liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
234567 201 - 250 of 301
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 201.
    Neshro, Barmano
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Structured management, Symptoms, Health-related Quality of Life and Alcohol in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, affecting at least 2.9 % of the Swedish population. Although AF is associated with increased risk of ischaemic stroke, there have been many reports on the underuse of oral anticoagulants (OAC) and non-adherence to guidelines in other areas as well. AF is also associated with disabling symptoms and decreased health-related quality of life (HRQoL), but some patients are asymptomatic. The reasons for the great variation of symptoms remain unclear. Furthermore, although research on AF has increased, studies have mainly focused on treatment, while studies on risk factors, such as alcohol consumption, have only recently gained attention.

    The aim of this thesis was to investigate whether structured care of patients with AF could improve guideline adherence and HRQoL compared to standard care, and to determine which factors affect symptoms and HRQoL prior to treatment with radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA), as well as improvement after RFA. Furthermore, we aimed to examine the associations of alcohol consumption with cardiac biomarkers, the size of the left atrium (LA), and re-ablation.

    This thesis is based on two studies. In the ‘Structured Management and Coaching – Patients with Atrial Fibrillation’ (SMaC-PAF) study, 176 patients were recruited to the intervention group, receiving a structured follow-up programme, and 146 patients were recruited to the control group, receiving standard care. The two groups were compared in regard to adherence to guidelines and patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) assessing symptoms and HRQoL.

    In the ‘Symptom burden, Metabolic profile, Ultrasound findings, Rhythm, neurohormonal activation, haemodynamics and health-related quality of life in patients with atrial Fibrillation’ (SMURF) study, 192 patients referred for their first RFA of AF were included. PROMs questionnaires were filled out, echocardiography was performed, and cardiac biomarkers were analysed. Alcohol consumption was assessed through interview and through analysis of ethyl glucuronide in hair (hEtG). AF recurrence and re-ablation within 12 months were examined.

    In the first study, after one year, 94% (n=112) and 74% (n=87) of patients with indication for OAC in the intervention and the control groups, respectively, actually received treatment with OAC (p <0.01). Both groups improved in anxiety and HRQoL scores over the year, but in the intervention group, arrhythmia-specific symptoms were less frequently experienced and the SF-36 scores were more similar to the norm population.

    In the second study, the most important predictors of arrhythmia-related symptoms and HRQoL prior to RFA were anxiety, depression and low-grade inflammation, while frequent AF attacks prior to RFA, freedom from AF recurrence after RFA, female gender, no enlarged LA, absence of diabetes, and the presence of heart failure were significant predictors of improvement in symptoms and HRQoL after RFA. Men with hEtG ≥7 pg/mg had higher levels of cardiac biomarkers, larger LA volumes and a higher re-ablation rate than men with hEtG <7 pg/mg, while no such findings were present in women.

    In conclusion, structured management was superior to standard care in patients with AF, emphasising the importance of structured care, adjusted to local requirements, in order to improve the care and well-being of patients with AF. Although the reasons for the great variety of symptoms in patients with AF still are not yet fully understood, it seems that psychological factors and inflammation play a role, and that improvement in symptoms and HRQoL after RFA is influenced by gender, diabetes, heart failure, LA size and the frequency of attacks before, as well as freedom from AF after, RFA. Finally, alcohol consumption corresponding to hEtG ≥7 pg/mg was associated with higher levels of cardiac biomarkers, larger LA size and a higher rate of re-ablation in men, implying that men with an hEtG-value ≥7 pg/mg have a higher risk for LA remodelling that could potentially lead to a deterioration of the AF situation.

    List of papers
    1. Structured care of patients with atrial fibrillation improves guideline adherence
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Structured care of patients with atrial fibrillation improves guideline adherence
    2016 (English)In: Journal of Atrial Fibrillation, ISSN 1941-6911, Vol. 9, no 4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    There are many reports of lack of guideline adherence in the treatment of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), and AF affects health-related quality of life (HRQoL) negatively. The aim of this study was to investigate whether structured care compared to standard care of a general AF population could improve guideline adherence and HRQoL, and reduce symptoms,anxiety and depression.

    Methods

    In total, 176 patients were recruited to the intervention and 146 patients to the control group.The intervention consisted of a structured follow-up program, while patients serving as controls received standard care. The primary outcome was guideline adherence evaluated through: appropriate use of oral anticoagulants (OAC) and antiarrhythmics, whether echocardiogram and thyroid lab tests were performed, and patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs), assessed with the questionnaires SF-36, EQ-5D, HADS and ASTA at baseline and after one year.

    Results

    Guideline adherence was significantly better in the intervention group, 91% vs. 63% (p < 0.01), mainly due to appropriate OAC treatment 94% vs. 74% (p < 0.01). Symptoms assessed with ASTA were less frequent and the negative impact of AF was reduced in the intervention group after one year/ at follow-up. Five scales in SF-36, and the visual analogue scale for current health status in EQ-5D (EQ-VAS), improved significantly in both groups.

    Conclusion

    Structured care of patients with AF significantly improved guideline adherence and patients reported fewer symptoms and a reduced negative impact on disease-specific HRQoL compared to standard care at one year follow-up.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Overland Park, KS, United States: CardioFront LLC, 2016
    Keywords
    Atrial fibrillation, Guideline Adherence, Anticoagulants, Health-related Quality of life, Symptoms, Anxiety.
    National Category
    Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-157019 (URN)10.4022/jafib.1498 (DOI)
    Available from: 2019-05-23 Created: 2019-05-23 Last updated: 2019-06-12Bibliographically approved
    2. Factors Predicting Arrhythmia-Related Symptoms and Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients Referred for Radiofrequency Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation: An Observational Study (the SMURF Study)
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors Predicting Arrhythmia-Related Symptoms and Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients Referred for Radiofrequency Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation: An Observational Study (the SMURF Study)
    2017 (English)In: JACC: Clinical Electrophysiology, ISSN 2405-500X, Vol. 3, no 5, p. 9p. 497-502Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Conclusions Anxiety, depression, and low-grade inflammation were the factors that predicted both arrhythmia-related symptoms and HRQoL in patients with AF. Obesity was the most significant predictor of patient general physical status. These factors need to be addressed in patients with AF to improve management of their disease. Intensive risk factor modification can be of great importance. (Reasons for Variations in Health Related Quality of Life and Symptom Burden in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation [SMURF]; NCT01553045)

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2017. p. 9
    Keywords
    anxiety; arrhythmia-related symptoms; atrial fibrillation; health-related quality of life; obesity
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-145630 (URN)10.1016/j.jacep.2016.12.004 (DOI)
    Available from: 2018-03-09 Created: 2018-03-09 Last updated: 2019-05-23
    3. The association between alcohol consumption, cardiac biomarkers, left atrial size and re-ablation in patients with atrial fibrillation referred for catheter ablation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The association between alcohol consumption, cardiac biomarkers, left atrial size and re-ablation in patients with atrial fibrillation referred for catheter ablation
    Show others...
    2019 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 4, article id e0215121Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Information on alcohol consumption in patients undergoing radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of atrial fibrillation (AF) is often limited by the reliance on self-reports. The aim of this study was to describe the long-term alcohol consumption, measured as ethyl glucuronide in hair (hEtG), in patients undergoing RFA due to AF, and to examine potential associations with cardiac biomarkers, left atrial size and re-ablation within one year after the initial RFA.

    Methods

    The amount of hEtG was measured in patients referred for RFA, and a cut-off of 7 pg/mg was used. N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and the mid-regional fragment of pro atrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP) were examined and maximum left atrium volume index (LAVI) was measured. The number of re-ablations was examined up to one year after the initial RFA. Analyses were stratified by gender, and adjusted for age, systolic blood pressure, body mass index, presence of heart failure and heart rhythm for analyses regarding NT-proBNP, MR-proANP and LAVI and heart rhythm being replaced by type of AF for analyses regarding re-ablation.

    Results

    In total, 192 patients were included in the study. Median (25th– 75th percentile) NT-proBNP in men with hEtG ≥ 7 vs. < 7 pg/mg was 250 (96–695) vs. 130 (49–346) pg/ml (p = 0.010), and in women it was 230 (125–480) vs. 230 (125–910) pg/ml (p = 0.810). Median MR-proANP in men with hEtG ≥ 7 vs. < 7 pg/mg was 142 (100–224) vs. 117 (83–179) pmol/l (p = 0.120) and in women it was 139 (112–206) vs. 153 (93–249) pmol/l (p = 0.965). The median of maximum LAVI was 30.1 (26.7–33.9) vs. 25.8 (21.4–32.0) ml/m2 (p = 0.017) in men, and 25.0 (18.9–29.6) vs. 25.7 (21.7–34.6) ml/m2 (p = 0.438) in women, with hEtG ≥ 7 vs. < 7 pg/ml, respectively. Adjusted analyses showed similar results, except for MR-proANP turning out significant in men with hEtG ≥ 7 vs. < 7 pg/mg (p = 0.047). The odds ratio of having a re-ablation was 3.5 (95% CI 1.3–9.6, p = 0.017) in men with hEtG ≥ 7 vs. < 7 pg/mg, while there was no significant difference in women.

    Conclusions

    In male patients with AF and hEtG ≥ 7 pg/mg, NT-proBNP and MR-proANP were higher, LA volumes larger, and there was a higher rate of re-ablations, as compared to men with hEtG < 7 pg/mg. This implies that men with an alcohol consumption corresponding to an hEtG-value ≥ 7, have a higher risk for LA remodelling that could potentially lead to a deterioration of the AF situation.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    San Francisco, CA, United States: Public Library of Science, 2019
    National Category
    Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-157020 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0215121 (DOI)000463992600055 ()30970005 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85064164504 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: County Council of Ostergotland [LIO-280731, LIO-445511]; Carldavid Jonsson Research Foundation; Linkoping University; Biosense Webster; Johnson Johnson; Heart Foundation

    Available from: 2019-05-23 Created: 2019-05-23 Last updated: 2019-06-12Bibliographically approved
    4. Predictors of improvement in arrhythmia-specific symptoms and health-related quality of life after catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predictors of improvement in arrhythmia-specific symptoms and health-related quality of life after catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation
    Show others...
    2019 (English)In: Clinical Cardiology, ISSN 0160-9289, E-ISSN 1932-8737, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 247-255Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background The primary goal of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of atrial fibrillation (AF) is to improve symptoms and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). However, most studies have focused on predictors of AF recurrence rather than on predictors of improvement in symptoms and HRQoL. Hypothesis We sought to explore predictors of improvement in arrhythmia-specific symptoms and HRQoL after RFA of AF, and to evaluate the effects on symptoms, HRQoL, anxiety, and depression. Methods We studied 192 patients undergoing their first RFA of AF. The Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), arrhythmia-specific questionnaire in tachycardia and arrhythmia (ASTA), and hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) questionnaires were filled out at baseline, at 4 months, and at a 1-year follow-up. Results All questionnaire scale scores improved significantly over time. In the ASTA symptom scale score, female gender and amp;gt; 10 AF episodes the month before RFA were significant positive predictors of improvement, while diabetes and AF recurrence within 12 months after RFA were significant negative predictors (R-2 = 0.18; P amp;lt; 0.001). In the ASTA HRQoL scale score, the presence of heart failure and amp;gt; 10 AF episodes the month before RFA were significant positive predictors of improvement, while diabetes, maximum left atrial volume and AF recurrence were significant negative predictors (R-2 = 0.20; P amp;lt; 0.001). Conclusion Left atrial volume, gender, diabetes, heart failure, the frequency of AF attacks prior to RFA, and recurrence of AF after RFA were significant factors affecting improvement in symptoms and HRQoL after RFA of AF. Future studies are warranted to confirm these findings.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    WILEY, 2019
    Keywords
    atrial fibrillation; catheter ablation; health-related quality of life; symptom burden
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-154666 (URN)10.1002/clc.23134 (DOI)000458424300006 ()30548275 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Biosense Webster; Carldavid Jonsson Research Foundation; County Council of Ostergotland [LIO-280731LIO-445511]; Heart Foundation, Linkoping University

    Available from: 2019-03-04 Created: 2019-03-04 Last updated: 2019-05-23
  • 202.
    Nielsen, Elinor
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Wåhlin, Ingrid
    Research Section, Kalmar County Council, Sweden; Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and life Sciences, Sweden.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Evaluating Pictures of Nature and Soft Music on Anxiety and Well-Being During Elective Surgery2018In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 12, p. 58-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients going through surgery being awake often have a sense of anxiety and need support to relax. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate whether looking at pictures of natural scenery could reduce anxiety and pain and increase relaxation and well-being being awake during the elective surgery. Methods: This three-arm, randomized intervention study consisted of one group viewing pictures of natural scenery, one group listening to soft instrumental music, and one control group without distraction, all adult patients (n=174). The State Trait Anxiety Inventory short form and a visual analogue scale on well-being were used as well as sedation treatment if necessary. Results: No differences related to anxiety after surgery were found among the three groups. When controlling for the effect of sedative treatment, however, patients without sedation had a lower degree of anxiety postoperatively (p=0.014). Younger patients had a higher degree of anxiety and lower degree of postoperative relaxation and well-being. Conclusion: Viewing pictures of natural scenery while being awake during elective surgery is as relaxing as listening to soft instrumental music. Offering nature scenery pictures for patients to view could be relaxing during the elective surgery.

  • 203.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Schnider, Thomas
    Institute of Anaesthesiology, Kantonsspital St. Gallen, St. Gallen, Switzerland.
    Uustal, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Should Propofol and Alfentanil Be Combined in Patient-Controlled Sedation? A Randomised Controlled Trial Using Pharmacokinetic Simulation2015In: Open Journal of Anesthesiology, ISSN 2164-5558, Vol. 5, no 6, p. 122-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patient-controlled sedation (PCS) is increasingly used for moderate sedation. Detailed understanding is essential for maintaining safety and giving the most benefit. We wanted to explore the associations between patients’ characteristics, perioperative pain and anxiety, the procedure, and the calculated concentrations at the effect site (Ce) of propofol. We also wanted to analyse the pharmacokinetic profiles of propofol and alfentanil during PCS, and their association with respiratory complications.

    Methods: 155 patients were double-blinded and randomised to have propofol or propofol and alfentanil for PCS during gynaecological surgery. Pharmacokinetic simulation of Ce and multiple regressions aided the search for correlations between explanatory variables and concentrations of drugs.

    Results: In group propofol, treatment for incontinence, anterior repair, and the patient’s weight correlated the best (B-coef = 0.20, 0.20 and 0.01; r = 0.69; r² = 0.48). When alfentanil was added, alfentanil and the patient’s weight were associated with Ce of propofol (B-coef = -0.40 and 0.01; r = 0.70; r² = 0.43). Logistic regression indicated that age and Ce of drugs were related to ten cases of respiratory complications.

    Conclusions: Patients’ weights and the type of surgery performed were associated with the Ce of propofol; this knowledge could be used for refinement of the doses given during PCS. Because the pharmacokinetic profiles of propofol and alfentanil are different, the alfentanil effect becomes predominant during the time course of sedation. In order to reduce the risk of early and late respiratory depression, alfentanil should not be added to propofol in the same syringe.

  • 204.
    Nilsson, Anna G.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bergthorsdottir, Ragnhildur
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Burman, Pia
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Dahlqvist, Per
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Ekman, Bertil
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Eden Engstrom, Britt
    University Hospital, Sweden.
    Ragnarsson, Oskar
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skrtic, Stanko
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; AstraZeneca RandD, Sweden.
    Wahlberg Topp, Jeanette
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Achenbach, Heinrich
    Shire Int GmbH, Switzerland.
    Uddin, Sharif
    Shire, MA USA.
    Marelli, Claudio
    Shire Int GmbH, Switzerland.
    Johannsson, Gudmundur
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Long-term safety of once-daily, dual-release hydrocortisone in patients with adrenal insufficiency: a phase 3b, open-label, extension study2017In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 176, no 6, p. 715-725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the long-term safety and tolerability of a once-daily, dual-release hydrocortisone (DR-HC) tablet as oral glucocorticoid replacement therapy in patients with primary adrenal insufficiency (AI). Design: Prospective, open-label, multicenter, 5-year extension study of DR-HC conducted at five university clinics in Sweden. Methods: Seventy-one adult patients diagnosed with primary AI who were receiving stable glucocorticoid replacement therapy were recruited. Safety and tolerability outcomes included adverse events (AEs), intercurrent illness episodes, laboratory parameters and vital signs. Quality of life (QoL) was evaluated using generic questionnaires. Results: Total DR-HC exposure was 328 patient-treatment years. Seventy patients reported 1060 AEs (323 per 100 patient-years); 85% were considered unrelated to DR-HC by the investigator. The most common AEs were nasopharyngitis (70%), fatigue (52%) and gastroenteritis (48%). Of 65 serious AEs reported by 32 patients (20 per 100 patient-years), four were considered to be possibly related to DR-HC: acute AI (n = 2), gastritis (n = 1) and syncope (n = 1). Two deaths were reported (fall from height and subarachnoid hemorrhage), both considered to be unrelated to DR-HC. From baseline to 5 years, intercurrent illness episodes remained relatively stable (mean 2.6-5.4 episodes per patient per year), fasting plasma glucose (0.7 mmol/L; P amp;lt; 0.0001) and HDL cholesterol (0.2 mmol/L; P amp;lt; 0.0001) increased and patient-/investigator-assessed tolerability improved. QoL total scores were unchanged but worsening physical functioning was recorded (P = 0.008). Conclusions: In the first prospective study evaluating the long-term safety of glucocorticoid replacement therapy in patients with primary AI, DR-HC was well tolerated with no safety concerns observed during 5-year treatment.

  • 205.
    Nord, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Kullman, Anita
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science.
    Hannestad, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dizdar Segrell, Nil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Is Levodopa Pharmacokinetics in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease Depending on Gastric Emptying?2017In: Advances in Parkinsons Disease, ISSN 2169-9712, Vol. 06, no 01Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Levodopa uptake from the gastrointestinal tract in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) can be affected by delayed gastric emptying (GE). This might lead to fluctuating levodopa levels resulting in increased motor fluctuations. Continuous dopaminergic stimulation (CDS) improves motor fluctuations and could be a result of smoothening in levodopa uptake. In this study we wanted to study the levodopa pharmacokinetics peripherally in PD patients with motor fluctuations and investigate the relation between levodopa uptake and GE and the effect of CDS. PD patients with wearing off (group 1) and on-off syndrome (group 2) were included. Breath tests were performed to evaluate the half time (T1/2) of GE. Concomitantly 1 tablet of Madopark® was given and the levodopa concentrations in blood and subcutaneous (SC) tissue were analyzed for both groups. Group 2 was then given a 10-d continuous intravenous levodopa treatment and the tests were repeated. Higher levels of levodopa in group 1 compared to group 2 in blood (p = 0.014) were seen. The GE was delayed in both group 1 (p < 0.001) and group 2 (p < 0.05) compared to a reference group with healthy volunteers with T1/2 median values 105 and 78 min vs. 72 min. There was no difference in GE between the two PD groups (p = 0.220) or in group 2 before and after infusion period (p = 0.861). CDS resulted in lower levodopa levels in blood (p < 0.001) and SC tissue (p < 0.01). In conclusion, PD patients in early complication phase have a more favourable levodopa uptake than patients later in disease. We found delayed GE in PD patients with motor fluctuations but no obvious relation between GE and levodopa uptake or GE and PD stage. The effect of CDS indicates no effect of CDS on the mechanisms of GE but on the mechanisms of levodopa uptake.

  • 206.
    Nordenskjold, Anna E.
    et al.
    Southern Alvsborg Hosp, Sweden.
    Fohlin, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Regional Cancer Center.
    Arnesson, Lars-Gunnar
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Einbeigi, Zakaria
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Erik
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Albertsson, Per
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Per
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Breast cancer survival trends in different stages and age groups - a population-based study 1989-20132019In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 45-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: During the recent decades, breast cancer survival has gradually improved but there is limited knowledge on the improvement in population-based studies of patients diagnosed with different stages of the disease and in different age groups.Patients and methods: In two Swedish health care regions a total of 42,220 female breast cancer patients below 90years of age were diagnosed between 1989 and 2013. They were treated and followed according to national and regional guidelines and formed a population-based cohort.Results: Using patients diagnosed in 1989-1993 as a reference to the relative risk, 5-year mortality decreased with 49% for patients diagnosed at the end of the observation period (CI 95% 45-58). The mortality tended to decrease for patients with all stages of breast cancer and test for trend resulted in a statistically significant improvement over time in 5-year relative survival in stage III and IV and in 10-year survival in stage I and III. For each operable stage of disease, patients aged below 40years or more than 70years when diagnosed tended to have less favorable survival than patients diagnosed between 40-69years of age. Test for trend resulted in statistically significant improvements over time for patients diagnosed at ages below 40, 40-54 and 54-69, but less marked improvements for patients older than 70 when diagnosed.Conclusions: During the period 1989-2013 the relative risk of 5-year mortality decreased with 49%. Improvements were seen in all age groups but were unevenly distributed between stages and age groups pointing to the need for further improvements for younger and elderly patients.

  • 207.
    Nordenskjöld, Jesper
    et al.
    Hassleholm Kristianstad Hospital, Sweden.
    Waldén, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kjellin, Anders
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Franzen, Herbert
    Ängelholm Hospital. Sweden.
    Atroshi, Isam
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Benefit of Local Anesthesia in Reducing Pain during Collagenase Injection for Dupuytrens Contracture2017In: Plastic and reconstructive surgery (1963), ISSN 0032-1052, E-ISSN 1529-4242, Vol. 140, no 3, p. 565-569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collagenase injection for Dupuytrens contracture is commonly administered without anesthesia. The authors studied the benefit of injecting local anesthesia before collagenase in reducing treatment-related pain. This prospective cohort study included 187 patients (mean age, 69 years; 80 percent men) at two orthopedic departments in Sweden. At one center, 161 consecutive patients scheduled for collagenase injection were assigned to two groups by alternating outpatient clinics; 78 received collagenase without local anesthesia using a modified method (injecting 0.80 mg in multiple spots in the cord) and 83 received local anesthesia injected in the proximal palm before collagenase. At the other center, 26 consecutive patients received collagenase using the standard method (0.58 mg injected in one spot) without local anesthesia. Immediately after the first injection (collagenase or local anesthesia), the patients rated the severity of injection-related pain on a visual analogue scale from 0 (no pain) to 10 (worst pain). Before finger manipulation 1 or 2 days after injection, the patients rated the pain experienced since injection. Mean score +/- SD for pain experienced during modified collagenase injection was 4.3 +/- 2.5 without local anesthesia and 2.3 +/- 1.7 during injection of local anesthesia (before collagenase) (age-and sex-adjusted mean difference, 2.1; 95 percent CI, 1.5 to 2.7; p amp;lt; 0.001). Mean pain score +/- SD during standard collagenase injection without local anesthesia was 4.8 +/- 1.8. Mean pain score +/- SD during the injection-manipulation interval was 2.9 +/- 1.9 in the group without local anesthesia and 2.9 +/- 2.3 in the local anesthesia group (p = 0.79). This study shows that local anesthesia significantly reduces the patients overall pain experience during collagenase treatment for Dupuytrens contracture.

  • 208.
    Noren, A.
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Gunnarsdottir, K.
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Ardnor, B.
    Umea Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Isaksson, B.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Lindell, G.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Rizell, M.
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Identification of Inequalities in the Selection of Liver Surgery for Colorectal Liver Metastases in Sweden2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Surgery, ISSN 1457-4969, E-ISSN 1799-7267, Vol. 107, no 4, p. 294-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Liver resection for colorectal liver metastases offers a 5-year survival rate of 25%-58%. This study aimed to analyze whether patients with colorectal liver metastases undergo resection to an equal extent and whether selection factors play a role in the selection process. Material and Methods: Data were retrieved from the Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry (2007-2011) for colorectal cancer and colorectal liver metastases. The patients identified were linked to the Swedish Registry of Liver and Bile surgery and the National Patient Registry to identify whether liver surgery or ablative treatment was performed. Analyses for age, sex, type of primary tumor and treating hospital (university, county, or district), American Society of Anesthesiologists class, and radiology for detection of metastatic disease were performed. Results: Of 28,355 patients with colorectal cancer, 21.6% (6127/28,355) presented with liver metastases. Of the patients with liver metastases, 18.5% (1134/6127) underwent liver resection or ablation. The cumulative proportion of liver resection/ablation was 4% (1134/28,355) of all colorectal cancer. If "not bowel resected" were excluded, the proportion slightly increased to 4.7% (1134/24,262). Around 15% of the patients with metastases were registered as referrals for liver surgery. In a multivariable analysis patients treated at a university hospital for primary tumor were more frequently surgically treated for liver metastases (p amp;lt; 0.0001). Patients with liver metastases from rectal cancer (p amp;lt; 0.0001) and men more often underwent liver resection (p = 0.006). A difference was found between health-care regions for the frequency of liver surgery (p amp;lt; 0.0001). Patients amp;gt;70 years and those with American Society of Anesthesiologists class amp;gt;2 underwent liver resection less frequently. Magnetic resonance imaging of the liver was more often used in diagnostic work-up in men. Conclusion: Patients with colorectal liver metastases are unequally treated in Sweden, as indicated by the low referral rate. The proximity to a hepatobiliary unit seems important to enhance the patients chances of being offered liver surgery.

  • 209.
    Olsson, Anki
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Blekinge Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Håkansson, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Berglund, Johan
    Blekinge Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Berg, Sören
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Protamine reduces whole blood platelet aggregation after cardiopulmonary bypass2016In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 58-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Platelet dysfunction is an important cause of postoperative bleeding after cardiac surgery. Protamine is routinely used for reversal of heparin after cardiopulmonary bypass (CBP), but may affect platelet aggregation. We assessed changes in platelet function in relation to protamine administration. Design: Platelet aggregation was analyzed by impedance aggregometry before and after protamine administration in 25 adult cardiac surgery patients. Aggregation was also studied after in vitro addition of heparin and protamine. The activators adenosine diphosphate (ADP), thrombin receptor activating peptide-6 (TRAP), arachidonic acid (AA) and collagen (COL) were used.Results: Platelet aggregation was reduced by approximately 50% after in vivo protamine administration; ADP 640 +/- 230 (AU*min, mean +/- SD) to 250 +/- 160, TRAP 939 +/- 293 to 472 +/- 260, AA 307 +/- 238 to 159 +/- 143 and COL 1022 +/- 350 to 506 +/- 238 (all p&lt;0.001). Aggregation was also reduced after in vitro addition of protamine alone with activators ADP from 518 +/- 173 to 384 +/- 157 AU*min p&lt;0.001, and AA 449 +/- 311 to 340 +/- 285 (p&lt;0.01) and protamine combined with heparin (1:1 ratio) with activators ADP to 349 +/- 160 and AA to 308 +/- 260 (both p&lt;0.001); and COL from 586 +/- 180 to 455 +/- 172 (p&lt;0.05). Conclusions: Protamine given after CPB markedly reduces platelet aggregation. Protamine added in vitro also reduces platelet aggregation, by itself or in combination with heparin.

  • 210.
    Olsson, Camilla
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Forsberg, Anna
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden; University Hospital, Skåne, Sweden..
    Bjerså, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Avdelningen för Kirurgi, Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborgs Universitet.
    Safety climate and readiness for implementation of evidence and person centered practice - A national study of registered nurses in general surgical care at Swedish university hospitals.2016In: BMC nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 15, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The rationale behind this study is the increasing research on relationships between patient safety, evidence based practice and person centered care, and the growing interest in outcomes of surgical patients. The aim of this study was to explore the safety climate and readiness to implement evidence-based and person centered care as perceived by registered nurses in Swedish surgical care.

    METHODS: The design was an exploratory, cross-sectional survey carried out in a national Swedish context. Data were collected through the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ - Short form) and the Context Assessment Index (CAI).

    RESULTS: In total, 1570 questionnaires were distributed, of which 727 were returned, giving a response rate of 46.3 %. The results revealed that in general, the safety climate in Swedish surgical care is positively related to readiness for evidence-based and person centered care, although specific management and cultural factors may be more sensitive and represent targets for improvement.

    CONCLUSION: This study presents new knowledge regarding the safety climate and readiness to implement evidence based practice and person centered care in general surgical wards in university hospitals and indicates important associations between these two areas. While RNs generally reported positive job satisfaction and a good team work culture in their units, there were indications that improvements in organizational management are needed.

  • 211.
    Oscarsson Tibblin, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sorliden, M.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Anskär, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    N-terminal fragment of pro-B-type natriuretic peptide is a predictor of cardiac events in high-risk patients undergoing acute hip fracture surgery2009In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, ISSN 0007-0912, Vol. 103, no 2, p. 206-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this investigation was to assess the incidence of elevated N-terminal fragment of pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and its relation to outcome defined as perioperative adverse cardiac events and all-cause mortality in high-risk patients undergoing non-elective surgery for hip fracture. A cohort of patients with hip fractures were extracted from a prospective observational study of high-risk patients (ASA class III or IV) undergoing emergency surgery. NT-proBNP and troponin I were measured before operation. An NT-proBNP greater than= 3984 ng litre(-1) was set as the cut-off level for significance. Perioperative adverse cardiac events and 30 day and 3 month mortality were recorded. Sixty-nine subjects were included. Thirty-four subjects (49%) had an NT-proBNP greater than= 3984 ng litre(-1) before surgery. Thirty-four subjects (49%) had a perioperative adverse cardiac event. Of these, 22 subjects (65%) had NT-proBNP above the diagnostic threshold compared with 12 subjects (34%) who had an NT-proBNP below the diagnostic threshold (P=0.01). Preoperative NT-proBNP greater than= 3984 ng litre(-1) [odds ratio (OR) 3.0; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0-8.9] and congestive heart failure (OR 3.0; 95% CI 1.0-9.0) were independent predictors of perioperative adverse cardiac events. A total of eight subjects (12%) died within 30 days after operation. There is a high incidence of elevated NT-proBNP in subjects undergoing non-elective hip fracture surgery. Preoperative NT-proBNP is a valuable predictor of cardiac complications in the perioperative period.

  • 212.
    Osman, Abdimajid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Hitzler, Walter E.
    Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Germany.
    Provost, Patrick
    CHUL, Canada; University of Laval, Canada.
    Peculiarities of studying the effects of pathogen reduction technologies on platelets2016In: PROTEOMICS - Clinical Applications, ISSN 1862-8346, E-ISSN 1862-8354, Vol. 10, no 8, p. 805-815Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transfusion of platelet concentrates (PCs) is mainly used for treatment of thrombocytopenic, trauma or surgery patients. The integrity and safety of these platelet preparations, however, is compromised by the presence of pathogens, such as viruses, bacteria and parasites. The transfer of allogeneic donor leukocytes contaminating PCs can also potentially cause adverse reactions in recipients. These considerations prompted the development and implementation of pathogen reduction technologies (PRT), which are based on chemically induced cross-linking and inactivation of nucleic acids. While the incumbent PRT may provide some protection against transfusion-transmitted infections, they are ineffective against infectious prions and may not inactivate other emerging pathogens. In addition, the safety of PRT concerning platelet viability and function has been questioned in several reports. Recent studies suggest that PRT, such as Intercept, may adversely affect the messenger RNA (mRNA) and microRNA content of platelets, as well as their functional integrity, which may compromise the clinical benefits of PRT. Here, we will discuss about the peculiarities of studying the effects of PRT on platelets, which will need to be taken into account in future studies aimed to characterize further, and polish, the rugged side of this otherwise useful and potentially important approach in transfusion medicine.

  • 213.
    Palm, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    On Fixation of Hip Prostheses2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis, comprising 5 separate studies, is concerned with fixation of prosthetic components in total hip arthroplasty. The results and conclusions of the studies fol-low;

    The initial stability of femoral revision components, the long cementless PCA stem and the Exeter standard stem cemented in a bed of impacted bone graft, was com-pared in an experimental study. The PCA stem was more stable than the Exeter stem. However, for both stems initial stability may not be sufficient to allow bone ingrowth. Initial fixation is especially vulnerable to torsion.

    Identical femoral stems with or without HA-coating were compared in a prospec-tive randomized clinical trial. The long-term stable fixation of a cementless Link RS femoral component was improved by application of hydroxyapatite coating to the femoral stem.

    In a clinical study the method of extensive impaction of morsellized bone allograft and a hydroxyapatite-coated cementless Mallory-Head acetabular component was found to be advantageous for acetabular revision in the presence of contained or acetabular wall defects. The limited contact between the HA-coated implant and living host bone did not seem to compromise long-term stable fixation.

    Two different cup designs were compared in a prospective randomized RSA study. At 3 years after implantation the cemented low profile Lubinus FAL cup performed as well as the cemented Lubinus Standard cup in terms of migration and polyethyl-ene wear.

    In a study of the relationship between radiolucent lines and migration the Lubinus FAL cup displayed more radiolucent lines in the cement bone interface than the Lubinus Standard cup but no difference in migration was found. Early appearance of such radiolucent lines represents an unspecific finding without reliable correla-tion to 3-year migration of the acetabular component.

    List of papers
    1. Initial stability of two different hip revision concepts: A biomechanical study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Initial stability of two different hip revision concepts: A biomechanical study
    1999 (English)In: Hip International, ISSN 1120-7000, Vol. 1, p. 7-13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12808 (URN)
    Available from: 2007-11-28 Created: 2007-11-28 Last updated: 2009-08-20
    2. Hydroxyapatite coating improves 8- to 10-year performance of the Link RS cementless femoral stem
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hydroxyapatite coating improves 8- to 10-year performance of the Link RS cementless femoral stem
    2002 (English)In: The Journal of Arthroplasty, ISSN 0883-5403, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 172-175Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In a prospective randomized clinical study, 12 hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated and 8 identical but noncoated stems were implanted in 20 patients. At 8- to 10-year follow-up, the HA-coated stems displayed excellent clinical and radiographic results in 11 out of 12 patients, whereas 7 out of 8 noncoated stems were failures and had been subject to revision. Despite the small number of patients in this series, HA coating seems to improve the long-term stable fixation of uncemented femoral implants.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12809 (URN)10.1054/arth.2002.29395 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-11-28 Created: 2007-11-28 Last updated: 2009-08-20
    3. Acetabular revision with extensive allograft impaction and uncemented hydroxyapatite-coated implants. Results after 9 (7-11) years follow-up
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acetabular revision with extensive allograft impaction and uncemented hydroxyapatite-coated implants. Results after 9 (7-11) years follow-up
    Show others...
    2007 (English)In: The Journal of Arthroplasty, ISSN 0883-5403, E-ISSN 1532-8406, Vol. 22, no 8, p. 1083-1091Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This is a clinical and radiographic review of 87 hips in 79 patients 9 (7-11) years after acetabular revision with extensive use of morselized allograft firmly impacted into localized defects as well as the entire acetabular cavity, followed by insertion of an uncemented hydroxyapatite-coated cup with supplementary screw fixation. The 9-year survival rate for the acetabular implant was 90.5% (95% CI, 83.4%-97.6%) with revision for any reason as end point and 94% (95% CI, 89%-99.1%) with revision for aseptic loosening as end point. Acetabular revision with massive allograft impaction and hydroxyapatite-coated implants show very promising results. The limited contact between implant and host bone does not seem to compromise implant survival in the 7- to 11-year perspective.

    Keywords
    acetabular, revision, allograft, impaction, hydroxyapatite coating, uncemented
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12810 (URN)10.1016/j.arth.2006.11.021 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-11-28 Created: 2007-11-28 Last updated: 2017-12-14
    4. No difference in migration or wear between cemented low-profile cups and standard cups. A randomized radiostereographic study of 53 patients over 3 years
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>No difference in migration or wear between cemented low-profile cups and standard cups. A randomized radiostereographic study of 53 patients over 3 years
    2007 (English)In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, Vol. 78, no 4, p. 479-484Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Minor design changes may cause major changes in implant performance. Thus, as part of a stepwise introduction of a new low-profile cup, we performed a randomized trial comparing it to a well-docu-mented standard cup.

    Patients and methods: 60 patients, stratified according to sex, weight, and age, underwent cemented total hip arthroplasty using a Lubinus SP2 stem with ceramic head and were randomized to either the new low-profile Lubinus Flanged Anti-Luxation cup (FAL) or the Lubinus Standard Eccentric cup (Standard). 7 patients were excluded and 53 (28 FAL) were evaluated at 3, 6, 12, and 36 months postoperatively. Primary outcome variables, cup migration (MTPM), and wear (total 3-dimensional femoral head penetration) were measured with radiostereometry (RSA). Clinical outcome was evaluated with the western Ontario and McMaster osteoarthritis index (Womac) and the visual analog pain score (VAS).

    Results: We found no difference in migration between the FAL and Standard cups. There was no difference in wear between the two cups and there was no correlation between wear and migration. 3 cups (2 FAL and 1 Standard) showed continuous migration of a magnitude that indicated an increased risk of early loosening. Clinical outcome was excellent, without any difference between the 2 groups.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12811 (URN)10.1080/17453670710014112 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-11-28 Created: 2007-11-28 Last updated: 2009-08-20
    5. Early radiolucent lines around cemented cups do not reliably predict increased migration as measured by radiostereometry
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Early radiolucent lines around cemented cups do not reliably predict increased migration as measured by radiostereometry
    2007 (English)Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12812 (URN)
    Available from: 2007-11-28 Created: 2007-11-28 Last updated: 2010-04-23
  • 214.
    Pasternak, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Towards surgical use of matrix metalloproteinase biology2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), such as collagenases, are a family of enzymes capable of degrading most constituents of the extracellular matrix. MMPs are thought to be involved in the aetiopathogenesis of tendon rupture. Additionally, failure of healing has in some instances been associated with elevated levels of MMPs. We have studied (a) the effects of the MMP-inhibitor doxycycline on healing of tendons and intestines in experimental models and (b) systemic levels of MMPs and their endogenous inhibitors (TIMPs) in patients with tendon rupture.

    In the first study, systemic doxycycline treatment lead to weakened rat Achilles tendons during healing after injury.

    Subsequently, systemic doxycycline was shown to improve biomechanical properties of tendon suture fixation in the rat Achilles tendon. Sutures were also coated with doxycycline, leading to similar improvement in mechanical strength of the suture construct during healing.

    In the third study, doxycycline-coated sutures improved the strength of healing intestinal anastomoses in an experimental model.

    Finally, we showed that patients with a history of Achilles tendon rupture had elevated levels of MMP-2, MMP-7 and TIMP-2 in serum. In addition, MMP-7 correlated inversely to mechanical strength of the tendon during healing.

    In conclusion, MMP-inhibitors can be administered systemically and locally to manipulate healing of tendons and intestines. Generalised alterations in the MMP-TIMP system may be involved in the pathogenesis of Achilles tendon rupture and associated with differences in outcome of healing.

    List of papers
    1. Doxycycline impairs tendon repair in rats
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Doxycycline impairs tendon repair in rats
    2006 (English)In: Acta Orthopaedica Belgica, ISSN 0001-6462, Vol. 72, no 6, p. 756-760Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Doxycycline exhibits various effects apart from its antimicrobial activity, such as inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). MMPs, mainly collagenases and gelatinases, are capable of degrading virtually all constituents of the extracellular matrix and are critical to connective tissue remodelling and healing. We therefore hypothesised that doxycycline would negatively influence the rat tendon healing process and impede tendon regeneration. The Achilles tendon of 60 Sprague Dawley rats was transected transversely. The animals were treated with doxycycline, 130 mg/kg body weight/day. The healing tendons were evaluated mechanically at 5, 8 and 14 days. Doxycycline significantly decreased force at failure (p < 0.005) and energy uptake (p < 0.001). Doxycycline serum concentration was 3.4 (SD 1.0) µg/ml. In conclusion, tendon healing can be affected by doxycycline at clinically relevant serum concentrations. This observation might be of relevance to further studies exploring effects of MMP-inhibitors on tendon tissue.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Bruxelles: Acta Medica Belgica, 2006
    Keywords
    tendon repair ; doxycycline ; matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13148 (URN)17260615 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2008-05-07 Created: 2008-05-07 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Doxycycline-coated sutures improve the suture-holding capacity of the rat Achilles tendon
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Doxycycline-coated sutures improve the suture-holding capacity of the rat Achilles tendon
    Show others...
    2007 (English)In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, Vol. 78, no 5, p. 680-686Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    There is evidence of high matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity around sutures inserted into tendons. This probably results in tissue breakdown, allowing the suture to cut through the tendon, and thus contributes to repair-site elongation and gap formation. We therefore hypothesized that treatment with the MMP inhibitor doxycycline would improve the sutureholding capacity of tendon. Animals, methods and results In the first sub-study, rats received a suture in the Achilles tendon. One group was treated with systemic doxycycline and the other received no treatment. At 3, 5, and 7 days, suture-holding capacity was measured mechanically. The pull-out force and energy were reduced in all tendons, at 3 days compared to freshly inserted sutures, but no further reduction was detected at later time points. Doxycycline- treated tendons showed improved suture-holding capacity as measured by higher energy uptake than in untreated tendons. Force at failure showed a trend towards improvement. The effect was most evident on day 3. In the second sub-study, sutures were coated with doxycycline. At 3 days, local doxycycline treatment caused improved suture-holding capacity—as measured by higher force at failure and higher energy uptake.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13149 (URN)10.1080/17453670710014392 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-05-07 Created: 2008-05-07 Last updated: 2009-08-20
    3. Doxycycline-coated sutures improve mechanical strength of intestinal anastomoses
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Doxycycline-coated sutures improve mechanical strength of intestinal anastomoses
    Show others...
    2008 (English)In: International Journal of Colorectal Disease, ISSN 0179-1958, E-ISSN 1432-1262, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 271-276Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims: After resection and repair of the intestines, tissue degradation leads to weakening of the repair site and a risk of postoperative leakage. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are thought to be responsible for collagenolysis in the direct vicinity of surgical sutures in many tissues. Several experimental studies show that MMP-inhibitors administered systemically alleviate postoperative weakening of intestinal anastomoses. We hypothesised that local delivery of MMP-inhibitors would achieve a similar effect.

    Methods: Implementing a novel method for the coating of biomaterials, we coated sutures with a crosslinked fibrinogen film and bound the MMP-inhibitor doxycycline into this film. The sutures were then used in a standard rat model for evaluating mechanical properties of colonic anastomoses 3 days after surgery.

    Results: The breaking strength of the anastomoses on the critical third day after operation was 17 % higher with doxycycline-coated sutures compared to controls (P=0.026). Energy uptake at failure was enhanced by 20 % (P=0.047).

    Conclusion: Drug delivery by means of MMP-inhibitor-coated sutures appears to improve tissue integrity during anastomotic repair and may reduce postoperative complications.

    Keywords
    colon, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), wound dehiscence, anastomotic leakage, suture
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-11695 (URN)10.1007/s00384-007-0401-0 (DOI)
    Note
    The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com: Björn Pasternak, Martin Rehn, Line Andersen, Magnus S. Ågren, Anne-Marie Heegaard, Pentti Tengvall and Per Aspenberg, Doxycycline-coated sutures improve mechanical strength of intestinal anastomoses, 2008, International Journal of Colorectal Disease, (23), 271-276 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00384-007-0401-0. Copyright: Springer, www.springerlink.comAvailable from: 2008-09-01 Created: 2008-09-01 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    4. Elevation of systemic matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -7 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 in patients with a history of Achilles tendon rupture
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Elevation of systemic matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -7 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 in patients with a history of Achilles tendon rupture
    2010 (English)In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 38, p. 308-317Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To compare serum levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) between patients with a history of Achilles tendon rupture and blood donor controls, and to relate MMPs and TIMPs to mechanical properties of the tendons during healing.

    Methods: More than three years after injury, we measured serum levels of MMP-1, -2, -3, -7, -8, -9 and -13 and TIMP-1 and -2 in eight patients who had suffered Achilles tendon rupture. Twelve blood donors served as controls. During the early phase of healing, the tendon modulus of elasticity was calculated from radiostereometric data and tendon cross-sectional area.

    Results: Patients with a history of Achilles tendon rupture had increased levels of MMP-2 (median difference (m.d.) 10 %; p = 0.01), MMP-7 (m.d. 15 %; p = 0.02) and TIMP-2 (m.d. 36%; p = 0.02), as compared to controls. Levels of MMP-7, measured three years after injury, correlated inversely to tendon modulus of elasticity (rs = -0.83; p = 0.02), and positively to tendon elongation (rs = 0.74; p = 0.05) during the early phase of healing. There was a trend towards positive correlation between MMP-7 and cross-sectional area during the early phase of healing (rs = 0.67; p = 0.08).

    Conclusions: Patients with a history of Achilles tendon rupture appear to have elevated levels of MMP-2, MMP-7 and TIMP-2 in serum. These pilot data support the view that the MMP-TIMP system is involved in tendinopathy and suggest that disturbances in proteolytic control might be generalised.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13151 (URN)10.1136/bjsm.2008.049411 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-05-07 Created: 2008-05-07 Last updated: 2017-12-13
  • 215.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Löfgren, Håkan
    Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
    Dedering, Asa
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Hedevik, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wibault, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Postoperative structured rehabilitation in patients undergoing surgery for cervical radiculopathy: a 2-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial2019In: Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, ISSN 1547-5654, E-ISSN 1547-5646, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 60-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE Information about postoperative rehabilitation for cervical radiculopathy (CR) is scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate the additional benefits of structured postoperative rehabilitation (SPT), which was performed in all patients, compared with a pragmatic standard postoperative approach (SA), in which rehabilitation was used as needed and patients sought physiotherapy on their own without a referral, in patients with MRI evidence of disc herniation and concomitant clinical signs who underwent surgery for CR. METHODS Patients (n = 202) were randomized to receive SPT or SA. Included key variables in the present study were primary and selected secondary outcomes of a prospective randomized controlled multicenter study. The main outcome was the Neck Disability Index (NDI) score. The NDI score, pain variables, self-efficacy, and health-related quality of life were investigated at baseline and 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. RESULTS SPT provided no additional benefits over SA (p = 0.08 to p = 0.99) at the postoperative 2-year follow-up. Both groups improved over time (p amp;lt; 0.0001), with no reported adverse effects. CONCLUSIONS One can conclude that SPT offered no additional benefits over SA; however, patients tolerated postoperative neck exercises without any negative side effects. These findings are important for the development of future active and neck-specific post-operative rehabilitation interventions for patients with CR.

  • 216.
    Peterzén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Management of patients treated with left ventricular assist devices: A clinical and experimental study2001Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis describes the management of patients treated with mechanical circulatory support devices for short- or long-term use. Twenty-four patients suffering from postcardiotomy heart failure were treated with a minimally invasive axial flow pump. The device was effective in unloading the failing left ventricle and in maintaining an adequate systemic circulation. The principles of perioperative monitoring, and pharmacological therapy are outlined. The pump was also used as an alternative to the heart-lung machine in conjunction with coronary artery bypass surgery. Together with a short-acting β-blocker, esmolol, the heart was decompressed and heart motion was reduced, facilitating bypass surgery on the beating heart. The anesthesiological considerations using this method are described.

    An implantable left ventricular assist device was used as a bridge to heart transplantation in 10 patients. We were interested in assessing the possibility to establish such a treatment program at a non-transplanting center. A multidisciplinary approach was enabled thanks to the organization of our Heart Center and due the close collaboration with our transplant center at Lund University. As one of the first centers in Europe, we established a well-functioning program with good results. Nine out of 10 of the bridge patients, with treatment times varying between 53 to 873 days, survived pump treatment and were eventually transplanted. The device proved to be powerful enough to support the failing heart and enable rehabilitation of the patients. Outpatient management became simpler when using the electrical device with belt-worn batteries. The uncertain durability and the high risk of device-related complications are shortcomings that limit its potential for more permanent treatment of heart failure.

    A new generation of small implantable axial blood flow pumps has therefore been developed. The principles of these pumps are based on the first generation axial flow pumps evaluated in this thesis. After several years of basic research and experimental studies, the first human implants have been performed. In the thesis, the hemodynamic effects of such a novel axial flow pump have been evaluated in an acute heart failure model. This technology holds great promise, both as a bridge to heart transplantation, and as a permanent circulatory support system.

    List of papers
    1. Postoperative management of patients with Hemopump support after coronary artery bypass grafting
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Postoperative management of patients with Hemopump support after coronary artery bypass grafting
    Show others...
    1996 (English)In: The Annals of thoracic surgery, ISSN 0003-4975, Vol. 62, no 2, p. 378-385Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    In this study, we describe postoperative monitoring, pharmacologic therapy, and hemodynamic responses in patients receiving Hemopump support after postcardiotomy heart failure.

    Methods

    The Hemopump was used in 24 patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction after coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Results

    Fourteen patients (58%) were weaned from the Hemopump. Low to moderate doses of a combination of catecholamines, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, vasodilators, and vasoconstrictors were required to optimize Hemopump function and left ventricular unloading. Mean arterial blood pressure, mixed venous oxygen saturation, and urinary output were the most important therapy guidelines.

    Conclusions

    Together with our clinical protocol, the Hemopump effectively unloaded the failing ventricle while maintaining vital-organ perfusion. Doses of vasoactive drugs could be kept low. This approach to treatment provides good conditions for recovery of the stunned myocardium.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13608 (URN)10.1016/0003-4975(96)00241-X (DOI)
    Available from: 2001-06-12 Created: 2001-06-12 Last updated: 2009-08-20
    2. Anesthetic management of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting with the use of an axial flow pump and a short-acting beta-blocker
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anesthetic management of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting with the use of an axial flow pump and a short-acting beta-blocker
    Show others...
    1999 (English)In: Journal of cardiothoracic and vascular anesthesia, ISSN 1053-0770, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 431-436Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To describe the clinical protocol regarding monitoring, pharmacologic interventions, and postoperative care during and after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) on the beating heart with an axial flow pump and a short-acting β-blocker.

    Design: A retrospective study.

    Setting: A university hospital.

    Participants: Seventeen patients scheduled for elective CABG.

    Interventions: Invasive monitoring was performed with either a standard pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) or a surgically placed PAC. An axial flow pump was inserted through a graft sutured to the ascending aorta. A short-acting β-blocker was administered to decrease the motion of the heart and make conditions for CABG adequate and safe.

    Measurements and main results: Compared with baseline measurements, there were significant decreases in mean arterial blood pressure, mixed venous oxygen saturation, and right ventricular ejection fraction during maximal axial flow pump support and β-blockade. No significant change in heart rate was observed at this time. Hemodynamic variables were normalized in the intensive care unit. All patients were separated from the Hemopump without inotropic support, and values of troponin-T, aspartate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase were low postoperatively. All patients survived and were discharged from the hospital.

    Conclusion: The anesthetic protocol for patients undergoing surgery with a beating heart and the combined use of an axial flow pump and a short-acting β-blocker is outlined. Multiple-vessel CABG on the beating heart was performed with maintenance of an acceptable hemodynamic situation.

    Keywords
    coronary artery bypass grafting, beating heart surgery, axial flow pump, β-blocker
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13609 (URN)10.1016/S1053-0770(99)90215-X (DOI)
    Available from: 2001-06-12 Created: 2001-06-12 Last updated: 2009-08-20
    3. Management of patients with end-stage heart disease treated with an implantable left ventricular assist device in a nontransplanting center
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Management of patients with end-stage heart disease treated with an implantable left ventricular assist device in a nontransplanting center
    Show others...
    2000 (English)In: Journal of cardiothoracic and vascular anesthesia, ISSN 1053-0770, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 438-443Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To describe the setup of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) program in a nontransplanting center.

    Design: A prospective study from February 1993 to June 1999.

    Setting: A university hospital.

    Participants: Ten patients, 6 men, with a mean age of 44 years (range 16 to 63 years) and with end-stage heart failure resulting from dilated cardiomyopathy (n = 7) or ischemic heart disease (n = 3).

    Interventions: The patients received the TCI (Thermo Cardiosystems Inc, Woburn, MA) Heart Mate implantable assist device. Five patients had a pneumatic device, and 5 had an electric device. All except 1 patient with an electric device had the pump for an extended period.

    Measurements and Main Results: Median time on the ventilator was 6.2 days, and median time in the ICU was 14 days. Significant hemodynamic improvement was observed by echocardiography and invasive monitoring. Milrinone and epinephrine supplemented by prostaglandin E1 were the most commonly used drugs to avoid right-sided heart failure. Nine patients were transplanted after pump therapy of 241 days (median) (range, 56 to 873 days). One patient died because of endovascular infection and septicemia. Infectious complications were frequent, especially when the pump time was extended.

    Conclusions: The introduction of an LVAD program in a nontransplanting center can be achieved with good results. Intense collaboration with a transplant center is mandatory. The complication rate increased when treatment times were extended.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13610 (URN)10.1053/jcan.2000.7943 (DOI)
    Available from: 2001-06-12 Created: 2001-06-12 Last updated: 2013-09-26
    4. Long-term follow-up of patients treated with an implantable left ventricular assist device as an extended bridge to heart transplantation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term follow-up of patients treated with an implantable left ventricular assist device as an extended bridge to heart transplantation
    Show others...
    2002 (English)In: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation, ISSN 1053-2498, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 604-607Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Four patients were given the TCI implantable left ventricular assist device as a bridge to heart transplantation. The median treatment time was 541 days (range 462 to 873 days), with a total of 2,417 treatment days. The patients were followed with exercise tests and echocardiography 3 to 18 months after implantation. An invasive method was used for quantification of inflow valve incompetence.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13611 (URN)10.1016/S1053-2498(01)00372-2 (DOI)
    Available from: 2001-06-12 Created: 2001-06-12 Last updated: 2009-08-20
    5. Hemodynamic Evaluation of the Jarvik 2000 Heart During Heart Failure
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hemodynamic Evaluation of the Jarvik 2000 Heart During Heart Failure
    Show others...
    2001 (English)In: ASAIO journal (1992), ISSN 1058-2916, E-ISSN 1538-943X, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 167-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The Jarvik 2000 Heart is an axial flow left ventricular assist system designed for long-term circulatory support. Purpose: To assess the level of hemodynamic support provided by the Jarvik 2000 in an animal model, with acute, severe heart failure. Methods: Heart failure (HF) was induced in 5 calves by progressively ligating the LAD coronary artery. A continuous infusion of esmolol hydrochloride was given to maintain the stability of HF. Compared to normal baseline values, during heart failure CI decreased by 33% (p < 0.02), LAP increased by 16% (p < 0.03), and BP decreased by 28% (p < 0.13). Once stable HF was established, the pump was turned on, and hemodynamic measurements were obtained at pump speed settings that ranged from 8,000 to 12,000 rpm. Results: Selected, mean hemodynamic values are presented in the table, CI, LAP, and BP improved significantly (p < 0.05) at pump speeds >9000 rpm. Pulse pressure (PP) narrowed by 64% (p < 0.009), and the PAP remained unchanged.

    Image Tools

    Blood flow in the femoral artery increased but was not statistically significant. Other hemodynamic parameters such as HR, SVR, PVR, and CVP did not change significantly. Conclusions: The Jarvik 2000 Heart can provide a level of cardiac output support that normalizes the CI and LAP, while maintaining some arterial pressure pulsatility during HF. Systemic perfusion is increased while the left heart is unloaded.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wolters Kluwer, 2001
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13612 (URN)
    Note

    The previous status of this article was Manuscript and the titel in manuskript form was Hemodynamic evaluation of the Jarvik 2000 Heart during heart failure in a calf model.

    ASAIO Cardiovascular Abstracts.

    Available from: 2001-06-12 Created: 2001-06-12 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
  • 217.
    Pham, Tuan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Karlsson, Matilda
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Andersson, Caroline M.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Mirdell, Robin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Automated VSS-based Burn Scar Assessment using Combined Texture and Color Features of Digital Images in Error-Correcting Output Coding2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 16744Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assessment of burn scars is an important study in both medical research and clinical settings because it can help determine response to burn treatment and plan optimal surgical procedures. Scar rating has been performed using both subjective observations and objective measuring devices. However, there is still a lack of consensus with respect to the accuracy, reproducibility, and feasibility of the current methods. Computerized scar assessment appears to have potential for meeting such requirements but has been rarely found in literature. In this paper an image analysis and pattern classifcation approach for automating burn scar rating based on the Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS) was developed. Using the image data of pediatric patients, a rating accuracy of 85% was obtained, while 92% and 98% were achieved for the tolerances of one VSS score and two VSS scores, respectively. The experimental results suggest that the proposed approach is very promising as a tool for clinical burn scar assessment that is reproducible and cost-efective.

  • 218.
    Pompermaier, Laura
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Outcome of burn care: the mortality perspective2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Despite the improvements in burn care during the last decades, burns remain catastrophic for the patients and a challenge for the care-givers.  The early outcome of burn care is to assess its quality and to improve it, but the crucial outcome is mortality, which is the main focus of this thesis. In particular, I address questions about mortality that have arisen from working with burned patients and that can have clinical consequences: the impact of pre- existing medical conditions; long-term survival; the causes of unexpected deaths; and the possible differences between sexes in the provision of resources.

    Patients with burns share the fact that the time of their injury is known, its severity can be quantified from the size of the burn, and the care is relatively standardised. The analysis of outcome among burned patients treated at a single burn centre may therefore be of general value to others who treat burns.

    Methods: We retrospectively analysed data that had been collected prospectively (the burn    unit database) from patients with burns admitted consecutively to a national burn centre in Sweden during the last 25 years.

    Results: Age and percentage of total body surface area burned (TBSA %) affected the in- hospital mortality, whereas pre-existing medical conditions did not influence the prediction of outcome (Paper I). After discharge, both age and the presence of full thickness burns reduced the long-term survival, whereas the extent of the burn (TBSA %) did not (Paper II). Most patients with moderate burns who die in hospital despite a good prognosis, die for reasons   other than the burn (Paper III). Previously, it has been shown that sex is not an independent factor for mortality during burn care; in this thesis we show that the sex of the patients did not affect the number of medical interventions given either (Paper IV).

    Conclusion: The addition of “coexisting condition” to a mortality model based on age and   size of burn does not improve its predictive value; rather, the factor “age” is sufficient to adjust for comorbidity in the assessment of a burn and its outcome (Paper I).

    If patients with burns survive, the long-term prognosis is good. The effect of age is the one that governs survival, whereas the effect of the extent of the burn ends when the patient is discharged (Paper II).

    The in-hospital mortality during burn care is low, but some patients die for reasons other than the actual burn (Paper III).

    In a centre where the mortality is independent of the sex of the patient, the provision of medical interventions is also equal between men and women (Paper IV).

    List of papers
    1. Inclusion of coexisting morbidity in a TBSA% and age based model for the prediction of mortality after burns does not increase its predictive power
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inclusion of coexisting morbidity in a TBSA% and age based model for the prediction of mortality after burns does not increase its predictive power
    2015 (English)In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 41, no 8, p. 1868-1876Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Several models for predicting mortality have been developed for patients with burns, and the most commonly used are based on age and total body surface area (TBSA%). They often show good predictive precision as depicted by high values for area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC). However the effect of coexisting morbidity on such prediction models has not to our knowledge been thoroughly examined. We hypothesised that adding it to a previously published model (based on age, TBSA%, full thickness burns, gender, and need for mechanical ventilation) would further improve its predictive power. Methods: We studied 772 patients admitted during the period 1997-2008 to the Linkoping University Hospital, National Burn Centre with any type of burns. We defined coexisting morbidity as any of the medical conditions listed in the Charlson list, as well as psychiatric disorders or drug or alcohol misuse. We added coexisting medical conditions to the model for predicting mortality (age, TBSA%, and need for mechanical ventilation) to determine whether it improved the model as assessed by changes in deviances between the models. Results: Mean (SD) age and TBSA% was 35 (26) years and 13 (17) %, respectively. Among 725 patients who survived, 105 (14%) had one or more coexisting condition, compared with 28 (60%) among those 47 who died. The presence of coexisting conditions increased with age (p &lt; 0.001) among patients with burns. The AUC of the mortality prediction model in this study, based on the variables age, TBSA%, and need for mechanical ventilation was 0.980 (n = 772); after inclusion of coexisting morbidity in the model, the AUC improved only marginally, to 0.986. The model was not significantly better either. Conclusion: Adding coexisting morbidity to a model for prediction of mortality after a burn based on age, TBSA%, and the need for mechanical ventilation did not significantly improve its predictive value. This is probably because coexisting morbidity is automatically adjusted for by age in the original model. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2015
    Keywords
    Burns; Comorbidity; Mortality; Prediction model
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124131 (URN)10.1016/j.burns.2015.09.017 (DOI)000367127700031 ()26507519 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2016-01-22 Created: 2016-01-19 Last updated: 2017-11-30
    2. Long-term survival after burns in a Swedish population
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term survival after burns in a Swedish population
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 157-161Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: As widely reported, the progress in burn care during recent decades has reduced the hospital mortality. The effect of the burns on long-term outcome has not received so much attention, and more study is indicated. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the long-time survival among patients who had been treated for burns.

    METHODS: We studied 1487 patients who were discharged alive from the Linköping University Hospital Burn Centre during the period 1993 until the end of December 2012. We used Cox's regression analysis to study the effect of burns on long-term survival after adjustment for different factors.

    RESULTS: Age and a full-thickness burn were significantly associated with mortality after discharge (p<0.001), whereas percentage of total body surface area burned (TBSA %), need for mechanical ventilation, and gender were not. Less than 1% of the patients with burns (13/1487) died within 30 days of discharge and a total of 176/1487 (12%) died during follow-up.

    CONCLUSION: Age and full-thickness burns reduce the long-time survival after discharge from the Burn Centre, whereas the effect of TBSA% and need for artificial ventilation ends with discharge.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2017
    Keywords
    Burns, Outcome, Long-term survival, Mortality
    National Category
    Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-131478 (URN)10.1016/j.burns.2016.07.018 (DOI)000392476000022 ()27613474 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery Linkoping University Hospital; Region of Ostergotland; Linkoping University, Linkoping, Sweden

    Available from: 2016-09-22 Created: 2016-09-22 Last updated: 2017-11-09Bibliographically approved
    3. Burned patients who die from causes other than the burn affect the model used to predict mortality: a national exploratory study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Burned patients who die from causes other than the burn affect the model used to predict mortality: a national exploratory study
    Show others...
    2018 (English)In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 280-287Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: The Baux score - the sum of age and total body surface area burned (TBSA %) - is a good predictor of mortality has a high specificity but low sensitivity. Our aim was to examine the causes of death in patients who die with Baux scores of <100, which may explain the lower sensitivity and possibly affect the prediction of mortality.

    METHODS: All patients admitted to our centre for burn care from 1993 to 2015 (n=1946) were included in this retrospective, descriptive, exploratory study. The study group comprised those patients who died with Baux scores of <100 (n=23), and their medical charts were examined for the cause of death and for coexisting diseases.

    RESULTS: Crude mortality was 5% (93/1946) for the overall cohort, and a quarter of the patients who died (23/93) had Baux scores of less than 100 (range 64-99). In this latter group, flame burns were the most common (18/23), the median (10th-90th centile) age was 70 (46-86) years and for TBSA 21 (5.0-40.5) %, of which 7 (0-27.0) % of the area was full thickness. The main causes of death in 17 of the 23 were classified as "other than burn", being cerebral disease (n=9), cardiovascular disease (n=6), and respiratory failure (n=2). Among the remaining six (burn-related) deaths, multiple organ failure (predominantly renal failure) was responsible. When we excluded the cases in which the cause of death was not related to the burn, the Baux mortality prediction value improved (receiver operating characteristics area under the curve, AUC) from 0.9733 (95% CI 0.9633-0.9834) to 0.9888 (95% CI 0.9839-0.9936) and the sensitivity estimate increased from 45.2% to 53.9%.

    CONCLUSION: Patients with burns who died with a Baux score <100 were a quarter of all the patients who died. An important finding is that most of these deaths were caused by reasons other than the burn, usually cerebrovascular disease. This may be the explanation why the sensitivity of the Baux score is low, as factors other than age and TBSA % explain the fatal outcome.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2018
    Keywords
    Baux score, Burns, Cause of death, Mortality
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-142898 (URN)10.1016/j.burns.2017.07.014 (DOI)000427535000006 ()28830698 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85027674409 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: Burn Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery, and Burns, Region Ostergotland; Linkoping University, Linkoping, Sweden

    Available from: 2017-11-09 Created: 2017-11-09 Last updated: 2019-04-12Bibliographically approved
  • 219.
    Pompermaier, Laura
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Department of Surgery, Plastic Surgery Unit, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Are there any differences in the provided burn care between men and women? A retrospective study2018In: Burns & Trauma, E-ISSN 2321-3876, Vol. 6, article id 22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Disparity between medical treatment for men and women has been recorded worldwide. However, it is difficult to find out if the disparities in both the use of resources and outcome depend entirely on sex-related discrimination. Our aim was to investigate if there are differences in burn treatments between the sexes.

    Methods

    All patients admitted with burns to Linköping University Hospital during the 16-year period 2000–2015 were included. Interventions were prospectively recorded using the validated Burn SCoring system (BSC). Data were analysed using a multivariable panel regression model adjusted for age, percentage total body surface area (%TBSA), and in-hospital mortality.

    Results

    A total of 1363 patients were included, who generated a total of 22,301 daily recordings while they were inpatients. Males were 70% (930/1363). Sex was not an independent factor for daily scores after adjustment for age, %TBSA, and mortality in hospital (model R2=0.60, p < 0.001).

    Conclusion

    We found no evidence of inequity between the sexes in treatments given in our burn centre when we had adjusted for size of burn, age, and mortality. BSC seems to be an appropriate model in which to evaluate sex-related differences in the delivery of treatments.

  • 220.
    Quinkler, Marcus
    et al.
    Endocrinol Charlottenburg, Germany.
    Ekman, Bertil
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Marelli, Claudio
    Shire Int GmbH, Switzerland.
    Uddin, Sharif
    Shire, MA USA.
    Zelissen, Pierre
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Murray, Robert D.
    Leeds Teaching Hospital NHS Trust, England.
    Prednisolone is associated with a worse lipid profile than hydrocortisone in patients with adrenal insufficiency2017In: Endocrine Connections, ISSN 2049-3614, E-ISSN 2049-3614, Vol. 6, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Prednisolone is used as glucocorticoid replacement therapy for adrenal insufficiency (AI). Recent data indicate that its use in AI is associated with low bone mineral density. Data on risk factors for cardiovascular disease in patients with AI treated with prednisolone are scarce, despite this condition being the predominant cause of excess mortality. We aimed to address this question using real-world data from the European Adrenal Insufficiency Registry (EU-AIR). Design/methods: EU-AIR, comprising of 19 centres across Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden and the UK, commenced enrolling patients with AI in August 2012. Patients receiving prednisolone (3-6 mg/day, n = 50) or hydrocortisone (15-30 mg/day, n = 909) were identified and grouped at a ratio of 1: 3 (prednisolone: hydrocortisone) by matching for gender, age, duration and type of disease. Data from baseline and follow-up visits were analysed. Data from patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia were excluded. Results: Significantly higher mean +/- s. d. total (6.3 +/- 1.6 vs 5.4 +/- 1.1 mmol/L; P = 0.003) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels (3.9 +/- 1.4 vs 3.2 +/- 1.0 mmol/L; P = 0.013) were identified in 47 patients on prednisolone vs 141 receiving hydrocortisone at baseline and at follow-up (P = 0.005 and P = 0.006, respectively). HbA1c, high-density lipoprotein and triglyceride levels, body mass index, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and waist circumference were not significantly different. Conclusions: This is the first matched analysis of its kind. Significantly higher LDL levels in patients receiving prednisolone relative to hydrocortisone could predict a higher relative risk of cardiovascular disease in the former group.

  • 221.
    Rakar, Jonathan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sommar, Pehr
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lönnqvist, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johnson, Hans
    Department of Surgery, Section of Plastic Surgery and Burn Centre, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Junker, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kratz, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Evaluating Multi-Lineage Induction of Human Dermal FibroblastsUsing Gene Expression AnalysisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    During the past decades, several adult stem cell populations from a range of tissues have been characterized. Since principally all human cells contain the same genetic material, the specific gene expression profile determines the cell phenotype. The notion of terminally differentiated somatic cells being necessarily restricted to one phenotype has been challenged, and instead an inherent range of plasticity for any given cell type has been suggested. We have in previous work shown that normal human dermal fibroblasts have an inherent plasticity and can be induced to differentiate towards adipogenic, chondrogenic, endotheliogenic and osteogenic lineages when subjected to defined induction media. The aim of the present study was to further study the differentiation of human dermal fibroblasts on a gene expression level. This was achieved by employing genome wide expression analysis using microarray technology. Selected gene expression was also evaluated over time using real-time PCR. Several master regulatory genes important for lineage commitment, as well as phenotypically relevant genes, were found regulated in the respective induced cultures. The results obtained in this study strengthen previously published results showing an inherent ability for controllable phenotype alteration of human dermal fibroblasts in vitro. We conclude that adipogenic, chondrogenic, endotheliogenic and osteogenic induction results in novel phenotypes that show a genetic readiness for lineage-specific biological functionality.

  • 222.
    Ramirez Sepulveda, Jorge I.
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Kvarnstrom, Marika
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Mandl, Thomas
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Braekke Norheim, Katrine
    Stavanger University Hospital, Norway.
    Joar Johnsen, Svein
    Stavanger University Hospital, Norway.
    Hammenfors, Daniel
    University of Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Jonsson, Malin V.
    University of Bergen, Norway; University of Bergen, Norway.
    Skarstein, Kathrine
    University of Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Brun, Johan G.
    University of Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Ronnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Forsblad-dElia, Helena
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Magnusson Bucher, Sara
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Baecklund, Eva
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Theander, Elke
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Omdal, Roald
    Stavanger University Hospital, Norway.
    Jonsson, Roland
    University of Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Nordmark, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Wahren-Herlenius, Marie
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Long-term follow-up in primary Sjogrens syndrome reveals differences in clinical presentation between female and male patients2017In: Biology of Sex Differences, ISSN 2042-6410, Vol. 8, article id 25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Despite men being less prone to develop autoimmune diseases, male sex has been associated with a more severe disease course in several systemic autoimmune diseases. In the present study, we aimed to investigate differences in the clinical presentation of primary Sjogrens syndrome (pSS) between the sexes and establish whether male sex is associated with a more severe form of long-term pSS. Methods: Our study population included 967 patients with pSS (899 females and 68 males) from Scandinavian clinical centers. The mean follow-up time (years) was 8.8 +/- 7.6 for women and 8.5 +/- 6.2 for men (ns). Clinical data including serological and hematological parameters and glandular and extraglandular manifestations were compared between men and women. Results: Male patient serology was characterized by more frequent positivity for anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB (p = 0. 02), and ANA (p = 0.02). Further, men with pSS were more frequently diagnosed with interstitial lung disease (p = 0. 008), lymphadenopathy (p = 0.04) and lymphoma (p = 0.007). Conversely, concomitant hypothyroidism was more common among female patients (p = 0.009). Conclusions: We observe enhanced serological responses and higher frequencies of lymphoma-related extraglandular manifestations in men with pSS. Notably, lymphoma itself was also significantly more common in men. These observations may reflect an aggravated immune activation and a more severe pathophysiological state in male patients with pSS and indicate a personalized managing of the disease due to the influence of the sex of patients with pSS.

  • 223.
    Ranebo, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Kalmar Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Björnsson Hallgren, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Patients with a long-standing cuff tear in one shoulder have high rates of contralateral cuff tears: a study of patients with arthroscopically verified cuff tears 22 years ago2018In: Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery, ISSN 1058-2746, E-ISSN 1532-6500, Vol. 27, no 3, p. E68-E74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The prevalence of contralateral full-thickness cuff tears (FTTs) and cuff tear arthropathy (CTA) is presumed to be higher in patients with long-standing cuff tears than in those with newly diagnosed tears, but data are currently lacking. Methods: Sixty-one patients with 38 partial and 23 full-thickness tears of 1 shoulder at arthroscopy were examined with bilateral radiographs, ultrasound, and the Constant-Murley score at a mean of 22 years (range, 21-25 years) after arthroscopy. Results: The overall rate of full-thickness tears in the contralateral shoulder was 50.8%. In patients with a full-thickness tear and CTA (Hamada grade amp;gt;= 2) in the index shoulder at follow-up, 18 of 20 (90%) had a contralateral full-thickness tear and 4 of 20 (20%) had CTA. In patients with a partial tear in the index shoulder at follow-up, 3 of 22 (13.6%) had a contralateral full-thickness tear and none had CTA. CTA changes were more common in patients with FTT and a previous acromioplasty (P amp;lt; .001). The correlation between shoulders was 0.72 for the number of tendons with FTT (P amp;lt; .001), 0.31 for the Hamada grade (P = .016), and 0.65 for the absolute Constant-Murley score (P amp;lt; .001). The number of tendons with a full-thickness tear at follow-up was a risk factor (odds ratio, 3.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.67-6.44; P amp;lt; .001) for a contralateral full-thickness tear. Patients with a partial or full-thickness tear in the contra-lateral shoulder had pain in 39.2% of cases. Conclusion: Patients with long-standing cuff tears have high rates of contralateral cuff tears. The severity of the condition is strongly correlated between the shoulders. Patients with full-thickness tears and a previous acromioplasty have a significantly higher frequency of CTA than patients with cuff tears who had not undergone a previous acromioplasty. (C) 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. All rights reserved.

  • 224.
    Ranebo, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden.
    Björnsson Hallgren, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Norlin, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Clinical and structural outcome 22 years after acromioplasty without tendon repair in patients with subacromial pain and cuff tears2017In: Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery, ISSN 1058-2746, E-ISSN 1532-6500, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 1262-1270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Long-term results regarding tear progression, arthropathy, and clinical scores of unrepaired rotator cuff tears are largely unknown. This study investigated whether the condition of the glenohumeral joint and rotator cuff had deteriorated at a minimum of 20 years after an acromioplasty without cuff repair and assessed the clinical results. Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted of a consecutive series of patients treated between 1989 and 1993 with acromioplasty without cuff repair due to subacromial pain and cuff tear. At follow-up results of x-ray, ultrasonography, and clinical scores were recorded. Results: At a mean of 22 years (range, 21-25 years), 69 patients were available for follow-up with Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index, Constant-Murley (CM) score, x-ray, and ultrasonography. Mean age at operation was 49 years (range, 19-69 years). There were 45 partial-thickness tears (PTT) and 24 full-thickness tears (FTT). Of 23 patients with FTT, 17 (74% with x-ray) had developed cuff tear arthropathy (Hamada amp;gt;= 2) and 20 (87% with ultrasonography) had progressed in tear size. Mean relative CM in patients with FTT and cuff tear arthropathy was 62 (standard deviation [SD], 27), and the mean WORC was 58% (SD, 26%). In the 43 PTT patients, 3 (7% with x-ray) had developed cuff tear arthropathy and 16 (42% with ultrasonography) had tear progression. With PTT at follow-up, the mean relative CM was 101 (SD, 22), and the mean WORC was 81% (SD, 20%). Conclusions: After an acromioplasty, most unrepaired full-thickness tears will, in long-term, increase in size and be accompanied by cuff tear arthropathy changes. Most partial thickness tears remain unchanged; cuff tear arthropathy is rare, and clinical scores generally good. (C) 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. All rights reserved.

  • 225.
    Ranebo, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Kalmar Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Björnsson Hallgren, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Norlin, Rolf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Long-term clinical and radiographic outcome of rotator cuff repair with a synthetic interposition graft: a consecutive case series with 17 to 20 years of follow-up2018In: Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery, ISSN 1058-2746, E-ISSN 1532-6500, Vol. 27, no 9, p. 1622-1628Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Treatment options for irreparable cuff tears include synthetic interposition grafts, but whether such grafts can maintain acceptable shoulder function and prevent cuff tear arthropathy in the long-term is unknown.

    Method

    This was a retrospective case series of 13 consecutive patients treated with a synthetic interposition graft made of Dacron (DuPont, Wilmington, DE, USA). Patients were examined with bilateral ultrasonography, bilateral x-ray imaging, Constant-Murley score, and Western Ontario Rotator Cuff score.

    Results

    After a mean of 18 years (range, 17-20 years), 1 patient had died, and 12 were available for x-ray imaging and 10 also for ultrasonography and clinical scores. Cuff tear arthropathy (Hamada grade ≥2) had developed in 9 of 12 (75%; 95% confidence interval, 43%-95%), including 3 patients operated on with arthroplastyin the follow-up period. The mean absolute Constant-Murley score was 46 (standard deviation, 26), and the mean Western Ontario Rotator Cuff score was 59 (standard deviation, 20). In 7 of 10 patients (70%) with available ultrasonography, the graft was interpreted as not intact. All patients had a contralateral full-thickness tear, and 7 of 12 patients (58 %; 95% confidence interval, 28%-85%) had contralateral cuff tear arthropathy. The number of patients with cuff tear arthropathy was not significantly different between the shoulder repaired with a Dacron graft and the contralateral shoulder (P = .667).

    Conclusion

    These results indicate that a synthetic interposition graft with screw fixation could not prevent cuff tear arthropathy and preserve cuff integrity in a long-term perspective.

  • 226.
    Rautio, Jorma
    et al.
    Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Andersen, Mikael
    University of Copenhagen Hospital, Denmark.
    Bolund, Stig
    University of Copenhagen Hospital, Denmark.
    Hukki, Jyri
    Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Vindenes, Hallvard
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Davenport, Peter
    Royal Manchester Childrens Hospital, England.
    Arctander, Kjartan
    Rikshosp Oslo, Norway.
    Larson, Ola
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Berggren, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Abyholm, Frank
    Rikshosp Oslo, Norway.
    Whitby, David
    Royal Manchester Childrens Hospital, England.
    Leonard, Alan
    Royal Hospital Sick Children, North Ireland.
    Lilja, Jan
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Neovius, Erik
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Elander, Anna
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Heliovaara, Arja
    Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Eyres, Phil
    University of Manchester, England.
    Semb, Gunvor
    University of Manchester, England; National Hospital Norway, Norway.
    Scandcleft randomised trials of primary surgery for unilateral cleft lip and palate: 2. Surgical results2017In: Journal of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, ISSN 2000-656X, E-ISSN 2000-6764, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 14-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Longstanding uncertainty surrounds the selection of surgical protocols for unilateral cleft lip and palate, and randomised trials have only rarely been performed. The Scandcleft Project consists of three trials commenced in 1997 involving ten centres in Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden, and the UK. Three groups of centres tested a newly-defined common technique for palatal repair (Arm A) against their local protocols (Arms B, C, D). Arm A was familiar to most of the surgeons in Trial 1, but not to the surgeons in the other Trials. Aim: To evaluate surgical events and complications of the 448 (293 boys, 155 girls) patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) enrolled in the three trials. Method: The three trials were carried out in parallel in adherence with a fully developed, ethically approved protocol. Operative time, bleeding, complications, and major dehiscence during and after both primary surgeries were recorded by the surgeon. Rates of fistula and surgery for velopharyngeal incompetence (VPI) were assessed until the youngest patient of the study had reached the age of 9 years. Pearson Chi-square statistical analysis was used to compare the outcomes. Results: No significant differences in bleeding, infection, anaesthetic complications or length of hospital stay between the different arms were found for Trial 1. However, in Trials 2 and 3 there were more airway problems in Arm A than with the traditional local protocols (Arms C or D). In Trial 3 fistula and VPI surgery rates were also higher in Arm A. Conclusions: The results do not provide statistical evidence that any technique is better than others, but indicate that surgery was more problematic for surgeons who were still gaining experience with an unfamiliar surgical protocol.

  • 227.
    Relbo Authen, Anne
    et al.
    National Hospital Norway, Norway.
    Grov, Ingelin
    National Hospital Norway, Norway.
    Karason, Kristjan
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Finn
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Eiskjaer, Hans
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Rådegran, Göran
    Lund University, Sweden;.
    Gude, Einar
    National Hospital Norway, Norway.
    Jansson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Dellgren, Göran
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Solbu, Dag
    Novartis Norge AS, Norway.
    Arora, Satish
    National Hospital Norway, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Andreassen, Arne K.
    National Hospital Norway, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Gullestad, Lars
    National Hospital Norway, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Effect of everolimus vs calcineurin inhibitors on quality of life in heart transplant recipients during a 3-year follow-up: Results of a randomized controlled trial (SCHEDULE)2017In: Clinical Transplantation, ISSN 0902-0063, E-ISSN 1399-0012, Vol. 31, no 9, article id e13038Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Scandinavian heart transplant everolimus de novo study with early calcineurin inhibitors avoidance (SCHEDULE) trial was a 12month, randomized, open-label, parallel-group trial that compared everolimus (EVR; n=56) to conventional CsA (n=59) immunosuppression. Previously, we reported that EVR outperformed CsA in improving renal function and coronary artery vasculopathy, despite a higher rejection rate with EVR. This study aimed to compare the effects of these treatments on quality of life (QoL). Within five post-operative days, patients (mean age 50 +/- 13years, 27% women) were randomized to EVR or a standard CsA dosage (CsA group). This study assessed quality of life (QoL), based on the Short Form-36, EuroQol-5D, and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Assessments were performed pre-HTx and 12 and 36months post-HTx. At 12 and 36months, the groups showed similar improvements in Short Form-36 measures (at pre-HTx, 12 and 36months the values were as follows: Physical component summary: EVR: 31.5 +/- 110.9, 49.1 +/- 9.7, and 47.9 +/- 10.6; Pamp;lt;.01; CsA: 32.5 +/- 8.2, 48.4 +/- 8.5, and 46.5 +/- 11.5; Pamp;lt;.01; mental component summary: EVR: 46.0 +/- 12.0, 51.7 +/- 11.9, and 52.1 +/- 13.0; Pamp;lt;.01; CsA: 38.2 +/- 12.5, 53.4 +/- 7.1, and 54.3 +/- 13.0; Pamp;lt;.01); similar decrease in mean BDI (EVR: 10.9 +/- 10.2, 5.4 +/- 4.7, and 8.1 +/- 9.0; Pamp;lt;.01; CsA: 11.8 +/- 7.1, 6.3 +/- 5.4, and 6.2 +/- 6.5; Pamp;lt;.01); and similar Euro Qol-improvements. Thus, in this small-sized study, EVR-based and conventional CsA immunosuppressive strategies produced similar QoL improvements.

  • 228.
    Richter, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fluorescence Guided Resection of Brain Tumors: Evaluation of a Hand-held Spectroscopic Probe2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Malignant gliomas grow infiltrative in the brain and can therefore not be completely removed by neurosurgical means. However, for an optimized oncological treatment it has proven useful to resect as much as possible of tumor. The identification of the tumor in the marginal zone is difficult but crucial. Studies have shown that visualization of the specific enhancement of 5-aminolevulinic acid(5-ALA) in the tumor can help to maximize the resection. The Department of Biomedical Engineering, Linköping University, has developed an optical hand-held probe (HHP) to identify tumor tissue with a high sensitivity by means of fluorescence spectroscopy.

    The technical design and the optical properties of the probe were gradually developed in a standard neurosurgical setting during resection of malignant gliomas. The device could easily be implemented in the operating room, meeting all requirements in terms of sterile handling and without interference of any kind with other equipment. The integration of the device in a navigation system and its use in combination with a blue light surgical microscope were simple. Measurements in 27 operations during resection of malignant gliomas were compared to results from biopsies from the same tumor locations. The equipment was tested as a stand-alone device (n = 180), integrated in a navigation system or in combination with the blue light microscope (n = 190). A ratiocal culated from the measurements enabled objective and comparable values for different tissue types, in correspondence with the findings from the histopathological examinations and in accordance with the navigation system as well as with the surgical microscope.The marginal zone was explored and tumor fluorescence could be identified beyond the fluorescence as seen through the microscope. A higher sensitivity of the HHP was confirmed; the specificity was lower.

    The combined use of the HHP with a navigation system and with asurgical microscope was beneficial.

    List of papers
    1. Evaluation of a Fiber-Optic Fluorescence Spectroscopy System to Assist Neurosurgical Tumor Resections
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of a Fiber-Optic Fluorescence Spectroscopy System to Assist Neurosurgical Tumor Resections
    Show others...
    2007 (English)In: Novel Optical Instrumentation for Biomedical Applications III (Proceedings Volume) / [ed] Christian D. Depeursinge, Bellingham, Washington, USA: SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2007, Vol. 6631, p. 66310W-1-66310W-8Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The highly malignant brain tumor, glioblastoma multiforme, is difficult to totally resect without aid due to its infiltrative way of growing and its morphological similarities to surrounding functioning brain under direct vision in the operating field. The need for an inexpensive and robust real-time visualizing system for resection guiding in neurosurgery has been formulated by research groups all over the world. The main goal is to develop a system that helps the neurosurgeon to make decisions during the surgical procedure. A compact fiber optic system using fluorescence spectroscopy has been developed for guiding neurosurgical resections. The system is based on a high power light emitting diode at 395 nm and a spectrometer. A fiber bundle arrangement is used to guide the excitation light and fluorescence light between the instrument and the tissue target. The system is controlled through a computer interface and software package especially developed for the application. This robust and simple instrument has been evaluated in vivo both on healthy skin but also during a neurosurgical resection procedure. Before surgery the patient received orally a low dose of 5-aminolevulinic acid, converted to the fluorescence tumor marker protoporphyrin IX in the malignant cells. Preliminary results indicate that PpIX fluorescence and brain tissue autofluorescence can be recorded with the help of the developed system intraoperatively during resection of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Bellingham, Washington, USA: SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2007
    Series
    Proceedings of SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, ISSN 0277-786X ; Vol. 6631
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-38407 (URN)10.1117/12.728546 (DOI)44225 (Local ID)9780819467751 (ISBN)44225 (Archive number)44225 (OAI)
    Conference
    Novel optical instrumentation for biomedical applications III : 17-19 June 2007, Munich, Germany
    Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
    2. Optical Touch Pointer for Fluorescence Guided Glioblastoma Resection Using 5-Aminolevulinic Acid
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Optical Touch Pointer for Fluorescence Guided Glioblastoma Resection Using 5-Aminolevulinic Acid
    2010 (English)In: Lasers in Surgery and Medicine, ISSN 0196-8092, E-ISSN 1096-9101, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 9-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Objective

    Total tumor resection in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is difficult to achieve due to the tumor's infiltrative way of growing and morphological similarity to the surrounding functioning brain tissue. The diagnosis is usually subjectively performed using a surgical microscope. The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate a hand-held optical touch pointer using a fluorescence spectroscopy system to quantitatively distinguish healthy from malignant brain tissue intraoperatively.

    Study Design/Materials and Methods

    A fluorescence spectroscopy system with pulsed modulation was designed considering optimum energy delivery to the tissue, minimal photobleaching of PpIX and omission of the ambient light background in the operating room (OR). 5-Aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) of 5 mg/kg body weight was given to the patients with a presumed GBM prior to surgery. During the surgery a laser pulse at 405 nm was delivered to the tissue. PpIX in glioblastoma tumor cells assigned with peaks at 635 and 704 nm was detected using a fiber optical probe.

    Results/Conclusion

    By using the pulsed fluorescence spectroscopy, PpIX fluorescence is quantitatively detected in the GBM. An effective suppression of low power lamp background from the recorded spectra in addition to a significant reduction of high power surgical lights is achieved.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell, 2010
    Keywords
    background light suppression • fluorescence spectroscopy • glioblastoma multiforme • intraoperative
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-53946 (URN)10.1002/lsm.20868 (DOI)
    Available from: 2010-02-15 Created: 2010-02-15 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
    3. Fluorescence Spectroscopy Measurements in Ultrasonic Navigated Resection of Malignant Brain Tumors
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fluorescence Spectroscopy Measurements in Ultrasonic Navigated Resection of Malignant Brain Tumors
    2011 (English)In: Lasers in Surgery and Medicine, ISSN 0196-8092, E-ISSN 1096-9101, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 8-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Objective: Glioblastoma multiforme is a highly malignant primary brain tumor. It has no border but at best a marginal zone, however, invisible to the surgeon. An optical touch pointer (OTP) enabling differentiation of healthy and tumor tissue by means of fiber-optic fluorescence spectroscopy has been developed. In combination with an ultrasonic navigation system, the OTP may be used for demarcation of resectable tumor tissue. The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical performance of OTP during surgery of malignant brain tumors. 

    Study Design/Materials and Methods: Nine patients were operated on with the standard surgical procedure, including white light microscopy and navigation. A total of 5 mg/kg bodyweight of 5-amino-levulin acid was orally administrated before surgery. The OTP was calibrated into the ultrasound-based navigation system and measurements were performed in tumor core and along the tumor border. The ratio between the protoporphyrin IX fluorescence at 635 nm and the autofluorescence was used for quantifications of data. Biopsies (n =20), ultrasound images (n = 30), and visual inspection (n =180) were compared to the fluorescence ratio. 

    Results/Conclusion : Healthy and tumor tissue could be identified and differentiated with the OTP(P < 0.001). The fluorescence ratio in average was 0 outside the tumor and low in the gliotic edema zone around the tumor. It increased in the marginal zone and was highest in the solid tumor tissue. In the necrotic tissue, in the center of the tumor, the ratio in average was 0. The OTP can be used in combination with ultrasound-based navigation and may help to determine whether to resect otherwise not identifiable tissue.

    Keywords
    5-amino-levulin acid (5-ALA);fluorescence-guided resection (FGR);glioblastoma multiforme;optical touch pointer (OTP);protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence;ultrasound navigation
    National Category
    Medical Laboratory and Measurements Technologies
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-64689 (URN)10.1002/lsm.21022 (DOI)000286440300002 ()
    Available from: 2011-02-01 Created: 2011-02-01 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
    4. Combination of Hand-Held Probe and Microscopy for Fluorescence Guided Surgery in the Brain Tumor Marginal Zone
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Combination of Hand-Held Probe and Microscopy for Fluorescence Guided Surgery in the Brain Tumor Marginal Zone
    2017 (English)In: Photodiagnosis and Photodynamic Therapy, ISSN 1572-1000, Vol. 18, p. 185-192Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Visualization of the tumor is crucial for differentiating malignant tissue from healthy brain during surgery, especially in the tumor marginal zone. The aim of the study was to introduce a fluorescence spectroscopy-based hand-held probe (HHF-probe) for tumor identification in combination with the fluorescence guided resection surgical microscope (FGR-microscope), and evaluate them in terms of diagnostic performance and practical aspects of fluorescence detection.

    Material and Methods

    Eighteen operations were performed on 16 patients with suspected high-grade glioma. The HHF-probe and the FGR-microscope were used for detection of protoporphyrin (PpIX) fluorescence induced by 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) and evaluated against histopathological analysis and visual grading done through the FGR-microscope by the surgeon. A ratio of PpIX fluorescence intensity to the autofluorescence intensity (fluorescence ratio) was used to quantify the spectra detected by the probe.

    Results

    Fluorescence ratio medians (range 0 – 40) measured by the probe were related to the intensity of the fluorescence in the FGR-microscope, categorized as “none” (0.3, n = 131), “weak” (1.6, n = 34) and “strong” (5.4, n = 28). Of 131 “none” points in the FGR-microscope, 88 (67%) exhibited fluorescence with the HHF-probe. For the tumor marginal zone, the area under the receiver operator characteristics (ROC) curve was 0.49 for the FGR-microscope and 0.65 for the HHF-probe.

    Conclusions

    The probe was integrated in the established routine of tumor resection using the FGR-microscope. The HHF-probe was superior to the FGR-microscope in sensitivity; it detected tumor remnants after debulking under the FGR-microscope. The combination of the HHF-probe and the FGR-microscope was beneficial especially in the tumor marginal zone.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2017
    Keywords
    High-grade glioma, Fluorescence guided resection (FGR), 5-Aminolaevulinic acid (5-ALA), Fluorescence spectroscopy, Protoporphyrin (PpIX)
    National Category
    Medical Engineering
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-134849 (URN)10.1016/j.pdpdt.2017.01.188 (DOI)000404315000028 ()28223144 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: Swedish Governmental Agency for Innovation Systems (Vinnova); Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research (SSF); Swedish Research Council (VR) [311-2006-7661, 523-2013-2735]; NovaMedTech; Swedish Childhood Cancer Foundation [MT 2013-0043]; ALF Grants Region

    Available from: 2017-03-08 Created: 2017-03-08 Last updated: 2018-05-07Bibliographically approved
  • 229.
    Rosenberg, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Staf, Christian
    Reg Canc Ctr, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Bjurberg, Maria
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Borgfeldt, Christer
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Dahm-Kahler, Pernilla
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hellman, Kristina
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hjerpe, Elisabet
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Erik
    Reg Canc Ctr, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Stalberg, Karin
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Tholander, Bengt
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Hogberg, Thomas
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Data quality in the Swedish Quality Register of Gynecologic Cancer - a Swedish Gynecologic Cancer Group (SweGCG) study2018In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 57, no 3, p. 346-353Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the quality of data on endometrial (EC) and ovarian, fallopian tube, peritoneal, abdominal or pelvic cancers (OC) registered in the Swedish Quality Register of Gynecologic Cancer (SQRGC).Method: A random sample of 500 patients was identified in the SQRGC and their medical charts were reviewed for re-abstraction of 31 selected core variables by an independent validator. The data in the SQRGC and the re-abstracted data were compared. The data were collected from 25 hospitals evenly distributed throughout Sweden. The main outcomes were comparability, timeliness, completeness and validity. Coverage was compared with the National Cancer Register (NCR). Timeliness was defined as the speed of registration i.e. when patients were registered in the SQRGC relative to date of diagnosis. Internationally accepted coding systems for stage, grading and histologic type were used ensuring a high degree of comparability. Correlations were estimated using Pearsons correlation coefficient and Cohens kappa coefficient.Results: The completeness was 95%. The timeliness was 88-91% within 12 months of diagnosis. The median degree of agreement between re-abstracted data and data in the SQRGC was 82.1%, with a median kappa value of 0.73 for ordinate variables and a median Pearsons correlation coefficient of 0.96. The agreements for the type of surgery were 76% (95% CI 70-81%; kappa 0.49) and type of primary treatment 90% (95% CI 87-94%; kappa 0.85) in OC and in EC 88% (95% CI 84-93%; kappa 0.84). The agreements for the FIGO stage were in OC and EC 74% (95% CI 68-80%; kappa 0.69) and 87% (95% CI 82-91%; kappa 0.79), respectively.Conclusions: The data in the Swedish Quality Register for Gynecologic Cancer are of adequate quality in order to be used as a basis for research and to evaluate possible differences in treatment, lead times and treatment results.

  • 230.
    Rosok, B. I
    et al.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Host-Brunsell, T.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Brudvik, K. W.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Carling, U.
    Univ Oslo, Norway; Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Dorenberg, E.
    Univ Oslo, Norway; Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Lothe, R. A.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Bjombeth, B. A.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Characterization of early recurrences following liver resection by ALPPS and two stage hepatectomy in patients with colorectal liver-metastases and small future liver remnants; a translational substudy of the LIGRO-RCT2019In: HPB, ISSN 1365-182X, E-ISSN 1477-2574, Vol. 21, no 8, p. 1017-1023Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Associated liver partition and portal vein ligation in staged hepatectomy (ALPPS) is an alternative resection method to portal vein embolization (PVE) in patients with small future liver remnants (FLR) but has been associated with early tumor recurrences. Methods: Twenty-four patients with colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) patients from the randomized multicenter LIGRO trial comparing outcome of ALPPS (n = 13) vs PVE (n = 11) were included in the study. Mutational analyses of the KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIC3CA and TP53 genes of the metastases were performed in 21 patients and correlated to early tumor recurrence. Results: Within 12 months, 13 patients experienced recurrences (6 in TSH group and 7 in ALPPS group). Nine of 13 patients with recurrences had mutations in the TP53 gene, while 3 of 8 patients without recurrence carried the same mutation. Only sporadic cases of the other mutations studied were identified. Conclusions: ALPPS did not appear to be associated with higher rate of rapid recurrences than PVE following radical resection of colorectal liver metastases. Mutations in genes associated with negative oncologic outcome after surgical resection most likely play a role for tumor recurrences in these patients.

  • 231.
    Rossitti, Hugo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical genetics.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Extent of surgery for phaeochromocytomas in the genomic era2018In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 105, no 2, p. E84-E98Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Germline mutations are present in 20–30 per cent of patients with phaeochromocytoma. For patients who develop bilateral disease, complete removal of both adrenal glands (total adrenalectomy) will result in lifelong adrenal insufficiency with an increased risk of death from adrenal crisis. Unilateral/bilateral adrenal‐sparing surgery (subtotal adrenalectomy) offers preservation of cortical function and independence from steroids, but leaves the adrenal medulla in situ and thus at risk of developing new and possibly malignant disease. Here, present knowledge about how tumour genotype relates to clinical behaviour is reviewed, and application of this knowledge when choosing the extent of adrenalectomy is discussed.

    Methods

    A literature review was undertaken of the penetrance of the different genotypes in phaeochromocytomas, the frequency of bilateral disease and malignancy, and the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms, with emphasis on explaining the clinical phenotypes of phaeochromocytomas and their associated syndromes.

    Results

    Patients with bilateral phaeochromocytomas most often have multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2) or von Hippel–Lindau disease (VHL) with high‐penetrance mutations for benign disease, whereas patients with mutations in the genes encoding SDHB (succinate dehydrogenase subunit B) or MAX (myelocytomatosis viral proto‐oncogene homologue‐associated factor X) are at increased risk of malignancy.

    Conclusion

    Adrenal‐sparing surgery should be the standard approach for patients who have already been diagnosed with MEN2 or VHL when operating on the first side, whereas complete removal of the affected adrenal gland(s) is generally recommended for patients with SDHB or MAX germline mutations. Routine assessment of a patient's genotype, even after the first operation, can be crucial for adopting an appropriate strategy for follow‐up and future surgery.

  • 232.
    Rubensson, Carin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Johansson, Torsten
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Tensioning of the radioscaphocapitate and long radio-lunate ligaments for dynamic radiocarpal instability2018In: Journal of Hand Surgery, European Volume, ISSN 1753-1934, E-ISSN 2043-6289, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 369-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During 1994-2003, we treated 20 patients with post-traumatic radial-sided wrist pain and dynamic radiocarpal instability. After arthroscopy confirmed no disruption of the radioscaphocapitate ligament and an increased laxity of the ligament, we passed a strip of the radioscaphocapitate ligament through the long radio-lunate ligament. The rationale of this procedure was to increase tension of the two ligaments and to close the space of Poirier. Eighteen patients were assessed after 1-3.7 years (mean 2.5 years). Four patients were symptom-free and 11 patients were markedly improved. Fourteen patients were followed for 11-15 years; four patients were symptom-free and eight patients were markedly improved. Two reported unchanged symptoms and none was worse in the follow-up. Based on our findings, we suggest a cause of post-traumatic radial-sided wrist pain is laxity of the radiocarpal joint. We conclude that our surgical procedure increases tension in the radioscaphocapitate and long radio-lunate ligaments and decreases wrist pain at rest and during activity. Level of Evidence: IV

  • 233.
    Rubensson, Carin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Ydreborg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Boren, Linda
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Karlander, Lars-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Flexor tendon repair after rupture caused by volar plate fixation of the distal radius2015In: Journal of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, ISSN 2000-656X, E-ISSN 2000-6764, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 112-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Volar plate fixation of unstable fractures of the distal radius is preferred by a majority of surgeons today. One known complication is the rupture of flexor tendons. The aim of this paper is to present flexor tendon ruptures after volar plate fixation analysing the clinical outcome after tendon surgery, aetiology, and methods of prevention. Seventeen consecutive ruptures in 14 patients were included. The incidence was 1.4%. Three patients declined tendon surgery. Eleven patients were treated with a free tendon graft. Only two patients showed excellent results regarding mobility in the thumb and/or fingers. Analysis of radiographs demonstrated sub-optimal placement of plate or screws in all cases. Rupture of a flexor tendon is a serious complication where the functional outcome after surgical reconstruction is uncertain. Early removal of the plate when the placement is sub-optimal or when local volar tenderness appears would probably prevent many ruptures.

  • 234.
    Ryösä, A.
    et al.
    Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Turku University Central Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Kukkonen, J.
    Department of Surgery, Division of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Satakunnan Keskussairaala, Pori, Finland.
    Björnsson, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Moosmayer, S.
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Martina Hansens Hospital, Sandvika, Norway.
    Holmgren, Theresa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Ranebo, M.
    Lanssjukhuset Kalmar Ortopedkliniken, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Bøe, B.
    Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Oslo Universitetssykehus Ulleval, Oslo, Norway.
    Äärimaa, V.
    Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Turku University Central Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Acute Cuff Tear Repair Trial (ACCURATE): Protocol for a multicentre, randomised, placebo-controlled trial on the efficacy of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair2019In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 5, article id e025022Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Rotator cuff tear is a very common and disabling condition that can be related to acute trauma. Rotator cuff tear surgery is a well-established form of treatment in acute rotator cuff tears. Despite its widespread use and almost a gold standard position, the efficacy of an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is still unknown. The objective of this trial is to investigate the difference in outcome between arthroscopic rotator cuff repair and inspection of the shoulder joint defined as placebo surgery in patients 45–70 years of age with an acute rotator tear related to trauma.

    Methods and analysis Acute Cuff Tear Repair Trial (ACCURATE) is a randomised, placebo-controlled, multicentre efficacy trial with sample size of 180 patients. Concealed allocation is done in 1:1 ratio. The randomisation is stratified according to participating hospital, gender and baseline Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (WORC). Both groups receive the same standardised postoperative treatment and physiotherapy. The primary outcome measure is the change in WORC score from baseline to 2-year follow-up. Secondary outcome measures include Constant-Murley Score, the Numerical Rating Scale for pain, subjective patient satisfaction and the health-related quality of life instrument 15 dimensions (15D). Patients and outcome assessors are blinded from the allocated intervention. The primary analysis of results will be conducted according to intention-to-treat analysis.

    Ethics and dissemination The study protocol for this clinical trial has been approved by the Ethics Committee of the Hospital District of Southwest Finland and Regional Ethics Committee in Linköping Sweden and Regional Committees for Medical and Health Research Ethics South East in Norway. Every recruiting centre will apply local research approvals. The results of this study will be submitted for publication in peer-reviewed journals.

  • 235.
    Røsok, Bård I
    et al.
    Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sparrelid, Ernesto
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Division of Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hasselgren, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Pomianowska, Ewa
    Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Bjørnbeth, Bjørn Atle
    Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Isaksson, Bengt
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Division of Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Scandinavian multicenter study on the safety and feasibility of the associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy procedure.2016In: Surgery, ISSN 0039-6060, E-ISSN 1532-7361, Vol. 159, no 5, p. 1279-1286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy (ALPPS) has emerged as an additional tool to increase the size of the future liver remnant (FLR) in the settings of advanced tumor burden in the liver. Initial reports have indicated high feasibility but also high mortality and morbidity. The aim of this study was to assess the initial experience with ALPPS in Scandinavia regarding feasibility, morbidity, and mortality.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a retrospective analysis of all patients who underwent ALPPS since its introduction at 3 Scandinavian hepatobiliary centers.

    RESULTS: Thirty-six patients were identified, 21 male and 15 female. Median age was 67 years (22-83). Colorectal liver metastases (n = 25) were the most common indication for ALPPS followed by hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 4), cholangiocarcinoma (n = 4), and other (n = 3). Median growth of the FLR between the operations was 67% (-17 to 238) in 6 (5-13) days. All patients completed the second operation, and 71% of the resections were R0. Although the total percentage of patients with complication(s) was 92%, only 4 patients (11%) had a grade 3b complication according to the Clavien-Dindo classification, and no other severe complications were noted. There was no in-hospital mortality, but 1 (2.8%) patient died within 90 days of operation.

    CONCLUSION: ALPPS is a highly feasible method to stimulate FLR growth in patients with colorectal liver metastases as well as primary hepatobiliary malignancies. The treatment can be carried out with relative safety.

  • 236.
    Salehi, Sahar
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Åvall Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Brandberg, Yvonne
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Johansson, Hemming
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Suzuki, Chikako
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Falconer, Henrik
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Lymphedema, serious adverse events, and imaging 1 year after comprehensive staging for endometrial cancer: results from the RASHEC trial2019In: International Journal of Gynecological Cancer, ISSN 1048-891X, E-ISSN 1525-1438, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 86-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Objectives In the Robot Assisted Surgery for High Risk Endometrial Cancer (RASHEC) trial, patients with high-risk endometrial cancer were randomly assigned to robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery (RALS) or laparotomy for pelvic and infrarenal para-aortic lymph node dissection. We here report on self-reported lower limb lymphedema (LLL), lymphocyst formation, ascites, and long-term serious adverse events 12 months after surgery. Patients and methods Patients were enrolled between 2013 and 2016, and 96 patients were included in the per protocol analysis, evenly distributed between RALS and laparotomy. Self-reported LLL was recorded using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire for endometrial cancerEN24, assessed before and 12 months after surgery. Computed tomography was assessed at baseline, 3, and 12 months. Medical charts were reviewed for serious adverse events and hospital admissions 31 to 365 days after surgery. Results At 12 months after laparotomy and RALS, 61% and 50% patients, respectively, reported LLL (p = 0.31). In univariate analysis, the mean score of LLL at 12 months was significantly higher for laparotomy than for RALS (p amp;lt; 0.05) and for those without abdominal drainage (p = 0.02), but was not independently associated with LLL in the multivariate analysis. Imaging showed no significant difference in lymphocyst formation or ascites between surgical modalities. No difference was found in serious adverse events and admissions to hospital for any reason. There was no agreement between lymphocyst formation or ascites and self-reported LLL. Conclusion Follow-up 1 year after comprehensive surgical staging for high-risk endometrial cancer showed no differences in self-reported LLL, findings on imaging, or SAE between laparotomy and robot-assisted surgery.

  • 237.
    Salehi, Sahar
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Legerstam, Berit
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Carlson, Joseph W.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Falconer, Henrik
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Robot-assisted laparoscopy versus laparotomy for infrarenal paraaortic lymphadenectomy in women with high-risk endometrial cancer: A randomised controlled trial2017In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 79, p. 81-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate if robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery (RALS) was non-inferior to laparotomy (LT) in harvesting infrarenal paraaortic lymph nodes in patients with presumed stage IeII high-risk endometrial cancer. Patients and methods: Patients with histologically proven endometrial cancer, presumed stage IeII with high-risk tumour features, were randomised to hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, pelvic and paraaortic lymphadenectomy by either RALS or LT. Primary outcome was paraaortic lymph node count. Secondary outcomes were perioperative events, postoperative complications and total health care cost. Results: Overall 120 patients were randomised and 96 patients were included in the per protocol analysis. Demographic, clinical and tumour characteristics were evenly distributed between groups. Mean (+/- SD) paraaortic lymph node count was 20.9 (+/- 9.6) for RALS and 22 (+/- 11, p = 0.45) for LT. The difference of means was within the non-inferiority margin (-1.6, 95% CI -5.78, 2.57). Mean pelvic node count was lower after RALS (28 +/- 10 versus 22 +/- 8, p amp;lt; 0.001). There was no difference in perioperative complications or readmissions between the groups. Operation time was longer (p amp;lt; 0.001) but total blood loss less (amp;lt;0.001) and hospital stay shorter (amp;lt;0.001) in RALS group than LT group. Health care costs for RALS was significantly lower (mean difference $1568 USD/(sic)1225 Euro, p amp;lt; 0.05). Conclusion: Our results demonstrate non-inferiority in paraaortic lymph node count, comparable complication rates, shorter hospital length and lower total cost for RALS over laparotomy. Generalisability of the latter finding requires a high-volume setting and high surgical proficiency. In women with high-risk endometrial cancer confined to the uterus, RALS is a valid treatment modality. Clinical trials registrations: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01847703. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 238.
    Sandström, Per A
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Rosok, Bard I.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Sparrelid, Ernesto
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Lindell, Gert
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Larsen, Peter Norgaard
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Lindhoff Larsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Schultz, Nicolai A.
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Bjornbeth, Bjorn A.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Isaksson, Bengt
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Rizell, Magnus
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Response to the Comment on "Should We Have a Little More Patience With the Conventional 2-Stage Hepatectomy?"2019In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 269, no 3, p. E33-E34Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 239.
    Sandström, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Lindhoff Larsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Rosok, Bard Ingvald
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Sparrelid, Ernesto
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Larsen, Peter Norgaard
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Schultz, Nicolai A.
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Bjornbeth, Bjorn Atle
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Lindell, Gert
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Bengt
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Rizell, Magnus
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Response to Comment on "When Innovation Is Not Enough in ANNALS OF SURGERY, vol 270, issue 2, pp E36-E372019In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 270, no 2, p. E36-E37Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 240.
    Sandström, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Rosok, Bard I.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Sparrelid, Ernesto
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Larsen, Peter N.
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Lindhoff Larsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Lindell, Gert
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Schultz, Nicolai A.
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Bjornbeth, Bjorn A.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Isaksson, Bengt
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Rizell, Magnus
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    ALPPS Improves Resectability Compared With Conventional Two-stage Hepatectomy in Patients With Advanced Colorectal Liver Metastasis Results From a Scandinavian Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial (LIGRO Trial)2018In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 267, no 5, p. 833-840Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate if associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy (ALPPS) could increase resection rates (RRs) compared with two-stage hepatectomy (TSH) in a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Background: Radical liver metastasis resection offers the only chance of a cure for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Patients with colorectal liver metastasis (CRLM) and an insufficient future liver remnant (FLR) volume are traditionally treated with chemotherapy with portal vein embolization or ligation followed by hepatectomy (TSH). This treatment sometimes fails due to insufficient liver growth or tumor progression. Methods: A prospective, multicenter RCTwas conducted between June 2014 and August 2016. It included 97 patients with CRLM and a standardized FLR (sFLR) of less than 30%. Primary outcome-RRs were measured as the percentages of patients completing both stages of the treatment. Secondary outcomes were complications, radicality, and 90-day mortality measured from the final intervention. Results: Baseline characteristics, besides body mass index, did not differ between the groups. The RR was 92% [ 95% confidence interval (CI) 84%-100%] (44/48) in the ALPPS arm compared with 57% (95% CI 43%-72%) (28/49) in the TSH arm [rate ratio 8.25 (95% CI 2.6-26.6); P amp;lt; 0.0001]. No differences in complications (Clavien- Dindo amp;gt;= 3a) [ 43% (19/44) vs 43% (12/28)] [1.01 (95% CI 0.4-2.6); P = 0.99], 90-day mortality [8.3% (4/48) vs 6.1% (3/49)] [ 1.39 [95% CI 0.3-6.6]; P = 0.68] or R0 RRs [77% (34/44) vs 57% (16/28)] [2.55 [95% CI 0.9-7.1]; P = 0.11)] were observed. Of the patients in the TSH arm that failed to reach an sFLR of 30%, 12 were successfully treated with ALPPS. Conclusion: ALPPS is superior to TSH in terms of RR, with comparable surgical margins, complications, and short- term mortality.

  • 241.
    Sandström, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Rosok, Bard I.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Sparrelid, Ernesto
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Larsen, Peter Norgaard
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Lindhoff Larsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Lindell, Gert
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Schultz, Nicolai A.
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Bjornbeth, Bjorn A.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Isaksson, Bengt
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Rizell, M.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Response to "ALPPS Versus Conventional Two-stage Hepatectomy in Patients With Advanced Colorectal Liver Metastases"2019In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 269, no 1, p. E16-E17Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 242.
    Sandström, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Rosok, Bard I.
    Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Sparrelid, Ernesto
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Division of Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindell, Gert
    Department of Surgery, Skane University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Larsen, Peter Norgaard
    Department of Surgical Gastroenterology and Transplantation, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Lindhoff Larsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Schultz, Nicolai A.
    Department of Surgical Gastroenterology and Transplantation, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Isaksson, Bengt
    Department of Surgery, Akademiska Hospital, University of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rizell, Magnus
    Department of Transplantation and Liver Surgery, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Response: "Unresectable Colorectal Liver Metastases: When Definitions Matter to Appropriately Assess Extreme Liver Resection Techniques2018In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 268, no 6, p. E83-E85Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 243.
    Saraste, Helena
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Abbott, Allan
    Katashev, A
    Murans, G
    3D analysis of spine and chest wall form and mobility. Application of a new method to evaluate treatment outcome in pediatric spine deformities2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary

    A new optical scanning method is applyed for a static and dynamic analysis of thorax and spine deformities in brace and surgically treated scoliosis patients to capture intervention dependent changes over time. The costs and additional information captured by the method is analysed.

    Introduction

    To evaluate the intervention dependent changes in spine and chest wall deformities, such as mobility of thorax, volume, symmetry of growth, and possible growth distorting factors are poorly known and should be studied. In patients with neuropathic spine deformities, the seat loading is of importance to enhance balanced sitting and preventing pressure problems. Quantitative methods to be used for over time comparisons need to be further developed.

    In adolescents the decision to treat a spine deformity is mainly based on radiographic findings, whereas many patients are more interested in how their body configuration deviates from the normality. There is a need to implement and evaluate a method for this purpose. In brace treated children and adolescents, a non-radiation producing examination is to prefer for repeated follow-up controls.

    Methods

    A consequtive series of children with spine deformity, who are enrolled in the treatment protocol, are invited to take part in the tests. In surgery group, tests are performed before and 3 months after surgery aimed to correct the spine and/or thorax deformity. In brace treatment and follow-up groups tests are made at the same time points as x-rays. The static and dynamic recordings are performed by and optic scanenr Artec 3D (Artec Group, San Diego, CA), and the sitting load distribution measurements with a sensor mat (Clin-seat Type 5315 by Tekscan, Boston, Massachusetts, USA). 60 children/year in brace treatment, 40 in surgery, and 50 in the follow-up group are estimated to be included. These methods´ costs and benefits as well as their added value for the clinical decision making will be evaluated after 2-3 years.

    Results

    A feasibility test shows that clinically small enough differences can be recorded and numerically expressed and analysed. An application on a consecutive, clinical patient group will be carried on.

    Conclusion

    The optical scanning method by Artec, allows a static and dynamic capturing of respiratoryassociated thorax movements and the changes of a spine deformity over time. The new method will be applied in a consecutive series of patients.

  • 244.
    Scheer, Vendela
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Bergman, Malin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine.
    Lerm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Serrander, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Kalén, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Topical benzoyl peroxide application on the shoulder reduces Propionibacterium acnes: a randomized study2018In: Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery, ISSN 1058-2746, E-ISSN 1532-6500, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 957-961Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Propionibacterium acnes is a common cause of infection following shoulder surgery. Studies have shown that standard surgical preparation does not eradicate P acnes. The purpose of this study was to examine whether topical application of benzoyl peroxide (BPO) gel could decrease the presence of P acnes compared with todays standard treatment with chlorhexidine soap (CHS). We also investigated and compared the recolonization of the skin after surgical preparation and draping between the BPO- and CHS-treated groups. Methods: In this single-blinded nonsurgical study, 40 volunteers-24 men and 16 women-were randomized to preoperative topical treatment at home with either 5% BPO or 4% CHS on the left shoulder at the area of a deltopectoral approach. Four skin swabs from the area were taken in a standardized manner at different times: before and after topical treatment, after surgical skin preparation and sterile draping, and 120 minutes after draping. Results: Topical treatment with BPO significantly reduced the presence of P acnes measured as the number of colony-forming units on the skin after surgical preparation. P acnes was found in 1 of 20 subjects in the BPO group and 7 of 20 in the CHS group (P = .044). The results remained after 2 hours (P = .048). Conclusion: Topical preparation with BPO before shoulder surgery may be effective in reducing P acnes on the skin and preventing recolonization. Conclusion: Topical preparation with BPO before shoulder surgery may be effective in reducing P acnes on the skin and preventing recolonization. (C) 2018 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. All rights reserved.

  • 245.
    Schonning, A.
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Karlen, J.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Frisk, T.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Heyman, M.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Svahn, J. E.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ora, I.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Kawan, L.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Holmqvist Persson, Britt-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Björklund, C.
    Umeå University Hospital, Sweden.
    Harila-Saari, A.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Ranta, S.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Venous thrombosis in children and adolescents with Hodgkin lymphoma in Sweden2017In: Thrombosis Research, ISSN 0049-3848, E-ISSN 1879-2472, Vol. 152, p. 64-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Pediatric patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) have several risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE). Although these patients are occasionally treated with thromboprophylaxis, no guidelines are implemented in Sweden. Scarce data from adult patients indicate an increased risk of VTE, but pediatric data is largely missing. Given the favorable overall survival of HL, there should reasonably be more focus on preventing complications. Materials and ethods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study, including all patients registered in the Childhood Cancer Registry under the age of 18 years diagnosed with HL between January 2005 and December 2015 in Sweden. Results: Data was retrieved from the medical records of all 163 patients (100%) at six Swedish pediatric cancer centers. The incidence of VTE was 7.7% (symptomatic VTE 3.9%). The median follow-up was 3.4 years (range 0.3-10.5). Only five patients (3.1%) were treated with thromboprophylaxis. All VTE events occurred in the older age category (11-17 years) and all but one (92.7%) had a mediastinal mass. While the VTE did not significantly affect the treatment of HL, it caused increased morbidity and 2/12 developed a post-thrombotic syndrome. No significant risk factors for VTE were identified. Conclusions: VTE is a relatively common complication of HL and its treatment, causing increased acute and long-term morbidity. However, due to limited number of events we could not demonstrate risk-factors for VTE that would identify patients who might benefit from thromboprophylaxis. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 246.
    Schultz, J. K.
    et al.
    Akershus University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Wallon, Conny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Blecic, L.
    Ostfold Hospital Kalnes, Norway.
    Forsmo, H. M.
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway; University of Bergen, Norway.
    Folkesson, J.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Buchwald, P.
    Skåne University Hospital Malmö, Sweden.
    Korner, H.
    University of Bergen, Norway; Stavanger University Hospital, Norway.
    Dahl, F. A.
    Akershus University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Oresland, T.
    Akershus University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Yaqub, S.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    One-year results of the SCANDIV randomized clinical trial of laparoscopic lavage versus primary resection for acute perforated diverticulitis2017In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 104, no 10, p. 1382-1392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Recent randomized trials demonstrated that laparoscopic lavage compared with resection for Hinchey III perforated diverticulitis was associated with similar mortality, less stoma formation but a higher rate of early reintervention. The aim of this study was to compare 1-year outcomes in patients who participated in the randomized Scandinavian Diverticulitis (SCANDIV) trial. Methods: Between February 2010 and June 2014, patients from 21 hospitals in Norway and Sweden presenting with suspected perforated diverticulitis were enrolled in a multicentre RCT comparing laparoscopic lavage and sigmoid resection. All patients with perforated diverticulitis confirmed during surgery were included in a modified intention-to-treat analysis of 1-year results. Results: Of 199 enrolled patients, 101 were assigned randomly to laparoscopic lavage and 98 to colonic resection. Perforated diverticulitis was confirmed at the time of surgery in 89 and 83 patients respectively. Within 1 year after surgery, neither severe complications (34 versus 27 per cent; P = 0.323) nor disease-related mortality (12 versus 11 per cent) differed significantly between the lavage and surgery groups. Among the 144 patients with purulent peritonitis, the rate of severe complications (27 per cent (20 of 74) versus 21 per cent (15 of 70) respectively; P = 0.445) and disease-related mortality (8 versus 9 per cent) were similar. Laparoscopic lavage was associated with more deep surgical-site infections (32 versus 13 per cent; P = 0.006) but fewer superficial surgical-site infections (1 versus 17 per cent; P = 0.001). More patients in the lavage group underwent unplanned reoperations (27 versus 10 per cent; P = 0.010). Including stoma reversals, a similar proportion of patients required a secondary operation (28 versus 29 per cent). The stoma rate at 1 year was lower in the lavage group (14 versus 42 per cent in the resection group; P amp;lt; 0.001); however, the Cleveland Global Quality of Life score did not differ between groups. Conclusion: The advantages of laparoscopic lavage should be weighed against the risk of secondary intervention (if sepsis is unresolved). Assessment to excludemalignancy (although uncommon) is advised.

  • 247.
    Segelman, J.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Ersta Hosp, Sweden.
    Mattsson, I.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Jung, Bärbel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Nilsson, P. J.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Palmer, G.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Buchli, C.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Risk factors for anastomotic leakage following ileosigmoid or ileorectal anastomosis2018In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 304-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    Reconstruction with an ileosigmoidal anastomosis (ISA) or ileorectal anastomosis (IRA) is a surgical option after a subtotal colectomy. Anastomotic leakage (AL) is a problematic complication and high rates have been reported, but there is limited understanding of the risk factors involved. The aim of this study was to assess the established and potential predictors of AL following ISA and IRA.

    Method

    This was a retrospective cohort study including all patients who had undergone ISA or IRA at three Swedish referral centres for colorectal surgery between January 2007 and March 2015. Data regarding clinical characteristics, treatment and outcome were collected from medical records. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to determine the association between patient and treatment related factors and the cumulative incidence of AL.

    Results

    In total, 227 patients were included. Overall, AL was detected amongst 30 patients (13.2%). Amongst patients undergoing colectomy with synchronous ISA or IRA (one‐stage procedure), AL occurred in 23 out of 120 (19.2%) compared with seven out of 107 (6.5%) after stoma reversal with ISA or IRA (two‐stage procedure) (= 0.004). In addition, the multivariate analyses revealed a statistically significantly lower odds ratio for AL following a two‐stage procedure (OR 0.10, 95% CI 0.03–0.41, = 0.001).

    Conclusions

    This study confirms high rates of AL following ISA and IRA. In particular, a synchronous procedure with colectomy and ISA/IRA carries a high risk of AL.

  • 248.
    Sekijima, Yoshiki
    et al.
    Shinshu University,Matsumoto, Japan.
    Campos, Raul Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yoshinaga, Tsuneaki
    Shinshu University, Matsumoto, Japan.
    Nagamatsu, Kiyoshiro
    Shinshu University, Matsumoto, Japan.
    Yazaki, Masahide
    Shinshu University,Matsumoto, Japan.
    Kametani, Fuyuki
    Tokyo Metropolitan Org Medical Research, Japan.
    Ikeda, Shu-ichi
    Shinshu University, Matsumoto, Japan.
    Pathological, biochemical, and biophysical characteristics of the transthyretin variant Y114H (p.Y134H) explain its very mild clinical phenotype2015In: Journal of the peripheral nervous system, ISSN 1085-9489, E-ISSN 1529-8027, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 372-379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transthyretin (TTR) is a homotetrameric protein that must misfold in order to form amyloid fibrils. Misfolding includes rate limiting tetramer dissociation, followed by fast tertiary structural changes of the monomer that enable aggregation. Hereditary ATTR amyloidosis is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder with systemic deposition of amyloid fibrils induced by TTR gene mutation. We identified a rare Y114H (p.Y134H) TTR variant in a Japanese patient presenting with late-onset, very mild clinical course. The patient had an extremely low serum variant TTR concentration (18% of total TTR), whereas the composition of variant TTR was 55% in amyloid fibrils in tenosynovial tissues obtained at carpal tunnel release surgery. The amyloid fibril deposits in the ATTR Y114H patient had an altered structure compared with that in wild-type ATTR patients, as determined by luminescent conjugated poly/oligo-thiophene fluorescence spectroscopy. Biophysical studies using recombinant protein showed that Y114H TTR was markedly destabilized both thermodynamically and kinetically and was highly amyloidogenic in vitro. These data suggest that extremely low serum variant Y114H TTR concentration, probably due to endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation of unstable variant TTR protein, protected this patient from severe amyloidosis, as self-assembly of the amyloidogenic intermediate is a concentration-dependent process.

  • 249.
    Semb, Gunvor
    et al.
    Division of Dentistry, University of Manchester , Manchester , UK; Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery , Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet , Oslo , Norway; Department of Speech and Language Disorders , Statped sørøst , Oslo , Norway..
    Enemark, Hans
    Cleft Palate Center , Aarhus , Denmark.
    Friede, Hans
    Department of Orthodontics , Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg , Sweden.
    Paulin, Gunnar
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Lilja, Jan
    Department of Plastic Surgery , Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg , Sweden.
    Rautio, Jorma
    Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital , Helsinki , Finland.
    Andersen, Mikael
    Copenhagen Cleft Palate Center, University Hospital of Copenhagen , Denmark.
    Åbyholm, Frank
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery , Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet , Oslo , Norway.
    Lohmander, Anette
    Division of Speech and Language Pathology , Karolinska Institute, and Karolinska University Hospital , Stockholm , Sweden.
    Shaw, William
    Division of Dentistry, University of Manchester , Manchester , UK.
    Mølsted, Kirsten
    Copenhagen Cleft Palate Center, University Hospital of Copenhagen , Denmark.
    Heliövaara, Arja
    Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital , Helsinki , Finland.
    Bolund, Stig
    Copenhagen Cleft Palate Center, University Hospital of Copenhagen , Denmark.
    Hukki, Jyri
    Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital , Helsinki , Finland.
    Vindenes, Hallvard
    Centre for Cleft Lip and Palate, Bergen University Hospital Haukeland , Bergen , Norway.
    Davenport, Peter
    Greater Manchester Cleft Lip and Palate Unit , Royal Manchester Childrens' Hospital , Manchester , UK.
    Arctander, Kjartan
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery , Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet , Oslo , Norway.
    Larson, Ola
    Stockholm Craniofacial Team , Karolinska University Hospital , Stockholm , Sweden.
    Berggren, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Whitby, David
    Greater Manchester Cleft Lip and Palate Unit , Royal Manchester Childrens' Hospital , Manchester , UK.
    Leonard, Alan
    The Royal Hospital for Sick Children , Belfast , N. Ireland.
    Neovius, Erik
    Stockholm Craniofacial Team , Karolinska University Hospital , Stockholm , Sweden.
    Elander, Anna
    Department of Plastic Surgery , Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg , Sweden.
    Willadsen, Elisabeth
    Department of Nordic Studies and Linguistics , University of Copenhagen , Denmark.
    Bannister, R. Patricia
    Greater Manchester Cleft Lip and Palate Unit , Royal Manchester Childrens' Hospital , Manchester , UK.
    Bradbury, Eileen
    Private Practitioner , Manchester , UK.
    Henningsson, Gunilla
    Stockholm Craniofacial Team , Karolinska University Hospital , Stockholm , Sweden.
    Persson, Christina
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Speech and Language; Division for Speech and Language Pathology , Sahlgrenska University Hospital , Gothenburg , Sweden Pathology Unit , Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg , Sweden; .
    Eyres, Philip
    Division of Dentistry, University of Manchester , Manchester , UK.
    Emborg, Berit
    Cleft Palate Center , Aarhus , Denmark.
    Kisling-Møller, Mia
    Division of Dentistry, University of Manchester , Manchester , UK.
    Küseler, Annelise
    Division of Dentistry, University of Manchester , Manchester , UK.
    Granhof Black, Birthe
    Division of Dentistry, University of Manchester , Manchester , UK.
    Schöps, Antje
    Copenhagen Cleft Palate Center, University Hospital of Copenhagen , Denmark.
    Bau, Anja
    Copenhagen Cleft Palate Center, University Hospital of Copenhagen , Denmark.
    Boers, Maria
    Copenhagen Cleft Palate Center, University Hospital of Copenhagen , Denmark.
    Søgaard Andersen, Helene
    Copenhagen Cleft Palate Center, University Hospital of Copenhagen , Denmark.
    Jeppesen, Karin
    Copenhagen Cleft Palate Center, University Hospital of Copenhagen , Denmark.
    Marxen, Dorte
    Copenhagen Cleft Palate Center, University Hospital of Copenhagen , Denmark.
    Paaso, Marjukka
    Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital , Helsinki , Finland.
    Hölttä, Elina
    Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital , Helsinki , Finland.
    Alaluusua, Suvi
    Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital , Helsinki , Finland.
    Turunen, Leena
    Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital , Helsinki , Finland.
    Humerinta, Kirsti
    Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital , Helsinki , Finland.
    Elfving-Little, Ulla
    Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital , Helsinki , Finland.
    Tørdal, Inger Beate
    Department of Speech and Language Disorders , Statped sørøst , Oslo , Norway.
    Kjøll, Lillian
    Department of Speech and Language Disorders , Statped sørøst , Oslo , Norway.
    Aukner, Ragnhild
    Department of Speech and Language Disorders , Statped sørøst , Oslo , Norway.
    Hide, Øydis
    Department of Speech and Language Disorders , Statped sørøst , Oslo , Norway.
    Feragen, Kristin Billaud
    Department of Speech and Language Disorders , Statped sørøst , Oslo , Norway.
    Rønning, Elisabeth
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery , Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet , Oslo , Norway.
    Skaare, Pål
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery , Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet , Oslo , Norway.
    Brinck, Eli
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery , Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet , Oslo , Norway.
    Semmingsen, Ann-Magritt
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery , Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet , Oslo , Norway.
    Lindberg, Nina
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery , Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet , Oslo , Norway.
    Bowden, Melanie
    Greater Manchester Cleft Lip and Palate Unit , Royal Manchester Childrens' Hospital , Manchester , UK.
    Davies, Julie
    Greater Manchester Cleft Lip and Palate Unit , Royal Manchester Childrens' Hospital , Manchester , UK.
    Mooney, Jeanette
    Greater Manchester Cleft Lip and Palate Unit , Royal Manchester Childrens' Hospital , Manchester , UK.
    Bellardie, Haydn
    Greater Manchester Cleft Lip and Palate Unit , Royal Manchester Childrens' Hospital , Manchester , UK.
    Schofield, Nina
    Greater Manchester Cleft Lip and Palate Unit , Royal Manchester Childrens' Hospital , Manchester , UK.
    Nyberg, Jill
    Stockholm Craniofacial Team , Karolinska University Hospital , Stockholm , Sweden.
    Lundberg, Maria
    Stockholm Craniofacial Team , Karolinska University Hospital , Stockholm , Sweden.
    Linder-Aronson Karsten, Agneta
    Stockholm Craniofacial Team, Department of Dental Medicine , Karolinska Institute , Stockholm , Sweden.
    Larson, Margareta
    Eastman Institute, Stockholms Läns Landsting , Stockholm , Sweden.
    Holmefjord, Anders
    Statped vest , Bergen , Norway.
    Reisæter, Sigvor
    Statped vest , Bergen , Norway.
    Pedersen, Nina-Helen
    Statped vest , Bergen , Norway.
    Rasmussen, Therese
    Statped vest , Bergen , Norway.
    Tindlund, Rolf
    Dental School, University of Bergen , Bergen , Norway.
    Sæle, Paul
    Oral Health Center of Expertise/Western Norway , Bergen , Norway.
    Blomhoff, Reidunn
    Centre for Cleft Lip and Palate, Bergen University Hospital Haukeland , Bergen , Norway.
    Jacobsen, Gry
    Centre for Cleft Lip and Palate, Bergen University Hospital Haukeland , Bergen , Norway.
    Havstam, Christina
    Division for Speech and Language Pathology , Sahlgrenska University Hospital , Gothenburg , Sweden.
    Rizell, Sara
    Department of Orthodontics , Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg , Sweden.
    Enocson, Lars
    Department of Orthodontics , Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg , Sweden.
    Hagberg, Catharina
    Department of Orthodontics , Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg , Sweden.
    Najar Chalien, Midia
    Department of Orthodontics , Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg , Sweden.
    Paganini, Anna
    Department of Plastic Surgery , Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg , Sweden.
    Lundeborg, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Mjönes, Anna-Britta
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Gustavsson, Annica
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Hayden, Christine
    The Royal Hospital for Sick Children , Belfast , N. Ireland.
    McAleer, Eilish
    The Royal Hospital for Sick Children , Belfast , N. Ireland.
    Slevan, Emma
    The Royal Hospital for Sick Children , Belfast , N. Ireland.
    Gregg, Terry
    The Royal Hospital for Sick Children , Belfast , N. Ireland.
    Worthington, Helen
    Division of Dentistry, University of Manchester , Manchester , UK.
    A Scandcleft randomised trials of primary surgery for unilateral cleft lip and palate: 1. Planning and management.2017In: Journal of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, ISSN 2000-656X, E-ISSN 2000-6764, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 2-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Longstanding uncertainty surrounds the selection of surgical protocols for the closure of unilateral cleft lip and palate, and randomised trials have only rarely been performed. This paper is an introduction to three randomised trials of primary surgery for children born with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP). It presents the protocol developed for the trials in CONSORT format, and describes the management structure that was developed to achieve the long-term engagement and commitment required to complete the project.

    METHOD: Ten established national or regional cleft centres participated. Lip and soft palate closure at 3-4 months, and hard palate closure at 12 months served as a common method in each trial. Trial 1 compared this with hard palate closure at 36 months. Trial 2 compared it with lip closure at 3-4 months and hard and soft palate closure at 12 months. Trial 3 compared it with lip and hard palate closure at 3-4 months and soft palate closure at 12 months. The primary outcomes were speech and dentofacial development, with a series of perioperative and longer-term secondary outcomes.

    RESULTS: Recruitment of 448 infants took place over a 9-year period, with 99.8% subsequent retention at 5 years.

    CONCLUSION: The series of reports that follow this introductory paper include comparisons at age 5 of surgical outcomes, speech outcomes, measures of dentofacial development and appearance, and parental satisfaction. The outcomes recorded and the numbers analysed for each outcome and time point are described in the series.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN29932826.

  • 250.
    Siekmann, W.
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden; Örebro University, Sweden.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Magnuson, A.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Sjölander, A.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Matthiessen, P.
    Örebro University, Sweden; Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Gupta, A.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Surgical and not analgesic technique affects postoperative inflammation following colorectal cancer surgery: a prospective, randomized study2017In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 19, no 6, p. O186-O195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim Epidural analgesia reduces the surgical stress response. However, its effect on pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the genesis of inflammation following major abdominal surgery remains unclear. Our main objective was to elucidate whether perioperative epidural analgesia prevents the inflammatory response following colorectal cancer surgery. Methods Ninety-six patients scheduled for open or laparoscopic surgery were randomized to epidural analgesia (group E) or patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (group P). Surgery and anaesthesia were standardized in both groups. Plasma cortisol, insulin and serum cytokines [interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta), IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-13, tumour necrosis factor , interferon , granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, prostaglandin E-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor] were measured preoperatively (T0), 1-6h postoperatively (T1) and 3-5days postoperatively (T2). Mixed model analysis was used, after logarithmic transformation when appropriate, for analyses of cytokines and stress markers. Results There were no significant differences in any serum cytokine concentration between groups P and E at any time point except for IL-10 which was 87% higher in group P [median and range 4.1 (2.3-9.2) pg/ml] compared to group E [2.6 (1.3-4.7) pg/ml] (P = 0.002) at T1. There was no difference in plasma cortisol and insulin between the groups at any time point after surgery. A significant difference in median serum cytokine concentration was found between open and laparoscopic surgery with higher levels of IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 at T1 in patients undergoing open surgery compared to laparoscopic surgery. No difference in serum cytokine concentration was detected between the groups or between the surgical technique at T2. Conclusions Open surgery, compared to laparoscopic surgery, has greater impact on these inflammatory mediators than epidural analgesia vs intravenous analgesia.

234567 201 - 250 of 301
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf