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  • 201.
    Nylander, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Dahlin, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Ebeling, C
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Vektorkardiografi bättre än skalärt EKG för diagnos av perioperativ hjärtinfarkt2000In: Kardiovaskulära dagarna,2000, 2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 202.
    Nyman, Ingvar
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Signs and implications of ischemia in unstable coronary artery disease1993Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Signs and implications of ischemia in ECG at rest and at a predischarge exercise test (ET), were assessed in 911 patients with suspected or definite unstable coronary artery disease (CAD) - i.e. unstable angina or non-Q-wave myocardial infarction (MI). Included in the study were men below 70 years of age admitted to the coronary care units of 8 hospitals,without signs of myocardial dysfunction or other serious disease. Randomization to acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) 75 mg daily or placebo was performed in 796 patients, as a part of the RISC study. A symptom limited predischarge ET was performed by 855 patient,, In initial ECG:s at rest, ST-changes were a more unfavourable sign regarding cardiac eventsthan isolated T-inversion, while those with no ST-segment or T-wave changes had the best prognosis. However, among patients on ASA treatment, ST -depression in ECG at rest was of some, although limited prognostic value.

    Concerning the ET evaluation, multiple logistic regression analysis showed that exercise induced ST -depression and exercise tolerance were independent predictors of MI or death, while ST -depression, exercise tolerance and provoked chest pain were independent predictors of future severe angina. When both ST-depression and work capacity was considered, a 'high risk' response at ET implied a !-year rate for cardiac death of 3.6% and for Ml+death of 15.4%. The corresponding figures for a 'low risk' response were 0% and 3.9%. The differences between patients with 'high risk' and 'low risk' responses at the ET were highly significant also regarding future severe angina. The prognostic value of the ET remained high in subgroups based on cardiac enzyme levels, age, findings in ECG at rest, and medication at time for the ET.

    The risk of cardiac death or MI was comparably increased in all patients with ST-depression at exercise, regardless of the presence or absence of chest pain. Thus, evaluation of prognosis should be based on the presence of myocardial ischemia, whether symptomatic or not. ASA 75 mg daily reduced the risk of MI or death at least as well in patients with 'silent ischemia' as in those with 'symptomatic ischemia' at the ET, and should be a mainstay of the treatment of symptom-free individuals.

    Among patients on ASA treatment, the finding of ST-depression alone at exercise was an insufficient indicator of the irreversible end points, due to the reduced absolute risk of MI or death. When both ST -depression and exercise tolerance were used in the evaluation, it was possible to identify a definite low-risk subset (40% of the ASA group) with a !-year rate ofMI or death of 2.9%, where further invasive investigation does not seem warranted. In ASA treated patients, the 'high risk' response at the ET implied a risk of MI or death of 13.4% during the following year. In this relatively large subset additional prognostic tests would be useful. Until such methods arc readily available and evaluated, early coronary angiography and possible revascularization should be considered in patients with severe ischemia.

  • 203.
    Olhager, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Department of health and environment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thuomas, Karl-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Forsum, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Nutrition. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Description and evaluation of a method based on magnetic resonance imaging to estimate adipose tissue volume and total body fat in infants1998In: Pediatric Research, ISSN 0031-3998, E-ISSN 1530-0447, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 572-577Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information about body fatness is important during nutritional assessment of infants, but current methods to estimate body composition in vivo are often not applicable in infants. Therefore, a new method based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was developed. This method, which can assess the volume and distribution of adipose tissue (AT) as well as total body fat, was applied in 11 healthy full-term infants. Their total body water was also estimated using the isotope dilution technique. Adipose tissue volume (ATV) was calculated from AT area in 16 images of the body taken by an MRI scanner (1.5 tesla). AT area was assessed using a computer program in which AT criteria was defined by the observer. ATV of the infants was therefore evaluated once by three observers and twice by a fourth observer. The different observers estimated total, s.c., and non-s.c. ATV with a precision that varied between 1.9 and 7.2%, 2.0 and 4.8%, and 4.2 and 40.7%, respectively. Variations during AT area calculations accounted for a large part of the imprecision when assessing total and s.c. ATV. The linear relationship between percent total body water and total ATV in relation to body weight was significant in all evaluations. Although average total ATV varied when estimated by the four observers, there was, within each evaluation, a fairly constant order between infants with respect to their ATV. It is concluded that the MRI procedure represents a useful possibility to assess body fatness in infants.

  • 204.
    Olsson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Radiation Physics.
    Davidsson, Anette
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Pettersson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Gustafsson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Finger doses from handling radioative isotopes at a Nuclear Medicine department2006In: EANM,2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 205.
    Olsson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Radiation Physics.
    Gustafsson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Hellerström, Sabine
    Klinsik Fysiologi HC.
    Granerus, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology Santiago, Chile, 20022002In: World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology Santiago, Chile 2002,2002, 2002Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 206.
    Petersson, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice.
    Östgren, Carl-Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    brismar, kerstin
    KI.
    Nilsson, Peter M
    Malmö.
    Association between elevated blood pressure and surrogate markers for insulin resistance in a defined population. The Söderåkra Cardiovascular Risk Factor Study2006In: ESH,2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 207. Piepsz, A
    et al.
    Blaufox, M D
    Gordon, I
    Granerus, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Majd, M
    O'Reilly, PO
    Rosenberg, A R
    Rossleigh, M A
    Sixt, R
    Concensus on renal cortical scintigraphy in children with urinary tract infection.1999In: Seminars in nuclear medicine, ISSN 0001-2998, E-ISSN 1558-4623, Vol. 29, p. 160-174Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 208.
    Powell, J T
    et al.
    University Hospitals of Coventry and Warwickshire, Walsgrave, Coventry, UK.
    Turner, R J
    University Hospitals of Coventry and Warwickshire, Walsgrave, Coventry, UK.
    Sian, M
    University Hospitals of Coventry and Warwickshire, Walsgrave, Coventry, UK.
    Debasso, Rachel
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Influence of fibrillin-1 genotype on the aortic stiffness in men2005In: Journal of applied physiology, ISSN 8750-7587, E-ISSN 1522-1601, Vol. 99, no 3, p. 1036-1040Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aortic stiffness is a predictor of cardiovascular mortality. The mechanical properties of the arterial wall depend on the connective tissue framework, with variation in fibrillin-1 and collagen I genes being associated with aortic stiffness and/or pulse pressure elevation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether variation in fibrillin-1 genotype was associated with aortic stiffness in men. The mechanical properties of the abdominal aorta of 79 healthy men (range 28-81 yr) were investigated by ultrasonographic phase-locked echo tracking. Fibrillin-1 genotype, characterized by the variable tandem repeat in intron 28, and collagen type I alpha 1 genotype characterized by the 2,064 OT polymorphism, were determined by using DNA from peripheral blood cells. Three common fibrillin-1 genotypes, 2-2, 2-3, and 2-4, were observed in 50 (64%), 10 (13%), and 11 (14%) of the men, respectively. Those of 2-3 genotype had higher pressure strain elastic modulus and aortic stiffness compared with men of 2-2 or 2-4 genotype (P = 0.005). Pulse pressure also was increased in the 2-3 genotype (P = 0.04). There was no significant association between type 1 collagen genotype and aortic stiffness in this cohort. In conclusion, the fibrillin-1 2-3 genotype in men was associated with increased aortic stiffness and pulse pressure, indicative of an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2005 the American Physiological Society.

  • 209. Prignent, Alain
    et al.
    Cosgriff, Philip
    Gates, Gary F
    Granerus, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Fine, Eugene J
    Itoh, Kazua
    Peters, Mike
    Piepsz, Amy
    Rehling, Michael
    Rutland, Michael
    Taylor, Andrew Jr
    Concensus report on quality control of quantitative measurments of renal function obtained from the renogram: Internaltional concensus committee from the scientific committee of radionuclides in nephrourology.1999In: Seminars in nuclear medicine, ISSN 0001-2998, E-ISSN 1558-4623, Vol. 29, p. 146-159Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 210.
    Renner, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics.
    Gårdhagen, Roland
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics.
    Heiberg, Einar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation .
    Validation of Simulated Velocity of Blood in Patient Specific Aorta2006In: VIII Svenska Kardiovaskulära Vårmöte,2006, Linköping, Sweden: Linköpings universitet , 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 211.
    Ressner, Marcus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Brodin, Lars-Åke
    The Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jansson, Tomas
    Lund Institute of Technology, Lund, Sweden.
    Hoff, Lars
    Vestfold University College, Noway.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Janerot-Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Effects of ultrasound contrast agents on doppler tissue velocity estimation2006In: Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography, ISSN 0894-7317, E-ISSN 1097-6795, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 154-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The combination of Doppler tissue imaging and myocardial contrast echocardiography has the potential to provide information about motion and perfusion of the myocardium in a single examination. The purpose of this study was to establish how the presence of ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) affects measurements of Doppler tissue velocities in vivo and in vitro. We performed echocardiography in 12 patients with ischemic heart disease before and immediately after a slow intravenous infusion of the UCA Optison, using color Doppler tissue imaging to examine the effect of contrast agents in vivo. The myocardial peak systolic velocities and their integrals were analyzed in digitally stored cineloops before and after contrast administration. To distinguish between methodologic and physiologic factors affecting the measurement of tissue velocity in vitro, experiments with a rotating disk and a flow cone phantom were also carried out for the 3 contrast agents: Optison, Sonovue, and Sonazoid. In vivo results show that the values for peak systolic velocity increased by about 10% during contrast infusion, from mean 5.2 ± 1.8 to 5.7 ± 2.3 cm/s (P = .02, 95% confidence interval 2%-16%). The increase in myocardial peak systolic velocities was verified in experimental models in which the UCA increased the estimated mean velocity in the order of 5% to 20% for the motion interval of 5 to 7 cm/s, corresponding to the myocardial velocities studied in vivo. The response was similar for all 3 contrast agents and was not affected by moderate variations in concentration of the agent. We have shown that the presence UCA will affect Doppler tissue measurements in vivo and in vitro. The observed bias is presumed to be an effect of harmonic signal contribution from rupturing contrast agent microbubbles and does not indicate biologic or physiologic effects. Copyright 2006 by the American Society of Echocardiography.

  • 212.
    Ressner, Marcus
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Brodin, Lars-Åke
    Jansson, Tomas
    Dept of Electrical Measurements Lund University.
    Hoff, Lars
    Faculty of Science and Engineering Vestfold University, Horten, Norge.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Janerot-Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Effekter av ultraljudskontrast vid hastighetsestimering med vävnadsdoppler2005In: Svenska Läkaresällskapets Riksstämma 2005,2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 213.
    Ressner, Marcus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Brodin, L-Å.
    Jansson, Tomas
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Janerot-Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    How Ultrasound Contrast Agents effects Doppler Tissue Velocity Estimation2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 214.
    Ressner, Marcus
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Kvikliene, Adriana
    Kaunas University of Technology.
    Hoff, Lars
    Westfold University College.
    Jurkonis, Rytis
    Kaunas University of Technology.
    Jansson, Tomas
    Lunds universitet.
    Janerot-Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Lukosevicius, Arunas
    Kaunas University of Technology.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Backscattered ultrasound from contrast microbubbles: effects of tissue and bubble interaction2004In: EMBS,2004, San Francisco: IEEE , 2004, p. 849-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 215.
    Ressner, Marcus
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Kvikliene, Adriana
    Inst of Biomedical Engineering Kaunas University of Technology,Lithuania.
    Hoff, Lars
    Faculty ofScience and Engineering Vestfold University, Horten, Norge.
    Jurkonis, Rytis
    Inst of Biomedical Engineering Kaunas University of Technology, Lithuania.
    Jansson, Tomas
    Dept of Electrical Measurements Lunds universitet.
    Janerot-Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Lukosevicius, Arunas
    Inst of Biomedical Engineering Kaunas University of Technology, Lithuania.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Ultrasound contrast for perfusion studies2005In: Nordic Baltic Conference Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics,2005, Umeå: IFMBE , 2005, p. 107-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 216.
    Ressner, Marcus
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Kvikliene, Adriana
    Kaunas University of Technology .
    Hoff, Lars
    Vestfold University, Horten Norge.
    Jurkonis, Rytis
    Kaunas University of Technology .
    Jansson, Tomas
    Lund University .
    Janerot-Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Lukosevicius, Arunas
    Kaunas University of Technology .
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Ultrasound contrast microbubbles: simulations and in vitro experiments2005In: EMBEC05,2005, Prag: IFMBE , 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 217. Richter, A
    et al.
    Cederholm, I
    Mucciano, C
    Jonasson, L
    Larsson, LE
    Janerot-Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Longterm home treatment with thoracic epidural analgesia in refractory angina2001In: Abstract at 4th International congress on coronary artery disease, Prague 2001,2001, 2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 218.
    Ricther, Arina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Cederholm, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Mucchiano, Carlo
    Smärtkliniken Eksjö.
    Janerot-Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Uchto, Michael
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Effect of thoracic epidural analgesia on refractory angina pectoris: Long-term home self-treatment2002In: Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia, ISSN 1053-0770, E-ISSN 1532-8422, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 679-684Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To evaluate the effects of long-term home self-treatment with thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) on angina, quality of life, and safety. Design: Prospective consecutive pilot study. Setting: Department of Cardiology, Heart Center, Link÷ping University Hospital. Participants: Between January 1998 and January 2000, 37 consecutive patients with refractory angina began treatment with TEA, using a subcutaneously tunnelled epidural catheter. Interventions: The patients were trained to provide self-treatment at home with intermittent injections of bupivacaine. Data were collected until January 2001, and the follow-up for each patient was 1 to 3 years. Measurements and Main Results: All but 1 of the patients improved symptomatically. The improvement was maintained throughout the treatment period (4 days to 3 years). The Canadian Cardiovascular Society angina class decreased from 3.6 to 1.7, frequency of anginal attacks decreased from 46 to 7 a week, nitroglycerin intake decreased from 32 to 5 a week, and the overall self-rated quality of life assessed by visual analog scale increased from 24 to 76 (all p < 0.001). No serious catheter-related complications occurred, however, 51% of the catheters became displaced and a new one had to be inserted during the study. Conclusion: Long-term self-administered home treatment with TEA seems to be an effective and safe adjuvant treatment for patients with refractory angina. It produces symptomatic relief of angina and improves the quality of life.

  • 219.
    Rousseau, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Janerot-Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Acute hyperoxaemia-induced effects on regional blood flow, oxygen consumption and central circulation in man2005In: Acta Physiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6772, E-ISSN 1365-201X, Vol. 183, no 3, p. 231-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:  Despite numerous in vitro and animal studies, circulatory effects and mechanisms responsible for the vasoconstriction seen during hyperoxaemia are yet to be ascertained. The present study set out to: (i) set up a non-invasive human model for the study of hyperoxia-induced cardiovascular effects, (ii) describe the dynamics of this effect and (iii) determine whether hyperoxaemia also, by vasoconstriction alters oxygen consumption (O2).

    Methods:  The study comprised four experiments (A, B, C and D) on healthy volunteers examined before, during and after 100% oxygen breathing. A: Blood flow (mL min−1·100 mL−1 tissue), venous occlusion plethysmography was assessed (n = 12). B: Blood flow was recorded with increasing transcutaneous oxygen tension (PtcO2) levels (dose–response) (n = 8). C: Heart rate (HR), stroke volume, cardiac output (CO) and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) was assessed using echocardiography (n = 8). D: O2 was measured using an open circuit technique when breathing an air-O2 mix (fraction of inhaled oxygen: FiO2 = 0.58) (n = 8).

    Results:  Calf blood flow decreased 30% during O2 breathing. The decrease in calf blood flow was found to be oxygen dose dependent. A similar magnitude, as for the peripheral circulation, of the effect on central parameters (HR/CO and SVR) and in the time relationship was noted. Hyperoxia did not change O2. An average of 207 (93) mL O2 per subject was washed in during the experiments.

    Conclusion:  This model appears suitable for the investigation of O2-related effects on the central and peripheral circulation in man. Our findings, based on a more comprehensive (central/peripheral circulation examination) evaluation than earlier made, suggest significant circulatory effects of hyperoxia. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the underlying mechanisms.

  • 220. Rydén Ahlgren, Å
    et al.
    Åstrand, H
    Sundkvist, G
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Increased aortic stiffness is persistent in type 1 diabetic women: A follow-up study2005In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 780-783Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims/hypothesis: We have previously reported that women, not men, with type 1 diabetes have increased aortic stiffness. Increased arterial stiffness may explain why diabetic women have a particularly high risk of developing cardiovascular complications. We have now followed up our previously investigated patients after 7 years, with a view to evaluating whether the sex difference was persistent, and also evaluating the degree of progression with time and the relationship between stiffness versus intima media thickness of the aorta. Methods: Stiffness (β) of the abdominal aorta (echo-tracking sonography) and intima media thickness (B-mode ultrasound) were assessed in 23 women and 19 men with type 1 diabetes and compared with matched healthy individuals. Results: At follow-up, aortic stiffness was still higher (60%) (p=0.0016) in diabetic than in control women, whereas there was no similar difference (p=0.4) between diabetic and control men. No progression of stiffness had occurred over the 7 years. At follow-up, the intima media thickness was increased and the internal diameter of the aorta was decreased in diabetic men and women without any sex-related difference. Conclusions/interpretation: The increased aortic stiffness that affects type 1 diabetic patients seems to be an early event that soon reaches a plateau without any further increase. Increased aortic stiffness in type 1 diabetic women seems to be a sex-specific functional disorder unrelated to the degree of underlying atherosclerosis. © Springer-Verlag 2005.

  • 221.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tropp, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Consequences of a change in rear-wheel position on seating ergonomics and mobility in spinal cord injured wheelchair usersManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to analyse the consequences of a change in rear-wheel position on mobility and seating ergonomic aspects. Twelve randomly selected paraplegic wheelchair users were tested iu two different activities, treadmill propulsion and computer work, in two different seating positions. The change in wheel position did affect chair ergonomics with respect to weight distribution and seat-inclination. These changes did have an effect on push frequency and stroke angle during treadmill, propulsion. We found no consistent effect on mechanical efficiency, estimated exertion, breathlessness or seating quality in this group. Nor did we find any consistent significant effect on pelvic position or under-seat pressure. There are effects from wheelchair adaptation, but these seem to be individual. With the knowledge of risk factors related to seating posture in mind, future research concerning effects of wheelchair adaptation has to be performed with considerations for individual changes.

  • 222.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Tropp, Hans
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    The effect of rear-wheel position on seating ergonomics and mobility efficiency in wheelchair users with spinal cord injuries: A pilot study2004In: Journal of rehabilitation research and development, ISSN 0748-7711, E-ISSN 1938-1352, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 65-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyzed the effect of rear-wheel position on seating comfort and mobility efficiency. Twelve randomly selected paraplegic wheelchair users participated in the study. Wheelchairs were tested in two rear-wheel positions while the users operated the wheelchair on a treadmill and while they worked on a computer. Propulsion efficiency, seating comfort, and propulsion qualities were registered at different loads during the treadmill session. During the computer session, pelvic position, estimated seating comfort, and estimated activity performance were measured. The change in rear-wheel position affected wheelchair ergonomics with respect to weight distribution (p < 0.0001) and seat inclination angle (position I = 5° and position II = 12°). These changes had a significant effect on push frequency (p < 0.05) and stroke angle (p < 0.05) during wheelchair propulsion. We found no consistent effect on mechanical efficiency, estimated exertion, breathlessness, seating comfort, estimated propulsion qualities, pelvic position, or activity performance.

  • 223.
    Schmekel, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ahlner, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Pharmacology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Malmström, M
    Venge, P
    Eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) in saliva: A new marker of disease activity in bronchial asthma2001In: Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 0954-6111, E-ISSN 1532-3064, Vol. 95, no 8, p. 670-675Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eosinophil cells play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of asthma, and concentration of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) in serum has been used to monitor activity of the disease. Our aim was to determine the feasibility and usefulness of measuring ECP in saliva and to use it as a marker of the disease. Thirty-eight patients with asthma and 16 healthy volunteers were included in this study. Repeatability of measurements of ECP in saliva was acceptable [intra-class correlation coefficients (Ri) = 0.74 and coefficients of repeatability (CR) = 0.37 in five healthy subjects]. Levels of ECP in saliva were higher in asthmatics than in volunteers (P < 0.01). There was a significant inverse association between a surrogate variable reflecting disease activity (i.e. change over a few weeks in dose of inhaled corticosteroid required by a change in clinical status of asthma) and a change over the same time period in salivary ECP in 19 patients with stable asthma (r = -0.64, P = 0.02). Our findings indicate that levels of salivary ECP are elevated in patients with asthma and associated with presumed activity of disease as recorded by alteration of taken dose of inhaled corticosteroid. ⌐ 2001 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  • 224.
    Schmekel, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Hedenström, Hans
    Klinisk fysiologi Uppsala.
    Hedenstierna, Göran
    Klinisk fysiologi Uppsala.
    Deposition of Terbutaline in the large or small airways: a single-center pilot study of ventilation-perfusion distribution and airway tone2002In: Current Therapeutic Research: Clinical and Experimental, ISSN 0011-393X, E-ISSN 1879-0313, Vol. 63, p. 536-548Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 225.
    Schmekel, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rydberg, Irene
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Norlander, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Naidu Sjöswärd, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ahlner, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stereoselective pharmacokinetics of S-salbutamol after administration of the racemate in healthy volunteers1999In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 1230-1235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Racemic R,S-salbutamol is taken to relieve bronchial constriction. Only the R-enantiomer has bronchodilating properties. The S-enantiomer has been proposed to cause in vitro bronchial hyperreactivity in guinea-pigs. Stereoselective elimination of salbutamol has been shown, with S-salbutamol being eliminated at a slower rate than R-salbutamol. This study questioned whether rates of stereoselective elimination were similar after oral or lung delivery, and whether the S:R ratio would increase after repeated inhalations in a situation resembling a common clinical use. Eighteen healthy volunteers received single-dose racemic salbutamol as a solution instilled in the trachea during anaesthesia, as inhaled micronized powder and/or as ingested tablets. Five volunteers inhaled repeated doses of racemic salbutamol. Concentrations in plasma and urine were measured using a technique which allowed chiral separation of samples with concentrations as low as 0.1 ng·mL -1. The bioavailability of S-salbutamol was significantly higher than that of R-salbutamol after the different modes of administration. Stereoselective elimination was more pronounced after oral administration than after inhalation. Repeated inhalations resulted in successive increases in the S:R ratio as steady state was approached. In conclusion, the clinical consequences of increasing plasma concentrations of S-salbutamol need to be further assessed.

  • 226.
    Schmekel, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Seveus, L
    Xu, S Y
    Venge, Per
    Human neutrophil lipocalin (HNL) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). Studies of lung lavage fluid and lung tissue2000In: Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 0954-6111, E-ISSN 1532-3064, Vol. 94, no 6, p. 564-568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) and human neutrophil lipocalin (HNL) are proteins which are stored in neutrophil granulocytes, in the primary and secondary granules, respectively. These granules or their contents of MPO and HNL are secreted upon activation of the cells, and measurement of these soluble markers in biological fluids, such as bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), has been proposed to mirror the degree of neutrophil activity in the tissue. We conducted a BAL study in 10 healthy volunteers, with the aim to evaluate the intra-individual variability of the concentration of HNL and MPO recovered in sequential aspirations, during a time period when the concentrations of HNL and MPO in BAL fluids were considered to have equilibrated with those in the underlying tissues. The concentrations of HNL were less variable than those of MPO (coefficients of variability 0.33+/-0.07 vs. 0.92+/-0.28,P+/-0.01). Suggesting HNL to be a more useful marker of neutrophil activity within the airspace. The specificity of HNL as a selective index of neutrophil cells was confirmed by means of immunohistochemical staining of uninvolved lung tissue specimens obtained from patients referred to pulmonectomy due to carcinoma. While HNL was located only to intracellular spaces of neutrophils, MPO was in addition located to other cells as well. We speculate that the dynamic changes of pressure across the membranes and flow of solutes during a lavage process might mobilize particulate matter and adherent cells, some of which may be loaded with MPO, and that this may introduce larger variability in the recovery of MPO than of HNL. We conclude that using HNL as a soluble indicator of neutrophil presence is more feasible than using MPO.

  • 227.
    Selskog, Pernilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Brandt, Einar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Quantification and Visualization of myocardial strain-rate tensors from time-resolved 3D cine phase contrast MRI.2001In: Proc. Intl. Soc. Mag. Reson. Med.,2001, 2001, p. 1870-1870Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 228.
    Selskog, Pernilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation .
    Heiberg, Einar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Quantification of myocardial strain-rate from 3D Cine phase contrast2000In: ESMRMB,2000, 2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 229.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kvitting, John-Peder Escobar
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    k-t2 BLAST: Exploiting spatiotemporal structure in simultaneously cardiac and respiratory time-resolved volumetric imaging2007In: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, ISSN 0740-3194, E-ISSN 1522-2594, Vol. 58, no 5, p. 922-930Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multidimensional imaging resolving both the cardiac and respiratory cycles simultaneously has the potential to describe important physiological interdependences between the heart and pulmonary processes. A fully five-dimensional acquisition with three spatial and two temporal dimensions is hampered, however, by the long acquisition time and low spatial resolution. A technique is proposed to reduce the scan time substantially by extending the k-t BLAST framework to two temporal dimensions. By sampling the k-t space sparsely in a lattice grid, the signal in the transform domain, x-f space, can be densely packed, exploiting the fact that large regions in the field of view have low temporal bandwidth. A volumetric online prospective triggering approach with full cardiac and respiratory cycle coverage was implemented. Retrospective temporal interpolation was used to refine the timing estimates for the center of k-space, which is sampled for all cardiac and respiratory time frames. This resulted in reduced reconstruction error compared with conventional k-t BLAST reconstruction. The k-t2 BLAST technique was evaluated by decimating a fully sampled five-dimensional data set, and feasibility was further demonstrated by performing sparsely sampled acquisitions. Compared to the fully sampled data, a fourfold improvement in spatial resolution was accomplished in approximately half the scan time.

  • 230.
    Silén, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hård af Segerstad, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Texter om PBL: texter, praktik, reflektioner2001Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Upprinnelsen till den rapport som du nu har i din hand är att det under några år har hållits en intern universitetspedagogisk konferens vid Linköpings universitet. Syftet med konferenserna har varit att stimulera universitetets lärare att skriva om sina pedagogiska erfarenheter och tankar. Ett antal utbildningar inom universitetet använder PBL och flera bidrag som diskuterar och belyser PBL har presenterats. Dessa har kommit att bli viktiga i den fortsatta utvecklingen av PBL. Nu har vissa av de tidigare rapporterna tagit slut och det har uppstått behov av att trycka dessa igen och då gärna i en samlad rapport.

    Den rapport som nu kommit till består alltså till stor del av tidigare presenterade bidrag. Rapporten har kompletterats med ett nyskrivet bidrag av Charlotte Silén och två bidrag som Charlotte skrivit i samband med forskarutbildningskurser. I rapporten finns också ett bidrag som  presenterats av Karin von Shilling på en PBL konferens 1995.

    Med denna design hoppas vi att rapporten ska kunna bli intressant både för den som vill skaffa sig en introduktion och för den som har erfarenheter av PBL och som vill skaffa sig idéer och perspektiv.

  • 231.
    Sjöberg, Birgitta Janero
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Subaortic flow profiles in aortic valve disease: a two-dimensional color Doppler study.1994In: Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography, ISSN 0894-7317, E-ISSN 1097-6795, Vol. 7, no 3 Pt 1, p. 276-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With time-corrected color Doppler echocardiography, the aortic subvalvular spatial flow velocity profile was registered in two perpendicular planes in 10 patients with aortic valve disease and in 5 healthy control subjects. Patients with predominant aortic valve stenosis had a fairly flat profile, and the subvalvular diameter, obtained from left parasternal two-dimensional tissue imaging, provided a good estimate of the mean of the two transverse flow axes. This explains the accuracy in determination of stroke volume and aortic valve area that is reported in studies on patients with aortic valve stenosis when the continuity equation is used. However, the use of apical pulsed Doppler ultrasound registrations from the left ventricular outflow tract and parasternal two-dimensional echocardiography for flow area calculation may introduce large errors in calculated stroke volume in certain patients with aortic regurgitation and in normal subjects, because of a non-flat spatial velocity profile or an inaccurate estimate of flow area.

  • 232.
    Sjöberg, Birgitta Janero
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Eidenvall, L
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Vascular characteristics influence the aortic ultrasound Doppler signal: computer and hydraulic model simulations.1993In: Acta Physiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6772, E-ISSN 1365-201X, Vol. 147, no 3, p. 271-279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an increasing demand for non-invasive methods for the assessment of left ventricular function. Ultrasound Doppler methods are promising, and the early systolic flow velocity signal immediately distal to the aortic valve has been used clinically for this purpose. However, the signal is influenced not only by left ventricular ejection but also by systemic vascular characteristics. Their relative contribution to the time-velocity signal has not been analysed in depth previously. A theoretical analysis, based on a three-element Windkessel model, neglecting peripheral outflow in early systole and assuming linear pressure rise, was therefore tested in computer and hydraulic model simulations where peripheral outflow was included. Significant changes in early aortic flow velocity parameters were found when vascular characteristics were altered. As predicted by the theory, with a standardized aortic valve area and aortic pressure change, the simulations confirmed that maximal flow velocity is related to compliance of the aorta and the large arteries, and that maximal acceleration is inversely related to the characteristic impedance of the aorta. Therefore, maximal velocity and acceleration can be used for assessment of left ventricular function only in situations where vascular characteristics can be considered relatively constant or where they can be estimated.

  • 233. Sköldstam, L
    et al.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Hagfors, L
    Johansson, G
    Weight reduction is not a major reason for improvement in rheumatoid arthritis from lacto-vegetarian, vegan or mediterranean diets2005In: Nutrition Journal, ISSN 1475-2891, E-ISSN 1475-2891, Vol. 4, no 15Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 234.
    Smedby, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Medical Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology UHL. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Wirell, Staffan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Medical Radiology.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Silén, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Göran, Pettersson
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, CSELAB - Cognitive Systems Engineering Laboratory.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Interactive volume rendering 3D images for anatomy learning on low-end computers2007In: ECR - European Congress of Radiology,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 235. Sparring Björkstén, Karin
    et al.
    Ekberg, Stefan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Säfström, Pia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Medical Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology UHL.
    Dige, N
    Granerus, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    A computerized human reference brain for rCBF/SPET technetium-99m exametazime (HMPAO) investigation of elderly2004In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 196-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using the bull's eye approach, a reference brain from the single photon emission tomography (SPET) images of 10 subjects aged 62-81 years with excellent mental and physical health was constructed. SPET images were acquired twice, 1 week apart, using a single detector rotating gamma camera collecting 64 planar images over a 360° orbit. The centre of each transaxial slice was first defined with an automatic edge detecting algorithm applied to an anterior-posterior and a side profile of the brain. Each slice was divided into 40 sectors. Maximum counts/pixel in each sector was picked. The 40 maximum count values from one transaxial slice were allowed to form a horizontal row in a new parametric image on the x-axis and slice number from the vertex to the basal parts of the brain on the y-axis. This new image was scaled to a 64 × 16 pixel matrix by interpolation, which meant a normalization of all studies to the same size. The parametric image in each subject was scaled with regard to intensity by a factor calculated by a normalization procedure using the least squares analysis. Mean and SD for each pixel were calculated, thereby constructing a 'mean parametric image', and a 'SD parametric image'. These two images are meant to be used as the reference brain for evaluation of patient studies. This method can be used for objective measurements of diffuse brain changes and for pattern recognition in larger groups of patients. Statistical multifactorial analysis of parameters used for acquisition and data processing is possible. © 2004 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  • 236.
    Strotman, JM
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Richter, Arina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Kukuluski, T
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Voigt, J-U
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Fransson, Sven Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Hatle, L
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Sutherland, GR
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Doppler Myocardial Imagning in the Assessment of Regional Myocardial Function in Longitudinal Direction Pre- and Post-PTCA.2001In: European Journal of Echocardiography, ISSN 1525-2167, E-ISSN 1532-2114, Vol. 2, p. 178-186Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 237. Strotmann, Jörg M.
    et al.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wilkenshoff, Ursula
    Wranne, Bengt
    Hatle, L.
    Sutherland, George
    Anatomic M-mode echocardiography: a new approach to assess regional myocardial function - A comparative in vivo and in vitro study of both fundamental and second harmonic imaging modes1999In: Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography, ISSN 0894-7317, E-ISSN 1097-6795, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 300-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate the accuracy of anatomic M-mode echocardiography (AMM).

    Methods: Eight phantoms were rotated on a device at different insonation depths (IDs) in a water beaker. They were insonated with different transducer frequencies in fundamental imaging (FI) and second harmonic imaging (SHI), and the diameters were assessed with conventional M-mode echocardiography (CMM) and AMM with the applied angle correction (AC) after rotation. In addition, left ventricular wall dimensions were measured with CMM and AMM in FI and SHI in 10 volunteers.

    Results: AC had the greatest effect on the measurement error in AMM followed by ID (AC: R2 = 0.295, ID: R2 = 0.268; P < .0001). SHI improved the accuracy, and a difference no longer existed between CMM and AMM with an AC up to 60 degrees. In vivo the limit of agreement between AMM and CMM was -1.7 to +1.8 mm in SHI.

    Conclusion: Within its limitations (AC < 60 degrees; ID < 20 cm), AMM could be a robust tool in clinical practice.

  • 238.
    Strömberg, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Respiratory inductive plethysmography (RIP): calibration, breathing pattern analysis and external CO2 dead space measurement1996Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Respiratory inductive plethysmography (RIP) is an important tool for ventilatory monitoring in research studies because it has minimal influence on the spontaneous breathing pattern and because the rib cage and abdominal contributions to the breaths are measured. RIP measures changes in rib cage and abdominal cross-sectional areas which are translated into lung volume estimates via RIP calibration against e.g., a pneumotachometer (PTM). The commercially available RIP (Respitrace ®) was used to evaluate models and methods for RIP calibration, to study changes in breathing pattern during induced bronchial obstruction in asthmatics and to improve a unique method for measuring the external CO2 dead space volume in facial visors and respiratory protective devices.

    Several models of the respiratory system and various methods and volume references can be used during RIP calibration. We found that conventional use of the PTM can result in large volumetric PTM errors, but with proper compensations the PTM is a useful volume reference. A linear model of the respiratory system, relating lung volume changes from the start of inspiration or expiration to rib cage and abdominal excursion from the start of respiratory motion, was the most accurate. The voluntarily preferential rib cage and abdominal breathing method for RIP calibration proved to be appropriate and robust with similar accuracy as that obtained with other methods.

    The spontaneous breathing pattern was recorded in asthmatics at rest and during bronchial histamine and methacholine challenges (HiCh/MeCh). The relationship between the airways' obstruction and the breathing pattern was explored. In one study, only four of eight patients showed a significant increase in minute ventilation (V'I: mean 72%) and mean inspiratory flow (VTI/TI; mean 80%) during HiCh. In another study a groupwise increase of 20% in V'I and V'TI/TI was found during repeated HiCh and repeated MeCh. However, the individual repeatability was poor. The ventilatory response did not correlate to the central or the peripheral airways' obstruction, nor to hypoxaemia or sensations of dyspnoea. Breathing pattern analysis is consequently not an adequate method for airways' obstruction monitoring during bronchial challenge. The ventilatory response appears to be the result of a complex interaction between several afferent stimuli and central ventilatory control mechanisms.

    Analysis of the variability of the breathing pattern components confirmed that the timing component (phase switching; inspiration/expiration) of the respiratory control system is more constant than the drive and volume function. Furthermore, the variability did not change during induced obstruction.

    A unique method for assessment of the external CO2 dead space volume in facial visors and respiratory protective devices was evaluated and further improved. The method was found to have sufficient accuracy (dead space measurement error ≤ 20%), provided that great concern was taken to measure the initial CO2 containing part of inspiration correctly with RIP.

  • 239. Sun, Y
    et al.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Janerot-Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Eidenvall, Lars
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Estimation of pulsatile flow by surface integration of velocity vectors in Doppler ultrasound images from two arthogonal planes1995In: Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography, ISSN 0894-7317, E-ISSN 1097-6795, Vol. 8, p. 904-914Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 240. Sun, Y
    et al.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sjöberg, Birgitta Janero
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Eidenvall, L
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Estimation of volume flow rate by surface integration of velocity vectors from color Doppler images.1995In: Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography, ISSN 0894-7317, E-ISSN 1097-6795, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 904-914Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new Doppler echocardiographically based method has been developed to quantify volume flow rate by surface integration of velocity vectors (SIVV). Electrocardiographic-gated color Doppler images acquired in two orthogonal planes were used to estimate volume flow rate through a bowl-shaped surface at a given time and distance from the probe. To provide in vitro validation, the method was tested in a hydraulic model representing a pulsatile flow system with a restrictive orifice. Accurate estimates of stroke volume (+/- 10%) were obtained in a window between 1.2 and 1.6 cm proximal to the orifice, just before the region of prestenotic acceleration. By use of the Bernoulli's equation, the estimated flows were used to generate pressure gradient waveforms across the orifice, which agreed well with the measured flows. To demonstrate in vivo applicability, the SIVV method was applied retrospectively to the determination of stroke volume and subaortic flow from the apical three-chamber and five-chamber views in two patients. Stroke volume estimates along the left ventricular outflow tract showed a characteristic similar to that in the in vitro study and agreed well with those obtained by the Fick oxygen method. The region where accurate measurements can be obtained is affected by instrumental factors including Nyquist velocity limit, wall motion filter cutoff, and color flow sector angle. The SIVV principle should be useful for quantitative assessment of the severity of valvular abnormalities and noninvasive measurement of pulsatile volume flows in general.

  • 241. Sun, Y
    et al.
    Janerot-Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Mathematical model that characterizes transmitral and pulmonary venous flow velocity patterns1995In: American journal of physiology, ISSN 0002-9513, Vol. 268, p. 476-489Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 242. Sun, Y
    et al.
    Sjöberg, Birgitta Janero
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Mathematical model that characterizes transmitral and pulmonary venous flow velocity patterns.1995In: American Journal of Physiology, ISSN 0002-9513, E-ISSN 2163-5773, Vol. 268, no 1 Pt 2, p. H476-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transmitral and pulmonary venous flow velocity (TMFV and PVFV, respectively) patterns are related to the physiological state of the left heart by use of an electrical analog model. Filling of left ventricle (LV) through the mitral valve is characterized by a quadratic Bernoulli's resistance in series with an inertance. Filling of the left atrium (LA) through the pulmonary veins is represented by a lumped network of linear resistance, capacitance, and inertance. LV and LA are each represented by a time-varying elastance. A volume dependency is incorporated into the LV model to produce physiological pressure-volume loops and Starling curves. The state-space representation of the analog model consists of 10 simultaneous differential equations, which are solved by numerical integration. Model validity is supported by the following. First, the expected effects of aging and decreasing LV compliance on TMFV and PVFV are accurately represented by the model. Second, the model-generated TMFV and PVFV waveforms fit well to pulsed-Doppler recordings in normal and postinfarct patients. It is shown that the TMFV deceleration time is prolonged by the increase in LV compliance and, to a lesser extent, by the increase in LA compliance. A shift from diastolic dominance to systolic dominance in PVFV occurs when LA compliance or pulmonary perfusion pressure increases or when LV compliance or mitral valve area decreases. The present model should serve as a useful theoretical basis for echocardiographic evaluation of LV and LA functions.

  • 243. Sun, Ying
    et al.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sjöberg, Birgitta Janero
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Eindvall, Lars
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Estimation of volume flow rate by surface integration of velocity vectors from color Doppler images1997In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, ISSN 0735-1097, E-ISSN 1558-3597, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 904-914Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new Doppler echocardiographically based method has been developed to quantify volume flow rate by surface integration of velocity vectors (SIVV). Electrocardiographic-gated color Doppler images acquired in two orthogonal planes were used to estimate volume flow rate through a bowl-shaped surface at a given time and distance from the probe. To provide in vitro validation, the method was tested in a hydraulic model representing a pulsatile flow system with a restrictive orifice. Accurate estimates of stroke volume (±10%) were obtained in a window between 1.2 and 1.6 cm proximal to the orifice, just before the region of prestenotic acceleration. By use of the Bernoulli's equation, the estimated flows were used to generate pressure gradient waveforms across the orifice, which agreed well with the measured flows. To demonstrate in vivo applicability, the SIVV method was applied retrospectively to the determination of stroke volume and subaortic flow from the apical three-chamber and five-chamber views in two patients. Stroke volume estimates along the left ventricular outflow tract showed a characteristic similar to that in the in vitro study and agreed well with those obtained by the Fick oxygen method. The region where accurate measurements can be obtained is affected by instrumental factors including Nyquist velocity limit, wall motion filter cutoff, and color flow sector angle. The SIVV principle should be useful for quantitative assessment of the severity of valvular abnormalities and noninvasive measurement of pulsatile volume flows in general.

  • 244.
    Sund Levander, Märtha
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Wahren, Lis Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pharmacology.
    Assessment and prevention of shivering in patients with severe cerebral injury. A pilot study.2000In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 9, p. 55-61Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 245.
    Sund-Levander, Märtha
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Forsberg, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery.
    Wahren, Lis Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV), Science in Nursing.
    Normal oral, rectal, tympanic and axillary body temperature in adult men and women: A systematic literature review2002In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 122-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate normal body temperature in adult men and women. A systematic review of data was performed. Searches were carried out in MEDLINE, CINAHL, and manually from identified articles reference lists. Studies from 1935 to 1999 were included. Articles were classified as (1) strong, (2) fairly strong and (3) weak evidence. When summarizing studies with strong or fairly strong evidence the range for oral temperature was 33.2-38.2░C, rectal: 34.4-37.8░C, tympanic: 35.4-37.8░C and axillary: 35.5-37.0░C. The range in oral temperature for men and women, respectively, was 35.7-37.7 and 33.2-38.1░C, in rectal 36.7-37.5 and 36.8-37.1░C, and in tympanic 35.5-37.5 and 35.7-37.5░C. The ranges of normal body temperature need to be adjusted, especially for the lower values. When assessing body temperature it is important to take place of measurement and gender into consideration. Studies with random samples are needed to confirm the range of normal body temperature with respect to gender and age.

  • 246.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Broqvist, Mats
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Freely mobile right-sided atrial thrombus mimicking myxoma2001In: European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1010-7940, E-ISSN 1873-734X, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 195-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 247.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Kågedahl, B
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Olin, C
    Rutberg, H
    Unspecifik elevation of plasma CK-MB and troponin-T after coronary surgery2003In: European Society for Cardiovascular Surgery,2003, 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 248.
    Säfström, Kåge
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Björkholm, A.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology Thoracic Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wiklund, G.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology Thoracic Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nielsen, Niels Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Assessment of the presence and extent of coronary artery disease in postmenopausal women after an episode of unstable coronary artery disease: incremental value of exercise electrocardiography and thallium-201 SPECTManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims To compare the incremental diagnostic properties of Thallium-201 (201TI) SPECT perfusion imaging with clinical and exercise test variables in a female population with a suspected high prevalence of coronary artery disease.

    Methods and Results We prospectively studied 121 postmenopausal women admitted to the coronary care unit with symptoms of unstable coronary artery disease and ECG changes suggestive of ischaemia. Incremental diagnostic logistic algorithms were developed. These included pretest variables (age; body mass index; previous myocardial infarction; myocardial markers at inclusion and type of anginal symptoms); exercise test (maximum workload; occurrence of ST-depression ≥ 0.1mV and peak heart rate); and 201TI scintigram (extent of thallium uptake abnormalities during exercise and presence of reversibility). End points were presence of coronary artery disease (250% diameter stenosis) and extent ('severe coronary artery disease' defined as left main, three vessel disease and two vessel disease involving proximal left anterior descending). Diagnostic accuracy and incremental value were assessed by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Incremental curve areas for disease presence were pretest 0.76 ±0.04, post-exercise ECG 0.83 ±0.04 (p<0.02 for the increment), and post-thallium scintigraphy 0.89 ±0.03 (p<0.02) and for disease extent were pretest 0.82 ±0.04, post-exercise ECG 0.89 ±0.03 (p<0.01 for the increment), and post thallium scintigraphy 0.92 ±0.02 (p = ns).

    Conclusion In postmenopausal women, stable after an episode of unstable coronary artery disease, there is an incremental value of adding 201TI SPECT to clinical parameters and exercise testing in the determination of coronary artery disease. In women with severe coronary artery disease there was no significant additive value of myocardial scintigraphy.

  • 249.
    Tengblad, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Mölstad, Sigvard
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Östgren, Carl-Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland.
    Sagittal abdominal diameter is strongly associated with Arterial stiffness and Left ventricular mass in patients with type 2 diabetes.2007In: EASD2,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 250.
    Thulesius, Olav
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Phlebography and heparin for deep venous thrombosis introduced by Gunnar Bauer more than 60 years ago2006In: Phlebology, ISSN 0268-3555, E-ISSN 1758-1125, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 107-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The story of a surgeon who in a country hospital in Sweden became a pioneer of modern phebology. He helped to set the standard of venography and heparin treatment for deep venous thrombosis and post-thrombotic valvular insufficiency more than 60 years ago. This happened when the surgeon Gunnar Bauer, stimulated by advancement in research and development of anticoagulants, introduced heparin treatment for deep venous thrombosis. He also started using descending phlebography for detection of venous reflux and advocated the controversial method of early ambulation after deep venous thrombosis. © 2006 Royal Society of Medicine Press.

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