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  • 201.
    Patzelt, Alexa
    et al.
    Charite, Germany.
    Cheung Mak, Wing
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jung, Sora
    Charite, Germany.
    Knorr, Fanny
    Charite, Germany.
    Meinke, Martina C.
    Charite, Germany.
    Richter, Heike
    Charite, Germany.
    Ruehl, Eckart
    Free University of Berlin, Germany.
    Cheung, Kitt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tran, Ngo Bich Nga Nathalie
    Charite, Germany.
    Lademann, Juergen
    Charite, Germany.
    Do nanoparticles have a future in dermal drug delivery?2017In: Journal of Controlled Release, ISSN 0168-3659, E-ISSN 1873-4995, Vol. 246, p. 174-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    More and more investigations confirm that nanoparticles are incapable of overcoming the intact skin barrier in vivo. Do nanoparticles still have a future in dermal drug delivery? Unlike many other topically applied substances, nanoparticles have not been reported to utilize the intercellular penetration pathway and preferentially make use of the follicular penetration pathway. Deep penetration into the follicular ducts has been described for a variety of particles and appears to be strongly influenced by particle size. For targeted drug delivery, smart nanoparticles are required which are able to release their loaded drugs subsequent to internal or external trigger stimuli, and thereby enable the translocation of the active agents into the viable epidermis. In the recent manuscript, three nanoparticles systems are summarized and compared which release their model drugs upon different trigger mechanisms. The BSA hydrogel nanoparticles release their model drug TRITC-dextran by passive diffusion due to a concentration gradient via a porous surface. The protease-triggered controlled release BSA nanoparticles release their model drug if they are applied simultaneously with protease nanoparticles, resulting in an enzymatic degradation of the particles and a release of the model drug FITC. Finally, the IR-triggered controlled release AuNP-doped BSA nanoparticles release their model drug FITC after photoactivation with wIRA. For all three nanoparticle systems, the release of their model drugs could be observed. For the first nanoparticle system, only low follicular penetration depths were found which might by due do an agglomeration effect. For the last two nanoparticle systems, deep follicular penetration and even an uptake by the sebaceous glands were verified. In conclusion, it could be demonstrated that nanoparticles do have a future in dermal drug delivery if smart nanoparticle systems are utilized which are able to release their drug at specific times and locations within the hair follicle. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 202.
    Perfezou, Maelle
    et al.
    Catalan Institute of Nanotechnology.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Merkoci, Arben
    Catalan Institute of Nanotechnology.
    Cancer detection using nanoparticle-based sensors2012In: Chemical Society Reviews, ISSN 0306-0012, E-ISSN 1460-4744, Vol. 41, no 7, p. 2606-2622Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This tutorial review surveys the latest achievements in the use of nanoparticles to detect cancer biomarkers and cancer cells with a focus on optical and electrochemical techniques. Nanoparticle based cancer diagnostics are becoming an increasingly relevant alternative to traditional techniques. Although some drawbacks exist in relation to the obtained sensitivity the use of nanoparticle-based sensors in biomarker detection or cancer cell detection offers some advantages in comparison to conventional methods. The developed techniques can be interesting and relevant for their use in point-of-care of cancer diagnostics. The methods can be of low cost and in addition easy to be incorporated into user-friendly sensing platforms.

  • 203.
    Persson, Nils-Krister
    et al.
    University of Borås.
    Maziz, Ali
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Öberg, Ingrid
    University of Borås.
    Christiansson, Isabella
    University of Borås.
    Stålhand, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Next generation Smart Textiles - morphing and actuating devices2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 204.
    Pettersson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Surface micromachined polymer actuators as valves in PDMS microfluidic system2000In: 1st Annual International, Conference On Microtechnologies in Medicine and Biology. 2000, IEEE , 2000, p. 334-335Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To control flows in microfluidic systems there is a need of valves. Desirable properties of such valves are in general low cost, low dead-volume, fast response and low power-consumption. For bioanalytical purposes the requirements also include biocompatibility and ability to function in biological fluids. One way to address these problems is to use surface-fabricated actuators, and then bonding the actuator chip with high aspect-ratio flow-channels in a thick polymer cover. A suitable cover structure can be made in elastomeric poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) which can be joined to a silicon surface. The active valve structures can be micromuscles, i.e. actuators based on conjugated polymer such as polypyrrole (PPy), which can be electrochemically doped. The reversible doping of PPy forces counterions to flow into or out of the polymer to balance the charge, resulting in a volume change. This volume change can be used in a bilayer actuator, where a metal can serve as constant volume layer as well as electrical contact to the polymer layer changing volume under reversible doping

  • 205.
    Polese, D
    et al.
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy .
    Martinelli, E
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy .
    Magna, G
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy .
    Dini, F
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy .
    Catini, A
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy .
    Paolesse, R
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy .
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Di Natale, C
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy .
    Sharing data processing among replicated optical sensor arrays2013In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 179, no SI, p. 252-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sensor networks prompt a great deal of research interest within the computer and analytical sciences. To this regard, one of the most important issues is concerned with the interpretation of data that are collected by different sensors. Due to sensors non-reproducibility, this problem may also persist even when many replicas of the same sensors are considered. In this case additional calibrations may be required to use a common knowledge database. Noteworthy, the same problem arises in case of sensors replacement. In this paper we demonstrate that in case of optical chemical sensors drawing inspiration from the connectivity strategy of the olfactory bulb, this problem can find a straightforward solution when an image sensor is used to measure the optical properties of an extended sensing layer. If the sensing layer is formed by a number of spots of different indicators, it is demonstrated that a common data processing can be applied to any replica of the sensing layer even if the indicators are spotted with different geometries and in different quantities.

  • 206.
    Puckert, C.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gelmi, A.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kozak Ljunggren, Monika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rafat, Mehrdad
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Optimisation of conductive polymer biomaterials for cardiac progenitor cells2016In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 6, no 67, p. 62270-62277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The characterisation of biomaterials for cardiac tissue engineering applications is vital for the development of effective treatments for the repair of cardiac function. New smart materials developed from conductive polymers can provide dynamic benefits in supporting and stimulating stem cells via controlled surface properties, electrical and electromechanical stimulation. In this study we investigate the control of surface properties of conductive polymers through a systematic approach to variable synthesis parameters, and how the resulting surface properties influence the viability of cardiac progenitor cells. A thorough analysis investigating the effect of electropolymerisation parameters, such as current density and growth, and reagent variation on physical properties provides a fundamental understanding of how to optimise conductive polymer biomaterials for cardiac progenitor cells.

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  • 207.
    Rai, Radheshyam
    et al.
    Aveiro University, Portugal.
    Sharma, Seema
    Magadh University, India.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Synthesis and Characterization of Bi, Fe, Al and Sb- Modified PLZT2012In: Synthesis, Characterization and Application of Smart Materials / [ed] Radheshyam Rai, USA: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2012, p. 31-98Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Smart materials, one of the more focused points in materials research, deal primarily with the chemistry, physics and applications of materials in the real world because it induces conformational changes in complex structures and properties which are useful for the control of them. The thrust area of these types of materials are the combination of functional properties like thermal, electric, magnetic, superconducting and optical, which have led to the development of a wide range of new technological devices. These types of materials have been found to be very useful and interesting for various solid state devices. This book examines research developments of smart materials, including processing, properties and applications, which include device materials and environmentally friendly materials. (Imprint: Nova)

  • 208.
    Rai, Radheshyam
    et al.
    Aveiro University, Portugal.
    Sharma, Seema
    Magadh University, India.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Singh, R. P.
    University of Allahabad, India.
    Experimental Techniques: An Introductory Overview2012In: Synthesis, Characterization and Application of Smart Materials / [ed] Radheshyam Rai, USA: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2012, p. 15-30Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Smart materials, one of the more focused points in materials research, deal primarily with the chemistry, physics and applications of materials in the real world because it induces conformational changes in complex structures and properties which are useful for the control of them. The thrust area of these types of materials are the combination of functional properties like thermal, electric, magnetic, superconducting and optical, which have led to the development of a wide range of new technological devices. These types of materials have been found to be very useful and interesting for various solid state devices. This book examines research developments of smart materials, including processing, properties and applications, which include device materials and environmentally friendly materials. (Imprint: Nova)

  • 209.
    Ramalingam, Murugan
    et al.
    Faculté de Chirurgie Dentaire, Université de Strasbourg, Strasbourg 67085, France.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Polymeric Nanofibers and their Applications in Sensors2012In: Intelligent Nanomaterials: processes, properties, and applications / [ed] Ashutosh Tiwari, Ajay Kumar Mishra, Hisatoshi Kobayashi, Anthony P. F. Turner, USA: John Wiley & Sons, 2012, p. 801-823Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The last three decades have seen extraordinary advances in the generation of new materials based on both fundamental elements and composites, driven by advances in synthetic chemistry and often drawing inspiration from nature. The concept of an intelligent material envisions additional functionality built into the molecular structure, such that a desirable response occurs under defined conditions.

  • 210.
    Ramalingam, Murugan
    et al.
    Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale U977, Faculté de Chirurgie Dentaire, Université de Strasbourg (UdS), France.
    Tiwari, AshutoshLinköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.Ramakrishna, SeeramHEM Labs at the National University of Singapore.Kobayashi, HisatoshiNational Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Japan.
    Integrated Biomaterials for Biomedical Technology2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This cutting edge book provides all the important aspects dealing with the basic science involved in materials in biomedical technology, especially structure and properties, techniques and technological innovations in material processing and characterizations, as well as the applications. The volume consists of 12 chapters written by acknowledged experts of the biomaterials field and covers a wide range of topics and applications.

  • 211.
    Ravichandran, Ranjithkumar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Åstrand, C.
    KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Patra, Hirak Kumar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Chotteau, V.
    KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Phopase, Jaywant
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Intelligent ECM mimetic injectable scaffolds based on functional collagen building blocks for tissue engineering and biomedical applications2017In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 7, no 34, p. 21068-21078Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrogels comprising natural extracellular matrix (ECM) components are very attractive as scaffolds for regenerative medicine applications due to their inherent biointeractive properties. Responsive materials that adapt to their surrounding environments and regulate transport of ions and bioactive molecules manifest significant advantages for biomedical applications. Although there are many exciting challenges, the opportunity to design, fabricate and engineer stimuli-responsive polymeric systems based on ECM components is particularly attractive for regenerative medicine. Here we describe a one-pot approach to fabricate in situ fast gellable intelligent ECM mimetic scaffolds, based on methacrylated collagen building blocks with mechanical properties that can be modulated in the kPa-MPa range and that are suitable for both soft and hard tissues. Physiochemical characterizations demonstrate their temperature and pH responsiveness, together with the structural and enzymatic resistance that make them suitable scaffolds for long-term use in regenerative medicine and biomedical applications. The multifunctionality of these hydrogels has been demonstrated as an in situ depot-forming delivery platform for the adjustable controlled release of proteins and small drug molecules under physiological conditions and as a structural support for adhesion, proliferation and metabolic activities of human cells. The results presented herein should be useful to the design and fabrication of tailor-made scaffolds with tunable properties that retain and exhibit sustained release of growth factors for promoting tissue regeneration.

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  • 212.
    Rawat, Niharika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mishra, Prashant
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ashaduzzaman, Md
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yazdi, R
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Syväjärvi, Michael
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Tekidag AB UCS Mjärdevi Science Park, Sweden.
    Fabrication of an atom-thick graphene bioanode for biofuel cell applications2016In: Biosensors 2016 – The World Congress on Biosensors, Gothenburg, Sweden, 25-27 May 2016, Elsevier, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 213.
    Rezaei, Babak
    et al.
    Amirkabir Univ Technol, Iran.
    Shoushtari, Ahmad Mousavi
    Amirkabir Univ Technol, Iran.
    Rabiee, Mohammad
    Amirkabir Univ Technol, Iran.
    Uzun, Lokman
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Hacettepe Univ, Turkey.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mak, Wing Cheung
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Electrochemical performance of nanofibrous highly flexible electrodes enhanced by different structural configurations2018In: Composites Science And Technology, ISSN 0266-3538, E-ISSN 1879-1050, Vol. 155, p. 81-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to their unique physicomechanical properties, one dimensional (1D) nanostructured conductive materials offer remarkable potential as a flexible electroactive medium for developing miniaturized electronic devices such as supercapacitors, sensors and actuators. In this work, thin films composed of nanocomposite nanofibers with two different architectures, i.e. whiskered nanofibers (WNFs) and hierarchical-structured nanofibers (H-SNFs), were fabricated and their capability to serve as flexible and bendable electrodes were evaluated. The main difference of these two architectures is how the distributions of the nano-fillers (carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes, CMWCNTs) through the nanofibers, i.e. the isotropic and anisotropic arrangements, lead to WNFs and H-SNFs, respectively. The percolation threshold of conduction for the H-SNFs (composed of 0.5 wt% CMWCNTs) and the WNFs (composed of 5 wt% CMWCNTs) were 0.13 S cm(-1) and 0.07 S cm(-1), respectively. Moreover, according to the electrochemical characterizations, although the WNFs had ten orders of magnitude higher nanotube content, the electroactivity and electron transfer rate of H-SNFs was considerably higher than those of WNFs, so that the cyclic voltammetric peak currents of H-SNFs was approximately 1.6 times higher than that of WNFs. As a proof-of-concept, our results indicate that the structural configuration is a major determinative factor, which can largely dictate the final electrical and electrochemical properties of the nanocomposite nanofibers. The bending durability results showed good electrochemical performance even upon 100 bending cycles with 120 bending angles (retained 93.4% and 83.3% of the initial peak currents for H-SNFs and WNFs, respectively). These two flexible nanocomposite nanofibrous structures could be promising materials for the development of flexible electrodes for biosensing to energy storage applications. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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  • 214.
    Rezaei, Babak
    et al.
    Nanotechnology Institute, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran, Iran.
    Shoushtari, Ahmad Mousavi
    Textile Engineering Department, AmirKabir University of Technology, Tehran, Iran.
    Rabiee, Mohammad
    Biomaterials Group, Biomedical Engineering Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran, Iran.
    Uzun, Lokman
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mak, Wing Cheung
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Multifactorial modeling and optimization of solution and electrospinning parameters to generate superfine polystyrene nanofibers2018In: Advances in Polymer Technology, ISSN 0730-6679, E-ISSN 1098-2329, Vol. 37, no 8, p. 2743-2755Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was conducted to provide a quantitative understanding of the influence of the different solution and electrospinning variables on the morphology and the mean diameter of electrospun polystyrene nanofibers. In this regard, the effect of different solvents and ionic additives on the electrical conductivity, viscosity, and surface tension of the electrospinning solutions and thereby the morphology of nanofibers were examined. The results indicated that the morphology of the fibers is extremely dependent on the solvent’s properties, especially volatility and electrical conductivity, and the ionic characteristics of additives. Finally, to estimate the optimal electrospinning conditions for production of nanofibers with minimum possible diameter, modeling of the process was undertaken using the response surface methodology. Experimentally, nanofibers with the finest diameter of 169 ï¿œ 21 nm were obtained under the optimized conditions, and these could be considered promising candidates for a wide practical range of applications ranging from biosensors to filtration.

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    Multifactorial modeling and optimization of solution and electrospinning parameters to generate superfine polystyrene nanofibers
  • 215.
    Roy, Ekta
    et al.
    Indian School Mines, India.
    Patra, Santanu
    Indian School Mines, India.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Madhuri, Rashmi
    Indian School Mines, India.
    Sharma, Prashant K.
    Indian School Mines, India.
    Introduction of selectivity and specificity to graphene using an inimitable combination of molecular imprinting and nanotechnology2017In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 89, p. 234-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, the nanostructured modified molecularly imprinting polymer has created a great attention in research field due to its excellent properties such as high surface to volume ratio, low cost, and easy preparation/handling. Among the nanostructured materials, the carbonaceous material such as graphene has attracted the tremendous attention of researchers owing to their fascinating electrical, thermal and physical properties. In this review article, we have tried to explore as well as compile the role of graphene-based nanomaterials in the fabrication of imprinted polymers. In other words, herein the recent efforts made to introduce selectivity in graphene-based nanomaterials were tried collected together. The major concern of this review article is focused on the sensing devices fabricated via a combination of graphene, graphene@nanoparticles, graphene@carbon nanotubes and molecularly imprinted polymers. Additionally, the combination of graphene and quantum dots was also included to explore the fluorescence properties of zero-band-gap graphene. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 216.
    Roy, Ekta
    et al.
    Indian School Mines, India.
    Patra, Santanu
    Indian School Mines, India.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Madhuri, Rashmi
    Indian School Mines, India.
    Sharma, Prashant K.
    Indian School Mines, India.
    Single cell imprinting on the surface of Ag-ZnO bimetallic nanoparticle modified graphene oxide sheets for targeted detection, removal and photothermal killing of E. Coli2017In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 89, p. 620-626Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A very cost-effective, fast, sensitive and specific imprinted polymer modified electrochemical sensor for the targeted detection, removal and destruction of Escherichia coli bacteria was developed onto the surface of Ag-ZnO bimetallic nanoparticle and graphene oxide nanocomposite. The nanocomposite played a dual role in this work, as a platform for imprinting of bacteria as well as a participated in their laser-light induced photo killing. In terms of sensing, our proposed sensor can detect E. Coli as few as 10 CFU mL(-1) and capture 98% of bacterial cells from their very high concentrated solution (10(5) CFU mL(-1)). Similarly to the quantitative detection, we have also investigated the quantitative destruction of E. Coli and found that 16.0 cm(2) area of polymer modified glass plate is sufficient enough to kill 10(5) CFU mL(-1) in the small time span of 5 minutes. The obtained results suggest that our proposed sensor have potential to serve as a promising candidate for specific and quantitative detection, removal as well as the destruction of a variety of bacterial pathogens. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 217.
    Saeid Hejazi, Mohammad
    et al.
    Tabriz University of Medical Science, Iran; Tabriz University of Medical Science, Iran.
    Reza Majidi, Mir
    University of Tabriz, Iran.
    Gholizadeh, Sima
    University of Tabriz, Iran.
    Hamidi-Asl, Ezat
    Mazandaran University, Iran.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mahdi Golabi, Seyed
    University of Tabriz, Iran.
    Effect of Electrophoresis on the Efficiency of Graphite-Nano-TiO2 Modified Silica Sol-Gel Electrode2015In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 3405-3410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrophoresis treatment was used to improve the function of a nano-TiO2 modified sol-gel electrode. Electrodes were prepared using TiO2 nanoparticles and fine graphite powder and then treated by electrophoresis. The developed electrode was employed for the detection of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) by following the decrease in the immobilised lactate peak current due to its LDH-mediated enzymatic oxidation. Detection was realised using square wave voltammetry (SWV). Experiments showed that the positive and negative heads of the electrophoresis-treated electrode displayed different activities, with the positive head response being remarkably improved. Parameters affecting the electrode response, such as applied potential value, electrophoresis time and percentage of TiO2, were investigated and optimised. The improved performance was dependent on TiO2 concentration as well as electrophoresis voltage and time. The prepared sensor, under optimised conditions, displayed a detection limit of 0.0073 U/mu l for LDH.

  • 218.
    Saha, Suparna
    et al.
    University of Calcutta, India.
    Sarkar, Priyabrata
    University of Calcutta, India.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Interference-Free Electrochemical Detection of Nanomolar Dopamine Using Doped Polypyrrole and Silver Nanoparticles2014In: Electroanalysis, ISSN 1040-0397, E-ISSN 1521-4109, Vol. 26, no 10, p. 2197-2206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a new approach to detect dopamine in nanomolar range using an electrochemical sensor utilizing a composite made of chitosan-stabilized silver nanoparticles and p-toluene sulfonic acid-doped ultrathin polypyrrole film. Studies included cyclic voltammogram, amperometry, differential pulse voltammetry and also investigation by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. A detection limit of 0.58 nM was achieved in the linear range 1 x 10(-9) M to 1.2 x 10(-7) M. High sensitivity towards DA, good reproducibility and long-term stability have been demonstrated without interference from ascorbic acid, uric acid, epinephrine, l-dopa, glucose. The sensing system was successfully applied for quantitative determination of dopamine in commercially available human blood serum.

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  • 219.
    Sanjay, Sharda Sunaram
    et al.
    Chemistry Department, Ewing Christian College Allahabad, Allahabad-211002, India.
    Singh, Ravindra P.
    Nano technology Application Centre, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002, India.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pandey, Avinash C.
    Nano technology Application Centre, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211002, India.
    Mode of Growth Mechanism of Nanocrystal Using Biomolecules2012In: Intelligent Nanomaterials: processes, properties, and applications / [ed] Ashutosh Tiwari, Ajay Kumar Mishra, Hisatoshi Kobayashi, Anthony P. F. Turner, USA: John Wiley & Sons, 2012, p. 625-648Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The last three decades have seen extraordinary advances in the generation of new materials based on both fundamental elements and composites, driven by advances in synthetic chemistry and often drawing inspiration from nature. The concept of an intelligent material envisions additional functionality built into the molecular structure, such that a desirable response occurs under defined conditions.

  • 220.
    Sankoh, Supannee
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Prince Songkla University, Thailand.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sekretareva, Alina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Stanford University, CA 94305 USA.
    Thavarungkul, Panote
    Prince Songkla University, Thailand.
    Kanatharana, Proespichaya
    Prince Songkla University, Thailand.
    Mak, Wing Cheung
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Colloid electrochemistry of conducting polymer: towards potential-induced in-situ drug release2017In: Electrochimica Acta, ISSN 0013-4686, E-ISSN 1873-3859, Vol. 228, p. 407-412Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past decades, controlled drug delivery system remains as one of the most important area in medicine for various diseases. We have developed a new electrochemically controlled drug release system by combining colloid electrochemistry and electro-responsive microcapsules. The pulsed electrode potential modulation led to the appearance of two processes available for the time-resolved registration in colloid microenvironment: change of the electronic charge of microparticles (from 0.5 ms to 0.1 s) followed by the drug release associated with ionic equilibration (1-10 s). The dynamic electrochemical measurements allow the distinction of drug release associated With ionic relaxation and the change of electronic charge of conducting polymer colloid microparticles. The amount of released drug (methylene blue) could be controlled by modulating the applied potential. Our study demonstrated a surface-potential driven controlled drug release of dispersion of conducting polymer carrier at the electrode interfaces, while the bulk colloids dispersion away from the electrode remains as a reservoir to improve the efficiency of localized drug release. The developed new methodology creates a model platform for the investigations of surface potential-induced in-situ electrochemical drug release mechanism. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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  • 221.
    Schmeisser, D
    et al.
    Brandenburg Tech Univ Cottbus, Germany.
    Bohme, O
    Brandenburg Tech Univ Cottbus, Germany.
    Yfantis, A
    Brandenburg Tech Univ Cottbus, Germany.
    Heller, T
    Brandenburg Tech Univ Cottbus, Germany.
    Batchelor, DR
    Brandenburg Tech Univ Cottbus, Germany.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dipole moment of nanoparticles at interfaces1999In: Physical Review Letters, ISSN 0031-9007, E-ISSN 1079-7114, Vol. 83, no 2, p. 380-383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The properties of heterogeneous interfaces are modified essentially by the presence of nanoparticles. We provide a model and give spectroscopic evidence that nanoscale clusters exist which have a metallic core and a shell of an almost perfect oxide. Such clusters produce a large dipole moment which manifests itself as shifts in core levels as seen by photoelectron spectroscopy, as well as non-Ohmic rectifying behavior in the device electrical properties.

  • 222.
    Schmekel, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Winquist, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Vikström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Respiratory Medicine.
    Analysis of breath samples for lung cancer survival2014In: Analytica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0003-2670, E-ISSN 1873-4324, Vol. 840, p. 82-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Analyses of exhaled air by means of electronic noses offer a large diagnostic potential. Such analyses are non-invasive; samples can also be easily obtained from severely ill patients and repeated within short intervals. Lung cancer is the most deadly malignant tumor worldwide, and monitoring of lung cancer progression is of great importance and may help to decide best therapy. In this report, twenty-two patients with diagnosed lung cancer and ten healthy volunteers were studied using breath samples collected several times at certain intervals and analysed by an electronic nose. The samples were divided into three sub-groups; group d for survivor less than one year, group s for survivor more than a year and group h for the healthy volunteers. Prediction models based on partial least square and artificial neural nets could not classify the collected groups d, s and h, but separated well group d from group h. Using artificial neural net, group d could be separated from group s. Excellent predictions and stable models of survival day for group d were obtained, both based on partial least square and artificial neural nets, with correlation coefficients 0.981 and 0.985, respectively. Finally, the importance of consecutive measurements was shown.

  • 223.
    Schmitz-Hertzberg, Sebastian-Tim
    et al.
    Fraunhofer Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Potsdam, Germany.
    Mak, Wing Cheung
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lai, Kwok Kei
    Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, China.
    Teller, Carsten
    Fraunhofer Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Potsdam, Germany.
    Bier, Frank
    Fraunhofer Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Potsdam, Germany.
    Multifactorial design of poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) capsules with various release properties for differently sized filling agents2013In: Journal of Applied Polymer Science, ISSN 0021-8995, E-ISSN 1097-4628, Vol. 130, no 6, p. 4219-4228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hydrolytic degradation and corresponding content release of capsules made of poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) strongly depends on the composition and material properties of the initially applied copolymer. Consecutive or simultaneous release from capsule batches of combinable material compositions, therefore, offers high control over the bioavailability of an encapsulated drug. The keynote of this study was the creation of a superordinated database that addressed the correlation between the release kinetics of filling agents with different molecular weights from PLGA capsules of alternating composition. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)–dextran (with molecular weights of 4, 40, and 2000 kDa) was chosen as a model analyte, whereas the copolymers were taken from various 50:50 PLGA, 75:25 PLGA, and polylactide blends. With reference to recent publications, the capsule properties, such as the size, morphology, and encapsulation efficiency, were further modified during production. Hence, uniform microdisperse and polydisperse submicrometer nanocapsules were prepared by two different water-in-oil-in-water emulsification techniques, and additional effects on the size and morphology were achieved by capsule solidification in two different sodium salt buffers. The qualitative and quantitative examination of the physical capsule properties was performed by confocal laser scanning microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Coulter counting techniques to evaluate the capsule size distribution and the morphological appearance of the different batches. The corresponding agent release was quantified by fluorescence measurement of the FITC–dextran in the incubation media and by the direct measurement of the capsule brightness via fluorescence microscopy. In summary, the observed agent release showed a highly controllable flexibility depending on the PLGA blends, preparation methods, and molecular weight of the used filling substances

  • 224.
    Sekretareva, Alina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Stanford University, CA 94305 USA.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Correspondence on "Can Nanoimpacts Detect Single-Enzyme Activity? Theoretical Considerations and an Experimental Study of Catalase Impacts"2017In: ACS Catalysis, ISSN 2155-5435, E-ISSN 2155-5435, Vol. 7, no 5, p. 3591-3593Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

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  • 225.
    Sekretareva, Alina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Volkov, Anton V.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zozoulenko, Igor V.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Screen printed microband array based biosensor for water monitoring2015In: The Frumkin Symposium, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 226.
    Sekretareva, Alina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vagin, Mikhail Yu
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Volkov, Anton V.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zozoulenko, Igor V.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony P.F.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Mats.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Total phenol analysis of water using a laccase-based microsensor array2015In: Program of the XXIII International Symposium on Bioelectrochemistry and Bioenergetics of the Bioelectrochemical Society. 14-18 June, 2015. Malmö, Sweden, Lausanne: Bioelectrochemical Society , 2015, p. 155-155Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The monitoring of phenolic compounds in raw waters and wastewaters is of great importance for environmental control. Use of biosensors for rapid, specific and simple detection of phenolic compounds is a promising approach. A number of biosensors have been developed for phenol detection. A general drawback of previously reported biosensors is their insufficient detection limits for phenols in water samples. One way to improve the detection limit is by the use of microelectrodes.

    Microband design of the microelectrodes combines convergent mass transport due to the microscale width and high output currents due to the macroscopic length. Among the various techniques available for microband electrode fabrication, we have chosen screen-printing which is a cost-effective production method.

    In this study, we report on the development of a laccase-based microscale biosensor operating under a convergent diffusion regime. Screen-printing followed by simple cutting was utilized for the fabrication of graphite microbands as a platform for further covalent immobilization of laccase. Numerical simulations, utilizing the finite element method with periodic boundary conditions, were used for modeling the voltammetric response of the developed microband electrodes. Anodization followed by covalent immobilization was used for the electrode modification with laccase. Direct and mediated laccase bioelectrocatalytic oxidation of phenols was studied on macro- and microscale graphite electrodes. Significant enhancement of the analytical performance was achieved by the establishment of convergent diffusion in the microscale sensor. Finally, the developed microsensor was utilized to monitor phenolic compounds in real waste water.

  • 227.
    Sekretaryova, Alina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Karyakin, Arkady A.
    Moscow MV Lomonosov State University, Russia.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Cholesterol Self-Powered Biosensor2014In: Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0003-2700, E-ISSN 1520-6882, Vol. 86, no 19, p. 9540-9547Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Monitoring the cholesterol level is of great importance, especially for people with high risk of developing heart disease. Here we report on reagentless cholesterol detection in human plasma with a novel single-enzyme, membrane-free, self-powered biosensor, in which both cathodic and anodic bioelectrocatalytic reactions are powered by the same substrate. Cholesterol oxidase was immobilized in a sol-gel matrix on both the cathode and the anode. Hydrogen peroxide, a product of the enzymatic conversion of cholesterol, was electrocatalytically reduced, by the use of Prussian blue, at the cathode. In parallel, cholesterol oxidation catalyzed by mediated cholesterol oxidase occurred at the anode. The analytical performance was assessed for both electrode systems separately. The combination of the two electrodes, formed on high surface-area carbon cloth electrodes, resulted in a self-powered biosensor with enhanced sensitivity (26.0 mA M-1 cm(-2)), compared to either of the two individual electrodes, and a dynamic range up to 4.1 mM cholesterol. Reagentless cholesterol detection with both electrochemical systems and with the self-powered biosensor was performed and the results were compared with the standard method of colorimetric cholesterol quantification.

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  • 228.
    Sekretaryova, Alina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Vagin, Mikhail Y
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A highly sensitive and self-powered cholesterol biosensor2014In: 24th Anniversary World Congress on Biosensors – Biosensors 2014, Elsevier, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Blood cholesterol is a very important parameter for the assessment of atherosclerosis and other lipid disorders. The total cholesterol concentration in human blood should be less than 5.17 mM. Concentrations in the range 5.17 – 6.18 mM are considered borderline high risk and levels above 6.21 mM, high risk. Cholesterol determination with high accuracy is therefore necessary in order to differentiate these levels for medical screening or diagnosis. Several attempts to develop highly sensitive cholesterol biosensors have been described, but, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a self-powered cholesterol biosensor, i.e. a device delivering the analytical information from the current output of the energy of the biocatalytic conversion of cholesterol, without any external power source. This is particularly relevant to the development of inexpensive screening devices based on printed electronics.

     

    We present two complementary bioelectrocatalytic platforms suitable for the fabrication of a self-powered biosensor. Both are based on cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) immobilisation in a sol-gel matrix, as illustrated in Fig. 1 [1]. Mediated biocatalytic cholesterol oxidation [2] was used as the anodic reaction and electrocatalytic reduction of hydrogen peroxide on Prussian Blue (PB) as the cathodic reaction. Due to a synergistic effect in the self-powered cholesterol biosensor, the analytical parameters of the overall device exceeded those of the individual component half-cells, yielding a sensitivity of 0.19 A M-1 cm-2 and a dynamic range that embraces the free cholesterol concentrations found in human blood.

     

    Thus, we have demonstrated the novel concept of highly sensitive cholesterol determination using the first self-powered cholesterol biosensor. This configuration is particularly promising for incorporation in emerging plastic- and paper-based analytical instruments for decentralised diagnostics and mobile health.

     

  • 229.
    Sekretaryova, Alina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bioelectrocatalytic systems for health applications2016In: Biotechnology Advances, ISSN 0734-9750, E-ISSN 1873-1899, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 177-197Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a brief overview of bioelectrocatalytic devices for in vitro health applications, including food safety and environmental analysis, focusing on microelectrode- and microfluidic-based biosensors, paper-based point-of-care devices and wearable biosensors. The main hurdles and future perspectives are discussed. We then consider the role of electron transfer between a biocatalyst and an electrode in biosensor design. Brief descriptions of indirect, direct and mediated mechanisms are given. The principal strategies, as well as recent developments for modulation of electron transfer in biocatalytic systems are summarised. In conclusion, we highlight some of the challenges associated with improving these redox systems.

  • 230.
    Sekretaryova, Alina N
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Karyakin, Arkady A
    Moscow State University, Russia.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Vagin, Mikhail Y
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Novel single-enzyme based self-powered biosensor2014In: 15th International Conference on Electroanalysis (ESEAC), 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 231.
    Sekretaryova, Alina N
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Vagin, Mikhail Y
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A screen-printed microband array biosensor for water monitoring2014In: 15th International Conference on Electroanalysis (ESEAC), 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 232.
    Sekretaryova, Alina N.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vagin, Mikhail Yu.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony P.F.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Electrocatalytic Currents from Single Enzyme Molecules2016In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 138, no 8, p. 2504-2507Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Single molecule enzymology provides an opportunity to examine details of enzyme mechanisms that are not distinguishable in biomolecule ensemble studies. Here we report, for the first time, detection of the current produced in an electrocatalytic reaction by a single redox enzyme molecule when it collides with an ultramicroelectrode. The catalytic process provides amplification of the current from electron-transfer events at the catalyst leading to a measurable current. This new methodology monitors turnover of a single enzyme molecule. The methodology might complement existing single molecule techniques, giving further insights into enzymatic mechanisms and filling the gap between fundamental understanding of biocatalytic processes and their potential for bioenergy production.

  • 233.
    Sekretaryova, Alina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Unsubstitutedand insoluble phenothiazine as an electron-transfer mediator in enzymaticelectrochemical biosensors2013In: Nano-scaled arrangements of proteins, aptamers, andother nucleic acid structures – and their potential applications , COST Thematic Workshop, 8-9 October 2013, Helmholtz Zentrum fürUmweltforschung, Leipzig, Germany, Leipzig: Helmholtz Zentrum für Umweltforschung , 2013, p. O1-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 234.
    Sekretaryova, Alina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Turner, Anthony P.F.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Karyakin, Arkady A.
    Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia.
    Unsubstituted phenothiazine as a superior water-insoluble mediator for oxidases2014In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 53, p. 275-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mediation of oxidases glucose oxidase (GOx), lactate oxidase (LOx) and cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) by a new electron shuttling mediator, unsubstituted phenothiazine (PTZ), was studied. Cyclic voltammetry and rotating-disk electrode measurements in nonaqueous media were used to determine the diffusion characteristics of the mediator and the kinetics of its reaction with GOx, giving a second-order rate constant of 7.6×103–2.1×104 M−1 s−1 for water–acetonitrile solutions containing 5–15% water. These values are in the range reported for commonly used azine-type mediators, indicating that PTZ is able to function as an efficient mediator. PTZ and GOx, LOx and ChOx were successfully co-immobilised in sol–gel membrane on a screen-printed electrode to construct glucose, lactate and cholesterol biosensors, respectively, which were then optimised in terms of stability and sensitivity. The electrocatalytic oxidation responses showed a dependence on substrate concentration ranging from 0.6 to 32 mM for glucose, from 19 to 565 mM for lactate and from 0.015 to 1.0 mM for cholesterol detection. Oxidation of substrates on the surface of electrodes modified with PTZ and enzyme membrane was investigated with double-step chronoamperometry and the results showed that the PTZ displays excellent electrochemical catalytic activities even when immobilised on the surface of the electrode.

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  • 235.
    Sekretaryova, Alina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Collision-based Electrochemistry for Investigation of Direct Electron Transfer of a Single Enzyme Molecule2017In: 26th Anniversary World Congress on Biosensors (Biosensors), Elsevier, 2017, p. 238-239Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eldectron transfer between a biorecognition element and an electrode is an essential element of bioelectrocatalytic systems, such as biosensors and biofuel cells. The number of working systems based on direct electron communication is limited and detailed investigations of the mechanism of the process are still required. Here, we present the use of a novel approach of collision-based bioelectrocatalysis to monitor electrocatalytic currents from individual redox enzyme molecules. This approach allowed us to calculate the individual turnover rates of these molecules and investigate the influence of the applied potential, pH and additions of inhibitor on the observed rates of direct electron transfer.

  • 236.
    Sekretaryova, Alina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Volkov, Anton V.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zozoulenko, Igor V.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vagin, Mikhail Yu
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Total phenol analysis of weakly supported water using a laccase-based microband biosensor.2016In: Analytica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0003-2670, E-ISSN 1873-4324, Vol. 907, p. 45-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The monitoring of phenolic compounds in wastewaters in a simple manner is of great importance for environmental control. Here, a novel screen printed laccase-based microband array for in situ, total phenol estimation in wastewaters and for water quality monitoring without additional sample pre-treatment is presented. Numerical simulations using the finite element method were utilized for the characterization of micro-scale graphite electrodes. Anodization followed by covalent modification was used for the electrode functionalization with laccase. The functionalization efficiency and the electrochemical performance in direct and catechol-mediated oxygen reduction were studied at the microband laccase electrodes and compared with macro-scale electrode structures. The reduction of the dimensions of the enzyme biosensor, when used under optimized conditions, led to a significant improvement in its analytical characteristics. The elaborated microsensor showed fast responses towards catechol additions to tap water – a weakly supported medium – characterized by a linear range from 0.2 to 10 μM, a sensitivity of 1.35 ± 0.4 A M−1 cm−2 and a dynamic range up to 43 μM. This enhanced laccase-based microsensor was used for water quality monitoring and its performance for total phenol analysis of wastewater samples from different stages of the cleaning process was compared to a standard method.

  • 237.
    Sharma, Deepali
    et al.
    Durban University of Technology, South Africa.
    Ashaduzzaman, Md.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Golabi, Mohsen
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Shriwastav, Amritanshu
    Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur, India.
    Bisetty, Krishna
    Durban University of Technology, South Africa.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Tekidag AB, UCS, Linköping, Sweden.
    Studies on Bacterial Proteins Corona Interaction with Saponin Imprinted ZnO Nanohoneycombs and Their Toxic Responses2015In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 7, no 43, p. 23848-23856Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Molecular imprinting generates robust, efficient, and highly mesoporous surfaces for biointeractions. Mechanistic interfacial interaction between the surface of core substrate and protein corona is crucial to understand the substantial microbial toxic responses at a nanoscale. In this study, we have focused on the mechanistic interactions between synthesized saponin imprinted zinc oxide nanohoneycombs (SIZnO NHs), average size 80-125 nm, surface area 20.27 m(2)/g, average pore density 0.23 pore/nm and number-average pore size 3.74 nm and proteins corona of bacteria. The produced SIZnO NHs as potential antifungal and antibacterial agents have been studied on Sclerotium rolfsii (S. rolfsii), Pythium debarynum (P. debarynum) and Escherichia coil (E. coli), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), respectively. SIZnO NHs exhibited the highest antibacterial (similar to 50%) and antifungal (similar to 40%) activity against Gram-negative bacteria (E. coil) and fungus (P. debarynum), respectively at concentration of 0.1 mol. Scanning electron spectroscopy (SEM) observation showed that the ZnO NHs ruptured the cell wall of bacteria and internalized into the cell. The molecular docking studies were carried out using binding proteins present in the gram negative bacteria (lipopolysaccharide and lipocalin Blc) and gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcal Protein A, SpA). It was envisaged that the proteins present in the bacterial cell wall were found to interact and adsorb on the surface of SIZnO NHs thereby blocking the active sites of the proteins used for cell wall synthesis. The binding affinity and interaction energies were higher in the case of binding proteins present in gram negative bacteria as compared to that of gram positive bacteria. In addition, a kinetic mathematical model (KMM) was developed in MATLAB to predict the internalization in the bacterial cellular uptake of the ZnO NHs for better understanding of their controlled toxicity. The results obtained from KMM exhibited a good agreement with the experimental data. Exploration of mechanistic interactions, as well as the formation of bioconjugate of proteins and ZnO NHs would play a key role to interpret more complex biological systems in nature.

  • 238.
    Sharma, Yashpal
    et al.
    National Institute Mat Science, Japan GJ University of Science and Technology, India .
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hattori, Shinya
    National Institute Mat Science, Japan .
    Terada, Dohiko
    National Institute Mat Science, Japan .
    K Sharma, Ashok
    DCR University of Science and Technology, India .
    Ramalingam, Murugan
    University of Strasbourg, France Tohoku University, Japan .
    Kobayashi, Hisatoshi
    National Institute Mat Science, Japan JST CREST, Japan .
    Fabrication of conducting electrospun nanofibers scaffold for three-dimensional cells culture2012In: International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, ISSN 0141-8130, E-ISSN 1879-0003, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 627-631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrospinning is a versatile method to fabricate nanofibers of a range of polymeric and composite materials suitable as scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. In this study, we report the fabrication and characterization of polyaniline-carbon nanotube/poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide-co-methacrylic acid) (PANI-CNT/PNIPAm-co-MAA) composite nanofibers and PNIPAm-co-MAA nanofibers suitable as a three-dimensional (3D) conducting smart tissue scaffold using electrospinning. The chemical structure of the resulting nanofibers was characterized with FUR and H-1 NMR spectroscopy. The surface morphology and average diameter of the nanofibers were observed by SEM. Cellular response of the nanofibers was studied with mice L929 fibroblasts. Cell viability was checked on 7th day of cell culture by double staining the cells with calcein-AM and PI dye. PANI-CNT/PNIPAm-co-MAA composite nanofibers were shown the highest cell growth and cell viability as compared to PNIPAm-co-MAA nanofibers. Cell viability in the composite nanofibers was obtained in order of 98% that indicates the composite nanofibers provide a better environment as a 3D scaffold for the cell proliferation and attachment suitable for tissue engineering applications.

  • 239.
    Sharma, Yashpal
    et al.
    International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1, Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047, Japan.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kobayashi, Hisatoshi
    International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1, Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047, Japan.
    Conducting Polymer Composites for Tissue Engineering Scaffolds2012In: Biomedical Materials and Diagnostic Devices / [ed] Ashutosh Tiwari, Murugan Ramalingam, Hisashi Kobayashi, Anthony P. F. Turner, USA: John Wiley & Sons, 2012, p. 597-510Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    "The functional materials with the most promising outlook have the ability to precisely adjust the biological phenomenon in a controlled mode. Engineering of advanced bio- materials has found striking applications in used for biomedical and diagnostic device applications, such as cell separation, stem-cell, drug delivery, hyperthermia, automated DNA extraction, gene targeting, resonance imaging, biosensors, tissue engineering and organ regeneration"--Provided by publisher. 

  • 240.
    Sharma, Yashpal
    et al.
    International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1, Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047, Japan.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kobayashi, Hisatoshi
    International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1, Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047, Japan.
    Electrospun Nanofiberfor Three Dimensional Cell Culture2013In: Nanomaterials in Drug Delivery, Imaging, and Tissue Engineering / [ed] Ashutosh Tiwari, Atul Tiwari, USA: John Wiley & Sons, 2013, p. 417-434Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    "Nanoscopic therapeutic systems incorporate therapeutic agents, molecular targeting and diagnostic imaging capabilities and are emerging as the next generation of multifarious nanomedicine to improve the therapeutic outcome including chemo and translational therapy. This reference work is one of the first to cover Nanotheragnostics which is the new edge of nanomedicine combining both diagnostic and therapeutic elements at nano level. This large multidisciplinary reference work is has four main parts: Biocompatible Nanomaterials; Nanomedicine: Drug Gene and Cell Delivery; Multi-functional Nanocarrier: Diagnosis, Imaging and Treatment; Tissue Engineering/Regenerative Medicine"--

  • 241.
    Sheikhzadeh, E.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. S University of Mashhad, Iran.
    Chamsaz, M.
    Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    Label-free impedimetric biosensor for Salmonella Typhimurium detection based on poly [pyrrole-co-3-carboxyl-pyrrole] copolymer supported aptamer2016In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 80, p. 194-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Gram-negative bacterium, Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a food borne pathogen responsible for numerous hospitalisations and deaths all over the world. Conventional detection methods for pathogens are time consuming and labour-intensive. Hence, there is considerable interest in faster and simpler detection methods. Polypyrrole-based polymers, due to their intrinsic chemical and electrical properties, have been demonstrated to be valuable candidates for the fabrication of chemo/biosensors and functional surfaces. Similarly aptamers have been shown to be good alternatives to antibodies in the development of affinity biosensors. In this study, we report on the combination of Poly [pyrrole-co-3-carboxyl-pyrrole] copolymer and aptamer for the development of a label-less electrochemical biosensor suitable for the detection of S. Typhimurium. Impedimetric measurements were facilitated by the effect of the aptamer/target interaction on the intrinsic conjugation of the poly [pyrrole-co-3-carboxyl-pyrrole] copolymer and subsequently on its electrical properties. The aptasensor detected S. Typhimurium in the concentration range 10(2)-10(8) CFU mL(-1) with high selectivity over other model pathogens and with a limit of quantification (LOQ) of 100 CFU mL(-1) and a limit of detection (LOD) of 3 CFU mL(-1). The suitability of the aptasensor for real sample detection was demonstrated via recovery studies performed in spiked apple juice samples. We envisage this to be a viable approach for the inexpensive and rapid detection of pathogens in food, and possibly in other environmental samples. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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  • 242.
    Sheikhzadeh, Elham
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran.
    Golabi, Mohsen
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Chamsaz, M
    Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran.
    Housaindokht, M.R.
    Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Label-free impedimetric Salmonella aptasensor based on pyrrole (pyrrole -3-carboxyl acid ) copolymer and its application in apple juice analysis2016In: Biosensors 2016 – The World Congress on Biosensors, Gothenburg, Sweden, 25-27 May 2016, Elsevier, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 243.
    Sheikhzadeh, Elham
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Chamsaz, M
    Golabi, Mohsen
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Label free impedimetric Salmonella aptasensor based on pyrrole (pyrrole -3-carboxyl acid ) copolymer.2015In: Sweden-Japan Seminar on Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology – SJS-Nano, Linköping, Sweden, 10-11 March 2015, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS), Stockholm. , 2015, p. 32-33Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Salmonella is a Gram-negative foodborne pathogen that can cause gastrointestinal infection that is the cause of numerous hospitalisations and deaths all over the world [1]. Conventional approaches for Salmonella detection, based on culture methods, are time-consuming and labour-intensive; this creates considerable need for the development of novel, fast and reliable approaches.

    Conductive polymers are poly-conjugated systems that present, at the same time, the properties of conductive materials and conventional polymers. Among them, polypyrrole and its derivatives are attracting a lot of attention in several fields including actuators and biosensors [2].

     

    Aptamers are single strand of DNA or RNA that can bind to specific target with high affinity showing in this way great potentiality as alternative to antibodies in affinity based biosensors [3].

     

    In the study presented herein the preparation, via electrodeposition, of a copolymer based on pyrrole and pyrrol 3-carboxylic acid and its application in the development of an aptamer based biosensor is presented. Immobilisation of aptamers, via EDC /NHS chemistry onto the synthetised polymer has been demonstrated via electrochemical techniques. The detection of different concentration of Salmonella was performed by incubation of the prepared electrode with different concentrations of bacteria, followed by impedance measurement in LiClO4 solution. A Nyquist plot of impedance spectra showed increase in the radii of the semicircle, corresponding to an increased charge transfer resistance, and associated to the interaction between the immobilised aptames and the bacteria in the sample. This initial result suggests that it should be possible to create a label-free sensor based on this method.

     

    [1] J. Yuan, Z. Tao, Y.Yu, X. Ma, Y. Xia, L. Wang, Z. Wang,Food Control 37 (2014) 188 – 192

    [2] R. Balint, N. J. Cassidy, S. H. Cartmell, Acta Biomaterialia 10 (2014) 2341–2353

    [3] S. Tombelli, M. Minunni, M. Mascini, Biosensors and Bioelectronics 20 (2005) 2424–2434

  • 244.
    Shukla, S. K.
    et al.
    Bhaskaracharya College of Applied Sciences, University of Delhi, Delhi 110075, India.
    Bharadvaja, Anand
    Bhaskaracharya College of Applied Sciences, University of Delhi, Delhi 110075, India.
    Parashar, G. K.
    Swami Shradhanand College, University of Delhi, Delhi 110036, India.
    Mishra, A. P.
    Department of Science and Technology, Technology Bhavan, Delhi 110061, India.
    Dubey, G. C.
    Institute of Defense Scientists and Technologists, S. K. Mazumdar Road, Delhi110054, India.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Fabrication of ultra-sensitive optical fiber based humidity sensor using TiO2 thin film2012In: Advanced Materials Letters, ISSN 0976-3961, Vol. 3, no 5, p. 365-370Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thin films of titanium dioxide in anatase form have been prepared using isobutyl titanate as precursor. The resulting TiO2 was coated on an U-shaped pyrex glass rod to sense the humidity of a controlled humid environment using optical fiber approach. The humidity sensing characteristics and the sensing mechanism have been investigated by measuring the output power of the sensor at different humidity. The developed humidity sensor was responded in the humidity ranging from 10 to 95% of relative humidity and exhibited the sensitivity of 0.78, response time 36s and recovery time 73s.

  • 245. Shukla, S. K.
    et al.
    Deshpande, Swapneel R.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Shukla, Sudheesh K.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Fabrication of a tunable glucose biosensor based on zinc oxide/chitosan-graft-poly (vinyl alcohol) core-shell nanocomposite2012In: Talanta, ISSN 0039-9140, Vol. 99, p. 283-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A potentiometrically tuned-glucose biosensor was fabricated using core-shell nanocomposite based on zinc oxide encapsulated chitosan-graft-poly(vinyl alcohol) (ZnO/CHIT-g-PVAL). In a typical experiment, ZnO/CHIT-g-PVAL core-shell nanocomposite containing <20 nm ZnO nanoparticles was synthesized using wet-chemical method. The glucose responsive bio-electrode, i.e., glucose oxidase/ZnO/chitosan-graft-poly(vinyl alcohol) (GOD/ZnO/CHIT-g-PVAL/ITO) was obtained by immobilization of glucose oxidase (GOD) onto the electrode made of resulting ZnO core-shell nanocomposite coated on the indium-tin oxide (ITO) glass substrate. The ZnO/CHIT-g-PVAL/ITO and GOD/ZnO/CHIT-g-PVAL electrodes were characterized with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), whereas ZnO/CHIT-g-PVAL size of core-shell nanoparticles were measured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The electrostatic interaction between GOD and ZnO/CHIT-g-PVAL provided the resulting tuned enzyme electrode with a high degree of enzyme immobilization and excellent lifetime stability. The response studies were carried out as a function of glucose concentration with potentiometric measurement. The GOD/ZnO/CHIT-g-PVAL/ITO bioelectrode has showed a linear potential response to the glucose concentration ranging from 2 mu M to 1.2 mM. The glucose biosensor exhibited a fast surface-controlled redox biochemistry with a detection limit of 0.2 mu M, a sensitivity of >0.04 V/mu M and a response time of three sec. ZnO/CHIT-g-PVAL core-shell nanocomposite could be a promising nanomaterials for a range of enzymic biosensors.

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  • 246.
    Shukla, S. K.
    et al.
    Bhaskaracharya College of Applied Sciences, University of Delhi, Delhi, India.
    Nidhi,
    Bhaskaracharya College of Applied Sciences, University of Delhi, Delhi, India.
    Sudha,
    Bhaskaracharya College of Applied Sciences, University of Delhi, Delhi, India.
    Pooja,
    Bhaskaracharya College of Applied Sciences, University of Delhi, Delhi, India.
    Namrata,
    Bhaskaracharya College of Applied Sciences, University of Delhi, Delhi, India.
    Charu,
    Bhaskaracharya College of Applied Sciences, University of Delhi, Delhi, India.
    Akshay,
    Bhaskaracharya College of Applied Sciences, University of Delhi, Delhi, India.
    Silvi,
    Bhaskaracharya College of Applied Sciences, University of Delhi, Delhi, India.
    Manisha,
    Bhaskaracharya College of Applied Sciences, University of Delhi, Delhi, India.
    Rizwana,
    Bhaskaracharya College of Applied Sciences, University of Delhi, Delhi, India.
    Bharadvaja, Anand
    Bhaskaracharya College of Applied Sciences, University of Delhi, Delhi, India.
    Dubey, G. C.
    Bhaskaracharya College of Applied Sciences, University of Delhi, Delhi, India.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Preparation and characterization of cellulose derived from rice husk for drug delivery2013In: Advanced Materials Letters, ISSN 0976-3961, E-ISSN 0976-397X, Vol. 4, no 9, p. 714-719Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose has been the extracted from rice husk by chemical treatment with aqueous solution of sodium hydroxide. The physical properties of derived cellulose (water uptake and swelling behavior) has been investigated with view of different applications.  The morphology and chemical structure were   investigated by Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Thermogravimetry (TG) techniques. The results revealed the formation of homogeneous porous (micro size) membrane. Further, the UV-vis spectra of cellulose in different pH shows its responsiveness towards hydronium ion, which is suitable for drug delivery. Further, obtained cellulose was used for drug delivery under optimized pH.

  • 247.
    Shukla, S. K.
    et al.
    Bhaskaracharya College of Applied Sciences, University of Delhi, Delhi 10075, India.
    Vamakshi, V.
    Bhaskaracharya College of Applied Sciences, University of Delhi, Delhi 10075, India.
    Minakshi, M.
    Bhaskaracharya College of Applied Sciences, University of Delhi, Delhi 10075, India.
    Bharadavaja, Anand
    Shekhar, Aparna
    Shivaji College, University of Delhi, Delhi, India.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Fabrication of electro-chemical humidity sensor based on zinc oxide/polyaniline nanocomposite2012In: Advanced Materials Letters, ISSN 0976-3961, Vol. 3, no 5, p. 421-425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present work reports the synthesis of nano size zinc oxide encapsulated polyanaline by wet-chemical method at ambient condition. The prepared composite was characterized by XRD, SEM, TGA and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The results revealed the formation of the crystalline homogenous ZnO centered composite with electrical conductance in the range of 10-2scm-1 andthermal stability up to 280 0C. Further, electrical resistance of a ZnO/PANi film of ~200 nm thickness was monitored against humidity to use as humidity sensitive element. The observed sensing parameters were response time, 32 sec; and recovery time,45 sec; sensor has exhibited better sensing characteristics than pure PANi and other reported humidity sensors.

  • 248.
    Shukla, Sudheesh K.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Demir, Mustafa M.
    Izmir Institute Technology, Turkey.
    Govender, Penny P.
    University of Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    Shukla, S. K.
    University of Delhi, India.
    Optical fibre based non-enzymatic glucose sensing over Cu2+-doped polyaniline hybrid matrix2017In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 242, p. 522-528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The opto-chemical glucose sensing over cupric ion doped polyaniline (Cu+2/PANI) hybrid polymer matrix coated glass rod based optode has been demonstrated.Cu+2/PANI hybrid matrix was synthesized by in situ chemical polymerization of intrinsically functionalized aniline. Furthermore, developed optode has been explored for direct oxidisation of glucose on Cu+2/PANI hybrid matrix for non-enzymatic glucose sensing employing O-dianisidine indicator system. The proposed glucose sensor works well in range of 50 mg/dL-200 mg/dL with response time of 15 s in artificial as well as in biological samples along with 40 days of lifespan. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 249.
    Shukla, Sudheesh K.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. University of Delhi, India .
    Parlak, Onur
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Shukla, S.K.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Delhi, India .
    Mishra, Sachin
    University of Delhi, India .
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Self-Reporting Micellar Polymer Nanostructures for Optical Urea Biosensing2014In: Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, ISSN 0888-5885, E-ISSN 1520-5045, Vol. 53, no 20, p. 8509-8514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the facile fabrication of a self-reporting, highly sensitive and selective optical urea nanobiosensor using chitosan-g-polypyrrole (CHIT-g-PPy) nanomicelles as a sensing platform. Urease was immobilized on the spherical micellar surface to create an ultrasensitive self-reporting nanobiosystem for urea. The resulting nanostructures show monodisperse size distributions before and after enzyme loading. The critical micelle concentration of the enzyme-immobilized polymer nanostructure was measured to be 0.49 mg/L in phosphate buffer at pH 7.4. The nanobiosensor had a linear optical response to urea concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 30 mM with a response time of a few seconds. This promising approach provides a novel methodology for self-reporting bioassembly over nanostructure polymer micelles and furnishes the basis for fabrication of sensitive and efficient optical nanobiosensors.

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  • 250.
    Shukla, Sudheesh K.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Cholesterol Oxidase Functionalised Polyaniline/Carbon Nanotube Hybrids for an Amperometric Biosensor2015In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 3373-3377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Functional carbon nanotubes (CNT) have attracted much attention for analytical and biomedical applications. This paper describes the fabrication of a cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) immobilised polyaniline (PANI)/CNT composite electrode for the amperometric detection of cholesterol. The prepared ChOx/PANI/CNT/Au bioelectrode bound ChOx via the available functionalties of PANI (-NH2) and CNT (-COOH). Moreover, the CNT creates a network inside the matrix that strengthens the mechanical property of the bioelectrode. The multifunctional matrix is presumed to provide a 3D-mesoporous surface, which substantially enhances enzyme activity. The linear range of the biosensor for cholesterol oleate was 30-280 mu M with a response time of 10 sec.

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