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  • 201.
    Dahlgren, Christina
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Björkquist, Eva
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Perception of quality of care in patients with pituitary disorders2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In order to support patients with lifelong chronic illness, such as pituitary disorders, it is a challenge to continuously offer high quality of care.

    Aim: The aim of this study was to examine how patients with pituitary disorders of different causes perceive quality of care in contact with a specialized endocrinology reception.

    Methods and materials: Randomly selected, patients with chronic pituitary disorders (n=100) were asked to participate. Seventy-seven patients (females, n=44), 22–82 years of age responded and participated in the study. The questionnaire Quality from the Patient’s Perspective (QPP; modified short version) was used to measure patient’s perception of quality of care (considered from four dimensions: physical- technical, medical-technical, identity- orientation and socio-cultural atmosphere). Each question was calculated using an action index of each investigated area. Impaired quality of care in specific dimensions above 15% indicates need of improvement. In addition two open-ended questions were asked.

    Results: Most of the respondents, 97%, expressed that necessary physical-technical equipment was available while in the medical-technical dimension 26% reported impaired quality of care. In the identity-orientation dimension, impaired quality of care was reported by 25% mainly due to non-participation in care- and treatment decisions as well as concerning information about results of treatments and self-care activities. In the socio-cultural dimension impaired quality of care was reported in 25%. In addition, the patients asked for extended telephone receptions at the clinic and improved information about pituitary disorders.

    Conclusion: The patients were satisfied with the technical part of the medical care, but less satisfied with participation in care decisions and information about self-care. In our setting improvements are needed regarding patient information and access to care.

  • 202.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gjellan, Solveig
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zanjani, Sepehr
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Validation of whole-­‐body adipose tissue quantification using air displacement plethysmometry2012In: ISMRM workshop on Fat-­‐Water Separation: Insights, Applications & Progress in MRI, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 203.
    Dahlqvist, Per
    et al.
    Norrlands ­universitetssjukhus, Umeå.
    Bensing, Sophie
    Karolinska universitetssjukhuset, Solna.
    Ekwall, Olov
    Drottning Silvias barn- och ungdomssjukhus, Göteborg.
    Wahlberg, Jeanette
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology.
    Bergthorsdottir, Ragnhildur
    Sahlgrenska universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg.
    Hulting, Anna-Lena
    Karolinska universitetssjukhuset, Solna.
    Nationellt kort vid binjurebarkssvikt: Nytt varningskort kan leda till bättre handläggning och ökad patientsäkerhet2012In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 108, no 44, p. 2226-2227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Akut binjurebarkssvikt ­(akut kortisolbrist/Addisonkris) är en ovanlig men viktig differentialdiagnos vid akut cirkulationssvikt.

    De flesta fall av Addisonkris drabbar patienter med känd binjurebarkssvikt, oftast i samband med gastroenterit eller annan infektion.

    Noggrann och tydlig information och utbildning av ­patienter, anhöriga och sjukvårdspersonal behövs för att undvika sjuklighet och dödsfall i akut binjurebarkssvikt.

    Ett nationellt varningskort i kreditkortsformat har tagits fram till patienter med bi­njurebarkssvikt för att uppmärksamma och förbättra handläggningen av detta potentiellt livshotande tillstånd.

  • 204.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Rheumatology in Östergötland.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Prognostic rule generation controlling for treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 205.
    Dahlén, Elsa M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andreasson, Thomas
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg.
    Cinthio, Magnus
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Is there an underestimation of intima-media thickness based on M-mode ultrasound technique in the abdominal aorta?2012In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 1-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Measuring intima-media thickness (IMT) in the common carotid artery (CCA) is a valuable resource for the evaluation of subclinical atherosclerosis. The main objective of this study was to explore whether a B-mode ultrasound technique, Philips ATL, and an M-mode ultrasound technique, Wall Track System (WTS), show interchangeable results when measured in CCA and the abdominal aorta (AA). A total of 24 healthy, young subjects were examined. IMT and lumen diameter (LD) of the AA and the CCA were measured twice by two skilled ultrasonographers with two different ultrasound equipment B-mode: (Philips, ATL and M-mode: WTS).The intra-observer variability of IMT in CCA and AA using B-mode showed a coefficient of variation 8% and 9%, and with M-mode 11% and 15%, respectively. Interobserver variability of IMT in CCA and AA using B-mode was 6% and 12%, and with M-mode 11% and 18%, respectively. CCA IMT was 0·53 ± 0·07 and 0·53 ± 0·09 mm using B-mode and M-mode, respectively. However, in AA, IMT was 0·61 ± 0·5 and 0·54 ± 0·10 mm using B-mode and M-mode, respectively. Thus, AA IMT was 11·5% thicker using B-mode (P<0·01). We received adequate IMT readings from the carotid artery as well as the AA using two commonly used B-mode and M-mode techniques. B-mode technique seems to show less variability, especially in the AA. More importantly, the two techniques measured different IMT thickness in the aorta, emphasizing the importance of using similar technique when comparing the impact of absolute values of IMT on cardiovascular disease.

  • 206.
    Dahlén, Elsa M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland.
    Bjarnegård, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland.
    Sagittal abdominal diameter is a more independent measure compared with waist circumference to predict arterial stiffness in subjects with type 2 diabetes - a prospective observational cohort study2013In: Cardiovascular Diabetology, ISSN 1475-2840, E-ISSN 1475-2840, Vol. 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Anthropometric measurements are useful in clinical practice since they are non-invasive and cheap. Previous studies suggest that sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD) may be a better measure of visceral fat depots. The aim of this study was to prospectively explore and compare how laboratory and anthropometric risk markers predicted subclinical organ damage in 255 patients, with type 2 diabetes, after four years.

    Methods

    Baseline investigations were performed in 2006 and were repeated at follow-up in 2010. Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) was evaluated by ultrasonography and aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured with applanation tonometry over the carotid and femoral arteries at baseline and at follow-up in a cohort of subjects with type 2 diabetes aged 55–65 years old.

    Results

    There were significant correlations between apolipoprotein B (apoB) (r = 0.144, p = 0.03), C - reactive protein (CRP) (r = 0.172, p = 0.009) at baseline and IMT measured at follow-up. After adjustment for sex, age, treatment with statins and Hba1c, the associations remained statistically significant. HbA1c, total cholesterol or LDL-cholesterol did not correlate to IMT at follow-up. Baseline body mass index (BMI) (r = 0.130, p = 0.049), waist circumference (WC) (r = 0.147, p = 0.027) and sagittal Abdominal Diameter (SAD) (r = 0.184, p = 0.007) correlated to PWV at follow-up. Challenged with sex, SBP and HbA1c, the association between SAD, not WC nor BMI, and PWV remained statistically significant (p = 0.036). In a stepwise linear regression, entering both SAD and WC, the association between SAD and PWV was stronger than the association between WC and PWV.

    Conclusions

    We conclude that apoB and CRP, but not LDL-cholesterol predicted subclinical atherosclerosis. Furthermore, SAD was more independent in predicting arterial stiffness over time, compared with WC, in middle-aged men and women with type 2 diabetes.

  • 207.
    Dahlén, Elsa M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Clinchy, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, West County Primary Health Care.
    Abdominal Obesity and low grade Systemic Inflammation as Markers for Subclinical Organ Damage in type 2 diabetes2014In: Diabetes & Metabolism, ISSN 1262-3636, E-ISSN 1878-1780, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 76-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore associations between abdominal obesity, inflammatory markers, and subclinical organ damage in 740 patients with type 2 diabetes. Waist circumference (WC) and sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD) was measured. Blood samples were analyzed for; C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin (IL) -1β and IL-6. Carotid intimamedia thickness (IMT) was evaluated by ultrasonography. Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured with applanation tonometry.

    Abdominal obesity were significantly correlated with; IL-6, CRP (both p= <0.001, WC and SAD, respectively), IMT (WC p=0.012, SAD p=0.003) and PWV (p<0.001, for WC and SAD, respectively). In multiple linear regressions with IMT as dependent variable and age, sex, statins, systolic blood pressure (SBP), Body Mass Index (BMI), CRP and HbA1c, as independent variables, SAD (p=0.047) but not WC, remained associated with IMT. In stepwise linear regression, entering both SAD and WC, the association between SAD and PWV was stronger than the association between WC and PWV.

    We conclude that SAD and WC are feasible measures of obesity that provides information on inflammation, atherosclerosis and arterial stiffness in type 2 diabetes. However, SAD was slightly more robustly associated to subclinical organ damage, compared with WC.

  • 208.
    Dahlén, Elsa M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland.
    Carotid intima-media thickness and apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-I ratio in middle-aged patients with Type 2 diabetes2009In: Diabetic Medicine, ISSN 0742-3071, E-ISSN 1464-5491, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 384-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims To explore the association between carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and the apolipoprotein B (apoB)/apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) ratio compared with conventional lipids in middle-aged patients with Type 2 diabetes.

    Methods We analysed data from 247 patients with Type 2 diabetes, aged 55–66 years, in the Cardiovascular Risk factors in Patients with Diabetes—a Prospective study in Primary care (CARDIPP-1) study. Primary care nurses measured blood pressure and anthropometric characteristics. Blood samples were taken for laboratory analyses. The carotid IMT was determined by ultrasonography at the University Hospital in Linköping and at the County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.

    Results The ApoB/apoA-I ratio (r = 0.207, P = 0.001), apoB (r = 0.166, P = 0.009) and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-c) (r = 0.129, P = 0.046) correlated with IMT. Conventional lipids, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and systolic blood pressure were not significantly correlated to IMT. A stepwise logistic regression analysis was conducted with IMT as the dependent variable and the apoB/apoA-I ratio, HbA1c, hsCRP, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), total cholesterol, non-HDL-c and treatment with statins as independent variables. Following adjustment for age and gender, only the apoB/apoA-I ratio remained significantly associated with IMT (odds ratio 4.3, 95% confidence intervals 1.7–10.8, P = 0.002).

    Conclusions We conclude that there was a significant association between the apoB/apoA-I ratio and IMT in middle-aged patients with Type 2 diabetes. The association was independent of conventional lipids, hsCRP, glycaemic control and use of statins.

  • 209.
    Damman, P.
    et al.
    Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Clayton, T.
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London, United Kingdom.
    Wallentin, L.
    Department of Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Center, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lagerqvist, B.
    Department of Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Center, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Fox, K.A.A.
    Cardiovascular Research, Department of Medical and Radiological Sciences, Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Hirsch, A.
    Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Windhausen, F.
    Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Pocock, S.J.
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London, United Kingdom.
    Tijssen, J.G.P.
    Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    de Winter, R.J.
    De Winter, R.J., Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Effects of age on long-term outcomes after a routine invasive or selective invasive strategy in patients presenting with non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndromes: A collaborative analysis of individual data from the FRISC II - ICTUS - RITA-3 (FIR) trials2012In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, E-ISSN 1468-201X, Vol. 98, no 3, p. 207-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To perform a patient-pooled analysis of a routine invasive versus a selective invasive strategy in elderly patients with non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndrome. Methods: A meta-analysis was performed of patientpooled data from the FRISC IIeICTUSeRITA-3 (FIR) studies. (Un)adjusted HRs were calculated by Cox regression, with adjustments for variables associated with age and outcomes. The main outcome was 5-year cardiovascular death or myocardial infarction (MI) following routine invasive versus selective invasive management. Results: Regarding the 5-year composite of cardiovascular death or MI, the routine invasive strategy was associated with a lower hazard in patients aged 65-74 years (HR 0.72, 95% CI 0.58 to 0.90) and those aged ≥75 years (HR 0.71, 95% CI 0.55 to 0.91), but not in those aged less than65 years (HR 1.11, 95% CI 0.90 to 1.38), p=0.001 for interaction between treatment strategy and age. The interaction was driven by an excess of early MIs in patients less than65 years of age; there was no heterogeneity between age groups concerning cardiovascular death. The benefits were smaller for women than for men (p=0.009 for interaction). After adjustment for other clinical risk factors the HRs remained similar. Conclusion: The current analysis of the FIR dataset shows that the long-term benefit of the routine invasive strategy over the selective invasive strategy is attenuated in younger patients aged less than65 years and in women by the increased risk of early events which seem to have no consequences for long-term cardiovascular mortality. No other clinical risk factors were able to identify patients with differential responses to a routine invasive strategy. Trial registration: http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN82153174 (ICTUS), http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN07752711 (RITA-3).

  • 210.
    Damman, Peter
    et al.
    University of Amsterdam.
    Clayton, Tim
    London School Hyg and Trop Med.
    Wallentin, Lars
    University of Amsterdam.
    Lagerqvist, Bo
    UCR, Uppsala.
    Fox, Keith A
    Royal Infirm, Edinburgh.
    Hirsch, Alexander
    University of Amsterdam.
    Windhausen, Fons
    University of Amsterdam.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Pocock, Stuart J
    London School Hyg and Trop Med.
    Tijssen, Jan G
    University of Amsterdam.
    de Winter, Robbert J
    University of Amsterdam.
    Age and 5-Year Outcomes After a Routine or Selective Invasive Strategy for Non-ST-Segment Elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes in JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN COLLEGE OF CARDIOLOGY, vol 58, issue 20, pp B110-B1102011In: JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN COLLEGE OF CARDIOLOGY, Elsevier , 2011, Vol. 58, no 20, p. B110-B110Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 211.
    Davidson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    CMT rapport: kostnader och kostnadseffektivitet av ett införande av dabigatran hos patienter med förmaksflimmer2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Förmaksflimmer är den vanligaste arytmin i Sverige och orsakar stora kostnader inom hälso- och sjukvården. Förutom att patienterna vanligen drabbas av försämrad livskvalitet går det också åt stora resurser för komplikationer i form av tromboembolier och stroke. De flesta behandlingar inom förmaksflimmer kombineras med antikoagulationsbehandling för att förebygga eller förhindra uppkomst av tromboembolier och ischemisk stroke. Vid denna behandling krävs noggrann dosering för att sänka risken för stroke utan att kraftigt höja risken för blödningar. Warfarin har under lång tid varit det mest effektivaantikoagulationsläkemedlet för skydd mot tromboembolier vid  förmaksflimmer. Ett annat behandlingsalternativ är acetylsalicylsyra (ASA). Ett nytt antikoagulationsläkemedel som heter dabigatran (Pradaxa®) har nyligen godkänts som förebyggande behandling av stroke och systemisk embolism hos patienter med förmaksflimmer. Dabigatran har i en stor studie, (RE-LY), visat sig reducera risken för stroke jämfört med warfarin.

    Det övergripande syftet med denna rapport är att beräkna hälsoekonomiska konsekvenser i form av kostnader och kostnadseffektivitet av ett införande av dabigatran (Pradaxa®) som förebyggande behandling av stroke och systemisk embolism hos patienter med förmaksflimmer. I grundanalysen analyseras dabigatran 150 mg två gånger per dag för personer som är under 80 år och dabigatran 110 mg två gånger per dag för personer 80 år eller äldre. Jämförelser görs med warfarin och ASA, och warfarinbehandlingen delas dessutom in i tre subgrupper; välinställda, dåligt inställda samt warfarin-naïva patienter.

    En simuleringsmodell har skapats för att beräkna långsiktiga kostnader och effekter för de olika behandlingsalternativen. Effekterna mäts i antal förhindrade stroke, antal vunna levnadsår samt antal vunna kvalitetsjusterade levnadsår (QALYs). Priset för de båda dagliga doserna av dabigatran (150 mg gånger två och 110 mg gånger två) är 25,39 kronor per dag.

    Analyserna i den här rapporten visar att kostnaden för förmaksflimmer i Sverige beräknas till drygt 4,1 miljarder kronor år 2010. Denna kostnad förväntas sjunka vid införande av dabigatran, till följd av besparingar inom vården av stroke och ett sänkt produktionsbortfall. Kostnaden per vunnet QALY för dabigatran 150 mg / 110 mg jämfört med warfarin, hos patienter som är 65 år gamla och följs upp i 20 år, har beräknats till 74 216 kronor. Vid jämförelse med välinställd warfarinbehandling höjs kostnaden per vunnet QALY till 107 186 kronor. Om dabigatran 110 mg två gånger dagligen jämförs med ASA leder det till lägre kostnader och bättre effekter, vilket innebär att dabigatran 110 mg två gånger dagligen är en dominant behandling för patienter som inte är lämpliga för warfarinbehandling.

    Ett införande av dabigatran leder till kostnadsförskjutningar inom flera olika områden. En ökad kostnad uppkommer för läkemedel, medan  sänkta kostnader uppkommer till följd av färre stroke. För patienten innebär dabigatran lägre risk för stroke och färre besök i sjukvården.

  • 212.
    Davidson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The Cost of Thromboembolic Events and their Prevention among Patients with Atrial Fibrillation2011In: Journal of Atrial Fibrillation, ISSN 1941-6911, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 00-00Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common type of cardiac arrhythmia. People with AF have a significantly increased risk of thromboembolic events, including stroke, and the main treatment is therefore aimed at preventing thromboembolic events via anticoagulation with warfarin or acetylsalicylic acid. However, the development of new anticoagulation treatments has prompted a need to know the current cost of AF-related thromboembolic events, for future cost-effectiveness comparisons with the existing treatments. In this study, we estimated the cost of thromboembolic events and their prevention among Swedish AF patients in 2010.

    Methods: The relevant costs were identified, quantified, and valued. The complications included were ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke, gastrointestinal bleeding, and other types of major bleeding caused by AF. Treatments intended to lower the risk of ischaemic stroke were also included. A societal perspective was used, including productivity loss due to morbidity. Patients with a CHADS2 score of 1 or higher were included.

    Results: Among the 9 340 682 inhabitants of Sweden, there are 118 000 patients with AF and at least one more risk factor for stroke, comprising 1.26% of the population. Of these patients, 43.3% are treated with warfarin, 28.3% use acetylsalicylic acid, and 28.3% are assumed to have no anticoagulation treatment. The cost of AF-related complications and its prevention in Sweden was estimated at €437 million for 2010, corresponding to €3 712 per AF patient per year. The highest cost was caused by stroke, and the second highest by the cost of monitoring the warfarin treatment. As the prevalence of AF is expected to increase in the future, AF-related costs are also expected to rise.

    Conclusion: Thromboembolic events cause high costs. New, easily-administered treatments that could reduce the risk of stroke have the potential to be cost-effective.

     

  • 213.
    Davidson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Oldgren, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cost-effectiveness of dabigatran compared with warfarin for patients with atrial fibrillation in Sweden2013In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 177-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with atrial fibrillation have a significantly increased risk of thromboembolic events such as ischaemic stroke, and patients are therefore recommended to be treated with anticoagulation treatment. The most commonly used anticoagulant consists of vitamin K antagonist such as warfarin. A new oral anticoagulation treatment, dabigatran, has recently been approved for stroke prevention among patients with atrial fibrillation. The purpose of this study was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of dabigatran as preventive treatment of stroke and thromboembolic events compared with warfarin in 65-year-old patients with atrial fibrillation in Sweden. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanA decision analytic simulation model was used to estimate the long-term (20-year) costs and effects of the different treatments. The outcome measures are the number of strokes prevented, life years gained, and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained. Costs and effect data are adjusted to a Swedish setting. Patients below 80 years of age are assumed to start with dabigatran 150 mg twice a day and switch to 110 mg twice a day at the age of 80 years due to higher bleeding risk. The price of dabigatran in Sweden is Euro2.82 (Swedish kronor 25.39) per day for both doses. The cost per QALY gained for dabigatran compared with warfarin is estimated at Euro7742, increasing to Euro12 449 if dabigatran is compared with only well-controlled warfarin treatment. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanDabigatran is a cost-effective treatment in Sweden, as its incremental cost-effectiveness ratio is below the normally accepted willingness to pay limit.

  • 214.
    Davidson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bergström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    En pilotstudie av självtestning vid behandling med oral antikoagulantia: Hälsoekonomiska aspekter2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To avoid the occurrence of thromboembolic events and ischemic stroke in the diagnoses that lead to increased risk of blood clotting, anticoagulant treatment, primarily in the form of warfarin (Waran®), is used. Warfarin requires regular testing to ensure efficient treatment. This testing is normally done at clinics but can also be performed by patients themselves by self-testing.

    This pilot study studies patients who self-test their warfarin therapy in the county of Östergötland, with a focus on costs and cost effectiveness.

    The study has a pre-post design for 12 months where the patients are their own controls. Twenty patients with warfarin therapy were included. The primary outcome measure is the time within therapeutic range before and after the selftesting. Patients answered at three times the instruments EQ-5D and SF-36 as well as questions regarding how much they would hypothetically be willing to pay to use self-testing equipment.

    Mean age was 56 years and 67 percent were male. Percentage of treatment within the therapeutic range was between 57 and 100 percent, with an average of 86 percent. Minor bleeding occurred in 3 patients but no thrombosis occurred. The study is too small to ensure no clinical differences. In total, self-testing cost SEK 180 per session, which was lower than the cost at the clinic (SEK 370). Patients' quality of life (measured in QALY weights) indicated a tendency to rise during the studied 12 months. The willingness-to-pay decreased from SEK 11,526 at baseline to SEK 6,490 after 12 months. As costs have been spared and the effects are expected to be equivalent, self-testing can be considered costeffective. Moreover, since it has been shown that there is a societal willingness to pay for the equipment this strengthens the result that self-testing is costeffective.

    The study’s findings suggest that self-testing leads to lower costs and a trend toward improved quality of life for patients. No clinical differences have been demonstrated. This makes self-testing considered a cost-effective measure of the studied patient population. However, this is a small pilot study and its results need to be verified in larger studies.

  • 215.
    Davidsson, Anette
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Georgiopoulos, C
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Gustafsson, Agnetha
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Zachrisson, Helene
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Evaluation and comparison of quantification tools for early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease with DaTSCAN SPECT.2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 216.
    Davidsson, Anette
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Georgiopoulos, C
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Gustafsson, Agnetha
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    Zachrisson, Helene
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Utvärdering och jämförelse av kvantifieringsverktyg för tidig diagnostik av Parkinsons sjukdom med DaTSCAN SPECT2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 217.
    Davidsson, Anette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Georgiopoulos, Charalampos
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dizdar (Dizdar Segrell), Nil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Granerus, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Zachrisson, Helene
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Comparison between visual assessment of dopaminergic degeneration pattern and semi-quantitative ratio calculations in patients with Parkinsons disease and Atypical Parkinsonian syndromes using DaTSCAN (R) SPECT2014In: Annals of Nuclear Medicine, ISSN 0914-7187, E-ISSN 1864-6433, Vol. 28, no 9, p. 851-859Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To verify if I-123-FP-CIT, DaTSCAN (R) can differentiate early stages of Parkinsons disease (PD) as well as patients with Atypical Parkinsonian syndromes (APS) from manifest Parkinsons disease. Methods 128 consecutive patients were investigated with I-123-FP-CIT SPECT during a 4-year period. All patients were diagnosed according to the established consensus criteria for diagnosis of PD (n = 53) and APS (n = 19). Remaining patients were grouped early PD (before onset of L-DOPA medication), (n = 20), vascular PD (n = 6), and non-PD syndromes (n = 30) and SWEDD (n = 1). SPECT images were analyzed visually according to a predefined ranking scale of dopaminergic nerve cell degeneration, distinguishing a posterior-anterior degeneration pattern (egg shape) from a more global and severe degeneration pattern (burst striatum). Striatum uptake ratios were quantitatively analyzed with the 3D software, EXINI. Results In the group of APS patients, the burst striatum pattern was most frequent and found in 61 % (11/18 patients). In PD patients, the egg shape pattern was dominating, especially in early PD where it was present in 95 % (19/20 patients). The positive predictive value for the egg shape pattern to diagnose PD was 92 % in this material (APS and all PD patients) and the specificity 90 % for the burst striatum pattern to exclude APS. The uptake ratios were reduced in both PD and APS patients and closely related to the image ranking. Conclusion In this study, we found that in more than half of the patients it was possible to differentiate between PD and APS by visual interpretation only. Similar results were obtained using semi-quantitative uptake ratios. Combining visual assessment with uptake ratios did not add to the discriminating power of DaTSCAN (R) SPECT in this material.

  • 218.
    Davidsson, Anette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Georgiopoulos, Charalampos
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dizdar Segrell, Nil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Granerus, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Zachrisson, Helene
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Comparison between visual assessment of dopaminergic degeneration pattern and semi-quantitative ratio calculations in patients with Parkinson's disease and Atypical Parkinsonian snydromes using DaTSCAN SPECT2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Parkinson's disease (PD) is a degenerative disorder characterized by the progressive degeneration of dopamine-containing cells in substantia nigra, and it is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder worldwide. It can be difficult to differentiate between idiopathic PD and Atypical Parkinsonian syndromes (APS). In a high percentage of APS patients, the right diagnosis is not established even during late stages of the disease. Currently there is no specific test to verify PD, especially in the early stages of the disease.

    The aim was to verify if 123I-FP-CIT, DaTSCAN ® can differentiate early stages of Parkinson's disease as well as patients with Atypical Parkinsonian syndromes from manifest Parkinson's disease.

    Materials and methods: 121 consecutive patients were investigated with 123I-FP-CIT SPECT, during a four year period. All patients were diagnosed according to the established consensus criteria for diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD), (n=53), Atypical Parkinsonian syndromes (APS) (n=18). Remaining patients were grouped early PD (before onset the of L-dopa medication), (n=20), and non-PD syndromes (n=30). SPECT images were analysed visually according to a predefined ranking scale of dopaminergic degeneration, distinguishing a posterior-anterior degeneration pattern (egg shape) to a more global and severe degeneration pattern (burst striatum). Striatum ratios were quantitatively analysed with the 3D software, EXINI.

    Results: In the group of APS patients the burst striatum pattern was most frequent and found in 61% (11/18 patients). In PD patients the egg shape pattern was dominating, especially in early PD where it was present in 95% (19/20 patients). The sensitivity of burst striatum degeneration pattern was 61% (95%-CI 36-83%), specificity 90% (95%-CI 81-96%). The sensitivity of egg shape pattern was 74% (95%-CI 62-84%), specificity 90% (95%-CI 47-90%). The uptake ratios were reduced in both PD and APS patients and closely related to the image pattern. The lowest putamen/caudate ratio was found in early PD.

    Conclusion: In this study we found that in more than half of the patients it was possible to differentiate between PD and APS by visual interpretation only. Similar results were obtained using semi-quantitative uptake ratios, but combining visual assessment with uptake ratios did not add to the discriminating power of DATSCAN ® SPECT in this material

    References: Kahraman D, Eggers C, Schicha H, Timmermann L, Schmidt M. Visual assessment of dopaminergic degeneration pattern in 123I-FP-CIT SPECT differentiates patients with atypical parkinsonian syndromes and idiopathic Parkinson's disease. J Neurol. 2012;259:251-60

  • 219.
    Davidsson, Anette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Olsson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Holmberg, Bengt
    Gustafsson, Agnetha
    Karolinska University.
    Left ventricle ejection fraction with gated myocardial perfusion SPECT: a comparison between a conventional scintillation detector gamma camera and cadmium-zinc-telluride dectector camera2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 220.
    Dawson, Andreas
    et al.
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    List, Thomas
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Svensson, Peter
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Ernberg, Malin
    Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Pain and intramuscular release of algesic substances in the masseter muscle after experimental tooth-clenching exercises in healthy subjects2013In: Journal of Orofacial Pain, ISSN 1064-6655, E-ISSN 1945-3396, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 350-360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS:

    To investigate whether experimental tooth clenching leads to a release of algesic substances in the masseter muscle.

    METHODS:

    Thirty healthy subjects (16 females, 14 males) participated. During two sessions, separated by at least 1 week, intramuscular microdialysis was performed to collect masseter muscle 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and glutamate as well as the metabolic markers pyruvate and lactate. Two hours after the start of microdialysis, participants were randomized to a 20-min repetitive experimental tooth-clenching task (50% of maximal voluntary contraction) or a control session (no clenching). Pain and fatigue were measured throughout. The Friedman and Wilcoxon tests were used for statistical analyses.

    RESULTS:

    No alterations were observed in the concentrations of 5-HT, glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate over time in the clenching or control session, or between sessions at various time points. Pain (P < .01) and fatigue (P < .01) increased significantly over time in the clenching session and were significantly higher after clenching than in the control session (P < .01).

    CONCLUSION:

    Low levels of pain and fatigue developed with this experimental tooth-clenching model, but they were not associated with an altered release of 5-HT, glutamate, lactate, or pyruvate. More research is required to elucidate the peripheral release of algesic substances in response to tooth clenching.

  • 221.
    De Basso, Rachel
    et al.
    Jonköping Hospital, Sweden .
    Astrand, Hakan
    Jonköping Hospital, Sweden .
    Ryden Ahlgren, Asa
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Sandgren, Thomas
    Capio Lundby Hospital, Sweden .
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Low wall stress in the popliteal artery: Other mechanisms responsible for the predilection of aneurysmal dilatation?2014In: Vascular Medicine, ISSN 1358-863X, E-ISSN 1477-0377, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 131-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The popliteal artery (PA) is, after aorta, the most common site for aneurysm formation. Why the PA is more susceptible than other peripheral muscular arteries is unknown. We hypothesized that the wall composition, which in turn affects wall properties, as well as the circumferential wall stress (WS) imposed on the arterial wall, might differ compared to other muscular arteries. The aim was to study the WS of the PA in healthy subjects with the adjacent, muscular, common femoral artery (CFA) as a comparison. Ninety-four healthy subjects were included in this study (45 males, aged 10-78 years and 49 females, aged 10-83 years). The diameter and intima-media thickness (IMT) in the PA and CFA were investigated with ultrasound. Together with blood pressure the WS was defined according to the law of Laplace adjusted for IMT. The diameter increased with age in both PA and CFA (pless than0.001), with males having a larger diameter than females (pless than0.001). IMT increased with age in both PA and CFA (pless than0.001), with higher IMT values in males only in PA (pless than0.001). The calculated WS was unchanged with age in both arteries, but lower in PA than in CFA in both sexes (pless than0.001). In conclusion, this study shows that the PA and CFA WS is maintained during aging, probably due to a compensatory remodelling response with an increase in arterial wall thickness. However, the stress imposed on the PA wall is quite low, indicating that mechanisms other than WS contribute to the process of pathological arterial dilatation in the PA.

  • 222.
    De Basso, Rachel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hedblad, Bo
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Carlson, Joyce
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Persson, Margaretha
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Östling, Gerd
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Increased carotid plaque burden in men with the Fibrillin-1 2/3 genotype2014In: Clinical and experimental pharmacology & physiology, ISSN 0305-1870, E-ISSN 1440-1681, Vol. 41, no 9, p. 637-642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Fibrillin-1 is an important constituent of the vascular wall and earlier studies have indicated an effect of the Fibrillin-1 (FBN1) 2/3 genotype on blood pressure as well as aortic stiffness in men. The aim was to determine if the FBN1 2/3 genotype was associated with presence of carotid plaque and incident cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in middle-aged subjects.

    Material and Method: The FBN1 genotype was characterized in 5765 subjects (2424 men, 3341 women; aged 45-69 years) recruited from the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study Cardiovascular Cohort, Sweden. Plaque occurrence and intima media thickness (IMT) of the carotid artery were assessed by ultrasound. Incidence of first cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction and stroke) and cause-specific mortality was monitored during a mean of 13.2 years follow-up.

    Results: The most common FBN1 genotypes were 2/2, 2/3 and 2/4 which accounted for 92.2% (n=5317) of the subjects. There were no differences between the three genotypes regarding age, blood pressure, glucose, lipids, smoking habits, CCA diameter and IMT in men and women. Presence of plaque in the carotid artery was higher in men with genotype 2/3 as compared to the 2/2 and 2/4 genotypes, (55% vs. 46% and 50%, p=0.007). No similar difference was observed in women. No significant relationship was observed between FBN1 genotypes and incidence of CVD or all-cause mortality.

    Conclusions: The increased prevalence of plaque in the carotid artery of middle-aged men with FBN1 2/3 genotype indicates a pathological arterial wall remodeling with a more pronounced atherosclerotic burden. 

  • 223.
    De Basso, Rachel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Åstrand, Håkan
    Department of Vascular Surgery, Jönköping Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Rydén Ahlgren, Åsa
    Clinical Physiology and Nuclearmedicine Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Sandgren, Thomas
    Department of Surgery, Capio Lundby Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Low wall stress in popliteal artery – other mechanisms responsible for the predilection of aneurysmal dilatation?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The popliteal artery (PA) is, after aorta, the most common site for aneurysm formation. Why the PA is more susceptible than other peripheral muscular arteries is unknown. We hypothesised that the wall composition, which in turn affects wall properties, as well as the circumferential wall stress imposed on the arterial wall, might differ compared to other muscular arteries. The aim was to study the circumferential wall stress of the PA in healthy subjects with the adjacent muscular common femoral artery (CFA) as a comparison.

    Material and Methods: Ninety-four healthy subjects were included in this study (45 males, range 10-78 years and 49 females, range 10-83 years). The lumen diameter (LD) and intima-media thickness (IMT) in the PA and CFA were investigated with a Philips P700 ultrasound device. Together with blood pressure the circumferential wall stress was defined according to the law of Laplace adjusted for IMT.

    Results: The diameter increased with age in both PA and CFA (P<.001), with males having larger diameter than females (P<.001). IMT increased with age in both PA and CFA (P<.001), with higher IMT values in males only in PA (P<0.001). The calculated wall stress was unchanged with age in both arteries, but lower in PA than in CFA in both male and female subjects (P<0.001).

    Conclusion: This study shows that the popliteal and common femoral artery wall stress is maintained during ageing, probably due to compensatory remodeling response with an increase in arterial wall thickness. However, the stress imposed on the popliteal artery wall is quite low, indicating that other mechanisms than wall stress contribute to the process of pathological arterial dilatation in the popliteal artery.

  • 224.
    De Geer, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Gjerde, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Clinical Physiology in Kalmar, Linköping University, County Council of Kalmar, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Olsson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Large variation in blood flow between left ventricular segments, as detected by adenosine stress dynamic CT perfusion.2015In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 291-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Dynamic cardiac CT perfusion (CTP) is based on repeated imaging during the first-pass contrast agent inflow. It is a relatively new method that still needs validation.

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the variation in adenosine stress dynamic CTP blood flow as compared to (99m) Tc SPECT. Secondarily, to compare manual and automatic segmentation.

    METHODS: Seventeen patients with manifest coronary artery disease were included. Nine were excluded from evaluation for various reasons. All patients were examined with dynamic stress CTP and stress/rest SPECT. CTP blood flow was compared with SPECT on a per segment basis. Results for manual and automated AHA segmentation were compared.

    RESULTS: CTP showed a positive correlation with SPECT, with correlation coefficients of 0·38 and 0·41 for manual and automatic segmentation, respectively (P<0·0001). There was no significant difference between the correlation coefficients of the manual and automated segmentation procedures (P = 0·75). The average per individual global CTP blood flow value for normal segments varied by a factor of 1·9 (manual and automatic segmentation). For the whole patient group, the CTP blood flow value in normal segments varied by a factor of 2·9/2·7 (manual/automatic segmentation). Within each patient, the average per segment blood flow in normal segments varied by a factor of 1·3-2·0/1·2-2·1 (manual/automatic segmentation).

    CONCLUSION: A positive but rather weak correlation was found between CTP and (99m) Tc SPECT. Large variations in CTP blood flow suggest that a cut-off value for stress myocardial blood flow is inadequate to detect ischaemic segments. Dynamic CTP is hampered by a limited coverage.

  • 225.
    De Geer, Lina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Oscarsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Cardiac mortality after septic shock.2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 226.
    Dessau, Ram B
    et al.
    Slagelse Hospital, Slagelse, Denmark.
    Fryland, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wilhelmsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nyman, Dag
    Åland University, Mariehamn, Finlad.
    Forsberg, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Study of a Cohort of 1,886 Persons To Determine Changes in Antibody Reactivity to Borrelia burgdorferi 3 Months after a Tick Bite2015In: Clinical and Vaccine Immunology, ISSN 1556-6811, E-ISSN 1556-679X, Vol. 22, no 7, p. 823-827Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lyme borreliosis is a tick-borne disease caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi. The most frequent clinical manifestation is a rash called erythema migrans. Changes in antibody reactivity to B. burgdorferi 3 months after a tick bite are measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). One assay is based on native purified flagellum antigen (IgG), and the other assay is based on a recombinant antigen called C6 (IgG or IgM). Paired samples were taken at the time of a tick bite and 3 months later from 1,886 persons in Sweden and the Åland Islands, Finland. The seroconversion or relative change is defined by dividing the measurement units from the second sample by those from the first sample. The threshold for the minimum level of significant change was defined at the 2.5% level to represent the random error level. The thresholds were a 2.7-fold rise for the flagellar IgG assay and a 1.8-fold rise for the C6 assay. Of 1,886 persons, 102/101 (5.4%) had a significant rise in antibody reactivity in the flagellar assay or the C6 assay. Among 40 cases with a diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis, the sensitivities corresponding to a rise in antibodies were 33% and 50% for the flagellar antigen and the C6 antigen, respectively. Graphical methods to display the antibody response and to choose thresholds for a rise in relative antibody reactivity are shown and discussed. In conclusion, 5.4% of people with tick bites showed a rise in Borrelia-specific antibodies above the 2.5% threshold in either ELISA but only 40 (2.1%) developed clinical Lyme borreliosis.

  • 227.
    Dilip Deb, Kaushik
    et al.
    DiponEd BioIntelligence LLP, Bangalore, India.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Ophthalmology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    De Muinck, Ebo
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Rafat, Mehrdad
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Regenerative Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Regenerative Medicine (IGEN) .
    Nanotechnology in stem cells research: advances and applications2012In: Frontiers in Bioscience, ISSN 1093-9946, E-ISSN 1093-4715, Vol. 17, p. 1747-1760Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human beings suffer from a myriad of disorders caused by biochemical or biophysical alteration of physiological systems leading to organ failure. For a number of these conditions, stem cells and their enormous reparative potential may be the last hope for restoring function to these failing organ or tissue systems. To harness the potential of stem cells for biotherapeutic applications, we need to work at the size scale of molecules and processes that govern stem cells fate. Nanotechnology provides us with such capacity. Therefore, effective amalgamation of nanotechnology and stem cells - medical nanoscience or nanomedicine - offers immense benefits to the human race. The aim of this paper is to discuss the role and importance of nanotechnology in stem cell research by focusing on several important areas such as stem cell visualization and imaging, genetic modifications and reprogramming by gene delivery systems, creating stem cell niche, and similar therapeutic applications.

  • 228.
    Dong, Mei
    et al.
    Shandong University, Peoples R China .
    Yang, Xiaoyan
    Shandong University, Peoples R China .
    Lim, Sharon
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Cao, Ziquan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Honek, Jennifer
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Lu, Huixia
    Shandong University, Peoples R China .
    Zhang, Cheng
    Shandong University, Peoples R China .
    Seki, Takahiro
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Hosaka, Kayoko
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Wahlberg, Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Yang, Jianmin
    Shandong University, Peoples R China .
    Zhang, Lei
    Shandong University, Peoples R China .
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Sun, Baocun
    Tianjin Medical University, Peoples R China .
    Li, Xuri
    Sun Yat Sen University, Peoples R China .
    Liu, Yizhi
    Sun Yat Sen University, Peoples R China .
    Zhang, Yun
    Shandong University, Peoples R China .
    Cao, Yihai
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Cold Exposure Promotes Atherosclerotic Plaque Growth and Instability via UCP1-Dependent Lipolysis2013In: Cell Metabolism, ISSN 1550-4131, E-ISSN 1932-7420, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 118-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Molecular mechanisms underlying the cold-associated high cardiovascular risk remain unknown. Here, we show that the cold-triggered food-intake-independent lipolysis significantly increased plasma levels of small low-density lipoprotein (LDL) remnants, leading to accelerated development of atherosclerotic lesions in mice. In two genetic mouse knockout models (apolipoprotein E-/- [ApoE(-/-)] and LDL receptor(-/-) [Ldlr(-/-)] mice), persistent cold exposure stimulated atherosclerotic plaque growth by increasing lipid deposition. Furthermore, marked increase of inflammatory cells and plaque-associated microvessels were detected in the cold-acclimated ApoE(-/-) and Ldlr(-/-) mice, leading to plaque instability. Deletion of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), a key mitochondrial protein involved in thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT), in the ApoE(-/-) strain completely protected mice from the cold-induced atherosclerotic lesions. Cold acclimation markedly reduced plasma levels of adiponectin, and systemic delivery of adiponectin protected ApoE(-/-) mice from plaque development. These findings provide mechanistic insights on low-temperature-associated cardiovascular risks.

  • 229.
    Doupi, Persephone
    et al.
    National Institute Health and Welf, Finland.
    Svaar, Helge
    Svaar Konsult, Norway.
    Bjorn, Brian
    Danish Soc Patient Safety, Denmark.
    Deilkas, Ellen
    Akershus University Hospital, Norway; Norwegian Directorate Heatlh, Norway.
    Nylen, Urban
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Ruthberg, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Use of the Global Trigger Tool in patient safety improvement efforts: Nordic experiences2015In: Cognition, Technology & Work, ISSN 1435-5558, E-ISSN 1435-5566, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 45-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Global Trigger Tool (GTT) developed by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement is a method for retrospective patient record review based on the use of triggers-signals of potential adverse events that have caused patient harm. The method has the purpose of patient safety measurement and monitoring among adult inpatient populations and has been increasingly popular among Nordic countries. Use of the GTT in the Nordic area has been part of broader legal and policy actions and initiatives supportive of patient safety promotion and is being used to establish also national level estimates of patient safety incidents. Limitations of the method are its dependency on quality of documentation and the varying inter-rater reliability observed in many studies. Strengths of the GTT are its ability to detect larger numbers, as well as different types of adverse events when compared to other incident detection methods, hence it is a good addition to the palette of means for organizational patient safety monitoring. Research on reliability, usefulness and implementation approaches of the GTT, including its automation, is ongoing in the Nordic countries and is expected to generate useful input for the international patient safety community.

  • 230.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Pulse wave velocity with 4D flow MRI: Systematic differences and age-related regional vascular stiffness2014In: Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 0730-725X, E-ISSN 1873-5894, Vol. 32, no 10, p. 1266-1271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to compare multiple methods for estimation of PWV from 4D flow MRI velocity data and to investigate if 4D flow MRI-based PWV estimation with piecewise linear regression modeling of travel-distance vs. travel time is sufficient to discern age-related regional differences in PWV. Methods: 4D flow MRI velocity data were acquired in 8 young and Solder (age: 23 +/- 2 vs. 58 +/- 2 years old) normal volunteers. Travel-time and travel-distance were measured throughout the aorta and piecewise linear regression was used to measure global PWV in the descending aorta and regional PWV in three equally sized segments between the top of the aortic arch and the renal arteries. Six different methods for extracting travel-time were compared. Results: Methods for estimation of travel-time that use information about the whole flow waveform systematically overestimate PWV when compared to methods restricted to the upslope-portion of the waveforms (p less than 0.05). In terms of regional PWV, a significant interaction was found between age and location (p less than 0.05). The age-related differences in regional PWV were greater in the proximal compared to distal descending aorta. Conclusion: Care must be taken as different classes of methods for the estimation of travel-time produce different results. 4D flow MRI-based PWV estimation with piecewise linear regression modeling of travel-distance vs. travel time can discern age-related differences in regional PWV well in line with previously reported data.

  • 231.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    A Novel MRI Framework for the Quantification of Any Moment of Arbitrary Velocity Distributions.2010In: Proc. Intl. Soc. Mag. Reson. Med. 18 (2010), ISMRM , 2010, p. 1359-1359Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Under the assumption that the intravoxel velocity distribution is symmetric about its mean, the well-known MRI phase-difference method permits an estimation of the mean velocity of a voxel. The mean velocity corresponds to the first moment of the velocity distribution. Here, a novel framework for the quantification of any moment of arbitrary spin velocity distributions is presented. Simulations on realistic velocity distributions demonstrate its application. The presented moment framework may assist in improving the understanding of existing MRI methods for the quantification of flow and motion and serve as a basis for the development of new methods.

  • 232.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    MR flow imaging beyond the mean velocity: Estimation of the skew  and kurtosis of intravoxel velocity distributions2011In: ISMRM 2011, International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine ( ISMRM ) , 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 233.
    Dziewierz, Artur
    et al.
    Jagiellonian University, Poland .
    Mielecki, Waldemar
    Jagiellonian University, Poland .
    Siudak, Zbigniew
    Jagiellonian University, Poland .
    Rakowski, Tomasz
    Jagiellonian University, Poland .
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Birkemeyer, Ralf
    Schwarzwald Baar Klinikum, Germany .
    Zasada, Wojciech
    Jagiellonian University, Poland .
    Dubiel, Jacek S.
    Jagiellonian University, Poland .
    Dudek, Dariusz
    Jagiellonian University, Poland .
    Early abciximab administration before primary percutaneous coronary intervention improves clinical outcome in diabetic patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (EUROTRANSFER Registry)2012In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 223, no 1, p. 212-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Diabetes is an important determinant of prognosis in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Limited data are available concerning benefits and risks of upstream abciximab administration in diabetic patients. Thus, the objective of the study was to assess the impact of early abciximab administration before primary angioplasty (PCI) for STEMI in diabetic patients. Methods: Data were gathered for 1650 consecutive STEMI patients transferred for primary PCI from hospital networks in seven countries in Europe from November 2005 to January 2007 (the EURO-TRANSFER Registry population). Patients were stratified by diabetes mellitus presence and then by abciximab administration strategy (early - more than 30 min before PCI vs. late). Results: Diabetes mellitus was diagnosed in 262 (15.9%) patients. Patients with diabetes mellitus were high-risk individuals, with advanced age, higher prevalence of comorbidities and increased risk of ischemic events during follow-up in comparison to non-diabetic patients. A total of 1086 patients who received abciximab were identified. Strategy of early abciximab administration was associated with enhanced infarct-related artery patency before PCI, and improved epicardial flow after PCI in both diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Importantly, early abciximab in diabetic patients led to the decrease in ischemic events, including 30-day (OR 0.260, 95% CI 0.089-0.759, p = 0.012) and 1-year (OR 0.273, 95% CI 0.099-0.749, p = 0.012) mortality reduction. However, only a trend toward improved survival was confirmed after adjustment for potential confounders. On the contrary, the reduction of 30-day (OR 0.620, 95% CI 0.334-1.189, p = 0.16) and 1-year (OR 0.643, 95% CI 0.379-1.089, p = 0.10) mortality rates was not significant among non-diabetic patients. Conclusions: Early administration of abciximab improves infarct-related artery patency before and after primary PCI, and leads to improved survival in diabetic STEMI patients.

  • 234.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Flow Imaging: Cardiac Applications of 3D Cine Phase-Contrast MRI2011In: Current Cardiovascular Imaging Reports, ISSN 1941-9074, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 127-133Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global and regional blood flow dynamics are of pivotal importance to cardiac function. Fluid mechanical forces can affect hemolysis and platelet aggregation, as well as myocardial remodeling. In recent years, assessment of blood flow patterns based on time-resolved, three-dimensional, three-directional phase-contrast MRI (3D cine PC MRI) has become possible and rapidly gained popularity. Initially, this technique was mainly known for its intuitive and appealing visualizations of the cardiovascular blood flow. Most recently, the technique has begun to go beyond compelling images toward comprehensive and quantitative assessment of blood flow. In this article, cardiac applications of 3D cine PC MRI data are discussed, starting with a review of the acquisition and analysis techniques, and including descriptions of promising applications of cardiac 3D cine PC MRI for the clinical evaluation of myocardial, valvular, and vascular disorders.

  • 235.
    Eckard, Nathalie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Compilation of cost-effectiveness evidence for different heart conditions and treatment strategies2011In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 72-76Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. Despite the continuing interest in health economic research, we could find no accessible data set on cost-effectiveness, useful as practical information to decision makers who must allocate scarce resources within the cardiovascular field. The aim of this paper was to present cost-effectiveness ratios, based on a systematic literature search for the treatment of heart diseases. Design. A comprehensive literature search on cost-effectiveness analyses of intervention strategies for the treatment of heart diseases was conducted. We compiled available cost-effectiveness ratios for different heart conditions and treatment strategies, in a cost-effectiveness ranking table. The cost-effectiveness ratios were expressed as a cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) or life year gained. Results. Cost-effectiveness ratios, ranging from dominant to those costing more than 1,000,000 Euros per QALY gained, and bibliographic references are provided for. The table was categorized according to disease group, making the ranking table readily available. Conclusions. Cost-effectiveness ranking tables provide a means of presenting cost-effectiveness evidence. They provide valid information within a limited space aiding decision makers on the allocation of health care resources. This paper represents an extensive compilation of health economic evidence for the treatment of heart diseases.

  • 236.
    Eckard, Nathalie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Use of cost-effectiveness data in priority setting decisions: experiences from the national guidelines for heart diseases in Sweden2014In: International Journal of Health Policy and Management, ISSN 2322-5939, E-ISSN 2322-5939, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 323-332Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The inclusion of cost-effectiveness data, as a basis for priority setting rankings, is a distinguishing feature in the formulation of the Swedish national guidelines. Guidelines are generated with the direct intent to influence health policy and support decisions about the efficient allocation of scarce healthcare resources. Certain medical conditions may be given higher priority rankings i.e. given more resources than others, depending on how serious the medical condition is. This study investigated how a decision-making group, the Priority Setting Group (PSG), used cost-effectiveness data in ranking priority setting decisions in the national guidelines for heart diseases.

    METHODS: A qualitative case study methodology was used to explore the use of such data in ranking priority setting healthcare decisions. The study addressed availability of cost-effectiveness data, evidence understanding, interpretation difficulties, and the reliance on evidence. We were also interested in the explicit use of data in ranking decisions, especially in situations where economic arguments impacted the reasoning behind the decisions.

    RESULTS: This study showed that cost-effectiveness data was an important and integrated part of the decision-making process. Involvement of a health economist and reliance on the data facilitated the use of cost-effectiveness data. Economic arguments were used both as a fine-tuning instrument and a counterweight for dichotomization. Cost-effectiveness data were used when the overall evidence base was weak and the decision-makers had trouble making decisions due to lack of clinical evidence and in times of uncertainty. Cost-effectiveness data were also used for decisions on the introduction of new expensive medical technologies.

    CONCLUSION: Cost-effectiveness data matters in decision-making processes and the results of this study could be applicable to other jurisdictions where health economics is implemented in decision-making. This study contributes to knowledge on how cost-effectiveness data is used in actual decision-making, to ensure that the decisions are offered on equal terms and that patients receive medical care according their needs in order achieve maximum benefit.

  • 237.
    Eckerdal, O
    et al.
    University of Umeå, Umeå.
    Ahlqvist, J
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Wing, K
    Length dimensions and morphologic variations of the external bony auditory canal. A radiographic and histologic investigation.1978In: Dento-Maxillo-Facial Radiology, ISSN 0250-832X, E-ISSN 1476-542X, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 43-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autopsy material comprising a total of 58 specimes of the temporal bone and the proximal part of the mandible was investigated tomographically and by microtome in comparative layers. Microradiographs and histologic sections were used as the main sources of information to determine the length dimensions of the different parts of the external auditory canal. The morphology and its developmental variations are compared and described. The diagnostic implications are discussed. In the authors' opinion, tomography is the method of choice to illustrate the morphologic properties of the external auditory canal. It is suggested that when the tomographic image reveals morphologic developmental or pathologic defects which give rise to problematic diagnosis, a control examination of the contralateral side should be performed.

  • 238.
    Edenbrandt, Lars
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden EXINI Diagnost AB, Sweden .
    Hoglund, Peter
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden .
    Frantz, Sophia
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Hasbak, Philip
    Rigshosp, Denmark .
    Johansen, Allan
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark .
    Johansson, Lena
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Kammeier, Annett
    Ruhr University of Bochum, Germany .
    Lindner, Oliver
    Ruhr University of Bochum, Germany .
    Lomsky, Milan
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Matsuo, Shinro
    Kanazawa University, Japan .
    Nakajima, Kenichi
    Kanazawa University, Japan .
    Nystrom, Karin
    EXINI Diagnost AB, Sweden .
    Olsson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Sjostrand, Karl
    EXINI Diagnost AB, Sweden .
    Svensson, Sven-Eric
    Blekingesjukhuset, Sweden .
    Wakabayashi, Hiroshi
    Kanazawa University, Japan .
    Tragardh, Elin
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Area of ischemia assessed by physicians and software packages from myocardial perfusion scintigrams2014In: BMC Medical Imaging, ISSN 1471-2342, E-ISSN 1471-2342, Vol. 14, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The European Society of Cardiology recommends that patients with greater than 10% area of ischemia should receive revascularization. We investigated inter-observer variability for the extent of ischemic defects reported by different physicians and by different software tools, and if inter-observer variability was reduced when the physicians were provided with a computerized suggestion of the defects. Methods: Twenty-five myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) patients who were regarded as ischemic according to the final report were included. Eleven physicians in nuclear medicine delineated the extent of the ischemic defects. After at least two weeks, they delineated the defects again, and were this time provided a suggestion of the defect delineation by EXINI Heart(TM) (EXINI). Summed difference scores and ischemic extent values were obtained from four software programs. Results: The median extent values obtained from the 11 physicians varied between 8% and 34%, and between 9% and 16% for the software programs. For all 25 patients, mean extent obtained from EXINI was 17.0% (+/- standard deviation (SD) 14.6%). Mean extent for physicians was 22.6% (+/- 15.6%) for the first delineation and 19.1% (+/- 14.9%) for the evaluation where they were provided computerized suggestion. Intra-class correlation (ICC) increased from 0.56 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.41-0.72) to 0.81 (95% CI 0.71-0.90) between the first and the second delineation, and SD between physicians were 7.8 (first) and 5.9 (second delineation). Conclusions: There was large variability in the estimated ischemic defect size obtained both from different physicians and from different software packages. When the physicians were provided with a suggested delineation, the inter-observer variability decreased significantly.

  • 239.
    Edström, Måns
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Gustafsson, Mika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. Huddinge University Hospital.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Regulatory T cells in Multiple Sclerosis – Indications of impaired function of suppressive capacity and a role for chemokines2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND Regulatory T cells (Treg) are critical for immune regulation and homeostasis. In multiple sclerosis (MS), the function of these cells has been shown to be impaired, although the underlying mechanism has yet to be shown. In the current study, we aimed to characterize and assess the phenotypical, functional and transcriptional characteristics of memory and naïve Treg in MS patients and controls.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS 27 patients with relapsing-remitting disease were included, along with 29 healthy controls. Flow cytometry was used for detailed phenotyping of Treg subpopulations CD4+CD45RA+/- and CD4dimCD25++ and their expression of FOXP3, CD39 and HELIOS. CFSE (proliferation marker) and CD69 (activation marker) were used to investigate the functional capacity of Treg. A microarray was employed for genome-wide transcriptional characterization of isolated Treg.

    RESULTS CD4+CD45RA–CD25++ activated Treg displayed a higher expression of FOXP3 and CD39 than resting CD4+CD45RA+CD25+ Treg, while no significant phenotypical differences were observed in Treg subpopulations between patients and controls. However, a lower anti-proliferative capacity was observed in activated Treg of MS patients compared with those of controls (p<0.05), while suppression of activation was similar to controls. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) of microarray data revealed enrichment for the GO gene set ‘chemokine receptor binding’ in MS Treg.

    CONCLUSION Although numerical phenotypical assessment of resting and activated Tregs did not reveal any significant difference between patients and controls, functional co-culturing experiments showed an impaired function in activated Treg of MS patients. Furthermore, GSEA revealed immune-related gene sets overexpressed in Treg of MS patients, possibly containing clues to the functional impairment. In particular over-activity in chemokine signalling in Treg would be of interest for further investigation.

  • 240. EIDENVALL, L
    et al.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    DETERMINATION OF REGURGITANT FLOW IN A PULSATILE MODEL BY INTEGRATING VELOCITIES FROM THE ENTIRE 3D PROXIMAL VELOCITY-FIELD1993In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 88, no 4, 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 241. Eidenvall, Lars
    et al.
    Sjöberg, Birgitta Janero
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Two-dimensional color Doppler flow velocity profiles can be time corrected with an external ECG-delay device.1992In: Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography, ISSN 0894-7317, E-ISSN 1097-6795, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 405-413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although two-dimensional ultrasound color flow imaging is often considered to be a real-time technique, the acquisition time for two-dimensional color images may be up to 200 msec. Time correction is therefore necessary to obtain correct flow velocity profiles. We have developed a time-correction method in which a specially designed unit detects the QRS complex from the patient and creates a trig pulse that is delayed incrementally in relation to the QRS complex. This trig pulse controls the acquisition of the ultrasound images. A number of consecutively delayed images, with known incremental delay between the sweeps, can thus be stored in the memory of the echocardiograph and transferred digitally to a computer. The time-corrected flow velocity profile is obtained by interpolation of data from the time-delayed profiles. The system was evaluated in a Doppler string phantom test. With this technique it is possible to study time-corrected flow velocity profiles without the need to alter existing ultrasound Doppler equipment.

  • 242. Eidenvall, Lars
    et al.
    Sjöberg, Birgitta Janero
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    INFORMATION IN THE AORTIC BLOOD VELOCITY SIGNAL - A SIMULATION STUDY1991In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF THE IEEE ENGINEERING IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY SOCIETY, VOL 13, PTS 1-5, 1991, p. 2248-2249Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 243.
    EINBEIGI, Zacharia
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Enerbäck, Charlotta
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology.
    WALLGREN, Arne
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    NORDLING, Margareta
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    KARLSSON, Per
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    BRCA1 gene mutations may explain more than 80% of excess numberof ovarian cancer cases after breast cancer – a population based studyfrom the Western Sweden Health Care region2010In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 49, p. 361-367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: In a previous cohort study, we showed that there was a significant variation in the frequency of ovarian cancer after having breast cancer in Sweden, with the highest risk occuring in the Western region. The present study aimed to evaluate whether the high prevalence of the founder mutation BRCA1 3171ins5 may explain the excess number of ovarian cancer.

     

     

    METHOD: Among more than 26 000 women with breast cancer in the Western Swedish Health Care Region, 159 cases were subsequently diagnosed with ovarian cancer, whereas the expected number was 96. Archived tissue material was analysed for six common Scandinavian BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations.

    RESULTS: The excess number of cases was 63 (95% CI 47-77), based on person-years at risk and national incidence rates of ovarian cancer. A BRCA1 gene mutation was detected in 33 cases corresponding to 52% of the excess number. The founder mutation, BRCA1 3171ins5, was detected in 44% of the excess number. The identified mutations decreased from 45% in women less than 50 years of age at follow-up to 14% at 60+ years at follow-up. There was no obvious decrease in mutation frequency by excess numbers with age. Age at follow-up and first-degree relatives with breast and/or ovarian cancer were the best predictors of a mutation in this material.

    CONCLUSION: The founder mutation, BRCA1 3171ins5, explains the excess of ovarian cancer after breast cancer in the region. From the relative frequency of the studied mutations found at the cancer genetic counselling clinic, it is estimated that BRCA1 gene mutations are associated with about 80-85% of the excess cases. This means that a negative screening for these mutations in similar cases may have a predictive value and could strongly reduce the risk of ovarian cancer in relatives.

  • 244.
    Ekerstad, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Löfmark, Rurik
    Stockholm Centre for Healthcare Ethics, LIME, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden .
    Lindenberger, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden .
    Andersson, David
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Frailty is independently associated with 1-year mortality for elderly patients with non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction2014In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881, Vol. 21, no 10, p. 1216-1224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: For the large population of elderly patients with cardiovascular disease, it is crucial to identify clinically relevant measures of biological age and their contribution to risk. Frailty is denoting decreased physiological reserves and increased vulnerability. We analysed the manner in which the variable frailty is associated with 1-year outcomes for elderly non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients aged 75 years or older, with diagnosed NSTEMI were included at three centres, and clinical data including judgment of frailty were collected prospectively. Frailty was defined according to the Canadian Study of Health and Aging Clinical Frailty Scale. Of 307 patients, 149 (48.5%) were considered frail. By Cox regression analyses, frailty was found to be independently associated with 1-year mortality after adjusting for cardiovascular risk and comorbid conditions (hazard ratio 4.3, 95% CI 2.4-7.8). The time to the first event was significantly shorter for frail patients than for nonfrail (34 days, 95% CI 10-58, p = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS: Frailty is strongly and independently associated with 1-year mortality. The combined use of frailty and comorbidity may constitute an important risk prediction concept in regard to cardiovascular patients with complex needs.

  • 245.
    Ekerstad, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Löfmark, Rurik
    Stockholm Centre for Healthcare Ethics, LIME, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Lindenberger, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Frailty as a Predictor of Short-Term Outcomes for Elderly Patients with non-ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction (NSTEMI)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background – For the large and growing population of elderly patients with cardiovascular disease it is important to identify clinically relevant measures of biological age and their contribution to risk. Frailty is an emerging concept in medicine denoting increased vulnerability and decreased physiologic reserves. We analyzed how the variable frailty predicts short-term outcomes for elderly NSTEMI patients.

    Methods and Results – Patients, aged 75 years or older, with diagnosed NSTEMI were included at three centers, and clinical data including judgement of frailty were collected prospectively. Frailty was defined according to the Canadian Study of Health and Aging (CSHA) Clinical Frailty Scale (CFS). Of 307 patients, 150 (48.5%) were considered frail. Frail patients were slightly older and presented with a greater burden of comorbidity. By multiple logistic regression, frailty was found to be a strong independent risk factor for inhospital mortality, one-month mortality (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.3 to 10.8) and the primary composite outcome (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.3 to 3.7). Particularly frail patients with a high comorbidity burden manifested a markedly increased risk for the primary composite outcome. By multiple linear regression, frailty was identified as a strong independent predictor for prolonged hospital care (frail 13.4 bed days, non-frail 7.5 bed days; P<0.0001).

    Conclusions - Frailty is a strong independent predictor of in-hospital mortality, one-month mortality, prolonged hospital care and the primary composite outcome. The combined use of frailty and comorbidity may constitute an ultimate risk prediction concept regarding cardiovascular patients with complex needs.

  • 246.
    Ekerstad, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Löfmark, Rurik
    LIME, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindenberger, Marcus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Frailty is independently associated with short-term outcomes for elderly patients with non-st-segment elevation myocardial infarction2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 247.
    Ekerstad, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Löfmark, Rurik
    Department of Medical Ethics, LIME, Karolinska Institutet.
    Lindenberger, Marcus
    Department of Medicine, Ryhov County Hospital Jönköping.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Frailty Is Independently Associated With Short-Term Outcomes for Elderly Patients With Non-ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction2011In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 124, no 22, p. 2397-2404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: For the large and growing population of elderly patients with cardiovascular disease, it is important to identify clinically relevant measures of biological age and their contribution to risk. Frailty is an emerging concept in medicine denoting increased vulnerability and decreased physiological reserves. We analyzed the manner in which the variable frailty predicts short-term outcomes for elderly non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction patients.

    Methods and results: Patients aged ≥ 75 years, with diagnosed non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction were included at 3 centers, and clinical data including judgment of frailty were collected prospectively. Frailty was defined according to the Canadian Study of Health and Aging Clinical Frailty Scale. The impact of the comorbid conditions on risk was quantified by the coronary artery disease-specific index. Of 307 patients, 149 (48.5%) were considered frail. By multiple logistic regression, frailty was found to be strongly and independently associated with risk for the primary composite outcome (death from any cause, myocardial reinfarction, revascularization due to ischemia, hospitalization for any cause, major bleeding, stroke/transient ischemic attack, and need for dialysis up to 1 month after inclusion) (odds ratio, 2.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-3.7) in-hospital mortality (odds ratio, 4.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-16.8), and 1-month mortality (odds ratio, 4.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-13.0).

    Conclusions: Frailty is strongly and independently associated with in-hospital mortality, 1-month mortality, prolonged hospital care, and the primary composite outcome. The combined use of frailty and comorbidity may constitute an ultimate risk prediciton concept in regard to cardiovascular patients with complex needs.

  • 248.
    Eklind-Cervenka, M
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute.
    Benson, L
    Karolinska Institute.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Edner, M
    Danderyd Hospital.
    Rosenqvist, M
    Karolinska Institute.
    Lund, L H
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Choice of angiotensin receptor blocker affects mortality in heart failure - analysis of 5823 patients in the swedish heart failure registry in EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL, vol 31, issue , pp 848-8482010In: EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL, Oxford University Press , 2010, Vol. 31, p. 848-848Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 249.
    Eklund, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Warntjes, Marcel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Phase Based Volume Registration on the GPU with Application to Quantitative MRI2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a method for fast phase based registration of volume data for medical applications. As the number of different modalities within medical imaging increases, it becomes more and more important with registration that works for a mixture of modalities. For these applications the phase based registration approach has proven to be superior. Today there seem to be two kinds of groups that work with medical image registration, one that works with refining of the registration algorithms and one that works with implementation of more simple algorithms on graphic cards for speeding up the algorithms. We put the work from these groups together and get the best from both worlds. We achieve a speedup of 10-30 compared to our CPU implementation, which makes fast phase based registration possible for large medical volumes.

  • 250.
    Ekman, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sigurdardottir, G
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kartul, N
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Enerbäck, Charlotta
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology.
    Systemically elevated Th1-, Th2-and Th17-associated chemokines in psoriasis in JOURNAL OF INVESTIGATIVE DERMATOLOGY, vol 132, issue , pp S28-S282012In: JOURNAL OF INVESTIGATIVE DERMATOLOGY, Nature Publishing Group , 2012, Vol. 132, p. S28-S28Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

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