liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
2345678 201 - 250 of 677
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 201.
    Eriksson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Jonköping University, Sweden; Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Wikström, Lotta
    Jonköping University, Sweden; Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Patients experiences and actions when describing pain after surgery - A critical incident technique analysis2016In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 56, p. 27-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Postoperative pain assessment remains a significant problem in clinical care despite patients wanting to describe their pain and be treated as unique individuals. Deeper knowledge about variations in patients experiences and actions could help healthcare professionals to improve pain management and could increase patients participation in pain assessments. Objective: The aim of this study was, through an examination of critical incidents, to describe patients experiences and actions when needing to describe pain after surgery. Methods: An explorative design involving the critical incident technique was used. Patients from one university and three county hospitals in both urban and rural areas were included. To ensure variation of patients a strategic sampling was made according to age, gender, education and surgery. A total of 25 patients who had undergone orthopaedic or general surgery was asked to participate in an interview, of whom three declined. Findings: Pain experiences were described according to two main areas: "Patients resources when in need of pain assessment" and "Ward resources for performing pain assessments". Patients were affected by their expectations and tolerance for pain. Ability to describe pain could be limited by a fear of coming into conflict with healthcare professionals or being perceived as whining. Furthermore, attitudes from healthcare professionals and their lack of adherence to procedures affected patients ability to describe pain. Two main areas regarding actions emerged: "Patients used active strategies when needing to describe pain" and "Patients used passive strategies when needing to describe pain". Patients informed healthcare professionals about their pain and asked questions in order to make decisions about their pain situation. Selfcare was performed by distraction and avoiding pain or treating pain by themselves, while others were passive and endured pain or refrained from contact with healthcare professionals due to healthcare professionals large work load. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 202. Eriksson, M
    et al.
    Isaksson, R-M
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Hellström-Ängerud, K
    Eriksson, M
    Logander, Elisabeth
    Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Differences in symptom presentation in STEMI patients, with or without a previous history of hypertension; a survey report from the SymTime study group.2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 203.
    Ernersson, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Berggren, B.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Lower fear of hypoglycaemia in patients with type 1 diabetes of short duration2012In: 17th FEND Annual Conference 2012, page 19, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Fear of hypoglycaemia is common in patients with type 1 diabetes and many patients deliberately aim at higher blood glucose than recommended to avoid hypoglycaemia. Patient empowerment is a process whereby patients have the skills, attitudes, and self-awareness necessary to influence the quality of their lives. An empowered patient has sufficient knowledge to take relevant decisions about their illness, medical treatment and their own health.

    Aim

    The aim was to study empowerment, fear of hypoglycaemia and problem areas among patients with type1 diabetes.

    Method

    Four hundred fifty-seven patients, mean age 48.5 (±15.4) years, completed an questionnaire including questions on the duration of diabetes, episodes of severe hypoglycaemias and metabolic control, the Swedish Diabetes Empowerment Scale – 23 (Swe-DES-23), Fear of Hypoglycaemia Survey (HFS) and the Problem Areas in Diabetes scale (SWE-PAID-20) .

    Results

    The level of HbA1c was not associated with fear of hypoglycaemia while patients with newly diagnosed (0-5 years) diabetes had significantly lower (p=0.001) fear of hypoglycaemia than those with longer duration. Episodes of severe hypoglycaemia during the last year also influenced the rating on HFS. HFS was 24.7(11.6) in those with no episodes, 30.5(13.9) 1 episode, 33.0(15.4) 2-4 episodes (all p<0.01). Patients with HbA1c ≥ 8.0 % rated lower empowerment (SWE-DES-23) compared to those who had an HbA1c between 6.1-7.9% (p=0.02) and compared to those with HbA1c lower or equal to 6.0 % (p<0.001).

    On the SWE-PAID-20 patients with HbA1c ≥8 % scored in average 32.2(20.5) while those with HbA1c ≤6.0% scored 20.0(17.6) (p<0.001) (higher value indicates more emotional distress related to diabetes).

    Conclusion

    Patients with poor metabolic control, HbA1c ≥8 % are less empowered and also experiences more emotional distress related to their diabetes. Fear of hypoglycaemia was lowest in patient with up to 5 years duration of type 1 diabetes. HbA1c was not associated with fear of hypoglycaemia while repeated episodes of severe hypoglycaemia during the last year increased this fear.

  • 204.
    Ernersson, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Löfgren, U-A
    Berggren, B
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Fear of hypoglycaemia and empowerment in patients with type 1 diabetes2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 205.
    Ernersson, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Young healthy individuals develop lack of energy when adopting an obesity provoking behaviour for four weeks; A phenomenological2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 206.
    Evangelista, Lorraine S.
    et al.
    Univ Calif Irvine, CA 92717 USA.
    Cacciata, Marysol
    Univ Calif Irvine, CA 92717 USA.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Dracup, Kathleen
    Univ Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Dose-Response Relationship Between Exercise Intensity, Mood States, and Quality of Life in Patients With Heart Failure2017In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 530-537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: We conducted a secondary analysis to (1) compare changes in mood disorders and quality of life (QOL) among 4 groups of patients with heart failure in a home-based exercise program who had varying degrees of change in their exercise capacity and (2) determine whether there was an association between exercise capacity, mood disorders, and QOL. Methods: Seventy-one patients were divided into 4 groups based on changes in exercise capacity from baseline to 6 months: group 1showed improvements of greater than 10% (n = 19), group 2 showed improvements of 10% or less (n = 16), group 3 showed reductions of 10% or less (n = 9), and group 4 showed reductions of greater than 10% (n = 27). Results: Over time, patients in all 4 groups demonstrated significantly lower levels of depression and hostility (P amp;lt; .001) and higher levels of physical and overall quality of life (P = .046). Group differences over time were noted in anxiety (P = .009), depression (P = .015), physical quality of life (P amp;lt; .001), and overall quality of life (P = .002). Greater improvement in exercise capacity was strongly associated with lower depression scores (r = -0.49, P = .01). Conclusions: An improvement in exercise capacity with exercise training was associated with a decrease in depression and anxiety and an increase in QOL in patients with heart failure.

  • 207.
    Evangelista, Lorraine S.
    et al.
    University of Calif Irvine, CA 92697 USA.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Nicholas Dionne-Odom, J.
    University of Alabama Birmingham, AL USA.
    An integrated review of interventions to improve psychological outcomes in caregivers of patients with heart failure2016In: CURRENT OPINION IN SUPPORTIVE AND PALLIATIVE CARE, ISSN 1751-4258, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 24-31Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose of reviewThis article examines interventions aimed at improving psychological outcomes (e.g., caregiver burden, quality of life, anxiety, depression, perceived control, stress mastery, caregiver confidence and preparedness, and caregiver mastery) in family caregivers of patients with heart failure.Recent findingsEight studies meeting the inclusion criteria were included in the review. The most common intervention involved psychoeducation facilitated by a nurse (6/8) and supplemented with a combination of follow-up face-to-face sessions (2/6), home visits (2/6), telephone calls (3/6), and telemonitoring (3/6). Two studies used a support group intervention of four to six sessions. Half of the interventions reported a significant effect on one or more primary outcomes, including caregiver burden (n=4), depressive symptoms (n=1), stress mastery (n=1), caregiver confidence and preparedness (n=1), and caregiver mastery (n=1).SummaryCompared with dementia and cancer family caregiving, few interventions have been evaluated in caregivers of patients with heart failure. Of the existing interventions identified in this review, considerable variability was observed in aims, intervention content, delivery methods, duration, intensity, methodological rigor, outcomes, and effects. Given this current state of the science, direct comparison of heart failure caregiver interventions and recommendations for clinical practice are premature. Thus, research priority is strongly warranted for intervention development and testing to enhance heart failure caregiver support and education.

  • 208.
    Ewertzon, Mats
    et al.
    Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Sweden.
    Alvariza, Anette
    Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Sweden; Dalen Hosp, Sweden.
    Winnberg, Elisabeth
    Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Sweden.
    Leksell, Janeth
    Dalarna Univ, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Norwegian Univ Sci and Technol, Norway.
    Goliath, Ida
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Ersta Hosp, Sweden.
    Momeni, Pardis
    Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Sweden.
    Kneck, Asa
    Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Sweden.
    Skott, Maria
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linnaeus Univ, Sweden; Kalmar Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Adaptation and evaluation of the Family Involvement and Alienation Questionnaire for use in the care of older people, psychiatric care, palliative care and diabetes care2018In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 74, no 8, p. 1839-1850Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimTo adapt the Family Involvement and Alienation Questionnaire (FIAQ) for use in the care of older people, psychiatric care, palliative care and diabetes care and to evaluate its validity and reliability. BackgroundInvolvement in the professional care has proven to be important for family members. However, they have described feelings of alienation in relation to how they experienced the professionals approach. To explore this issue, a broad instrument that can be used in different care contexts is needed. DesignA psychometric evaluation study, with a cross-sectional design. MethodThe content validity of the FIAQ was evaluated during 2014 by cognitive interviews with 15 family members to adults in different care contexts. Psychometric evaluation was then conducted (2015-2016). A sample of 325 family members participated, 103 of whom in a test-retest evaluation. Both parametric and non-parametric methods were used. ResultsThe content validity revealed that the questionnaire was generally understood and considered to be relevant and retrievable by family members in the contexts of the care of older people, psychiatric care, palliative care and diabetes care. Furthermore, the FIAQ (Revised), demonstrated satisfactory psychometric properties in terms of data quality, homogeneity, unidimensionality (factor structure), internal consistency and test-retest reliability. ConclusionThe study provides evidence that the FIAQ (Revised) is reliable and valid for use in further research and in quality assessment in the contexts of the care of older people, psychiatric care, palliative care and diabetes care.

  • 209.
    Fagerström, Carola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Living With Liver Cirrhosis A Vulnerable Life2017In: Gastroenterology Nursing, ISSN 1042-895X, E-ISSN 1538-9766, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 38-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Liver cirrhosis is a chronic liver disease. Patients with liver cirrhosis need to manage the symptoms of the disease and possible complications. Symptoms due to ascites, encephalopathy, and/ or varices are hard to manage and live with. Self-care is necessary for coping with the symptoms and for improving the patients life situation. The aim of this study was to explore the areas of life situation and self-care among patients suffering from liver cirrhosis with complications. Interviews with patients with liver cirrhosis (n = 13), seven women and six men (46-70 years), were performed. Data were analyzed using inductive content analysis. The experience of the patients life situation was described from two aspects: vulnerability and reflection on life. Vulnerability was expressed as symptom experience, feelings of loneliness, preconceptions, and limits in daily life. In reflection on life, the patients expressed acceptance and sadness. Self-care dealt with (a) being responsible by observing symptoms and signs; (b) adhering to treatment, prescription, and advice; and (c) the need for more understanding of and information about the disease. When caring for patients with liver cirrhosis, it is important to identify symptoms and feelings and help patients individually to maintain health through self-care.

  • 210.
    Fagevik Olsén, Monika
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bjerså, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Undergraduate physical therapy students´ experiences of supervision during bachelor thesis course2017In: Global Journal of Medical, Physical and Health Education, ISSN 2449-1802, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 183-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies evaluating scientific supervision at the undergraduate level are few and heterogeneous. The aim of this study was to further explore undergraduate students´ experiences of and thoughts about scientific supervision. The sample of informants consisted of 13 physical therapy students from two Swedish universities. Data collection was done using semi-structured interviews covering the areas of supervision and collaboration. Data analysis was performed according to qualitative content analysis. Three theme emerged from the interviews- the role of the supervisor, the student's perception of uncertainty and structure of the supervision. Physical therapy students´ experience of their supervision was dependent on the supervisors’ attributes, both favourable and unfavourable, difficulties with communication, being disregarded and affected by the supervisors’ personal views. This was also put in the context of the current form of supervision, as individual and group supervision brought both positive and negative factors to the experience of the process.

  • 211.
    Ferguson, Caleb
    et al.
    University of Technology Sydney, Australia.
    Hendriks, Jeroen
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Partnering with patients in shared decision-making for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation2017In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 178-180Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 212.
    Fluur, Christina
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Bolse, Kärstin
    Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Spouses' reflections om implantable cardioverter defibrillator treatment with focus on the future and the end-of-life: a qualitative content analysis2014In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 70, no 8, p. 1758-1769Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To explore future reflections of spouses living with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator recipient with focus on the end-of-life phase in an anticipated palliative phase.

    Background

    A history of or risk for life-threatening arrhythmias may require an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. Despite the life-saving capacity of the device, eventually life will come to an end. As discussion about preferences of shock therapy at end-of-life phase seldom takes place in advance, the implantable cardioverter defibrillator recipients may face defibrillating shocks in the final weeks of their lives, adding to stress and anxiety in patients and their families.

    Design

    Qualitative study with in-depth interviews analysed with a content analysis.

    Methods

    Interviews were performed with 18 spouses of medically stable implantable cardioverter defibrillator recipients during 2011–2012.

    Results

    The spouses described how they dealt with changes in life and an uncertain future following the implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation. Six subcategories conceptualized the spouses’ concerns: Aspiring for involvement; Managing an altered relationship; Being attentive to warning signs; Worries for deterioration in the partner's health; Waiting for the defibrillating shock; and Death is veiled in silence.

    Conclusion

    Despite the partner's serious state of health; terminal illness or death and the role of the device was seldom discussed with healthcare professionals or the implantable cardioverter defibrillator recipient. Open and honest communication was requested as important to support coping with an unpredictable life situation and to reduce worries and uncertainty about the future and end-of-life.

  • 213. Fogelberg, Annika
    et al.
    Uhlin, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Yngman-Uhlin, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    VÄNTAN PÅ EN NJURTRANSPLANTATION - ur ett patientperspektiv2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 214.
    Foldemo, Anniqa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wärdig, Rikard
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bachrach-Lindstrom, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Edman, Gunnar
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Holmberg, Tommy
    Tiohundra AB, Sweden .
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Valter, Lars
    Tiohundra AB, Sweden .
    Osby, Urban
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden Karolinska Institute, Sweden Tiohundra AB, Sweden .
    Health-related quality of life and metabolic risk in patients with psychosis2014In: Schizophrenia Research, ISSN 0920-9964, E-ISSN 1573-2509, Vol. 152, no 1, p. 295-299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Improved Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is an alternative treatment goal for individuals with psychosis, who have up to two times greater prevalence of type 2 diabetes, hypertension and obesity than the general population. Aim: to compare HRQoL in patients with psychosis, especially schizophrenia, with a reference sample and explore the relationship between HRQoL and metabolic risk factors in these patients. Methods: a prospective cohort study was carried out in specialized psychiatric outpatient departments in Sweden. The patients were invited consecutively. A prospective population-based study of public health in the south-east of Sweden served as reference group. Patients were assessed with psychiatric questionnaires that included Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF). Health-related quality of life was assessed using the questionnaire EQ5D, both for patients and the population, and several other health status outcomes were used. Results: At 73%, schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder were the most common diagnoses in the patient group. The results in patients (n = 903) and population (n = 7238) showed significant differences in lower EQ5D among patients. According to the definition by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), elevated blood pressure was the only metabolic risk associated with lower HRQoL in patients. Raised LDL-cholesterol levels were also significantly related to lower HRQoL. Conclusion: patients suffering from psychosis had significantly lower HRQoL regarding all components in EQ5D, except for the pain/discomfort component. Almost half of the patient group met the criteria for metabolic syndrome. According to the IDF criteria, elevated blood pressure was the only metabolic risk factor that had an impact on HRQoL.

  • 215.
    Forsling, Elin
    et al.
    Norrbotten County Council, Sweden; Sundby Hospital, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Robert
    Norrbotten County Council, Sweden.
    Eliasson, Mats
    Sundby Hospital, Sweden; Umeå University, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Rose-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Norrbotten County Council, Sweden.
    Health care contact is higher in the week preceding a first myocardial infarction: A review of medical records in Northern Sweden in 20072015In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 450-456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Prodromal symptoms before myocardial infarction (MI) are common, but there are limited data regarding health care contact prior to the acute onset of MI and the impact of gender on early presentation to health care. Aims: The purpose of this study was to describe and analyse prodromal symptoms reported in medical records and study health care contact in the week before the acute onset of MI in comparison to the general population. Methods: From the Northern Sweden MONICA Study we accessed the medical records of 359 patients aged 32-74 years with a first MI in the county of Norrbotten in 2007. We identified those patients health care contact during the seven days before the MI and compared them with the weekly number of contacts in the general population aged 45-74 years in the county during 2007. Results: We found that 23.1% of the women and 17.6% of the men had at least one contact the week before the MI. With the exception of the 14 women aged 45-55 years, health care consumption in both women and men in all age groups between 45- 74 years of age was 75%-165% higher in the week prior to the MI than in the general population of the same ages. In the first health care contact, pain-related symptoms were most frequent (43%), and fatigue was present in 8% of patients. There were no differences between women and men in health care consumption or presenting symptoms. Conclusion: Both women and men with a first MI are in contact more frequently than the general population in the week prior to the event.

  • 216.
    Frödin, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Lotfi, Kourosh
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Fomichov, Victoria
    Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Juliusson, G.
    Lund University, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Frequent and long-term follow-up of health-related quality of life following allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation2015In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 898-910Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Health-related quality of life (HRQL) was evaluated in 94 patients undergoing allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) after myeloablative (MAC, n=18) or reduced intensity conditioning (RIC, n=76). HRQL was assessed with the EORTC QLQ C-30 during the inpatient period as well as during the following 3years, i.e. at baseline and 12 times thereafter. Functional status and global quality of life decreased from baseline to weeks 2 and 3, especially role and social functions. Symptoms increased significantly during the first 3weeks, particularly appetite loss, nausea and vomiting, diarrhoea and fatigue. It took at least 1year for HRQL to return to the baseline level. The only function that improved significantly 3years after HSCT was role function. Patients treated with MAC experienced significantly worse HRQL at baseline than patients treated with RIC, as well as more pain, sleep disturbance and appetite loss in weeks 3 and 4. Patients with extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease experienced reduced HRQL. These results provide a clinically useful overview of patients HRQL during and after HSCT and indicate when they require increased support. The results demonstrate the importance of close follow-ups during the first year after HSCT to improve preventive or supportive interventions.

  • 217.
    Fuentes, Jenny Pia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science.
    Svala, Josephine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science.
    Sjuksköterskans upplevelser av kommunikation med patienter inom palliativ cancervård: en litteraturstudie2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: Majoriteten av patienter i palliativ vård har någon form av cancersjukdom. Centralt i palliativ vård är god kommunikation mellan sjuksköterskan och den döende patienten.

    Syfte: Syftet med studien var att beskriva sjuksköterskans upplevelser av kommunikation med vuxna patienter med cancer (18 år eller äldre) som vårdas inom palliativ vård.

    Metod: En litteraturstudie med systematiskt tillvägagångssätt. Sökningar i databaserna PubMed, CINAHL och PsycINFO genomfördes.

    Resultat: Baserades på 12 artiklar som resulterade i två teman: (1) Betydelsen av relationen mellan sjuksköterskan och patienten och (2) faktorer som upplevdes påverka relationen mellan sjuksköterskan och patienten. Ur dessa identifierades fem kategorier: (1) vårdande relation (2) icke-verbal kommunikation (3) känslor och attityder hos sjuksköterskan (4) arbetsmiljö och (5) kulturella aspekter.

    Konklusion: En god relation är avgörande för en lyckad kommunikation mellan sjuksköterskan och den palliativa patienten. Sjuksköterskan bör skapa en relation som utgår från trygghet, acceptans och tillit så att en bra kommunikation kan ske.

  • 218.
    Gardner, Benjamin
    et al.
    UCL, England.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hrubos Strom, Harald
    Akershus University Hospital, Norway.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Skagerström (Malmsten), Janna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Editorial Material: From does it work? to what makes it work?: The importance of making assumptions explicit when designing and evaluating behavioural interventions in EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR NURSING, vol 13, issue 4, pp 292-2942014In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 292-294Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 219.
    Georg, Carina
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Karlgren, Klas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ulfvarson, Johanna
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Jirwe, Maria
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Henriksson Welin, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    A Rubric to Assess Students Clinical Reasoning When Encountering Virtual Patients2018In: Journal of Nursing Education, ISSN 0148-4834, E-ISSN 1938-2421, Vol. 57, no 7, p. 408-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Training with virtual patients has been proposed as a suitable learning activity to improve clinical reasoning skills for nursing students. However, published instruments with the capacity to assess students reasoning process in the encounter with virtual patients are lacking. Method: Deductive and abductive analyses were used to adapt the Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric (LCJR) to assess nursing students clinical reasoning skills in the encounter with virtual patients. The new rubrics ability to capture nursing students clinical reasoning processes was tested using deductive analysis and statistical analysis. Results: A grading rubric for virtual patients, the vpLCJR, was developed. Cronbachs alpha showed .892, indicating good internal consistency. Conclusion: The rubric vpLCJR, which deconstructs aspects of clinical reasoning for both students and faculty members, can be used to clarify expectations, assess students clinical reasoning process, and provide feedback for learning when nursing students encounter virtual patients.

  • 220.
    Gifford, Wendy
    et al.
    University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
    Lewis, Krystina B.
    University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
    Eldh, Ann Catrine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science.
    Fiset, Val
    University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
    Abdul-Fatah, Tara
    University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
    Aberg, Anna Cristina
    Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden; Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Thavorn, Kednapa
    Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
    Graham, Ian D.
    University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
    Wallin, Lars
    Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Feasibility and usefulness of a leadership intervention to implement evidence-based falls prevention practices in residential care in Canada2019In: Pilot and Feasibility Studies, ISSN 2055-5784, Vol. 5, no 103, article id 31452925Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Leadership is critical to supporting and facilitating the implementation of evidence-based practices in health care. Yet, little is known about how to develop leadership capacity for this purpose. The aims of this study were to explore the (1) feasibility of delivering a leadership intervention to promote implementation, (2) usefulness of the leadership intervention, and (3) participants’ engagement in leadership to implement evidence-based fall prevention practices in Canadian residential care.

    Methods

    We conducted a mixed-method before-and-after feasibility study on two units in a Canadian residential care facility. The leadership intervention was based on the Ottawa model of implementation leadership (O-MILe) and consisted of two workshops and two individualized coaching sessions over 3 months to develop leadership capacity for implementing evidence-based fall prevention practices. Participants (n = 10) included both formal (e.g., managers) and informal (e.g., nurses and care aids leaders). Outcome measures were parameters of feasibility (e.g., number of eligible candidates who attended the workshops and coaching sessions) and usefulness of the leadership intervention (e.g., ratings, suggested modifications). We conducted semi-structured interviews guided by the Implementation Leadership Scale (ILS), a validated measure of 12-item in four subcategories (proactive, supportive, knowledgeable, and perseverant), to explore the leadership behaviors that participants used to implement fall prevention practices. We repeated the ILS in a focus group meeting to understand the collective leadership behaviors used by the intervention team. Barriers and facilitators to leading implementation were also explored.

    Results

    Delivery of the leadership intervention was feasible. All participants (n = 10) attended the workshops and eight participated in at least one coaching session. Workshops and coaching were rated useful (≥ 3 on a 0–4 Likert scale where 4 = highly useful) by 71% and 86% of participants, respectively. Participants rated the O-MILe subcategories of supportive and perseverant leadership highest for individual leadership, whereas supportive and knowledgeable leadership were rated highest for team leadership.

    Conclusions

    The leadership intervention was feasible to deliver, deemed useful by participants, and fostered engagement in implementation leadership activities. Study findings highlight the complexity of developing implementation leadership and modifications required to optimize impact. Future trials are now required to test the effectiveness of the leadership intervention on developing leadership for implementing evidence-based practices.

  • 221.
    Grankvist, Olov
    et al.
    Norrbotten County Council, Luleå, Sweden.
    Olofsson, Anders D.
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Isaksson, Rose-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Norrbotten County Council, Luleå, Sweden.
    Can physicians be replaced with gynecological teaching women to train medical students in their first pelvic examination? A pilot study from Northern Sweden2014In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, Vol. 96, no 1, p. 50-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    The main objective was to gain a deeper understanding of how medical students perceive and experience learning from gynecological teaching women (GTW) instead of physicians in their first pelvic examination. A second aim was to describe how the women experience their roles as GTW.

    METHODS:

    Data were collected from individual interviews with 24 medical students from a medical school in Sweden and with 5 GTW. Discourse analysis was performed to acquire a deeper understanding of the informants' experiences and to understand social interactions.

    RESULTS:

    Five themes revealed in the medical students' experiences: "Hoping that anxiety will be replaced with security," "Meeting as equals creates a sense of calm," "Succeeding creates a sense of security for the future," "Wanting but not having the opportunity to learn more," and "Feeling relieved and grateful." One theme revealed in the GTW experiences: "Hoping to relate in a trustworthy way."

    CONCLUSION:

    To replace physicians with GTW may facilitate the learning process and may also help medical students improve their communicative skills. Using GTW will hopefully further improve students' basic medical examination techniques and physician-patient relationships.

    PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS:

    Since GTW seems to increase self-confidence and skills of medical students performing their first pelvic examination we recommend that the use of GTW is considered in the training of medical students.

  • 222.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Sund-Levander, Märtha
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Assessment of Fever: Physiology, Immunology and Measurement in Clinical Practice2015 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    When we say that someone has a fever, what do we really mean? Most people only take their temperature when they have a fever, and with good reason: fever is part of a larger response in the body.

    Assessment of Fever, a problem-based learning (PBL) textbook, uses inter-professional discussions of scenarios from clinical practice to examine the question of body temperature. The authors start by examining the historical perspective and go on to consider technical measurement accuracy and thermoregulation from a physiological and immunological perspective. They address evaluations of body temperature and inflammatory activity in various conditions. They end by discussing how evidence-based knowledge can inform clinical practice, looking at different scenarios in the shape of case histories and realistic situations from clinical practice. These clinical scenarios are pertinent both in an inter-professional perspective in clinical practice and in the advanced education of health-care professionals, research scientists, and technicians. Each chapter concludes with a number of reflections and additional questions that the reader will be able to answer using the material presented in the book.

  • 223.
    Grossmann, Benjamin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Nilsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Patient-controlled sedation with propofol for endoscopic procedures: A cost analysis2019In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Patient‐controlled sedation (PCS) with propofol accompanied by a bedside nurse anaesthetist is an alternative sedation method for endoscopic procedures compared with midazolam administered by a nurse or endoscopist. Increasing costs in health care demands an economic perspective when introducing alternative methods. We applied a hospital perspective on a cost analysis comparing different methods of sedation and the resource use that were expected to affect cost differences related to the sedation.

    Methods

    Based on two randomised previous studies, the direct costs were determined for different sedation methods during two advanced endoscopic procedures: endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and flexible bronchoscopy including endobronchial ultrasound. ERCP comparisons were made between midazolam sedation by the endoscopic team, PCS with a bedside nurse anaesthetist and propofol sedation administered by a nurse anaesthetist. Bronchoscopy comparisons were made between midazolam sedation by the endoscopic team and PCS with a bedside nurse anaesthetist, categorised by premedication morphine‐scopolamine or glycopyrronium.

    Results

    Propofol PCS with a bedside nurse anaesthetist resulted in lower costs per patient for sedation for both ERCP (233 USD) and bronchoscopy (premedication morphine‐scopolamine 267 USD, premedication glycopyrronium 269 USD) compared with midazolam (ERCP 425 USD, bronchoscopy 337 USD). Aborted procedures that needed to be repeated and prolonged hospital stays significantly increased the cost for the midazolam groups.

    Conclusion

    Propofol PCS with a bedside nurse anaesthetist reduces the direct sedation costs for ERCP and bronchoscopy procedures compared with midazolam sedation.

  • 224.
    Grossmann, Benjamin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Nilsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Patient-controlled Sedation During Flexible Bronchoscopy: A Randomized Controlled Trial2019In: Journal of Bronchology & Interventional Pulmonology, ISSN 1944-6586, E-ISSN 1948-8270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patient-controlled sedation (PCS) is a documented method for endoscopic procedures considered to facilitate early recovery. Limited data have been reported, however, on its use during flexible bronchoscopy (FB).

    Materials and Methods: This study hypothesized that PCS with propofol during FB would facilitate early recovery, with similar bronchoscopist and patient satisfaction compared with nurse-controlled sedation (NCS) with midazolam. A total of 150 patients were randomized 1:1:1 into a control group (premedication with morphine-scopolamine and NCS with midazolam), PCS-MS group (premedication with morphine-scopolamine and PCS with propofol), and PCS-G group (premedication with glycopyrronium and PCS with propofol).

    Results: The procedures included transbronchial biopsy, transbronchial needle aspiration, cryotherapy/biopsy, and/or multistation endobronchial ultrasound. FB duration values in median (range) were 40 (10 to 80), 39 (12 to 68), and 44 (10 to 82) minutes for the groups NCS, PCS-MS, and PCS-G, respectively. An overall 81% of the patients in the combined PCS groups were ready for discharge (modified Post Anaesthetic Discharge Scoring System, score 10) 2 hours after bronchoscopy compared with 40% in the control group (P<0.0001). Between PCS groups, 96% of the PCS-G group patients were ready for discharge compared with 65% in the PCS-MS group (P=0.0002) at 2 hours. Bronchoscopists’ and patients’ satisfaction scores were high in all groups. Postdischarge quality scores showed no differences among the groups.

    Conclusion: PCS with propofol during FB is feasible, as it shortened recovery time without compromising procedure conditions for bronchoscopists or patients. A rapid postsedation stabilization of vital signs facilitates surveillance before the patient leaves the hospital.

  • 225.
    Grossmann, Benjamin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Nilsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Rectal ketamine during paediatric burn wound dressing procedures: a randomised dose-finding study2019In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 1081-1088Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Worldwide, ketamine is used during paediatric procedures, but no recommendations are available regarding a suitable dose for rectal administration during procedures involving high levels of pain and/or anxiety such as burn wound dressing change.

    Methods

    We evaluated three different single doses of rectally administered racemic ketamine mixed with a fixed dose of 0.5 mg/kg of midazolam. In total, 90 children – aged 6 months to 4 years – were randomised 1:1:1 to receive 4 mg/kg (K-4 group), 6 mg/kg (K-6 group) or 8 mg/kg (K-8 group) of racemic ketamine for a maximum of three consecutive procedures. Primary outcome measure was procedural pain evaluated by Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) behavioural scale. Secondary outcome included feasibility and recovery time. Patient safety was evaluated using surrogate outcomes.

    Results

    In total, 201 procedures in 90 children aged 19 ± 8 months were completed. The median maximum pain was FLACC 0 in all groups (p = 0.141). The feasibility was better for groups K-6 (p = 0.049) and K-8 (p = 0.027) compared with K-4, and the mean recovery time was the longest for group K-8 (36 ± 22 min) compared with groups K-4 (25 ± 15 min; p = 0.003) and K-6 (27 ± 20 min; p = 0.025). Median maximum sedation measured by the University of Michigan Sedation Scale (UMSS) was higher in group K-8 compared with group K-4 (p < 0.0001) and K-6 (p = 0.023). One child in group K-8 had a study drug-related serious adverse event — laryngospasm/airway obstruction. No rescue analgosedative medication was administered for group K-6.

    Conclusions

    A rectally administered mixture of racemic ketamine (6 mg/kg) and midazolam (0.5 mg/kg) during paediatric burn dressing procedures with a duration of approximately 30 min provides optimal conditions regarding pain relief, feasibility, recovery time and patient safety, with no need for rescue analgosedative medication.

  • 226.
    Grundström, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Disclosing the invisible: experiences, outcomes and quality of endometriosis healthcare2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Many women with endometriosis report that their symptoms are normalized and trivialized when they seek medical care and they often experience diagnostic delays, ineffective treatments and physiological, psychological and social consequences. However, there is a knowledge gap when it comes to women’s experiences of different aspects of endometriosis healthcare, and the quality of that care.

    Aim: The aim of this thesis was to identify, describe and analyse the experiences, encounters and outcomes of endometriosis healthcare from different perspectives.

    Design and Method: This thesis is a summary of four studies with different methods and designs. Study I and II were qualitative interview studies in which nine women with a laparoscopy-verified endometriosis diagnosis (study I) and 25 healthcare professionals (HCPs) (study II) described their experiences of healthcare encounters related to endometriosis symptoms. The interviews were analysed using interpretive phenomenology (study I) and conventional content analysis (study II). Study III was a cross-sectional observational comparative study measuring pain thresholds, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and symptoms of anxiety and depression using quantitative sensory testing (QST) and questionnaires in order to determine pain thresholds in healthy women (n=55) and women with persistent pelvic pain (PPP), with (n=14) and without (n=23) a confirmed diagnosis of endometriosis. The correlations between pain thresholds and duration of PPP, HRQoL and symptoms of anxiety and depression were also analysed. Study IV was a quantitative observational study using register data from the National Quality Register for Gynaecological Surgery. Patient-reported experience measures (PREM) and patient-reported outcome measures (PROM) after benign hysterectomy were analysed and compared in women with and without PPP and endometriosis (study IV).

    Results: The results of the thesis are summarized in three themes: The struggle to visualize the pain, The endometriosis diagnosis as a key to understanding and enduring persistent pelvic pain and Healthcare encounters as potentially life changing.

    In the first theme, women and HCPs described the healthcare encounters concerning endometriosis symptoms as troublesome (study I, II). The women struggled with disclosing, visualizing and communicating their hidden pain to the HCPs (study I), and HCPs expressed insecurity and limited knowledge when caring for these women (study II). Study III showed widespread reduced pain thresholds among women with PPP compared with healthy controls, and a significant positive correlation between duration of PPP and reduced pain thresholds . Study III also showed a reduced HRQoL and higher prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms among women with PPP, which were also described by the women (study I).

    The importance of getting a diagnosis was described in the second theme by both women and HCPs (study I, II), but women with PPP with and without endometriosis diagnosis did not differ significantly in their pain thresholds or psychosocial outcomes in study III. Likewise, women with PPP with and without endometriosis gave more equal PREM and PROM answers than women in the pain-free comparison group. Overall, women undergoing hysterectomy on benign indications were satisfied with the experience and outcomes of the surgery (study IV).

    As described in the last theme, healthcare encounters could be constructive or destructive. Positive experiences could make the symptoms easier to endure. The constructive encounters were often characterized by a holistic approach and a care structured in multidisciplinary teams.

    Conclusion and clinical implications: The results suggest that PPP should be taken seriously and treated actively in order to minimize the risk of physiological and psychological consequences, such as reduced pain thresholds, lower HRQoL and symptoms of anxiety and depression. Unrelieved PPP could also be an explanatory factor for long-term physiological consequences, such as lower PREM and PROM after hysterectomy.

    High-quality endometriosis healthcare should provide an interaction of physical, psychological and social factors. If women experience that HCPs acknowledge their pain and the effect of pain on HRQoL and mental health, and are offered proper pain-relieving treatment, healthcare encounters could change their lives.

    List of papers
    1. The double-edged experience of healthcare encounters among women with endometriosis: a qualitative study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The double-edged experience of healthcare encounters among women with endometriosis: a qualitative study
    2018 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 1-2, p. 205-211Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives

    To identify and describe the experience of healthcare encounters among women with endometriosis.

    Background

    Endometriosis is a “hidden” chronic gynaecological disease appearing in every 10th woman of fertile age. Different manifestations of pain are the main symptoms, often leading to impaired physical and mental health, and lower quality of life. Previous research on healthcare experiences among women with endometriosis has focused on diagnostic delay and experiences of encountering general practitioners.

    Design

    A qualitative, interpretive, phenomenological approach was used.

    Methods

    We interviewed nine women aged 23–55, with a laparoscopy-confirmed diagnosis of endometriosis. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. The data were analysed following the steps of the interpretive phenomenological approach.

    Results

    Two themes were identified in the interview transcripts: being treated with ignorance and being acknowledged. The essence: “the double-edged experience of healthcare encounters” emerged from the themes. The women's experience was double-edged as it involved contradictory feelings: the encounters were experienced as both destructive or constructive. On the one hand, the destructive side was characterised by ignorance, exposure and disbelief. On the other hand, the constructive side made the women feel acknowledged and confirmed, boosting their self-esteem.

    Conclusions

    The new and important aspects of the findings are that the experience of healthcare encounters is for the first time expressed as double-edged: both destructive and constructive. The experience was of specific importance as it affected the women's perceptions of themselves and of their bodies.

    Relevance to clinical practice

    The information about the constructive side of the experience is of clinical valuable for all healthcare professionals (nurses, midwives and doctors) encountering these women, as it provides a new level of understanding of the experiences. The findings demonstrate both psychological and practical aspects that can help professionals to improve the encounters.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2018
    Keywords
    dysmenorrhoea, endometriosis, experience, healthcare encounter, healthcare professionals, phenomenology, qualitative study
    National Category
    Nursing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-141005 (URN)10.1111/jocn.13872 (DOI)000418871000042 ()28493635 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: County Council of Ostergotland; Linkoping University; Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden

    Available from: 2017-09-20 Created: 2017-09-20 Last updated: 2019-12-04Bibliographically approved
    2. “A challenge” – healthcare professionals' experiences when meeting women with symptoms that might indicate endometriosis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>“A challenge” – healthcare professionals' experiences when meeting women with symptoms that might indicate endometriosis
    2016 (English)In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 7, p. 65-69Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    The aim of the study was to identify and describe the experiences of healthcare professionals when meeting women with symptoms that might indicate endometriosis.

    Methods

    Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 gynecologists, six general practitioners and nine midwives working at one university hospital, one central hospital, one private gynecology clinic and five healthcare centers in south-east Sweden. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim and analyzed using qualitative conventional content analysis.

    Results

    Three clusters were identified: the corroborating encounter, the normal variation of menstruation cycles, and the suspicion of endometriosis. The healthcare professionals tried to make a corroborating encounter by acknowledging the woman, taking time to listen, and giving an explanation for the problems. Healthcare professionals had different ways to determine what was normal as regards menstrual pain, ovulation pain and dyspareunia. They also needed to have the competence to act and react when the symptoms indicated endometriosis.

    Conclusions

    Meeting women with symptoms that might indicate endometriosis is challenging and demands a certain level of competence from healthcare professionals. Sometimes the symptoms are camouflaged as “normal” menstruation pain, making it hard to satisfy the needs of this patient group.

    Keywords
    Chronic pelvic pain;Dysmenorrhea;Endometriosis;Healthcare professional;Qualitative study
    National Category
    Nursing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124016 (URN)10.1016/j.srhc.2015.11.003 (DOI)000370089000012 ()
    Available from: 2016-01-18 Created: 2016-01-18 Last updated: 2019-06-28
    3. Impact of Pelvic Pain and Endometriosis on Patient-Reported Outcomes and Experiences of Benign Hysterectomy: A Study from the Swedish National Register for Gynecological Surgery
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of Pelvic Pain and Endometriosis on Patient-Reported Outcomes and Experiences of Benign Hysterectomy: A Study from the Swedish National Register for Gynecological Surgery
    2018 (English)In: Journal of Women's Health, ISSN 1540-9996, E-ISSN 1931-843X, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 691-698Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The study objective was to analyze and compare patient-reported experience measures (PREMs) and patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) after hysterectomy in women with and without a preoperative complaint of pelvic pain associated with and without a confirmed diagnosis of endometriosis. Methods: Retrospective nationwide register study. Data on 28,776 hysterectomies performed on benign indication between 2004 and 2016 were retrieved from the Swedish National Register for Gynecological Surgery. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to compare the PREMs and PROMs items. The results are presented as adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Regardless of the occurrence of pelvic pain preoperatively and a diagnosis of endometriosis, 1 year after surgery, the women were satisfied or very satisfied (amp;gt;90%) with the hysterectomy, and their medical condition was improved or much improved (amp;gt;95%). The women with a preoperative complaint of pelvic pain and endometriosis more often reported excessively short hospital stays (aOR 1.45, 95% CI 1.17-1.79), more severe complications after discharge (aOR 2.02, 95% CI 1.59-2.66) at the 8-week follow-up and at the 1-year follow-up (aOR 2.31, 95% CI 1.57-3.39), and more dissatisfaction with the operation (aOR 1.83, 95% CI 1.35-2.48) than preoperative pelvic pain-free women without endometriosis at the 1-year follow-up. Conclusions: The majority of the women were satisfied after their hysterectomy. The women with pelvic pain and endometriosis were at a higher risk of being dissatisfied. Pelvic pain per se seemed to be the main factor affecting the rating in the PREMs and PROMs, and the endometriosis was a significant contributing factor.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    MARY ANN LIEBERT, INC, 2018
    Keywords
    endometriosis; experience; hysterectomy; outcome; pelvic pain
    National Category
    Other Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-143941 (URN)10.1089/jwh.2017.6546 (DOI)000417085200001 ()29148910 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish National Quality Registry of Gynecological Surgery; Swedish Government; Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions

    Available from: 2017-12-29 Created: 2017-12-29 Last updated: 2019-06-28
  • 227.
    Grundström, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Norrköping.
    Alehagen, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Impact of Pelvic Pain and Endometriosis on Patient-Reported Outcomes and Experiences of Benign Hysterectomy: A Study from the Swedish National Register for Gynecological Surgery2018In: Journal of Women's Health, ISSN 1540-9996, E-ISSN 1931-843X, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 691-698Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The study objective was to analyze and compare patient-reported experience measures (PREMs) and patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) after hysterectomy in women with and without a preoperative complaint of pelvic pain associated with and without a confirmed diagnosis of endometriosis. Methods: Retrospective nationwide register study. Data on 28,776 hysterectomies performed on benign indication between 2004 and 2016 were retrieved from the Swedish National Register for Gynecological Surgery. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to compare the PREMs and PROMs items. The results are presented as adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Regardless of the occurrence of pelvic pain preoperatively and a diagnosis of endometriosis, 1 year after surgery, the women were satisfied or very satisfied (amp;gt;90%) with the hysterectomy, and their medical condition was improved or much improved (amp;gt;95%). The women with a preoperative complaint of pelvic pain and endometriosis more often reported excessively short hospital stays (aOR 1.45, 95% CI 1.17-1.79), more severe complications after discharge (aOR 2.02, 95% CI 1.59-2.66) at the 8-week follow-up and at the 1-year follow-up (aOR 2.31, 95% CI 1.57-3.39), and more dissatisfaction with the operation (aOR 1.83, 95% CI 1.35-2.48) than preoperative pelvic pain-free women without endometriosis at the 1-year follow-up. Conclusions: The majority of the women were satisfied after their hysterectomy. The women with pelvic pain and endometriosis were at a higher risk of being dissatisfied. Pelvic pain per se seemed to be the main factor affecting the rating in the PREMs and PROMs, and the endometriosis was a significant contributing factor.

  • 228.
    Grundström, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Norrköping.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Alehagen, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Arendt-Nielsen, Lars
    Center for Sensory‐Motor Interactions, Department of Health Science and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Reduced pain thresholds and signs of sensitization in women with persistent pelvic pain and suspected endometriosis2019In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 98, no 3, p. 327-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Endometriosis is a gynecological disorder that may cause considerable pelvic pain in women of fertile age. Determining pain mechanisms is necessary in order to optimize the treatment of the disease. The objective of the study was to evaluate pain thresholds in women with persistent pelvic pain with and without confirmed endometriosis, and healthy, unaffected controls, and analyze how pain thresholds in these cohorts related to duration of pelvic pain, quality of life, and symptoms of anxiety and depression.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Pain thresholds for heat, cold and pressure were assessed with quantitative sensory testing on six locations on a reference group of 55 healthy women and on 37 women with persistent pelvic pain who had been admitted for diagnostic laparoscopy on the suspicion of endometriosis. Validated instruments were applied to assess quality of life and symptoms of anxiety and depression. Data were analyzed by means of uni- and multivariate analysis of variance and Spearman's rank-order correlation.

    RESULTS: The women with persistent pelvic pain had significantly lower pain thresholds compared with the reference women. In the women with pain, no differences were observed in pain thresholds between women with (n = 13) and women without (n = 24) biopsy-proven endometriosis. The duration of pelvic pain correlated significantly positively with reduced pain thresholds, ie, the longer the duration, the more sensitization. In the persistent pelvic pain group, pain thresholds for heat correlated significantly with the Short Form Health Survey 36 dimension of bodily pain, and thresholds for cold correlated with Short Form Health Survey 36 bodily pain and with symptoms of depression.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our results showed widespread alterations in pain thresholds in women with persistent pelvic pain that are indicative of central sensitization and a time-dependent correlation. Women with pelvic pain and suspicion of endometriosis should probably be treated more thoroughly to prevent or at least minimize the concomitant development of central sensitization.

  • 229.
    Grundström, Hanna
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Norrköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kjølhede, Preben
    Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Alehagen, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    “A challenge” – healthcare professionals' experiences when meeting women with symptoms that might indicate endometriosis2016In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 7, p. 65-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    The aim of the study was to identify and describe the experiences of healthcare professionals when meeting women with symptoms that might indicate endometriosis.

    Methods

    Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 gynecologists, six general practitioners and nine midwives working at one university hospital, one central hospital, one private gynecology clinic and five healthcare centers in south-east Sweden. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim and analyzed using qualitative conventional content analysis.

    Results

    Three clusters were identified: the corroborating encounter, the normal variation of menstruation cycles, and the suspicion of endometriosis. The healthcare professionals tried to make a corroborating encounter by acknowledging the woman, taking time to listen, and giving an explanation for the problems. Healthcare professionals had different ways to determine what was normal as regards menstrual pain, ovulation pain and dyspareunia. They also needed to have the competence to act and react when the symptoms indicated endometriosis.

    Conclusions

    Meeting women with symptoms that might indicate endometriosis is challenging and demands a certain level of competence from healthcare professionals. Sometimes the symptoms are camouflaged as “normal” menstruation pain, making it hard to satisfy the needs of this patient group.

  • 230.
    Grundström, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Norrköping.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Arendt-Nielsen, Lars
    Aalborg Univ, Denmark.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Associations between pain thresholds for heat, cold and pressure, and Pain Sensitivity Questionnaire scores in healthy women and in women with persistent pelvic pain2019In: European Journal of Pain, ISSN 1090-3801, E-ISSN 1532-2149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The Pain Sensitivity Questionnaire (PSQ) is a self‐rating instrument developed as a time‐ and cost‐saving alternative to quantitative sensory testing (QST). The aims of the study were to assess (a) the associations between PSQ scores and QST in women with persistent pelvic pain and in pain‐free controls and (b) to what extent demographic variables and psychological distress influenced PSQ scores.

    Methods

    Fifty‐five healthy women and 37 women with persistent pelvic pain participated. All filled in the PSQ and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and had QST (heat, cold and pressure pain thresholds) performed on six locations on the body. Information on age, body mass index, smoking habits and pain duration were collected. Principal component analysis and orthogonal partial least square regressions were used.

    Results

    The patients scored significantly higher on PSQ than the controls. Significant multivariate correlations between pain thresholds and PSQ scores were found only in the patient group. In the patient group, the heat and cold pain thresholds correlated more strongly with PSQ scores than the pressure pain threshold.

    Conclusions

    The PSQ score was significantly higher in pelvic pain patients, and correlations between QSTs and the PSQ were only found for patients.

    Significance

    The PSQ reflects pain sensitivity in women with PPP and can be used as a non‐invasive and painless way to assess this condition in clinical practice.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-06-13 15:39
  • 231.
    Grönlund, V.
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Finspång, Primary Health Care in Finspång. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland.
    Carlsson, A.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Tingström, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kärner, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The desire for a good life - patients beliefs of self-care after a coronary event2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

         

    Introduction: After a first coronary event there is an increased risk for a recurrent event. Despite that risk, 1/5 of the patients continue to smoke, 1/3 is obese and more than half of the patients have elevated blood pressure and total cholesterol. Secondary preventive self-care activities are needed to improve outcomes and the belief of patients plays a vital role in changing behavior.                         

    Aim: To examine patients’ beliefs of self-care 6-12 months after a coronary event.                         

    Method: The study design was qualitative. Twenty-five patients, including 10 women, mean age 65 years with stable coronary artery disease participated in four focus group interviews. Data were taped, transcribed and analyzed according to the conventional content analysis.                         

    Findings: Patients’ belief of self-care is influenced by their desire of a good life even though life seems fragile. Patients try to live up to the standard of health care prescription and advices. However, these achievements require behavior change and conscious boundaries, which are challenged by various obstacles such as fear of, overstrain and stress. Physical activity is considered as both a source to well-being and a necessity, but patients are uncertain and afraid for overstraining. A healthy diet is seen as important but the advices given are sometimes contradictory and create confusion. Medication is found important but not at the cost of all the side-effects. Patients also report that in order to believe in their ability and to be responsible for self-care, support from health care providers is expected. But at the same time the invaluable support and information is often not provided, creating uncertainty.                         

    Discussion: The study highlights the patients’ perspective of self-care and what they view as important in self-care after an event of coronary artery disease. The patients’ expectations on health services comprise information, support and continuous follow-up. This is necessary to facilitate the patient’s responsibility for their own care.                         

    Conclusion: Patients’ beliefs about the concept of self-care after an event of coronary artery disease are multifaceted and voluminous compared to the health care definition. The findings of the study challenge health care policies approach to self-care. There is a need to reconsider and assess what and how secondary preventive patient education should be performed after an event of coronary artery disease.  

                        

  • 232.
    Grönlund, V.
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Finspång, Primary Health Care in Finspång. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland.
    Rudenas, A.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Finspång, Primary Health Care in Finspång. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland.
    Appel, M.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland.
    Ednarsson, T.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Norrköping.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland.
    Tingström, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kärner Köhler, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Problem-based learning after Coronary artery disease - how do patients experience it?2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 233.
    Guldbrand, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Dizdar, B.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bunjaku, B.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, West County Primary Health Care.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Randomization to a low-carbohydrate diet advice improves health related quality of life compared with a low-fat diet at similar weight-loss in Type 2 diabetes mellitus2014In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, ISSN 0168-8227, E-ISSN 1872-8227, Vol. 106, no 2, p. 221-227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    To compare the effects on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of a 2-year intervention with a low-fat diet (LFD) or a low-carbohydrate diet (LCD) based on four group-meetings to achieve compliance. To describe different aspects of taking part in the intervention following the LFD or LCD.

    Methods

    Prospective, randomized trial of 61 adults with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. The SF-36 questionnaire was used at baseline, 6, 12 and 24 months. Patients on LFD aimed for 55–60 energy percent (E%) and those on LCD for 20 E% from carbohydrates. The patients were interviewed about their experiences of the intervention.

    Results

    Mean body-mass-index was 32.7 ± 5.4 kg/m2 at baseline. Weight-loss did not differ between groups and was maximal at 6 months, LFD: −3.99 ± 4.1 kg, LCD: −4.31 ± 3.6 kg (p < 0.001 within groups). There was an increase in the physical component score of SF-36 from 44.1 (10.0) to 46.7 (10.5) at 12 months in the LCD group (p < 0.009) while no change occurred in the LFD group (p < 0.03 between groups). At 12 months the physical function, bodily pain and general health scores improved within the LCD group (p values 0.042–0.009) while there was no change within the LFD group.

    Conclusions

    Weight-changes did not differ between the diet groups while improvements in HRQoL only occurred after one year during treatment with LCD. No changes of HRQoL occurred in the LFD group in spite of a similar reduction in body weight.

     

  • 234.
    Gunnarsson, Stina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Alehagen, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lemming, Dag
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ertzgaard, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Berntsson, Shala Ghaderi
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Experiences from intrathecal baclofen treatment based on medical records and patient- and proxy-reported outcome: a multicentre study2019In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 41, no 9, p. 1037-1043Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate patient satisfaction with intrathecal baclofen treatment, complications from the treatment, and the impact of general expectations on treatment outcome in relation to satisfaction.

    Methods: A multicentre study with cross-sectional design. Data were collected through questionnaires and patient records. Patients were recruited from six outpatient intrathecal baclofen clinics in Sweden. Eighty-three patients who had been treated with intrathecal baclofen for 1–4 years were included. For patients unable to communicate, data were collected through a proxy. The Patient Global Impression of Change was used to measure patients’ general satisfaction with change from intrathecal baclofen treatment. The Life Orientation Test – revised, was used to measure general expectations/optimism.

    Results: General satisfaction with intrathecal baclofen treatment was high; 51/77 patients reported “much improved” or “very much improved.” There was no relationship between the two main outcomes (general satisfaction and general expectations/optimism) (rs = 0.12, p = 0.382). The two groups; those who could and those who could not communicate, did differ regarding personal characteristics and should be evaluated as such.

    Conclusions: Most patients/proxies reported a high level of satisfaction with intrathecal baclofen treatment. The reported satisfaction with intrathecal baclofen treatment was not dependent on general expectations.

    • Implications for Rehabilitation
    • Patients with intrathecal baclofen treatment report low levels of health and quality of life at the same time as they are highly satisfied with their treatment.

    • Intrathecal baclofen should be equally offered to both optimistic and less optimistic patients.

    • Patients who are able to/not able to communicate, differs in characteristics and should be informed and followed up in different ways in daily clinical practice.

  • 235.
    Gustafsson, E.
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Litström, Emma
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Drott, Jenny
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Reliability testing of oxaliplatin-associated neurotoxicity questionnaire (OANQ), a pilot study2016In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 747-754Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    The purpose of this study was to test the reliability of the Swedish version of the Oxaliplatin-Associated Neurotoxicity Questionnaire (OANQ) administrated throughout a self-reported mobile phone-based system, a pilot study.

    METHODS:

    Twenty-three patients from two university hospitals and two regional hospitals who had been treated with oxaliplatin were included through purposive sampling between autumn 2013 to autumn 2014. A test-retest was performed through a mobile phone-based system, with a recall period of 1 h to determine the reliability of the questionnaire.

    RESULTS:

    Internal consistency was strong for the three domains of the scale (α > 0.840). The statistical analyses for the test-retest indicated that the OANQ was stable. Intraclass correlation (ICC) for symptom items and effect on daily activities items showed an overall excellent reproducibility at 69 and 83 %, respectively. The weighted kappa for symptom items and daily activities items showed an overall almost perfect agreement at 59 and 52 %, respectively. A paired samples t test did not reveal any significant differences between the two measures.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The OANQ was tested and considered a reliable assessment for capturing the oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neurotoxicity (OIPN) in patients receiving oxaliplatin. However, further reliability testing of the OANQ is needed.

  • 236.
    Gustafsson, Elin
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Litström, Emma
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Drott, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Reliability testing of Oxaliplatin-Associated Neurotoxicity Questionnaire (OANQ)2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 237.
    Gutefeldt, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Hedman, Christina A
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Thyberg, Ingrid S M
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Arnqvist, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Spångeus, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Upper extremity impairments in type 1 diabetes with long duration: common problems with great impact on daily life2019In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 633-640Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To investigate the prevalence, activity limitations and potential risk factors of upper extremity impairments in type 1 diabetes in comparison to controls.

    METHODS: In a cross-sectional population-based study in the southeast of Sweden, patients with type 1 diabetes <35 years at onset, duration ≥20 years, <67 years old and matched controls were invited to answer a questionnaire on upper extremity impairments and activity limitations and to take blood samples.

    RESULTS: Seven hundred and seventy-three patients (ages 50 ± 10 years, diabetes duration 35 ± 10 years) and 708 controls (ages 54 ± 9 years) were included. Shoulder pain and stiffness, hand paraesthesia and finger impairments were common in patients with a prevalence of 28-48%, which was 2-4-folds higher than in controls. Compared to controls, the patients had more bilateral impairments, often had coexistence of several upper extremity impairments, and in the presence of impairments, reported more pronounced activity limitations. Female gender (1.72 (1.066-2.272), p = 0.014), longer duration (1.046 (1.015-1.077), p = 0.003), higher body mass index (1.08 (1.017-1.147), p = 0.013) and HbA1c (1.029 (1.008-1.05), p = 0.007) were associated with upper extremity impairments.

    CONCLUSIONS: Compared to controls, patients with type 1 diabetes have a high prevalence of upper extremity impairments, often bilateral, which are strongly associated with activity limitations. Recognising these in clinical practise is crucial, and improved preventative, therapeutic and rehabilitative interventions are needed. Implications for rehabilitation Upper extremity impairments affecting the shoulder, hand and fingers are common in patients with type 1 diabetes, the prevalence being 2-4-fold higher compared to non-diabetic persons. Patients with diabetes type 1 with upper extremity impairments have more pronounced limitations in daily activities compared to controls with similar impairments. Recognising upper extremity impairments and activity limitations are important and improved preventive, therapeutic and rehabilitation methods are needed.

  • 238.
    Gutefeldt, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Hedman, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Bachrach Lindström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Spångeus, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Arnqvist, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Dysregulated growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-1 axis in adult type 1 diabetes with long duration2018In: Clinical Endocrinology, ISSN 0300-0664, E-ISSN 1365-2265, Vol. 89, no 4, p. 424-430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ContextIn type 1 diabetes (T1D), dysregulation of the GH-IGF-1 axis has been reported. Whether this is related to upper extremity impairments (UEI) is unknown. ObjectiveExamine differences in GH-IGF-1 axis between T1D on subcutaneous insulin treatment and matched controls without diabetes and possible associations between GH-IGF-1 axis and UEI. DesignCross-sectional population-based study. Patients with T1D, onset amp;lt;35years, duration 20years, amp;lt;67years old and controls were invited to answer questionnaires and take blood samples. SubjectsA total of 605 patients with T1D and 533 controls accepted to participate. OutcomesFasting levels of IGF-1, IGF-1 Z-score, IGFBP-1, IGFBP-3, C-peptide, GH and UEI. ResultsPatients with T1D had lower IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 and higher IGFBP-1 and GH than controls. The difference in IGF-1 persisted with age. Insulin dose was associated with increasing IGF-1 Z-score but even at a very high insulin dose (amp;gt;1U/kg) IGF-1 Z-score was subnormal compared to controls. IGF-1 Z-score was unaffected by glycaemic control (HbA1c) but increased with residual insulin secretion, (C-peptide 1-99 pmol/L). IGFBP-1 was associated with fasting blood glucose, negatively in controls and positively in patients with T1D probably reflecting insulin resistance and insulin deficiency, respectively. There was no association between lower IGF-1 Z-score and UEI in T1D. ConclusionIn adult T1D with fair glycaemic control, the GH-IGF-1 axis is dysregulated exhibiting GH resistance, low IGF-1 and elevated IGFBP-1. Subcutaneous insulin cannot normalize these changes while endogenous insulin secretion has marked effects on IGF-1 pointing to a role of portal insulin.

  • 239.
    Hagell, Peter
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Sweden.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, Sweden.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Beware of the origin of numbers: Standard scoring of the SF-12 and SF-36 summary measures distorts measurement and score interpretations2017In: Research in Nursing & Health, ISSN 0160-6891, E-ISSN 1098-240X, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 378-386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 12-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-12) is a generic health rating scale developed to reproduce the Physical and Mental Component Summary scores (PCS and MCS, respectively) of a longer survey, the SF-36. The standard PCS/MCS scoring algorithm has been criticized because its expected dimensionality often lacks empirical support, scoring is based on the assumption that physical and mental health are uncorrelated, and because scores on physical health items influence MCS scores, and vice versa. In this paper, we review the standard PCS/MCS scoring algorithm for the SF-12 and consider alternative scoring procedures: the RAND-12 Health Status Inventory (HSI) and raw sum scores. We corroborate that the SF-12 reproduces SF-36 scores but also inherits its problems. In simulations, good physical health scores reduce mental health scores, and vice versa. This may explain results of clinical studies in which, for example, poor physical health scores result in good MCS scores despite compromised mental health. When applied to empirical data from people with Parkinsons disease (PD) and stroke, standard SF-12 scores suggest a weak correlation between physical and mental health (r(s). 16), whereas RAND-12 HSI and raw sum scores show a much stronger correlation (r(s). 67-.68). Furthermore, standard PCS scores yield a different statistical conclusion regarding the association between physical health and age than do RAND-12 HSI and raw sum scores. We recommend that the standard SF-12 scoring algorithm be abandoned in favor of alternatives that provide more valid representations of physical and mental health, of which raw sum scores appear the simplest.

  • 240.
    Hagglund, Eva
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hagerman, Inger
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Response to the Letter to the Editor on: Effect of yoga versus hydrotherapy training on health-related quality of life and exercise capacity in patients with heart failure: A randomized controlled study2018In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 94-94Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 241.
    Hall, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Operationsprocessen: operationsplaneringssystems betydelse för patientsäkerheten vid kirurgi 2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Patient safety is an important part in the performance of good quality in healthcare and particularly in critical areas like anesthesia and surgery. The process of surgery can be supported by an operating room information system, but there is no adequate description of how a system like this will support a safer care of the patient.

    Purpose: The aim of the present study is to describe the process and importance of an operating room information system for the patient safety in operating rooms from the perspective of employees.

    Method: An empirical study with a qualitative onset was implemented and analyzed using directed content analysis according to Hseih & Shannon. Twenty six interviews were performed from nine different positions during the process of surgery in three different hospitals in mid- and southern Sweden.

    Results: Operating room management included planning, surgery and evaluation. Extern planning was handled by the surgery ward or reception and intern planning by the surgery department. To complete the process there was an inter-department coordination and planning. Changes and insufficient planning had to be taken into account during this process of planning surgery. Executed planning functioned as the working document during the day of surgery. Evaluation was considered as mostly production-oriented and patient-related evaluation was missing. Two areas emerge from patient safety, perspective and significance. The importance of an operating room information system related to patient safety was information, safety controls, organization and changes.

    Conclusion: Patient safety was guaranteed by employees who worked in the process of surgery and not by the operating room information systems. Development of safety functions in operating room information system may improve patient safety.

  • 242.
    Hallberg, Inger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ranerup, Agneta
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Ulrika
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kjellgren, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Experiences, expectations and challenges of an interactive mobile phone-based system to support self-management of hypertension: patients and professionals perspectives2018In: Patient Preference and Adherence, ISSN 1177-889X, E-ISSN 1177-889X, Vol. 12, p. 467-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A well-controlled blood pressure (BP) reduces cardiovascular complications. Patient participation in care using technology may improve the current situation of only 13.8% of adults diagnosed with hypertension worldwide having their BP under control. Objective: The objective of this study was to explore patients and professionals experiences of and expectations for an interactive mobile phone-based system to support self-management of hypertension. Methods: The self-management system consists of: 1) a mobile phone platform for self-reports, motivational messages and reminders; 2) a device for measuring BP and 3) graphical feedback of self-reports. Patients diagnosed with high BP (n=20) and their treating professionals (n=7) participated in semi-structured interviews, after 8 weeks use of the system in clinical practice. Data were analyzed thematically. Results: The self-reporting of BP, symptoms, medication use, medication side effects, lifestyle and well-being was perceived to offer insight into how daily life activities influenced BP and helped motivate a healthy lifestyle. Taking increased responsibility as a patient, by understanding factors affecting ones well-being, was reported as an enabling factor for a more effective care. Based on the experiences, some challenges were mentioned: for adoption of the system into clinical practice, professionals educational role should be extended and there should be a reorganization of care to fully benefit from technology. The patients and professionals gave examples of further improvements to the system, for example, related to the visualization of graphs from self-reports and an integration of the system into the general technical infrastructure. These challenges are important on the path to accomplishing adoption. Conclusion: The potential of a more autonomous, knowledgeable and active patient, through use of the interactive mobile system would improve outcomes of hypertension treatment, which has been desired for decades. Documentation and visualization of patients self-reports and the possibilities to communicate these with professionals may be a significant resource for person-centered care.

  • 243.
    Hallberg, Inger
    et al.
    Institutionen för vårdvetenskap och hälsa, Göteborgs Universitet, Centrum för personcentrerad vård, Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs Universitet.
    Taft, Charles
    Institutionen för vårdvetenskap och hälsa, Göteborgs Universitet, Centrum för personcentrerad vård, Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs Universitet.
    Ranerup, Agneta
    Avdelningen för informatik, Göteborgs Universitet, Centrum för personcentrerad vård, Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs Universitet.
    Bengtsson, Ulrika
    Institutionen för vårdvetenskap och hälsa, Göteborgs Universitet, Centrum för personcentrerad vård, Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs Universitet.
    Hoffman, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Stiftelsen NEPI, Linköping .
    Höfer, Stefan
    Department of Medical Psychology, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck, Austria.
    Kasperowski, Dick
    Institutionen för filosofi, lingvistik och vetenskapsteori, Göteborgs Universitet.
    Mäkitalo, Åsa
    Institutionen för pedagogik, kommunikation och lärande, Göteborgs Universitet.
    Lundin, Mona
    Institutionen för pedagogik, kommunikation och lärande, Göteborgs Universitet.
    Ring, Lena
    Centrum för forsknings- och bioetik, Uppsala Universitet, Enheten för läkemedelsanvändning, Läkemedelsverket, Uppsala.
    Rosenqvist, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Kjellgren, Karin I
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Institutionen för vårdvetenskap och hälsa, Göteborgs Universitet, Centrum för personcentrerad vård, Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs Universitet.
    Phases in development of an interactive mobile phone-based system to support self-management of hypertension2014In: Integrated Blood Pressure Control, ISSN 1178-7104, E-ISSN 1178-7104, Vol. 7, p. 19-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hypertension is a significant risk factor for heart disease and stroke worldwide. Effective treatment regimens exist; however, treatment adherence rates are poor (30%–50%). Improving self-management may be a way to increase adherence to treatment. The purpose of this paper is to describe the phases in the development and preliminary evaluation of an interactive mobile phone-based system aimed at supporting patients in self-managing their hypertension. A person-centered and participatory framework emphasizing patient involvement was used. An interdisciplinary group of researchers, patients with hypertension, and health care professionals who were specialized in hypertension care designed and developed a set of questions and motivational messages for use in an interactive mobile phone-based system. Guided by the US Food and Drug Administration framework for the development of patient-reported outcome measures, the development and evaluation process comprised three major development phases (1, defining; 2, adjusting; 3, confirming the conceptual framework and delivery system) and two evaluation and refinement phases (4, collecting, analyzing, interpreting data; 5, evaluating the self-management system in clinical practice). Evaluation of new mobile health systems in a structured manner is important to understand how various factors affect the development process from both a technical and human perspective. Forthcoming analyses will evaluate the effectiveness and utility of the mobile phone-based system in supporting the self-management of hypertension.

  • 244.
    Hanberger, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Akesson, K.
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden Jonköping University, Sweden Jonköping University, Sweden .
    Samuelsson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Glycated haemoglobin variations in paediatric type 1 diabetes: the impact of season, gender and age2014In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 103, no 4, p. 398-403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimTo study whether monthly variations in type 1 diabetes incidence are related to monthly glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels at diagnosis and if high HbA1c at diagnosis is related to certain clinical variables at diagnosis and during the clinical course of the disease. MethodsData from 4430 boys and 3590 girls registered in the Swedish paediatric diabetes quality registry, Swedish paediatric diabetes quality registry, from 2000 to 2010 were analysed. ResultsMonth of onset varied (pless than0.001), with 53% diagnosed during September to February, and mean HbA1c at diagnosis was highest in May (10.9%, 96mmol/mol) and lowest in (October 9.4%, 88mmol/mol) (pless than0.001). Girls showed higher HbA1c at onset than boys (pless than0.001). More than half (53%) with an annual mean HbA1c of greater than9.3% (78mmol/mol) and 4% of those with an annual mean of less than7.4% (57mmol/mol) in 2007 had greater than9.3% (78mmol/mol) in 2010. ConclusionPatients with high HbA1c levels during a certain period have the same high levels several years later. This group, perhaps including those with high HbA1c level at diagnosis, may need more intensive care, including extra support from the diabetes teams and other forms of medical treatment.

  • 245.
    Hanberger, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Birkebaek, Niels
    Department of Paediatrics, Aarhus, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Denmark.
    Bjarnason, Ragnar
    Children’s Medical Center, Landspítali University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland.
    Drivvoll, Ann Kristin
    Woman and Children’s Division, Department of Paediatric Medicine, Norwegian Childhood Diabetes Registry, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Johansen, Anders
    Department of Paediatrics, Herlev University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.
    Skrivarhaug, Torild
    Woman and Children’s Division, Department of Paediatric Medicine, Norwegian Childhood Diabetes Registry, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway / Woman and Children’s Division, Department of Paediatric Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Thorsson, Arni V
    Children’s Medical Center, Landspítali University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland.
    Samuelsson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Childhood diabetes in the nordic countries: a comparison of quality registries.2014In: Journal of diabetes science and technology, ISSN 1932-2968, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 738-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2008 a Nordic collaboration was established between the quality registries in Denmark, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden to improve quality of care for children with diabetes. This study aimed to describe those registries and confirm that the registry variables are comparable. Selected variables were used to demonstrate outcome measurements. The organization of the registries and methodology are described. Cross-sectional data for patients between birth and 14.9 years with type 1 diabetes mellitus in 2009 (n = 6523) from 89 centers were analyzed. Variables were age, gender, and diabetic ketoacidosis at onset, together with age, gender, HbA1c, insulin regimen, and severe hypoglycemia at follow-up in 2009. All 4 registries use a standardized registration at the onset of diabetes and at follow-up, conducted at the local pediatric diabetes centers. Methods for measuring HbA1c varied as did methods of registration for factors such as hypoglycemia. No differences were found between the outcomes of the clinical variables at onset. Significant variations were found at follow-up for mean HbA1c, the proportion of children with HbA1c < 57 mmol/mol (NGSP/DCCT 7.4%), (range 15-31%), the proportion with insulin pumps (range 34-55%), and the numbers with severe hypoglycemia (range 5.6-8.3/100 patient years). In this large unselected population from 4 Nordic countries, a high proportion did not reach their treatment target, indicating a need to improve the quality of pediatric diabetes care. International collaboration is needed to develop and harmonize quality indicators and offers possibilities to study large geographic populations, identify problems, and share knowledge.

  • 246.
    Hanberger, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Samuelsson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Holl, Reinhard W.
    Univ Ulm, Germany; German Inst Diabet Res, Germany.
    Froehlich-Reiterer, Elke
    Med Univ Graz, Austria.
    Åkesson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Cty Hosp, Sweden; Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Hofer, Sabine
    Med Univ Innsbruck, Austria.
    Type 1 diabetes during adolescence: International comparison between Germany, Austria, and Sweden2018In: Pediatric Diabetes, ISSN 1399-543X, E-ISSN 1399-5448, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 506-511Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: By using pediatric diabetes quality registries in Austria, Germany, and Sweden treatment of type 1 diabetes and the outcome of care during the vulnerable adolescence period were compared. Methods: Data in DPV, broadly used in Austria and Germany, and Swediabkids used in Sweden, from clinical visits in the year 2013 on 14 383 patients aged 11 to 16 years regarding hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), insulin regimen, body mass index (BMI)-SD score (SDS), blood pressure, hypoglycemia, ketoacidosis, and smoking habits were analyzed. Results: Patients in Sweden had fewer clinical visits per year (P amp;lt; .05), lower insulin dose per kg (P amp;lt; .001), and lower proportion of fast acting insulin compared with Germany and Austria (P amp;lt; .001). The proportion of pump users was higher in Sweden (P amp;lt; .001). Patients in Sweden had lower mean HbA1c levels (Austria: 64 mmol/mol, Germany: 63 mmol/mol, and Sweden: 61 mmol/mol [8.0%, 7.9%, and 7.7%, respectively]; P amp;lt; .001). The frequency of severe hypoglycemia was higher in Sweden while it was lower for ketoacidosis (3.3% and 1.1%, respectively) than in Austria (1.1% and 5.3%) and Germany (2.0% and 4.4%) (P amp;lt; .001). Girls in all 3 countries had higher HbA1c and BMI-SDS than boys. Conclusions: Sharing data between diabetes registries and nations enables us to better understand differences in diabetes outcome between countries. In this particular comparison, pediatric patients with diabetes in Sweden were more often treated with insulin pump, had lower HbA1c levels and a higher rate of severe hypoglycemia. Patients in Austria and Germany used rapid acting insulin analogs more often and had a lower rate of ketoacidosis.

  • 247.
    Harle, Karolina
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Experience of living with an enterocutaneous fistula2015In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 24, no 15-16, p. 2175-2183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. The purpose of this study was to describe patients experiences of living with an enterocutaneous fistula. Background. An enterocutaneous fistula is a complex and serious illness that usually occurs as a complication from surgery or spontaneously as a result of an underlying disease. The illness is demanding both physically and mentally and causes substantial medical and nursing problems for the afflicted individual. Design. A descriptive design with a qualitative approach. Methods. In-depth interviews were performed with nine participants who had experiences of living with an enterocutaneous fistula. The analysis was conducted using descriptive phenomenology according to Giorgi. Results. The essence of this study was that living with an enterocutaneous fistula is about handling an illness that causes several limitations in daily life and the following five themes emerged from the data: restrictions in daily life, approaches to illness, emotions, dependence and need of support. A constant fear of leakage from the fistula appliance, being dependent on intravenous fluids and being dependent on health care professionals caused isolation and social restriction. Conclusions. The participants had many strategies for handling their illness. By being well trained, engaged and having a positive and understanding approach, health care professionals can encourage hope, motivation and self-care. This can lead to decreased dependence and help the patient to better handle their illness. Relevance to clinical practice. The competence of health care professionals is essential in the care of patients with an enterocutaneous fistula.

  • 248.
    Hedberg, Berith
    et al.
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden; Futurum, Sweden.
    Malm, Dan
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden; Ryhov Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Broström, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Factors associated with confidence in decision making and satisfaction with risk communication among patients with atrial fibrillation2018In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 446-455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Atrial fibrillation is a prevalent cardiac arrhythmia. Effective communication of risks (e.g. stroke risk) and benefits of treatment (e.g. oral anticoagulants) is crucial for the process of shared decision making. Aim: The aim of this study was to explore factors associated with confidence in decision making and satisfaction with risk communication after a follow-up visit among patients who three months earlier had visited an emergency room for atrial fibrillation related symptoms. Methods: A cross-sectional design was used and 322 patients (34% women), mean age 66.1 years (SD 10.5 years) with atrial fibrillation were included in the south of Sweden. Clinical examinations were done post an atrial fibrillation episode. Self-rating scales for communication (Combined Outcome Measure for Risk Communication and Treatment Decision Making Effectiveness), uncertainty in illness (Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale-Community), mastery of daily life (Mastery Scale), depressive symptoms (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and vitality, physical health and mental health (36-item Short Form Health Survey) were used to collect data. Results: Decreased vitality and mastery of daily life, as well as increased uncertainty in illness, were independently associated with lower confidence in decision making. Absence of hypertension and increased uncertainty in illness were independently associated with lower satisfaction with risk communication. Clinical atrial fibrillation variables or depressive symptoms were not associated with satisfaction with confidence in decision making or satisfaction with risk communication. The final models explained 29.1% and 29.5% of the variance in confidence in decision making and satisfaction with risk communication. Conclusion: Confidence in decision making is associated with decreased vitality and mastery of daily life, as well as increased uncertainty in illness, while absence of hypertension and increased uncertainty in illness are associated with risk communication satisfaction.

  • 249.
    Hellman, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Radiographers' perceptions of patients care needs during a computed tomography examination2014In: Journal of Radiology Nursing, ISSN 1546-0843, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 206-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe the radiographers' perceptions of the patient care that is needed by the latter undergoing a computed tomography (CT) examination. The study was conducted using phenomenography methodology. Eight female and four male radiographers were interviewed at three radiology departments in central Sweden. The radiographers highlighted that the patients' need for information regarding the whole examination was important for them to understand the procedure. The radiographers' perception was that the time required for a CT examination needs to be adjusted so that there is sufficient time for individualized patient care, while at the same time taking into account the patient's age and illness. There was also a need for the examination to be carried out by a knowledgeable professional radiographer. In conclusion, this study shows that patients are in need of good communication, information, physical/psychological care, and individualized adapted examination time. Radiographers' knowledge and ability to understand patients' needs have a significant impact if patients are involved in their examination.

  • 250.
    Hellqvist, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Support supplied by Parkinson's disease specialist nurses to Parkinson's disease patients and their spouses2015In: Applied Nursing Research, ISSN 0897-1897, E-ISSN 1532-8201, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 86-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    The purpose of the study was to identify the role of the Parkinson's disease specialist nurse in providing support both for people with Parkinson's disease (PD) and their spouses.

    BACKGROUND:

    PD is a neurodegenerative disease with symptoms that affect many aspects of daily life. In Sweden, specialised nurses called Parkinson's disease specialist nurses (PD specialist nurses) have been working for over a decade to support PD patients and their families.

    METHOD:

    A qualitative approach was taken using dyad interviews with each PD patient and spouse. The analysis was conducted using conventional qualitative content analysis.

    FINDINGS:

    The analysis resulted in the identification of one overarching category; competent, professional practice, tailored for the individual. Four categories: professional competence, nursing practice, continuity of contact and emotional support, are distinct but related to each other and show different nuances of the same phenomenon.

    CONCLUSION:

    The work of PD specialist nurses in providing support to PD patients and their relatives should be tailored to individual patients and their families as well as including skilled nursing care to relieve the impact of the disease on daily life

2345678 201 - 250 of 677
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf