead to improvements. A more severe consequence, as stated by Sorian (2006), is that we sometimes accept an organizational system that not only fails to reward or encourage quality improvements but also sometimes punishes those who prioritize quality over cost-effectiveness. The need for more evidence about how to organize and manage new quality initiatives is identified as an important task within studies of healthcare improvement (Walshe 2009, Olsson et al. 2007).

    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-63716 (URN)
    Available from: 2010-12-30 Created: 2010-12-30 Last updated: 2010-12-30
  • 246.
    Andersson, Ann-Christine
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Quality Improvement in Healthcare: Experiences from a Swedish County Council Initiative2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Quality improvement (QI) has become an important issue in healthcare settings. A central question for many healthcare systems is how to manage improvement initiatives adequately. All county councils and regions managing healthcare in Sweden have started to work with QI at an organizational system level, to varied extents. The Kalmar county council improvement initiative constitutes the empirical basis of this thesis. The aim of the thesis is to provide knowledge about different aspects of a county-wide improvement initiative, and a broader understanding of factors and strategies that affect participation, management and outcomes. The overall study design is based on a case study.

    The first two studies illuminate the practice-based (micro level), bottom-up perspective. Inductively five different areas (categories) were identified. Factors influencing participation in improvement initiatives provided the basis for the next study. The result showed that different staff categories were attracted by different initiatives. The next two studies illuminate the top-down (macro/meso) management perspective. Managers’ views of how patients can participate were investigated and a content analysis of the written answers was made. Four main areas (categories) were identified. A survey study investigated all of the county council managers’ experiences of the whole improvement initiative. Overall the managers thought that the improvement work was worth the effort. To evaluate the Breakthrough Collaborative program, a survey was developed and tested. This survey was used to investigate process and outcome of the BC program. The majority of the respondents were satisfied with their work, but wanted more time for teams to meet and work. To find out if an improvement program can affect outcome and contribute to sustainable changes, interviews were made with project applicants (n=202). Almost half (48%) of the projects were funded, and of those 51% were sustained. Of the rejected (not funded) projects, 28% were accomplished and sustained anyway. The results in this thesis cannot show that the “golden mean” exists, or that a single best way to manage changes and improvements in a healthcare organization has been found, but the way QI initiatives are organized does affect participation and outcomes. The intention, from the management topdown system level, encouraging staff and units and letting practice-based ideas develop at all system levels, can stimulate and facilitate improvement work.

    List of papers
    1. Five Types of Practice-Based ImprovementIdeas in Health Care Services: An EmpiricallyDefined Typology
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Five Types of Practice-Based ImprovementIdeas in Health Care Services: An EmpiricallyDefined Typology
    2011 (English)In: Quality Management in Health Care, ISSN 1063-8628, E-ISSN 1550-5154, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 122-130Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to empirically identify and present different kinds of practice-based improvement ideas developed in health care services. The focus is on individual placement needs, problems/issues, and the ability to organize work on the development, implementation, and institutionalization of ideas for the health care sector. This study is based on a Swedish county council improvement program. Health care departments and primary health care centers in the Kalmar County Council were invited to apply for money to accomplish improvement projects. A qualitative content analysis was done of 183 proposed applications from various health care departments and primary health care centers. The following 5 types of improvement projects were identified: organizational process, evidence and quality, competence development, process technology, and proactive patient work. This illustrates the range of strategies that encourage letting individual units define their own improvement needs. These projects point to the various problems and experiences health care professionals encounter in their day-to-day work. To generalize beyond this improvement program and to validate the typology, we applied it to all articles found when searching for quality improvement projects in the journal Quality Management in Health Care during the last 2 years and found that all of them could be fitted into at least 1 of those 5 categories. This article provides valuable insights into the current state of improvemen  work in Swedish health care, and will serve as a foundation for further investigations in this quality improvement program.

    Keywords
    health care settings, improvement projects, quality improvement initiatives, Hälso- och sjukvård, Förbättringsarbete, Kvalitet
    National Category
    Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-68073 (URN)10.1097/QMH.0b013e3182134b3c (DOI)
    Available from: 2011-05-10 Created: 2011-05-10 Last updated: 2018-01-12
    2. Improvement Strategies: Forms and Consequences for Participation in Healthcare Improvement Projects
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improvement Strategies: Forms and Consequences for Participation in Healthcare Improvement Projects
    2013 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    From a management point of view there are many different approaches from which to choose in how to engage staff in initiatives to improve performance. The present study investigates how two different types of improvement strategies stimulate and encourage involvement of different professional groups in healthcare organizations. The first type, Designed Improvement Processes, is constituted of a methodologically guided collaborative program. The second type, Intrapreneurship Projects, is characterized by an “intrapreneur” working with an improvement project in a rather free manner. The data analysis was carried out through classifying the participants´ profession, position, gender and the organizational administration of which they were a part. The result showed that nurses were the largest group participating in both improvement initiatives. Physicians were also well represented, although they seemed to prefer the less structured Intrapreneurship Projects approach. Assistant nurses, being the second largest staff group, were poorly represented in both initiatives. This indicates that the benefits and support for one group may push another group aside. Managers need to give prerequisites and incentives for staff who do not participate to do so.

    Keywords
    Gender, Healthcare settings, Nursing staff professions, Participation, Quality Improvement, Quality Management
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-91250 (URN)
    Available from: 2013-04-18 Created: 2013-04-18 Last updated: 2013-04-18Bibliographically approved
    3. Patient participation in quality improvement: managers’ opinions of patients as resources
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patient participation in quality improvement: managers’ opinions of patients as resources
    2012 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 21, no 23-24, p. 3590-3593Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate managers’ opinions of how to take advantage of patients as resources in quality improvement work in the Swedish healthcare sector.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell, 2012
    National Category
    Reliability and Maintenance
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-85638 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2702.2012.04254.x (DOI)000310978000030 ()
    Available from: 2012-11-26 Created: 2012-11-26 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    4. Managers’ Views and Experiences of a Large-Scale County Council Improvement Program: Limitations and Opportunities
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Managers’ Views and Experiences of a Large-Scale County Council Improvement Program: Limitations and Opportunities
    2013 (English)In: Quality Management in Health Care, ISSN 1063-8628, E-ISSN 1550-5154, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 152-160Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore and evaluate managers’ views of a large-scale improvement program, including their experiences and opinions about improvement initiatives and drivers for change. The study is based on a survey used in 2 nationwide mappings of improvement initiatives and developmental trends in Swedish health care. The participants were all managers in a county council in Sweden. Data were analyzed descriptively, and statements were ranked in order of preferences. A majority of the respondents stated that they had worked with improvements since the county council improvement program started. The managers sometimes found it difficult to find data and measurements that supported the improvements, yet a majority considered that it was worth the effort and that the improvement work yielded results. The top-ranked driving forces were ideas from personnel and problems in the daily work. Staff satisfaction was ranked highest of the improvement potentials, but issues about patients’ experiences of their care and patient safety came second and third. The managers stated that no or only a few patients had been involved in their improvement initiatives. Large-scale county council improvement initiatives can illuminate quality problems and lead to increased interest in improvement initiatives in the health care sector.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2013
    National Category
    Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-91251 (URN)10.1097/QMH.0b013e31828bc276 (DOI)000209317100009 ()
    Available from: 2013-04-18 Created: 2013-04-18 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
    5. Evaluating a questionnaire to measure improvement initiatives in Swedish healthcare
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluating a questionnaire to measure improvement initiatives in Swedish healthcare
    2013 (English)In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 13, no 48Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Quality improvement initiatives have expanded recently within the healthcare sector. Studies have shown that less than 40% of these initiatives are successful, indicating the need for an instrument that can measure the progress and results of quality improvement initiatives and answer questions about how quality initiatives are conducted. The aim of the present study was to develop and test an instrument to measure improvement process and outcome in Swedish healthcare.

    METHODS:

    A questionnaire, founded on the Minnesota Innovation Survey (MIS), was developed in several steps. Items were merged and answer alternatives were revised. Employees participating in a county council improvement program received the web-based questionnaire. Data was analysed by descriptive statistics and correlation analysis. The questionnaire psychometric properties were investigated and an exploratory factor analysis was conducted.

    RESULTS:

    The Swedish Improvement Measurement Questionnaire consists of 27 items. The Improvement Effectiveness Outcome dimension consists of three items and has a Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.67. The Internal Improvement Processes dimension consists of eight sub-dimensions with a total of 24 items. Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the complete dimension was 0.72. Three significant item correlations were found. A large involvement in the improvement initiative was shown and the majority of the respondents were satisfied with their work.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The psychometric property tests suggest initial support for the questionnaire to study and evaluate quality improvement initiatives in Swedish healthcare settings. The overall satisfaction with the quality improvement initiative correlates positively to the awareness of individual responsibilities.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    BioMed Central, 2013
    National Category
    Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-89620 (URN)10.1186/1472-6963-13-48 (DOI)000315037600001 ()
    Available from: 2013-02-28 Created: 2013-02-28 Last updated: 2017-12-06
    6. Evaluating a Breakthrough Series Collaborative in a Swedish healthcare context
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluating a Breakthrough Series Collaborative in a Swedish healthcare context
    2013 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the mid-1990s, increased attention has been placed on quality improvement and patient safety within the healthcare context. This study aims to evaluate the use of the Breakthrough Series Collaborative methodology in a Swedish county council improvement program, comparing measurements at the beginning and after six months. A questionnaire was used, and improvement processes and outcomes were analysed. The results showed an overall large engagement in improvements, although the methodology and the facilitators were seen as only moderately supportive. Nursing educators have highlighted the importance of improvement education amongst healthcare professions, and nurses could play an active role in improving healthcare practices and patient safety.

    Keywords
    Breakthrough Series Collaborative, Nursing, Quality Improvement, Questionnaire, Swedish healthcare
    National Category
    Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-91252 (URN)
    Available from: 2013-04-18 Created: 2013-04-18 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
    7. Sustainable Outcomes of an Improvement Program: Do Financial Incentives Matter?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sustainable Outcomes of an Improvement Program: Do Financial Incentives Matter?
    2013 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether an improvement program can contribute to positive sustainable improvements in an organization, and whether financial incentives are driving forces for improvements. The material was all projects (n=232) that applied for funding in a county council improvement program between 2007 and 2010. The projects were analyzed as to whether they received funding (n=98) or were rejected (n=95). In addition, a categorization of the projects’ intentions was analyzed. Some projects were still ongoing, but 50 projects were implemented and sustained two or more years after being finalized. Implemented improvements were on different levels, from (micro level) units up to the entire (macro level) organization. In addition, 27 rejected projects were finalized without funding. Eighteen of those 27 were sustainably implemented. This study indicates that there are incentives other than financial at work if an improvement program will contribute to sustainable improvements in the organization. To encourage practice-based improvements is one way of incentivizing the intention and effort to become and perform better.

    Keywords
    Quality improvement, healthcare settings, improvement program, sustainable improvement, financial incentives
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-91254 (URN)
    Available from: 2013-04-18 Created: 2013-04-18 Last updated: 2013-04-18Bibliographically approved
  • 247.
    Andersson, Ann-Christine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Elg, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för Hälsa och samhälle.
    Perseius, Kent-Inge
    Landstinget i Kalmar län.
    Five Types of Practice-Based ImprovementIdeas in Health Care Services: An EmpiricallyDefined Typology2011In: Quality Management in Health Care, ISSN 1063-8628, E-ISSN 1550-5154, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 122-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to empirically identify and present different kinds of practice-based improvement ideas developed in health care services. The focus is on individual placement needs, problems/issues, and the ability to organize work on the development, implementation, and institutionalization of ideas for the health care sector. This study is based on a Swedish county council improvement program. Health care departments and primary health care centers in the Kalmar County Council were invited to apply for money to accomplish improvement projects. A qualitative content analysis was done of 183 proposed applications from various health care departments and primary health care centers. The following 5 types of improvement projects were identified: organizational process, evidence and quality, competence development, process technology, and proactive patient work. This illustrates the range of strategies that encourage letting individual units define their own improvement needs. These projects point to the various problems and experiences health care professionals encounter in their day-to-day work. To generalize beyond this improvement program and to validate the typology, we applied it to all articles found when searching for quality improvement projects in the journal Quality Management in Health Care during the last 2 years and found that all of them could be fitted into at least 1 of those 5 categories. This article provides valuable insights into the current state of improvemen  work in Swedish health care, and will serve as a foundation for further investigations in this quality improvement program.

  • 248.
    Andersson, Ann-Christine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Elg, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University.
    Perseius, Kent-Inge
    Kalmar County Council/Department of Neurobiology, Caring Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Improvement Strategies: Forms and Consequences for Participation in Healthcare Improvement Projects2013Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    From a management point of view there are many different approaches from which to choose in how to engage staff in initiatives to improve performance. The present study investigates how two different types of improvement strategies stimulate and encourage involvement of different professional groups in healthcare organizations. The first type, Designed Improvement Processes, is constituted of a methodologically guided collaborative program. The second type, Intrapreneurship Projects, is characterized by an “intrapreneur” working with an improvement project in a rather free manner. The data analysis was carried out through classifying the participants´ profession, position, gender and the organizational administration of which they were a part. The result showed that nurses were the largest group participating in both improvement initiatives. Physicians were also well represented, although they seemed to prefer the less structured Intrapreneurship Projects approach. Assistant nurses, being the second largest staff group, were poorly represented in both initiatives. This indicates that the benefits and support for one group may push another group aside. Managers need to give prerequisites and incentives for staff who do not participate to do so.

  • 249.
    Andersson, Ann-Christine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Elg, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University and Skåne University Hospital, 205 06 Malmö, Sweden.
    Perseius, Kent-Inge
    Research Unit, Psychiatry Division, Kalmar County Council, Sweden.
    Practice-based improvement ideas in healthcare services2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. The present study will contribute to knowledge of how practitioners in a healthcare region engage in quality improvement initiatives. The focus is on individual placement needs, problems/issues and the ability to organize work on the development, implementation and institutionalization of ideas for the healthcare sector.

    Design and settings. This study is based on the Kalmar county council Improvement Program. Healthcare departments and primary healthcare centers in the county council were invited to apply for money to accomplish improvement projects. The aim is to empirically identify and present the different kinds of practice-based improvement ideas developed in healthcare services. The 202 applications received from various healthcare departments and primary healthcare centers are analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

    Outcome and Results. Five types of improvement projects were identified: Organizational Process; Evidence and Quality; Competence Development; Process Technology; and Proactive Patient Work. This illustrates the range of strategies that encourage letting individual units define their own improvement needs. In addition, a common characteristic among the studied project applications is to increase patient safety, effectiveness and availability of care, and education/training. Those intentions are found in many of the applications and therefore give the impression of being most important to caregivers today.

    Conclusions. These projects point to the various problems and experiences healthcare professionals encounter in their day-to-day work. This paper provides valuable insights into the current state of improvement work in Swedish healthcare, and will serve as a foundation for further investigations in this quality program.

  • 250.
    Andersson, Ann-Christine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Elg, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University and Skåne University Hospital, 205 06 Malmö, Sweden.
    Perseius, Kent-Inge
    Research Unit, Psychiatry Division, Kalmar County Council, Sweden.
    Who conducts quality improvement initiatives in healthcare services? An evaluation of an improvement program in acounty council in Sweden2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The aim of this paper is to contribute to the knowledge of who engages in quality improvement initiatives and to describe whether staff professions or gender are relevant variables.

    Design/methodology/approach – This paper contains an evaluation of the participants in a specific defined strategic improvement initiative program in one county council in southeast Sweden. The improvement program was initiated by county council politicians to encourage improvement initiatives and to spread improvement skills and knowledge in the organization. The program is driven both “top down” (teaching/convincing line managers to demand improvements) and “bottom up” through improvement programs using methodology to help teams identify, plan and adopt improvements in their daily work. Data was collected from special applications (called Free Applications, FA) and from participants in the education program (called Improvement Program, IP), both of which include information about profession and 2 gender. A content analysis was made. After the first categorization of which types of improvement projects practitioners engage in, further analysis of staff disciplines, professions (hierarchy) and gender was done. The results were compared to the overall structure of staff presence in the county council.

    Findings – Changes in participation occurred over time. The FA (Free Applications) part (n=202) shows a higher share of leaders and managers (35%), but their participation in the IP (Improvement Program) (n=477) fluctuated (8-26%). Physicians were more represented in the FA than in the IP. The largest single group was nurses. Overall the gender perspective reflects the conditions of the county council, but in FA the representation of women wa