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  • 201.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    "Titta, jag klar". Rhetorical devices in an immersion classroom2004In: ASLA,2003, Uppsala: ASLA , 2004, p. 178-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 202.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Touch as social control: Haptic organization of attention in adult-child interactions2016In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 92, p. 30-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the interactional organization of sustained (temporally extended) control touch, deployed in adult child encounters in Swedish primary school and family settings. The detailed analysis shows that sustained touches are employed by adults to manage and monitor childrens participation, usually calling for appropriate displays of attention to particular activities. Sustained touch sets the evolving limits on the childs postural orientation and movements by establishing a sensorial, corporeal contact and is instrumental in arranging the childs bodily positioning into a particular participation framework. Retrospectively, it orients to the child recipients inattentiveness and inappropriate participation. Prospectively, it solicits and sustains the childs coordinated and attentive participation in activities that constitute a state of talk, e.g. interactionally big packages (Sacks, 1995), i.e., adults extended instructions or disciplining. In multi-tasking situations, sustained touch works to manage the multiple overlapping participation frameworks. The adult, already engaged in a talk-based activity, constrains the touch recipients conversational contribution, or puts it on hold, using sustained touch as a prosthetic resource to signal her/his prospective attention. In all, the interactional analysis of interpersonal touch shows how the situational conditions, social roles and relations inform and shape body behavior. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 203.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    What makes a child a good language learner?: Interactional competence, identity and immersion in a Swedish language classroom2017In: Annual Review of Applied Linguistics, ISSN 0267-1905, E-ISSN 1471-6356, Vol. 37, p. 45-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The research presented here is an examination of how child language novices (zero beginners) develop interactional competences and repertoires in a Swedish as a second language classroom. Two 7-year-old girls’ learning trajectories are the focus in a yearlong study of their second language (L2) development. The girls’ transition from highly repetitious and formulaic production to formally and semantically more diverse discourse is documented, along with a broadening of the girls’ classroom interactional repertoires. They initiated and took part in interactions with teachers and peers and participated in a growing range of classroom discursive activities. The longitudinal analysis also documents the differences in their two learning trajectories, particularly in terms of their L2 resources and pragmatic skills, as well as their identities as successful or unsuccessful language learners (as ascribed to them by the teachers). The study illustrates an intricate and synergistic, rather than unidirectional, relationship between these two child novice learners’ competences, L2 features, and identities.

  • 204.
    Cekaite, Asta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andrén, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Childrens Laughter and Emotion Sharing With Peers and Adults in Preschool2019In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, article id 852Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigates how laughter features in the everyday lives of 3-5-year old children in Swedish preschools. It examines and discusses typical laughter patterns and their functions with a particular focus on childrens and intergenerational (child-adult/educator) laughter in early education context. The research questions concern: who laughs with whom; how do adults respond to childrens laughter, and what characterizes the social situations in which laughter is used and reciprocated. Theoretically, the study answers the call for sociocultural approaches that contextualize childrens everyday social interaction, e.g., in different institutions or homes, to study the diverse conditions society forms for learning, sociality, and socialization and development of shared norms. Methodologically, the study makes use of mixed methods: it uses descriptive statistics that identify prevalent patterns in laughter practices and, on the basis of these results, examines social-interactional situations of childrens laughter in detail. It was found that childrens laughter tended to be directed to children and adults laughter tended to be directed to adults. Eighty seven percent of childrens laughter was directed to other children, and adults directed their laughter to other adults 2.7 times as often as to children. The qualitative interaction analysis shows that children and adults exhibited different patterns of laughter. Children primarily sought and received affiliation through laughter in the peer group, and the adults were often focused on the institutional and educational goals of the preschool. Overall, the study shows that intergenerational reciprocal laughter was a rare occurrence and suggests that laughter between generations is interesting in that it can be seen as indicative of how children and adults handle alterity in their everyday life. By deploying multiple methods, the present study points to the importance of viewing emotion and normsharedness in social interaction not just as a matter of communicating an emotion from one person to another, but as an intricate process of inviting the others into or negotiating the common emotional and experiential ground.

  • 205.
    Cekaite, Asta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bergnehr, Disa
    Univ Boras, Sweden.
    Affectionate touch and care: embodied intimacy, compassion and control in early childhood education2018In: European Early Childhood Education Research Journal, ISSN 1350-293X, E-ISSN 1752-1807, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 940-955Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Relational care, interpersonal intimacy and emotional attunement are crucial for childrens development and wellbeing in ECEC. The present study examines how they are enacted in a Swedish preschool (for 1-5-year-olds) through recurrent adult-child physical conduct, i.e. affectionate and affectionate-controlling touch. The data consist of 24 hours of video-recorded observations of everyday activities. The study shows that educators Affectionate-Comforting touch was used for emotion regulation as compassionate response to childrens distress; Amicable touch engaged children in spontaneous affection; and, Affectionate-Controlling touch was used to mildly control and direct the childs bodily conduct and participation in preschool activities, or to mitigate the educators verbal disciplining. The study demonstrates the emotional complexity of ECEC enacted through the practices of haptic sociality. It supports the holistic policies arguing that embodied relational care should be integrated in ECEC, contrary to ideas that connect professionalism with emotional distance and lack of physical contact.

  • 206.
    Cekaite, Asta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Björk-Willén, Polly
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Att lära svenska som andraspråk i förskolan: lek och lärarledda aktiviteter2017In: Förskolan och barns utveckling / [ed] Lindgren, Anne-Li, Pramling, Nicklas; Säljö, Roger, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2017, 1, p. 125-140Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 207.
    Cekaite, Asta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Björk-Willén, Polly
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Enchantment in storytelling: Co-operation and participation in childrens aesthetic experience2018In: Linguistics and Education, ISSN 0898-5898, E-ISSN 1873-1864, Vol. 48, p. 52-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In early childhood education, storytelling has traditionally been seen as a learning activity that lays the groundwork for childrens vocabulary and literacy development. The present study uses video-recorded storytelling events to examine young childrens emotional involvement and aesthetic experiences during adult storytelling in a regular Swedish preschool for 1- to 3.5-year-olds. By adopting a multimodal interactional perspective on human sense-making, socialization, and literacy (Goodwin, 2017), it contributes to research examining multimodality in early childhood literacy (Kyratzis amp; Johnson, 2017). The analytical focus is on co-operation in aesthetic experience: the teachers ways of organizing an entertaining, affectively valorized and enchanting storytelling, and the children audiences verbal and nonverbal participation (Goodwin amp; Goodwin, 2004). The study shows that teachers used lighthouse gaze, props, marked prosody and pauses to invite the child audience to participate, join the attentive multiparty participation frameworks and share the affective layering of story. The young children exploited the recognizability of the story and contributed by co-participating through bodily repetitions, choral completions, elaborating or volunteering anticipatory contributions, and pre-empting the upcoming story segment. The study suggests that through adult-child co-operation, the embodied telling becomes a site for childrens affective and aesthetic literacy socialization. (C) 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  • 208.
    Cekaite, Asta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Björk-Willén, Polly
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Peer group interactions in multilingual educational settings: Co-constructing social order and norms for language use2013In: International Journal of Bilingualism, ISSN 1367-0069, E-ISSN 1756-6878, Vol. 17, no 2SI, p. 174-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study explores peer group interactions in early multilingual educational settings, specifically focusing on children's language-related episodes. Highlighting the multifaceted work of these interactional practices, it demonstrates in detail how children's corrective actions, targeting, assessing and criticizing of the other's language use were utilized in building the peer group identities and relations, while simultaneously indexing local norms for conduct and language use. Designed as outright disagreements with the prior speaker, corrections highlighted the contrast between the recipient's error and the speaker's remedy and entailed (a) the disagreement with the prior speaker (e.g. linguistic polarity marker 'no'), (b) the explicit identification of the trouble source ('this is not x') and (c) the instruction as to the correct replacement ('this is x'). Similarly, word searches in the peer group were resolved so as to index the asymmetry in knowledge between the peers. In the production of corrections, the children displayed and recognized the relevance of appropriate use of the lingua franca (e.g. Swedish) as part of their situated production of local social order. Language expertise was an issue for negotiations and redefinitions in multilingual peer group's interactions and was one of the factors organizing social relations in multilingual educational settings.

  • 209.
    Cekaite, Asta
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Blum-Kulka, Shoshana
    Hebrew University .
    Gröver, Vibeke
    Oslo University.
    Teubal, Eva
    D. Yellin's Teacher College, Jerusalem.
    Children's peer talk and learning: Uniting discursive, social and cultural facetsof peers' interaction2014In: Children's peer talk: Learning from each other / [ed] Cekaite Asta, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014, 1, p. 3-20Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 210.
    Cekaite, Asta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Blum-Kulka, ShoshanaHebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel.Grøver, VibekeInstitutt for pedagogikk, Oslo University, Norway.Teubal, EvaDavid Yellin Academic College of Education, Jerusalem, Israel.
    Children’s peer talk: learning from each other2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Inside and outside the classroom, children of all ages spend time interacting with their peers. Through these early interactions, children make sense of the world and co-construct their childhood culture, while simultaneously engaging in interactional activities which provide the stepping stones for discursive, social and cognitive development. This collection brings together an international team of researchers to document how children's peer talk can contribute to their socialization and demonstrates that if we are to understand how children learn in everyday interactions we must take into account peer group cultures, talk, and activities. This book will be of interest to students and researchers in the fields of language acquisition, sociolinguistics, pragmatics and discourse analysis, and related disciplines. It examines naturally occurring talk of children aged from three to twelve years from a range of language communities, and includes ten studies documenting children's interactions and a comprehensive overview of relevant research.

  • 211.
    Cekaite, Asta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ekström, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Emotion Socialization in Teacher-Child Interaction: Teachers Responses to Childrens Negative Emotions2019In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, article id 1546Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examines 1- to 5-year-old childrens emotion socialization in an early childhood educational setting (a preschool) in Sweden. Specifically, it examines social situations where teachers respond to childrens negative emotional expressions and negatively emotionally charged social acts, characterized by anger, irritation, and distress. Data consisted of 14 h of video observations of daily activities, recorded in a public Swedish preschool, located in a suburban middle-class area and include 35 children and 5 preschool teachers. By adopting a sociocultural perspective on childrens development and socialization, the study examines the communicative practices through which the expressions of negative emotions are responded to and the norms and values that are communicated through these practices. The data are analyzed by using multimodal analysis of interaction that provides a tool for detailed analysis of participants verbal and embodied actions and sense-making. The analyses show that teachers responded to childrens negatively charged emotional expressions as social acts (that were normatively evaluated), and the adults instructed children how to modify their social conduct (rather than deploying explicit discussions about emotions). The teachers used communicative genres that prioritized general moral principles and implemented the non-negotiability of norms over individual childrens emotional-volitional perspectives and individual preferences. The teachers instructive socializing activities were characterized by movement between multiple temporal horizons, i.e., general (emotional) discourse that transcended the hereand-now, and specific instructions targeting the childrens conduct in a current situation. The study discusses how emotion socialization can be related to the institutional characteristics and collective participatory social conditions of early childhood education.

  • 212.
    Cekaite, Asta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Evaldsson, Ann-Carita
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Language policies in play: Learning ecologies in multilingual preschool interactions among peers and teachers2017In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communiciation, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 451-475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we argue that a focus on language learning ecologies, that is, situations for participation in various communicative practices, can shed on the intricate processes through which minority children develop or are constrained from acquiring cultural and linguistic competencies (here, of a majority language). The analysis draws on a language socialization approach to examine the micro-level contexts of an immigrant childs preschool interactions with peers and teachers, and the interplay between these and macro-level language and educational policies. It was found that, in contrast to institutional and curricular policy aspirations concerning the positive potentials of childrens play as a site associated with core learning affordances, the language learning ecology created in the multilingual peer group interactions was limited. Social relations in the peer group, the novices marginal social position, and the childs rudimentary knowledge of the lingua franca, Swedish, precluded her from gaining access to shared peer play activities. The current study thus corroborates prior research showing that peer interactions in second language settings may pose a challenge to children who have not already achieved some competence in the majority language and that more support and interactions with the teachers can be useful.

  • 213.
    Cekaite, Asta
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Evaldsson, Ann-Carita
    Uppsala universitet, Institution för pedagogik.
    Staging linguistic identities and negotiating monolingual norms in multhiethnic school settings2008In: International Journal of Multilingualism, ISSN 1479-0718, E-ISSN 1747-7530, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 177-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on children's language alternation practices in two primary school settings. More specifically we explore how participants (children and teachers) in episodes of language alternation invoke linguistic and social identities, thereby 'talking into being' language and educational ideologies. The present study is based on multi-sited ethnography in two multiethnic educational settings where classroom activities are primarily in Swedish. Theoretically, it draws on sequential identity-related approaches to language alternation practices (Gafaranga, 2001). As demonstrated, both children and teachers draw on a range of linguistic varieties, and refrained from involving in polylingual practices. In so doing, they were actively engaged in producing and resisting a range of locally valued identities (i.e. monolingual, bilingual, and polylingual student). Simultaneously a monolingual norm was brought into being and, importantly, the children appropriated and exploited the monolingual norms-in being for organising their social relations. Overall the study highlights the links between social and linguistic identities, language choice, and language and educational ideologies. We argue that an understanding of children's polylingual practices in multilingual settings is provided by a close analysis of the local processes of identity work located within the wider sociocultural context (e.g. language and educational ideologies)

  • 214.
    Cekaite, Asta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Holm Kvist, Malva
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Correction: The Comforting Touch: Tactile Intimacy and Talk in Managing Childrens Distress (vol 50, pg 109, 2017)2017In: Research on Language and Social Interaction, ISSN 0835-1813, E-ISSN 1532-7973, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 326-326Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 215.
    Cekaite, Asta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Holm Kvist, Malva
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Comforting Touch: Tactile Intimacy and Talk in Managing Childrens Distress2017In: Research on Language and Social Interaction, ISSN 0835-1813, E-ISSN 1532-7973, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 109-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examines young childrens distress management in situ, focusing on situations of crying and caregivers embodiedhapticsoothing responses in preschools in Sweden. The adults responses to crying involve embraces, stroking, and patting. Haptic soothing is managed by calibrating the bodily proximity and postural orientations between the participants, including hapticembracing or face-to-faceformations that are coordinated with particular forms of talk. Haptic formations configure specific affordances for embodied participation by actualizing the availability of tactile, aural, and visual modalities. The interactional organization of soothing in an embracing formation involves: an initiation/invitation and response, submergence of two bodies into a close haptic contact, and coordinated withdrawal from haptic contact. The embracing formation temporarily suspends the requirements for the distressed person to act like a responsive listener and speaker. The caregiver uses the face-to-face formation to reestablish conditions for the childs interactional co-presence. Data are in Swedish and English translation.

  • 216.
    Cekaite Thunqvist, Asta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    A child's development of interactional competence in a Swedish L2 classroom2007In: The Modern language journal, ISSN 0026-7902, E-ISSN 1540-4781, Vol. 91, no 1, p. 45-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores a child's emergent second language (L2) interactional competence during her first year in a Swedish immersion classroom. Within the theoretical framework of situated learning, it focuses on how she acquires expertise in a specific classroom practice: multiparty classroom talk. The data cover three periods (the early, middle, and late phases) of her first school year. The methods adopted combine a microanalytic approach with ethnographic fieldwork analyses of L2 socialization within a classroom community. The analyses revealed systematic changes in the novice's interactional engagements. An interplay of language skills and turn-taking skills influenced her participation in multiparty talk during the three periods, casting her as (a) a silent child, (b) a noisy and loud child, and (c) a skillful student. These changes indicate that learning cannot be seen as the unilinear development of a single learner identity. It is argued that a detailed longitudinal analysis may provide important insights into the relationship between participation and L2 learning. Instead of unilinear development of a single learner identity, we may find different participation patterns linked to distinct language learning affordances over time. © 2007 The Modern Language Journal.

  • 217.
    Cekaite Thunqvist, Asta
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Aronsson, Karin
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Language play, peer group improvisations, and L2 learning2014In: Children’s peer talk: learning from each other / [ed] Asta Cekaite, Shoshana Blum-Kulka, Vibeke Grøver, Eva Teubal, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014, p. 194-213Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 218.
    Chaulagai, Som
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Understanding Childhood- Everyday Life and Welfare System, from the point of view of Childcare Workers in Finland.2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study carried out in one children’s home in Finland. This study aims to understand how the caregivers collectively perceive their work to secure and construct the childhood of the children living in the children’s home. Furthermore, the study mainly includes caregiver’s perceptions and practices of upbringing of children in the children’s home, which have been thoroughly analysed in the study. The study follows carefully designed two qualitative research methods: focus group interview and text for data collection. The data comprise one focus group interview of seven child care workers that includes five discussion questions about children’s home, listening to the children, importance of rules, regulations and daily routines, children’s future and difficulties in the work. References have been given to the ‘text’, i.e. institution’s policy documents- rules and regulations and the Finnish Child Welfare Act for the analysis of the data. However, the study does not include the analysis of the ‘text’ itself. Moreover, thematic analysis is used for data analysis.

    The study highlights that understanding childhood comprise the process of trust building between children and care workers- allowing children’s voice, agency, independence and protection respecting the child rights, personal integrity with the provision of safe home, trustable adults and permanent routines and individual child care plan. In addition, the same body ‘caregiver’ who, at the same time, allows child autonomy, agency and independence, also regulates the children’s everyday life, controls children and creates limitation, bridge trust and protect them from developing deviancy and asocial behaviours. Such process gives special consideration to the children’s psychological as well as physical incompetency such as age, immaturity and the vulnerable past in the children’s home that partly creates dilemmas/conflicts in delivering full agency to the children as mentioned in the legal frame work. The study reveals that building trust takes place through interaction between children and care workers and is a long-term process that backs up bringing corrective experiences in children. Listening to the children means helping and teaching them to recognise own feelings, emotions and stand independent and strong for oneself in the future. Likewise, respect to the child rights and organising everyday life delivers protection and safety net to the children. The study reveals, despites various difficulties at work, such as changing welfare act, complicated bureaucracy, unlimited parental rights and surprising legal interference, the child workers have the professional as well as moral obligations to protect children and provide them a safe and intact growing environment. Finally, the study reveals that future of the children is based on the personal choices they make in future and only a few of them will have relatively better life than others. However, all of the children are always under potential risk of post-traumatic collapses.

     

    Keywords: childhood, child perspective, agency, children’s voice, building trust.

     

  • 219.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Building bilingual oppositions: Code-switching in children's disputes2004In: Language in society (London. Print), ISSN 0047-4045, E-ISSN 1469-8013, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 33-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates children's procedures for constructing oppositional stances in argumentative exchanges. While most previous research on children's arguments entails a monolingual bias, the present analysis focuses on bilingual practices of code-switching in disputes emerging during play activities. Drawing on more than ten hours of video-taped play interaction in a bilingual school setting, it is shown how the language contrast arising through code-switching displays and highlights the affective intensity of oppositional stances. Sequential analyses show how code-switching works to escalate social opposition, often to the peak of an argument, resulting in subsequent backdown or full termination of the dispute. Moreover, in certain participant constellations code-switching may be used to constrain opponents' opportunities to engage in further adversative interaction. Finally, it is argued that an approach to play discourse concerned with children's methods for accomplishing accountable actions allows for a view of bilingualism as socially distributed, that is, as an emergent and interactionally managed feature of discourse. (Bilingualism, child disputes, code-switching, social interaction)*.

  • 220.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Can I be with?: Negotiating play entry in a bilingual school2001In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 515-543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines children's procedures for entering play activities in a bilingual school context. While most previous research has focused on individual `access strategies' and their outcomes for peer group participation, the present study argues for a dialogic approach, particularly stressing the collaborative work involved in such interactions. In-depth analyses of entry episodes highlight a number of interactive resources, some of them closely related to the bilingual setting. These resources are discussed in terms of their local anchoring in the discourse structure, as well as in terms of participants' orientations to their functions. On this view, bilingualism is cast as a socially distributed phenomenon, managed in the local organization of play entry negotiations.

  • 221.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Childhood and social interaction in everyday life: Introduction to the special issue2009In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 41, p. 1473-1476Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 222.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Childhood and social interaction in everyday life: Introduction to the special issue2009In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 41, no 8, p. 1473-1476Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 223.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies.
    Childhood bilingualism and metalinguistic skills: Analysis and control in young Swedish-English bilinguals1999In: Applied Psycholinguistics, ISSN 0142-7164, E-ISSN 1469-1817, Vol. 20, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 224.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Code-switching for all practical purposes: Bilingual organization of children's play2000Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines bilingual children's code-switching practices as they occur in multiparty play activities in an English school in Sweden. By focusing on the endogenous organization of play events, the study contributes to our understanding of bilingualism as both resource for and result of children's social conduct. The central questions are: what is the role of bilingual practices in children's mundane reflexive production of social order, and, specifically, what sort of interactional work may be accomplished through code-switching?

    Interpretive analyses of naturally occurring play episodes were conducted, broadly along the lines of interaction and conversation analytic research. The empirical data comprise over 20 hours of audio- and video-recorded play, taking place during recess. The analyses draw upon previous work on language alternation, which focuses on members' procedures for accomplishing locally meaningful interaction in bilingual conversation (Auer, 1984; Gumperz, 1982).

    The results are reported in four empirical studies, highlighting the following features: The children did not make use of a specialized play language. Rather, both English and Swedish were commonly spoken during recess activities. Further, the children's choice of language was locally sensitive and guided by a general preference for same language talk. In light of this preference, the linguistic contrast arising with code-switching served to contextualize children's actions. More specifically, the empirical studies demonstrate (i) how code-switching may be used to facilitate children's entry into ongoing play; (ii) how it may serve to bring about a shift in conversational footing; (iii) to highlight the oppositional nature of certain actions within dispute exchanges, and finally, (iv) to enhance, in certain sequential locations, children's competitive bids for the conversational floor.

    The present approach diverges from the monolingual perspective traditionally adopted in research on bilingualism, as well as the commonplace conceptualization of bilingualism as, above all, an aspect of the individual mind. Instead, bilingualism is viewed as a set of contingent practices within joint activities in play. Thus, the present study highlights the socially distributed nature of bilingualism, managed and accomplished within interactional exchanges.

    List of papers
    1. Can I be with?: Negotiating play entry in a bilingual school
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can I be with?: Negotiating play entry in a bilingual school
    2001 (English)In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 515-543Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines children's procedures for entering play activities in a bilingual school context. While most previous research has focused on individual `access strategies' and their outcomes for peer group participation, the present study argues for a dialogic approach, particularly stressing the collaborative work involved in such interactions. In-depth analyses of entry episodes highlight a number of interactive resources, some of them closely related to the bilingual setting. These resources are discussed in terms of their local anchoring in the discourse structure, as well as in terms of participants' orientations to their functions. On this view, bilingualism is cast as a socially distributed phenomenon, managed in the local organization of play entry negotiations.

    Keywords
    Social interaction, Conversation analysis, Bilingualism, Children's play
    National Category
    Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-22879 (URN)10.1016/S0378-2166(99)00131-9 (DOI)2220 (Local ID)2220 (Archive number)2220 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Footing in bilingual play
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Footing in bilingual play
    2000 (English)In: Journal of Sociolinguistics, ISSN 1360-6441, E-ISSN 1467-9841, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 435-457Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In Goffman's classic paper (1979), bilingual code-switching was seen as a prototypical device for accomplishing shifts in footing. Yet his work has not informed research on code-switching to any great extent. The present study of primary school children's play interaction in an English-Swedish school setting combines a sequential approach to code-switching with an analysis of footing (cf. Auer 1984), extending prior work in showing that code-switches often involve subtle shifts of footing, both in terms of production formats and participation frameworks. Code-switches were employed as important rhetorical and dramaturgic play devices, e.g. when contextualizing changes of addressee and shifts of frame (e.g. serious, nonserious). In contrast to earlier, often speaker-centered work, reception is discussed in-depth in the present analyses, and it is shown that footings are truly interactional achievements.

    Keywords
    Bilingualism, Code-switching, Footing, Play dialogues
    National Category
    Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-22877 (URN)10.1111/1467-9481.00123 (DOI)2218 (Local ID)2218 (Archive number)2218 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
    3. Building bilingual oppositions: Code-switching in children's disputes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Building bilingual oppositions: Code-switching in children's disputes
    2004 (English)In: Language in society (London. Print), ISSN 0047-4045, E-ISSN 1469-8013, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 33-58Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates children's procedures for constructing oppositional stances in argumentative exchanges. While most previous research on children's arguments entails a monolingual bias, the present analysis focuses on bilingual practices of code-switching in disputes emerging during play activities. Drawing on more than ten hours of video-taped play interaction in a bilingual school setting, it is shown how the language contrast arising through code-switching displays and highlights the affective intensity of oppositional stances. Sequential analyses show how code-switching works to escalate social opposition, often to the peak of an argument, resulting in subsequent backdown or full termination of the dispute. Moreover, in certain participant constellations code-switching may be used to constrain opponents' opportunities to engage in further adversative interaction. Finally, it is argued that an approach to play discourse concerned with children's methods for accomplishing accountable actions allows for a view of bilingualism as socially distributed, that is, as an emergent and interactionally managed feature of discourse. (Bilingualism, child disputes, code-switching, social interaction)*.

    Keywords
    bilingualism, child disputes, code-switching, social interaction
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-46304 (URN)10.1017/S0047404504031021 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    4. Overlap in Bilingual Play: Some Implications of Code-Switching for Overlap Resolution
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Overlap in Bilingual Play: Some Implications of Code-Switching for Overlap Resolution
    2001 (English)In: Research on Language and Social Interaction, ISSN 0835-1813, E-ISSN 1532-7973, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 421-451Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines children's procedures for dealing with simultaneous bilingual speech as it anses in multiparty play episodes. Sequential analyses of more than 10 hr of videorecorded recess activities at an English school in Sweden revealed that children use an array of methods to minimize the overlapping passage. Erceptions to tins may be found in exchanges that are demonstrably competitive with regard to turn taking, in which participants' actions strive to gain exclusive rights to the floor, often resulting in stretched overlaps. Moreover, the sequential location of bilingual overlap onset proved relevant for its resolution: Whereas in onset paticipants would use different methods to deal with simultaneity, resulting in various outcomes of overlap negotiation, instances of overlapping turn baginnings occasioned by multiple self-selection were always resolved the same way, with the speaker diverging from the language of previous turns(s) keeping the floor. It is therefore suggested that the linguistic contrast arising with the code-switch may enhance second speakers' chances to acquire the floor and that the effectiveness of this "turn security device" is strongly dependent on its sequential placement.

    National Category
    Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-34392 (URN)10.1207/S15327973RLSI3404_02 (DOI)21400 (Local ID)21400 (Archive number)21400 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
  • 225.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Handlingars konsekvens och tolkningars relevans: Om deltagarorientering inom konversationsanalys2009In: Den väsentliga vardagen: Några diskursanalytiska perspektiv på tal, text och bild, Stockholm: Carlssons , 2009, 1, p. 39-73Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Här ger arton forskare som alla varit doktorander till professor Karin Aronsson sin beskrivning av olika former av vardagliga fenomen. Det handlar om hur människor i olika sammanhang samspelar och skapar mening. Gemensamt för de författare som bidrar i boken är att de är eller har varit doktorander vid Institutionen Barn och tema Kommunikation, vid Linköpings universitet. Sedan mitten av 1980-talet har institutionen erbjudit en dynamisk forskningsmiljö för personer med intresse för samtal, kulturella uttryck och socialt liv i och utanför institutionella sammanhang.

  • 226.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Overlap in Bilingual Play: Some Implications of Code-Switching for Overlap Resolution2001In: Research on Language and Social Interaction, ISSN 0835-1813, E-ISSN 1532-7973, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 421-451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines children's procedures for dealing with simultaneous bilingual speech as it anses in multiparty play episodes. Sequential analyses of more than 10 hr of videorecorded recess activities at an English school in Sweden revealed that children use an array of methods to minimize the overlapping passage. Erceptions to tins may be found in exchanges that are demonstrably competitive with regard to turn taking, in which participants' actions strive to gain exclusive rights to the floor, often resulting in stretched overlaps. Moreover, the sequential location of bilingual overlap onset proved relevant for its resolution: Whereas in onset paticipants would use different methods to deal with simultaneity, resulting in various outcomes of overlap negotiation, instances of overlapping turn baginnings occasioned by multiple self-selection were always resolved the same way, with the speaker diverging from the language of previous turns(s) keeping the floor. It is therefore suggested that the linguistic contrast arising with the code-switch may enhance second speakers' chances to acquire the floor and that the effectiveness of this "turn security device" is strongly dependent on its sequential placement.

  • 227.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Pragmatic skills and awareness in bilinguals: Children¿s directives in school contexts1996Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Bearing in mind the vast amount of research within the field of second language leruning (see McLaughlin, 1985 for a review), surprisingly little attention has been given to the pragmatic development of young L2 leruners. As pragmatic skills constitute an important part of a person's communicative competence, this is somewhat unfortunate.

    The present work is an attempt to investigate pragmatic aspects of young bilinguals' communicative behavior. The following sections are merely intended to give the reader a brief introduction to the concepts used and perspectives considered in the study at hand, they do not provide an extensive overview of the field of research.

  • 228.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Review of O. Kuure: Discovering traces of the past: Studies of bilingualism among school pupils in Finland and in Sweden.1999In: Applied Psycholinguistics, ISSN 0142-7164, E-ISSN 1469-1817, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 589-597Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 229.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Aronsson-Ottosson, Karin
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Footing in bilingual play2000In: Journal of Sociolinguistics, ISSN 1360-6441, E-ISSN 1467-9841, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 435-457Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Goffman's classic paper (1979), bilingual code-switching was seen as a prototypical device for accomplishing shifts in footing. Yet his work has not informed research on code-switching to any great extent. The present study of primary school children's play interaction in an English-Swedish school setting combines a sequential approach to code-switching with an analysis of footing (cf. Auer 1984), extending prior work in showing that code-switches often involve subtle shifts of footing, both in terms of production formats and participation frameworks. Code-switches were employed as important rhetorical and dramaturgic play devices, e.g. when contextualizing changes of addressee and shifts of frame (e.g. serious, nonserious). In contrast to earlier, often speaker-centered work, reception is discussed in-depth in the present analyses, and it is shown that footings are truly interactional achievements.

  • 230.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Evaldsson, Ann-Carita
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies.
    Flerspråkighet till vardags - en introduktion2004In: Ett vardagsliv med flera språk / [ed] Jakob Cromdal och Ann-Carita Evaldsson, Stockholm: Liber , 2004, 1, p. 11-43Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Flerspråkighet bland barn är ett aktuellt ämne i Norden, såväl för forskare som inom skolans värld. Men synen på flerspråkighet präglas fortfarande i mångt och mycket av en enspråkig världsåskådning, där tvåspråkiga individer ses som "dubbelt enspråkiga".Denna nordiska antologi förhåller sig kritisk till den enspråkiga normen. Genom att i detalj studera hur barn och ungdomar i flerspråkiga miljöer samspelar i vardagliga situationer på skolgården och i klassrummet, visar författarna hur flerspråkighet kan förstås som en social praktik, som något människor använder i sin vardag för en rad olika syften.

  • 231.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Landqvist, Håkan
    Akademin för utbildning, kultur och kommunikation, Mälardalens högskola.
    Persson Thunqvist, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Osvaldsson, Karin
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Finding out what’s happened: Two procedures for opening emergency calls2012In: Discourse Studies, ISSN 1461-4456, E-ISSN 1461-7080, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 371-397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines two corpora of telephone calls to the Swedish emergency services SOSAlarm. The focus of analysis is on the procedural consequentiality of the routine opening by theoperator. In the first corpus, the summons are answered by identification of the service via the emergency number. In the second corpus, the protocol has been altered, such that the opening entails the emergency number combined with a standard query concerning the nature of the incident. Through sequential and categorial analysis of the two collections, we highlight the distinct trajectories of action ensuing from the two opening protocols. The stand-alone emergency number opening typically results in callers asking for a specific service. In contrast, opening turns that endwith a direct query about the incident tend to solicit brief descriptions of the trouble. We discuss the benefits of the latter procedure in terms of topical progression and institutional relevance, proposing that the work of emergency assistance agencies worldwide might consider implementing opening routines with a similar design.

  • 232.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Osvaldsson, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Managing and Exploiting Interruption in Multiparty Talk2006In: Advances in Communications and Media Research, New York: Nova Publishers , 2006, p. 103-127Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In a society predicated on information, the media has a pervasive presence. From government policy to leisure television, the information age touches us all. The papers collected in this book constitute some of today's leading analyses of the information industry. Together, these essays represent a needed foundation for understanding the present state and future development of the mass media. Current trends in communications as well as media impact on public opinion are studied and reported on.

  • 233.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Osvaldsson, Karin
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Working towards trouble: Some categorial resources for accomplishing disputes in a correctional youth facility2012In: Disputes in Everyday Life: Social and Moral Orders of Children and Young People / [ed] Susan Danby & Maryanne Theobald, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2012, p. 141-163Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Volume 15 of Sociological Studies of Children and Youth investigates the interactional procedures used by children and young people as disputes arise in varying contexts of their everyday life. Disputes are a topic of angst and anxiety for children, young people and adults alike, and yet are important times for interactional matters to be addressed. A particular intention of the book is its ethnomethodological focus, bringing a fine-grained analysis and understanding to disputes and related interactional matters. Such analysis highlights the in situ competency of children and young people as they manage their social relationships and disputes to offer insight into how children arrange their social lives within the context of school, home, neighbourhood, correctional, club and after school settings. This volume offers a contemporary understanding of the relational matters of childrens peer cultures to better understand and address the complex nature of children and young peoples everyday lives in todays society. 

  • 234.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Osvaldsson, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Persson Thunqvist, Daniel
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute.
    Barn ringer 1122007In: Signalen - Tidningen "För ett tryggare samhälle" från SOS Alarm, ISSN 1651-6958, no 2, p. 28-30Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 235.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Osvaldsson, Karin
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Persson-Thunqvist, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Sociology . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Context that matters: Producing “thick-enough descriptions” in initial emergency reports2008In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 40, p. 927-959Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines how troublesome events are described in children’s emergency calls. In focus forthe analysis are the procedures through which participants methodically deal with contextual informationconcerning the reported emergency event during the early phases of the call, i.e., up to the point where theoperator is able to set emergency priority. This choice is motivated by a set of institutional concerns thatsurface in the interaction typically, but not solely, through the operator’s ways of receiving and managing thecaller’s unfolding report. The initial phase of emergency calls thus offers a locus of order, a phenomenon initself, in addition to offering access to some of the finer details of sequential and categorical organisation ofinteraction in emergency calls. Applying Ryle’s (1968) distinction between ‘thin’ vs. ‘thick’ description(roughly, the description of an observed event vs. description of the meaning of an observed event) to thereporting of emergencies, we argue that determining the relevant level of ‘thickness’ is, above all, a task forthe participants themselves. Hence, our analysis shows that interaction during the early phases of emergencycalls is distinctively geared towards producing a ‘thick-enough’ description of the reported event. Thesefindings are discussed in terms of the methodological problem of how features of the context can enterinteraction analytic accounts of institutional exchanges. Specifically, we argue that relevant features ofcontext ‘brought along’ to emergency calls (to do, for instance, with operators’ institutional agendas orcallers’ situations) are also ‘brought about’ by the participants as part of the interactional work throughwhich one party’s observations are jointly transformed into descriptions that form accountable reports ofemergency events.

  • 236.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Persson-Thunqvist, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Osvaldsson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    ‘‘SOS 112 what has occurred?’’: Managing openings in children’s emergency calls2012In: Discourse, Context & Media, ISSN 2211-6958, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 183-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the initial exchanges in calls to the Swedish emergency services, focusing on callers’ responses to the standardised opening phrase “SOS one one two, what has occurred?”. Comparisons across three age groups – children, teenagers and adults – revealed significant differences in caller behaviour. Whereas teenagers and adults offered reports of the incident, child callers were more prone to request dispatch of specific assistance units. This pattern was only observable when children were accompanied by an adult relative, which leads us to propose that child callers may be operating under prior adult instruction concerning how to request help. The second part of the analysis examines the local organisation of participants' actions, showing how turn-design and sequencing manifest the local concerns of the two parties. The analysis thus combines quantitative and qualitative methods to explore the ways through which the parties jointly produce an early sense of emergency incidents. These results are discussed in terms of children's agency and competence as informants granted to them by emergency operators, and how such competence ascriptions run against commonsense conceptualisations of children as less-than-full-fledged members of society.

  • 237.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sparrman, Anna
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Evaldsson, Ann-Carita
    Uppsala University.
    Adelswärd, Viveka
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Några diskursanalytiska perspektiv på tal, text och bild2009In: Den väsentliga vardagen: Några diskursanalytiska perspektiv på tal, text och bild, Stockholm: Carlssons , 2009, 1, p. 13-35Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Här ger arton forskare som alla varit doktorander till professor Karin Aronsson sin beskrivning av olika former av vardagliga fenomen. Det handlar om hur människor i olika sammanhang samspelar och skapar mening. Gemensamt för de författare som bidrar i boken är att de är eller har varit doktorander vid Institutionen Barn och tema Kommunikation, vid Linköpings universitet. Sedan mitten av 1980-talet har institutionen erbjudit en dynamisk forskningsmiljö för personer med intresse för samtal, kulturella uttryck och socialt liv i och utanför institutionella sammanhang.

  • 238.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies.
    Tholander, Michael
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning.
    Aronsson, Karin
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies.
    Doing reluctance: Managing delivery of assessments in peer evaluation2007In: Discursive research in practice: New approaches to psychology and interaction / [ed] Alexa Hepburn, Sally Wiggins, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press , 2007, p. 203-222Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past few decades new ways of conceiving the relation between people, practices and institutions have been developed, enabling an understanding of human conduct in complex situations that is distinctive from traditional psychological and sociological conceptions. This distinctiveness is derived from a sophisticated analytic approach to social action which combines conversation analysis with the fresh treatment of epistemology, mind, cognition and personality developed in discursive psychology. This text is the first to showcase and promote this new method of discursive research in practice. Featuring contributions from a range of international academics, both pioneers in the field and exciting new researchers, this book illustrates an approach to social science issues that cuts across the traditional disciplinary divisions to provide a rich participant-based understanding of action.

  • 239.
    Dackman, Tua
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    "Med hänsyn till barnens bästa": Vårdnaden om barn efter skiljsmässa i svensk lagstiftning 1900-1976 samt i Linköpings Rådhusrätt 1921-19531999Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med denna första del av rapporten ar att undersöka den svenska lagstiftningen, samt tillkomsten av densamma. angående vårdnaden om barn efter aktenskapsskillnad under 1900-talet för att få en inblick i lagstiftarnas syn på faderns respektive moderns förhållande till barnen med avseende på lämplighet att ta hand om barnen efter en skilsmässa.

    Hur skulle enligt lagtexten vårdnanden om bamen ordnas efter äktenskapsskillnad? Vilka synpunkter på moderns respektive faderns förhållande till barnen framkommer i förarbetena till och debatten kring den aktuella lagstiftningen och annan relevant lagstiftning? Vilka faktorer ansågs viktiga att ta hänsyn till vid avgörandet av vårdnadsfrågan? Kort och gott. vilken innebörd får uttrycket "barnens bästa" i detta  lagstiftningsarbete under 1900-talet?

  • 240. Dahl, Thomas
    et al.
    Lindgren, Anne-Li
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Gullberg, Eva
    Lindgren, Cecilia
    Axelsson, Thom
    Qvarsebo, Jonas
    Sandin, Bengt
    Areschoug, Judith
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute.
    Conference Review: Chilhood and the State - the State of Childhood. The Society for the History of Children and Youth (SHCY) Bi-Annual Conference 26-29 June2003In: H-Education, Vol. OctoberArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 241.
    Danby, Susan
    et al.
    Queensland University of Technology, Australia.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Rendle-Short, Johanna
    Australian National University, Australia.
    Butler, Carly
    Loughborough University, UK.
    Osvaldsson Cromdal, Karin
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Emmison, Michael
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Parentification: Counselling talk on a helpline for children and young people2015In: The Palgrave Handbook of Child Mental Health / [ed] Michelle O'Reilly & Jessica Nina Lester, Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, p. 578-596Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This Handbook illustrates the importance of examining child mental health from a different perspective, one that assumes that psychiatric categories are made real in and through both written and spoken language. It gathers a range of applied and theoretical analyses from leading scholars and clinicians in order to examine the conversational practices of children diagnosed with mental health disorders alongside those of their parents, families and practitioners. The contributors move away from viewing mental illness as an objective truth; instead reintroducing the relevance of language in constructing and deconstructing the assumptions that surround the diagnosis and treatment of childhood mental health disorders. Including chapters on ADHD, autism, depression, eating disorders and trauma, this collection addresses the diversity involved in discussing child mental health.Divided into six parts: the place of conversation/discourse analysis; critical approaches; social constructions of normal/abnormal; situating and exploring the difficulties involved; managing problem behaviour and discussing different practices involved; this Handbook presents a comprehensive overview of child mental health. It is an essential reference resource for all those involved or interested in child mental health.

  • 242.
    Danby, Susan
    et al.
    Queensland University of Technology, School of Early Childhood .
    Osvaldsson, Karin
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Bullying: The Moral and Social Orders at Play2011In: Children & society, ISSN 0951-0605, E-ISSN 1099-0860, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 255-257Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 243.
    de Conink-Smith, Ning
    et al.
    Department of Education. Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Sandin, Bengt
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Schrumpf, Ellen
    Högskolan i Telemark, Norway.
    Industrious Children: Work and Childhood in the Nordic Countries 1850-19901997Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Children's work is a controversial subject both in the sciences of sociology and history. It does not accord well with the modern idea of a good childhood - that children actually work. Children ought to spend their time playing and attending school. The historians' interest has focused on industrial child labour - its emergence and its disappearance. But relatively few children worked in industry. Far more children were employed in agriculture and retail trade, if they did not help at home or at the neighbour's. Sometimes they received pay - other times not - and they often worked on the edge of the law.The articles in this book examine children's work from the mid-1800's and until the 1990's, because children's work is not a closed chapter in history. But, the character and social function of the children's work have been changed over time. This anthology is the result of an inter-Nordic research project about children's work in the Nordic countries involving all the five Nordic countries

  • 244.
    Eckert, Gisela
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Notions of Children and Childhood Parents Talking about Children's TV-habits1998Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The general purpose of my study is to examine what different notions of children and childhood emerge when parents talk about children's TV-habits. More specifically, this paper concentrates on two aspects of children's use of television in which parents' concern about protecting children becomes evident. The two aspects are: the question of whether children should be allowed to watch the news and the question of limiting the time children are allowed to spend in front of the TV.

  • 245.
    Eckert, Gisela
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wasting time or having fun?: Cultural meanings of children and childhood2001Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores contemporary cultural meanings of children and childhood in a Swedish context. Its point of departure is an understanding that the meanings ascribed to what it is to be a child and what childhood is, are part of culture and, as such, transform through time and space. As a way to access everyday ideas of children and childhood, two groups of children and their parents were interviewed about one of two child activities, namely children's play or children's TV-habits. In order to create a situation in which they could reflect on the topics discussed and express a variety of ideas, the interviews were semi-structured.

    The analysis was inspired by the work of Strauss and Quinn (1997) and their cognitive theory of cultural meaning, as well as by Billig et al.'s (1988) concept of ideological dilemmas. According to Strauss and Quinn (1997), cultural meanings can be traced in expressions of typical everyday ideas - shared among a group of people - about a phenomenon. In line with this, the interviews were scrutinized with the aim of finding shared expressions, arguments, metaphors and/or interpretations evoked in talk about children's play or TV-habits. These shared themes, in turn, have been looked upon as cultural meanings of children and childhood.

    The analysis resulted in the formulation of several cultural meanings of children and childhood. There is the educational childhood that focuses on learning, the idyllic childhood that stresses harmony, and the child-guided childhood that takes its point of departure from pleasure and fun. Additionally, there is the vulnerable child who needs adult protection, the robust child who can endure some problems, and children as small people who should be negotiated with. Moreover, there are the preferred innocent and the potentially evil child. In the interviews, accounts forming the basis of the different cultural meanings were intertwined. At times, these accounts were contradictory. This could take the form of overt reasoning around a particular dilemma. It could also be manifested in more salient dilemmas. For example, in the TV interviews it proved to be difficult to associate TV with accepted forms of relaxation. The children, in turn, presented their views on how the adult world talks about children, play and TV. In their discussions, children were characterized as vulnerable and potentially evil, but valuable. The children sometimes argued against the perceived adult view by putting themselves in a more competent and active position. However, it was also possible to trace widespread trust in adults.

  • 246.
    Enander, Viveka
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Högskola.
    Holmberg, Carin
    Ersta Sköndal Högskola.
    Lindgren, Anne-Li
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Ersta Sköndal Högskola.
    Att följa med samtiden: kvinnojoursrörelse i förändring2013Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna bok handlar om rörelsepolitik, det vill säga en social rörelses politiska påverkansmöjligheter. Det är den första studien av en riksorganisation inom den svenska kvinnojoursrörelsen och har såväl ett historiskt som dagsaktuellt anslag. Sveriges Kvinno- och Tjejjourers Riksförbund (SKR) bröt sig ur Riksorganisationen för kvinnojourer och tjejjourer (Roks) i Sverige vid mitten av 1990-talet i samband med en konflikt vars ideologiska kärna var synen på feminism, män och barn. Ur SKR:s perspektiv handlade konflikten också om olika synsätt på organisation, demokrati och öppenhet. I boken analyseras de skiljelinjer som SKR valde att fokusera vid starten och i den fortsatta verksamheten. Samtidigt undersökt vilken påverkan den nya organisationen haft på den politiska dagordningen. Vilka framgångar kan skönjas och vad har offrats på vägen? Här analyseras samtidspolitiska förändringar genom en ideell organisations formering och utveckling och i relation till både det civila samhället och staten.

  • 247.
    Eriksson (Barajas), Katarina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies.
    Booktalk Dilemmas2001In: Oxford Ethnography and Education Conference, 2001, Vol. 46, p. 391-408Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The syllabus for mother tongue teaching in Sweden states that an essential goal is that pupils, in conversation with others, should be able to express feelings and thoughts evoked by literature. The present paper addresses how schools try to promote pupils' reading, examining authentic school-run booktalk conversations from a discursive approach. The data consists of video-recorded sessions with small groups of pupils in Grades 4-7. A series of booktalk dilemmas were identified. The so-called book clubs studied were aimed at promoting reading for pleasure. Yet, literary practices were, at times, transformed into calculating tasks, vocabulary lessons or reading aloud exercises. Another complication concerned the synchronising of the pupils' reading, which led to extensive negotiations on the part of teacher and pupils.

  • 248.
    Eriksson (Barajas), Katarina
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Booktalk Dilemmas: teachers’ organisation of pupils’ reading2002In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 391-408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The syllabus for mother tongue teaching in Sweden states that an essential goal is that pupils, in conversation with others, should be able to express feelings and thoughts evoked by literature. The present paper addresses how schools try to promote pupils’ reading, examining authentic school-run booktalk conversations from a discursive approach. The data consists of video-recorded sessions with small groups of pupils in Grades 4–7. A series of booktalk dilemmas were identified. The studied so-called book clubs were aimed at promoting reading for pleasure. Yet, literary practices were, at times, transformed into (i) calculating tasks, (ii) vocabulary lessons, or, (iii) reading aloud exercises. Another complication concerned the synchronising of the pupils’ reading that led to extensive negotiations on the part of teacher and pupils.

  • 249.
    Eriksson (Barajas), Katarina
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hur används film i skolan?: Nytt forskningsprojekt ska ge svar på frågan2003In: Svenskläraren, ISSN 0346-2412, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 17-18Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Det finns en rad kartläggningar av vilka skolor som använt skolfilm. Det finns också anvisningar för hur skolorna bör arbeta med skolbio. Men det saknas forskning om hur skolbiofilmerna faktiskt används ute på skolorna. En grupp forskare vid Linköpings universitet har just börjat undersöka det.

  • 250.
    Eriksson (Barajas), Katarina
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Life and Fiction2005Conference paper (Other academic)
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