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  • 201.
    Ali Abdi, Abshir
    et al.
    East Africa University, Somalia.
    Osman, Abdimajid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Prevalence of common hereditary risk factors for thrombophilia in Somalia and identification of a novel Gln544Arg mutation in coagulation factor V2017In: Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis, ISSN 0929-5305, E-ISSN 1573-742X, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 536-543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thrombophilia, commonly manifested as venous thromboembolism (VTE), is a worldwide concern but little is known on its genetic epidemiology in many parts of the globe particularly in the developing countries. Here we employed TaqMan genotyping and pyrosequencing to evaluate the prevalence of known common nucleotide polymorphisms associated with thrombophilia in a Somali population in the Puntland region of Somalia. We also employed next generation sequencing (NGS) to investigate other genetic variants in a Somali patient with deep venous thrombosis (DVT). As expected, we found no existence of factor V Leiden (rs6025) and prothrombin G20210A (rs1799963) in the Somali population. The G allele of ABO [261G/delG] polymorphism (rs8176719) was found at a frequency of 29%, similar to that observed in other African populations. We found the lowest so far reported frequency of MTHFR C677T (rs1801133) polymorphism in the Somali population (T allele frequency 1.5%). A novel and deleterious single nucleotide variation in exon 11 of coagulation factor V (c.1631A amp;gt; G) causing Gln544Arg exchange in factor V was identified in a 29 years old Somali female with DVT. The same patient was heterozygous to VKORC1 Asp36Tyr polymorphism (rs61742245) that predisposes to warfarin resistance. In conclusion, this study shows that common hereditary factors for thromboembolism found in Caucasians are either less frequent or absent in the Somali population-similar to the situation in other Africans. NGS is possibly a better choice to detect genetic risk variants for thrombosis in this ethnic group.

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  • 202.
    Ali, Fatema Mohammed
    et al.
    Univ Sydney, Australia.
    Westling, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zhao, Luke Hong Lu
    Univ Sydney, Australia.
    Corneil, Brian D.
    Univ Western Ontario, Canada.
    Camp, Aaron J.
    Univ Sydney, Australia.
    Splenius capitis: sensitive target for the cVEMP in older and neurodegenerative patients2019In: European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, ISSN 0937-4477, E-ISSN 1434-4726, Vol. 276, no 11, p. 2991-3003Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) is a technique used to assess vestibular function. Cervical VEMPs (cVEMPs) are obtained conventionally from the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle; however, the dorsal neck muscle splenius capitis (SPL) has also been shown to be a reliable target alongside the SCM in young subjects. Objective This study aimed to compare cVEMPs from the SCM and SPL in two positions across young, older, and Parkinsons disease (PD) patients. Method Experiments were carried out using surface EMG electrodes placed over the SCM and SPL. cVEMPs were measured using a 30 s, 126 dB sound stimulus with 222 individual tone bursts, while subjects were in a supine and head-turned posture (also known as the head elevation method), and in a seated head-turned posture. Results When comparing cVEMPs across positions, the incidence of supine and seated SCM-cVEMPs diminished significantly in older and PD patients in comparison with young subjects. However, no statistically significant differences in incidences were found in seated SPL-cVEMPs when comparing young, older and PD patients. SPL-cVEMPs were present significantly more often than seated SCM-cVEMPs in PD patients. Conclusions SPL-cVEMPs are not altered to the same extent that SCM-cVEMPs are by aging and disease and its addition to cVEMP testing may reduce false-positive tests for vestibulopathy.

  • 203.
    Ali, Lilas
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Swedish Institute Health Science, Sweden; Swedish Institute Health Science, Sweden.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Swedish Institute Health Science, Sweden; Swedish Institute Health Science, Sweden.
    Skarsater, Ingela
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Swedish Institute Health Science, Sweden; Swedish Institute Health Science, Sweden; Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden; Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Caring Situation, Health, Self-efficacy, and Stress in Young Informal Carers of Family and Friends with Mental Illness in Sweden2015In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 407-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study compared the caring situation, health, self-efficacy, and stress of young (16-25) informal carers (YICs) supporting a family member with mental illness with that of YICs supporting a friend. A sample of 225 carers, assigned to a family group (n = 97) or a friend group (n = 128) completed the questionnaire. It was found that the family group experiences a lower level of support and friends experienced a lower positive value of caring. No other differences in health, general self-efficacy and stress were found. YICs endure different social situations, which is why further study of the needs of YICs, especially those supporting friends, is urgently needed.

  • 204.
    Ali, Neserin
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Ljunggren, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Karlsson, Helen
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Wierzbicka, Aneta
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Pagels, Joakim
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Isaxon, Christina
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Gudmundsson, Anders
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Rissler, Jenny
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Nielsen, Jorn
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Lindh, Christian H.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Karedal, Monica
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Comprehensive proteome analysis of nasal lavage samples after controlled exposure to welding nanoparticles shows an induced acute phase and a nuclear receptor, LXR/RXR, activation that influence the status of the extracellular matrix2018In: Clinical Proteomics, ISSN 1542-6416, E-ISSN 1559-0275, Vol. 15, article id 20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Epidemiological studies have shown that many welders experience respiratory symptoms. During the welding process a large number of airborne nanosized particles are generated, which might be inhaled and deposited in the respiratory tract. Knowledge of the underlying mechanisms behind observed symptoms is still partly lacking, although inflammation is suggested to play a central role. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of welding fume particle exposure on the proteome expression level in welders suffering from respiratory symptoms, and changes in protein mediators in nasal lavage samples were analyzed. Such mediators will be helpful to clarify the pathomechanisms behind welding fume particle-induced effects. Methods: In an exposure chamber, 11 welders with work-related symptoms in the lower airways during the last month were exposed to mild-steel welding fume particles (1 mg/m(3)) and to filtered air, respectively, in a double-blind manner. Nasal lavage samples were collected before, immediately after, and the day after exposure. The proteins in the nasal lavage were analyzed with two different mass spectrometry approaches, label-free discovery shotgun LC-MS/MS and a targeted selected reaction monitoring LC-MS/MS analyzing 130 proteins and four in vivo peptide degradation products. Results: The analysis revealed 30 significantly changed proteins that were associated with two main pathways; activation of acute phase response signaling and activation of LXR/RXR, which is a nuclear receptor family involved in lipid signaling. Connective tissue proteins and proteins controlling the degradation of such tissues, including two different matrix metalloprotease proteins, MMP8 and MMP9, were among the significantly changed enzymes and were identified as important key players in the pathways. Conclusion: Exposure to mild-steel welding fume particles causes measurable changes on the proteome level in nasal lavage matrix in exposed welders, although no clinical symptoms were manifested. The results suggested that the exposure causes an immediate effect on the proteome level involving acute phase proteins and mediators regulating lipid signaling Proteases involved in maintaining the balance between the formation and degradation of extracellular matrix proteins are important key proteins in the induced effects.

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  • 205.
    Ali, Neserin
    et al.
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Karin
    Center for Molecular Protein Science, Biochemistry and Structural Biology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Rissler, Jenny
    Department of Design Sciences, Ergonomic and Aerosol Technology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Helen Marg
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Svensson, Christian R
    Department of Design Sciences, Ergonomic and Aerosol Technology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Gudmundsson, Anders
    Department of Design Sciences, Ergonomic and Aerosol Technology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Lindh, Christian H
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Bo A G
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Cedervall, Tommy
    Center for Molecular Protein Science, Biochemistry and Structural Biology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Kåredal, Monica
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Analysis of nanoparticle-protein coronas formed in vitro between nanosized welding particles and nasal lavage proteins.2016In: Nanotoxicology, ISSN 1743-5390, E-ISSN 1743-5404, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 226-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Welding fumes include agglomerated particles built up of primary nanoparticles. Particles inhaled through the nose will to some extent be deposited in the protein-rich nasal mucosa, and a protein corona will be formed around the particles. The aim was to identify the protein corona formed between nasal lavage proteins and four types of particles with different parameters. Two of the particles were formed and collected during welding and two were manufactured iron oxides. When nasal lavage proteins were added to the particles, differences were observed in the sizes of the aggregates that were formed. Measurements showed that the amount of protein bound to particles correlated with the relative size increase of the aggregates, suggesting that the surface area was associated with the binding capacity. However, differences in aggregate sizes were detected when nasal proteins were added to UFWF and Fe2O3 particles (having similar agglomerated size) suggesting that yet parameters other than size determine the binding. Relative quantitative mass spectrometric and gel-based analyses showed differences in the protein content of the coronas. High-affinity proteins were further assessed for network interactions. Additional experiments showed that the inhibitory function of secretory leukocyte peptidase inhibitor, a highly abundant nasal protein, was influenced by particle binding suggesting that an understanding of protein function following particle binding is necessary to properly evaluate pathophysiological events. Our results underscore the importance of including particles collected from real working environments when studying the toxic effects of particles because these effects might be mediated by the protein corona.

  • 206. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Ali, Zaheer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Investigating mechanisms of angiogenesis in health and disease using zebrafish models2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Angiogenesis, the growth of blood vessels from an existing vasculature, can occur by sprouting from preexisting vessels or by vessel splitting (intussusception). Pathological angiogenesis drives choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in age related macular degeneration (AMD) which is commonly restricted under the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), called occult CNV, but may also involve vessels penetrating through the RPE into the sub-retinal space. Pathological vessels are poorly developed, insufficiently perfused and highly leaky, phenotypes that are considered to drive disease progression and lead to poor prognosis. Currently, a number of anti-angiogenic drugs exists, the majority of which target vascular endothelial factor (VEGF), but although they often are highly beneficial for treating eye diseases in the short-term, they are generally of limited efficacy in other diseases such as cancer, and also have poorer efficacy when used for treatment of eye diseases in the long-term. A better understanding of the mechanisms underlying pathological angiogenesis can generate new targets for treatment leading to development of better drugs for cancer and retinopathies, but perhaps also other angiogenesis-dependent diseases, in the future. In this thesis mechanisms involved in developmental angiogenesis or pathological angiogenesis in the choroid, cornea or melanoma was identified. These findings highlight the need to further elaborate our knowledge related to angiogenesis in different tissues/conditions for a more targeted, and potentially effective treatment of diseases in the future.

    In paper I, we for the first time identified the choriocapillaries (CCs) in adult zebrafish and found that occult CNV could be induced by exposing the fish to severe hypoxia. Interestingly, we found that occult CNV relied on intussusception, involving not only de novo generation of intussusceptive pillars but also a previously poorly understood mechanism called pillar splitting. This involved HIF-VEGF-VEGFR2 signaling and evidence that this also occurred in both rats and humans suffering from AMD suggested that the mechanism was conserved and clinically relevant.

    In contrast, we found in paper II that the development of CCs in the zebrafish relies on sprouting angiogenesis, involve continuous remodeling, and delayed maturation of the vasculature in 2D. The initial development was found to occur by a unique process of tissuewide synchronized vasculogenesis. As expected, VEGFA via VEGFR2 was also critical for the development of these vessels in the zebrafish embryo, but surprisingly this was independent on hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1.

    Inflammatory nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB) signaling is involved in the progression of angiogenesis, but this signaling pathway has mainly been studied in the inflammatory cells and the role of NF-kB in the endothelial cells during angiogenesis is poorly understood. In paper III, we found that blocking NF-kB signaling using a specific IKK2 blocker IMD0354, specifically blocks pathological as well as developmental angiogenesis by targeting endothelial cell NF-kB signaling in the endothelial cells. Using a rat model for suture-induced corneal neovascularization, IMD0354 treatment lead to reduced production of inflammatory C-C motif chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2), C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 5 (CXCL5) and VEGF, and thereby reduced pathological corneal angiogenesis in this model.

    Using the zebrafish tumor xenograft model in paper IV, we found an association between Microphthalmia associated transcription factor (MITF) and pigment epithelium derived factor (PEDF), which was involved in pathological tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. Similarly, in paper V we used zebrafish transplantation models to study and investigate the use of biocompatible polymers for the delivery of pro-angiogenic FGF-2 as a potential treatment strategy for ischemic diseases such as myocardial infarction (MI). Conclusively, this thesis provides new insights into diverse fields of angiogenic assays using zebrafish, and reveals new mechanisms of angiogenesis in health and disease. This work will hopefully provide a foundation for further studies into occult CNV related to AMD, a process that has not been possible to study previously in pre-clinical models. In addition, zebrafish xenograft or other transplantation models used in this work will likely be important to study cancer biology and to develop more attractive pharmaceutical preparations based on biocompatible hydrogels formulated as microspheres in the future.

    List of papers
    1. Selective IKK2 inhibitor IMD0354 disrupts NF-kappa B signaling to suppress corneal inflammation and angiogenesis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Selective IKK2 inhibitor IMD0354 disrupts NF-kappa B signaling to suppress corneal inflammation and angiogenesis
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    2018 (English)In: Angiogenesis, ISSN 0969-6970, E-ISSN 1573-7209, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 267-285Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Corneal neovascularization is a sight-threatening condition caused by angiogenesis in the normally avascular cornea. Neovascularization of the cornea is often associated with an inflammatory response, thus targeting VEGF-A alone yields only a limited efficacy. The NF-kappa B signaling pathway plays important roles in inflammation and angiogenesis. Here, we study consequences of the inhibition of NF-kappa B activation through selective blockade of the IKK complex I kappa B kinase beta (IKK2) using the compound IMD0354, focusing on the effects of inflammation and pathological angiogenesis in the cornea. In vitro, IMD0354 treatment diminished HUVEC migration and tube formation without an increase in cell death and arrested rat aortic ring sprouting. In HUVEC, the IMD0354 treatment caused a dose-dependent reduction in VEGF-A expression, suppressed TNF alpha-stimulated expression of chemokines CCL2 and CXCL5, and diminished actin filament fibers and cell filopodia formation. In developing zebrafish embryos, IMD0354 treatment reduced expression of Vegf-a and disrupted retinal angiogenesis. In inflammation-induced angiogenesis in the rat cornea, systemic selective IKK2 inhibition decreased inflammatory cell invasion, suppressed CCL2, CXCL5, Cxcr2, and TNF-alpha expression and exhibited anti-angiogenic effects such as reduced limbal vessel dilation, reduced VEGF-A expression and reduced angiogenic sprouting, without noticeable toxic effect. In summary, targeting NF-kappa B by selective IKK2 inhibition dampened the inflammatory and angiogenic responses in vivo by modulating the endothelial cell expression profile and motility, thus indicating an important role of NF-kappa B signaling in the development of pathologic corneal neovascularization.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer Netherlands, 2018
    Keywords
    Cornea; Neovascularization; NF-kappa B; IMD0354; IKK2; VEGF
    National Category
    Cell and Molecular Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-147373 (URN)10.1007/s10456-018-9594-9 (DOI)000428924500007 ()29332242 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85041334437 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [2012-2472]; Swedish Foundation Stiftelsen Synframjandets Forskningsfond/Ogonfonden; Svenska Sallskapet for Medicinsk Forskning; Linkoping Universitet; Jeanssons Stiftelser

    Available from: 2018-05-18 Created: 2018-05-18 Last updated: 2019-05-01Bibliographically approved
    2. Regulatory and Functional Connection of Microphthalmia-Associated Transcription Factor and Anti-Metastatic Pigment Epithelium Derived Factor in Melanoma
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regulatory and Functional Connection of Microphthalmia-Associated Transcription Factor and Anti-Metastatic Pigment Epithelium Derived Factor in Melanoma
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    2014 (English)In: Neoplasia, ISSN 1522-8002, E-ISSN 1476-5586, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 529-542Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a member of the serine protease inhibitor superfamily, has potent anti-metastatic effects in cutaneous melanoma through its direct actions on endothelial and melanoma cells. Here we show that PEDF expression positively correlates with microphthalmia-associated transcription factor ( MITF) in melanoma cell lines and human samples. High PEDF and MITF expression is characteristic of low aggressive melanomas classified according to molecular and pathological criteria, whereas both factors are decreased in senescent melanocytes and naevi. Importantly, MITF silencing down-regulates PEDF expression in melanoma cell lines and primary melanocytes, suggesting that the correlation in the expression reflects a causal relationship. In agreement, analysis of Chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to high throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) data sets revealed three MITF binding regions within the first intron of SERPINF1, and reporter assays demonstrated that the binding of MITF to these regions is sufficient to drive transcription. Finally, we demonstrate that exogenous PEDF expression efficiently halts in vitro migration and invasion, as well as in vivo dissemination of melanoma cells induced by MITF silencing. In summary, these results identify PEDF as a novel transcriptional target of MITF and support a relevant functional role for the MITF-PEDF axis in the biology of melanoma.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Neoplasia, 2014
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-110497 (URN)10.1016/j.neo.2014.06.001 (DOI)000340553600007 ()25030625 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Ministerio de Ciencia y Competitividad of Spain [SAF-2010-19256, SAF-2011-24225, SAF-2012-32117, FIS 11/02568, RD09/0076/0101, PT13/0010/0012, PI12/01552]; LiU-Cancer; Svenska Sallskapet for Medicinsk Forskning; Ake Wibergs Stiftelse; Goesta Fraenkels Stifelse; Fundacion Cientifica de la Asociacion Espanola Contra el Cancer

    Available from: 2014-09-15 Created: 2014-09-12 Last updated: 2018-12-07
    3. Adjustable delivery of pro-angiogenic FGF-2 by alginate: collagen microspheres
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adjustable delivery of pro-angiogenic FGF-2 by alginate: collagen microspheres
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    2018 (English)In: BIOLOGY OPEN, ISSN 2046-6390, Vol. 7, no 3, article id UNSP bio027060Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Therapeutic induction of blood vessel growth (angiogenesis) in ischemic tissues holds great potential for treatment of myocardial infarction and stroke. Achieving sustained angiogenesis and vascular maturation has, however, been highly challenging. Here, we demonstrate that alginate: collagen hydrogels containing therapeutic, pro-angiogenic FGF-2, and formulated as microspheres, is a promising and clinically relevant vehicle for therapeutic angiogenesis. By titrating the amount of readily dissolvable and degradable collagen with more slowly degradable alginate in the hydrogel mixture, the degradation rates of the biomaterial controlling the release kinetics of embedded proangiogenic FGF-2 can be adjusted. Furthermore, we elaborate a microsphere synthesis protocol allowing accurate control over sphere size, also a critical determinant of degradation/release rate. As expected, alginate: collagen microspheres were completely biocompatible and did not cause any adverse reactions when injected in mice. Importantly, the amount of pro-angiogenic FGF-2 released from such microspheres led to robust induction of angiogenesis in zebrafish embryos similar to that achieved by injecting FGF-2-releasing cells. These findings highlight the use of microspheres constructed from alginate: collagen hydrogels as a promising and clinically relevant delivery system for pro-angiogenic therapy.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    COMPANY OF BIOLOGISTS LTD, 2018
    Keywords
    Hydrogels; Microspheres; Angiogenesis; Vasculature; Zebrafish
    National Category
    Cell and Molecular Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-147419 (URN)10.1242/bio.027060 (DOI)000429100500002 ()29449216 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Svenska Sallskapet for Medicinsk Forskning; Ake-Wiberg Foundation; Goesta Fraenkel Foundation; Ahrens Stiftelse; Ollie och Elof Ericssons Stiftelse; Carmen och Bertil Ragners Stiftelse; KI Stiftelser och fonder; Loo och Hans Ostermans Stiftelse for Medicinsk Forskning; Vetenskapsradet; Linkoping University

    Available from: 2018-05-17 Created: 2018-05-17 Last updated: 2018-12-07
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    Investigating mechanisms of angiogenesis in health and disease using zebrafish models
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  • 207.
    Ali, Zaheer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Cui, Dongmei
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Peoples R China.
    Yang, Yunlong
    Fudan Univ, Peoples R China.
    Tracey-White, Dhani
    UCL Inst Ophthalmol, England.
    Vazquez Rodriguez, Gabriela
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Moosajee, Mariya
    UCL Inst Ophthalmol, England.
    Ju, Rong
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Peoples R China.
    Li, Xuri
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Peoples R China.
    Cao, Yihai
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Synchronized tissue-scale vasculogenesis and ubiquitous lateral sprouting underlie the unique architecture of the choriocapillaris2020In: Developmental Biology, ISSN 0012-1606, E-ISSN 1095-564X, Vol. 457, no 2, p. 206-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The choriocapillaris is an exceptionally high density, two-dimensional, sheet-like capillary network, characterized by the highest exchange rate of nutrients for waste products per area in the organism. These unique morphological and physiological features are critical for supporting the extreme metabolic requirements of the outer retina needed for vision. The developmental mechanisms and processes responsible for generating this unique vascular network remain, however, poorly understood. Here we take advantage of the zebrafish as a model organism for gaining novel insights into the cellular dynamics and molecular signaling mechanisms involved in the development of the choriocapillaris. We show for the first time that zebrafish have a choriocapillaris highly similar to that in mammals, and that it is initially formed by a novel process of synchronized vasculogenesis occurring simultaneously across the entire outer retina. This initial vascular network expands by un-inhibited sprouting angiogenesis whereby all endothelial cells adopt tip-cell characteristics, a process which is sustained throughout embryonic and early post-natal development, even after the choriocapillaris becomes perfused. Ubiquitous sprouting was maintained by continuous VEGF-VEGFR2 signaling in endothelial cells delaying maturation until immediately before stages where vision becomes important for survival, leading to the unparalleled high density and lobular structure of this vasculature. Sprouting was throughout development limited to two dimensions by Bruchs membrane and the sclera at the anterior and posterior surfaces respectively. These novel cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying choriocapillaris development were recapitulated in mice. In conclusion, our findings reveal novel mechanisms underlying the development of the choriocapillaris during zebrafish and mouse development. These results may explain the uniquely high density and sheet-like organization of this vasculature.

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  • 208.
    Ali, Zaheer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Islam, Anik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sherrell, Peter
    Imperial Coll London, England.
    Le-Moine, Mark
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lolas, Georgios
    Univ Athens, Greece.
    Syrigos, Konstantinos
    Univ Athens, Greece.
    Rafat, Mehrdad
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Adjustable delivery of pro-angiogenic FGF-2 by alginate: collagen microspheres2018In: BIOLOGY OPEN, ISSN 2046-6390, Vol. 7, no 3, article id UNSP bio027060Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Therapeutic induction of blood vessel growth (angiogenesis) in ischemic tissues holds great potential for treatment of myocardial infarction and stroke. Achieving sustained angiogenesis and vascular maturation has, however, been highly challenging. Here, we demonstrate that alginate: collagen hydrogels containing therapeutic, pro-angiogenic FGF-2, and formulated as microspheres, is a promising and clinically relevant vehicle for therapeutic angiogenesis. By titrating the amount of readily dissolvable and degradable collagen with more slowly degradable alginate in the hydrogel mixture, the degradation rates of the biomaterial controlling the release kinetics of embedded proangiogenic FGF-2 can be adjusted. Furthermore, we elaborate a microsphere synthesis protocol allowing accurate control over sphere size, also a critical determinant of degradation/release rate. As expected, alginate: collagen microspheres were completely biocompatible and did not cause any adverse reactions when injected in mice. Importantly, the amount of pro-angiogenic FGF-2 released from such microspheres led to robust induction of angiogenesis in zebrafish embryos similar to that achieved by injecting FGF-2-releasing cells. These findings highlight the use of microspheres constructed from alginate: collagen hydrogels as a promising and clinically relevant delivery system for pro-angiogenic therapy.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 209.
    Ali, Zaheer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mukwaya, Anthonny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Biesemeier, Antje
    Univ Tubingen, Germany.
    Ntzouni, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ramskold, Daniel
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Giatrellis, Sarantis
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Mammadzada, Parviz
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Cao, Renhai
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lennikov, Anton
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Missouri, MO 65211 USA.
    Marass, Michele
    Max Planck Inst Lung and Heart Res, Germany.
    Gerri, Claudia
    Max Planck Inst Lung and Heart Res, Germany.
    Hildesjö, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Taylor, Michael
    Univ Wisconsin, WI 53706 USA.
    Deng, Qiaolin
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Peebo, Beatrice
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping. Bayer AB, Sweden.
    del Peso, Luis
    Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain; Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas Alberto Sols, CSIC-UAM Madrid, Spain.
    Kvanta, Anders
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Rickard
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Schraermeyer, Ulrich
    Univ Tubingen, Germany.
    Andre, Helder
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Steffensen, John F.
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Lagali, Neil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Cao, Yihai
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kele, Julianna
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Univ Autonoma Madrid, Spain; UAM, Spain.
    Intussusceptive Vascular Remodeling Precedes Pathological Neovascularization2019In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 39, no 7, p. 1402-1418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective—

    Pathological neovascularization is crucial for progression and morbidity of serious diseases such as cancer, diabetic retinopathy, and age-related macular degeneration. While mechanisms of ongoing pathological neovascularization have been extensively studied, the initiating pathological vascular remodeling (PVR) events, which precede neovascularization remains poorly understood. Here, we identify novel molecular and cellular mechanisms of preneovascular PVR, by using the adult choriocapillaris as a model.

    Approach and Results—

    Using hypoxia or forced overexpression of VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) in the subretinal space to induce PVR in zebrafish and rats respectively, and by analyzing choriocapillaris membranes adjacent to choroidal neovascular lesions from age-related macular degeneration patients, we show that the choriocapillaris undergo robust induction of vascular intussusception and permeability at preneovascular stages of PVR. This PVR response included endothelial cell proliferation, formation of endothelial luminal processes, extensive vesiculation and thickening of the endothelium, degradation of collagen fibers, and splitting of existing extravascular columns. RNA-sequencing established a role for endothelial tight junction disruption, cytoskeletal remodeling, vesicle- and cilium biogenesis in this process. Mechanistically, using genetic gain- and loss-of-function zebrafish models and analysis of primary human choriocapillaris endothelial cells, we determined that HIF (hypoxia-induced factor)-1α-VEGF-A-VEGFR2 signaling was important for hypoxia-induced PVR.

    Conclusions—

    Our findings reveal that PVR involving intussusception and splitting of extravascular columns, endothelial proliferation, vesiculation, fenestration, and thickening is induced before neovascularization, suggesting that identifying and targeting these processes may prevent development of advanced neovascular disease in the future.

    Visual Overview—

    An online visual overview is available for this article.

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  • 210.
    Ali, Zaheer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zang, Jingjing
    Univ Zurich, Switzerland.
    Lagali, Neil
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Speech Therapy, Otorhinolaryngology and Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Schmitner, Nicole
    Univ Innsbruck, Austria.
    Salvenmoser, Willi
    Univ Innsbruck, Austria.
    Mukwaya, Anthonny
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Speech Therapy, Otorhinolaryngology and Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Neuhauss, Stephan C. F.
    Univ Zurich, Switzerland.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Kimmel, Robin A.
    Univ Innsbruck, Austria.
    Photoreceptor Degeneration Accompanies Vascular Changes in a Zebrafish Model of Diabetic Retinopathy2020In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 61, no 2, article id UNSP 43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a leading cause of vision impairment and blindness worldwide in the working-age population, and the incidence is rising. Until now it has been difficult to define initiating events and disease progression at the molecular level, as available diabetic rodent models do not present the full spectrum of neural and vascular pathologies. Zebrafish harboring a homozygous mutation in the pancreatic transcription factor pdx1 were previously shown to display a diabetic phenotype from larval stages through adulthood. In this study, pdx1 mutants were examined for retinal vascular and neuronal pathology to demonstrate suitability of these fish for modeling DR. METHODS. Vessel morphology was examined in pdx1 mutant and control fish expressing the fli1a:EGFP transgene. We further characterized vascular and retinal phenotypes in mutants and controls using immunohistochemistry, histology, and electron microscopy. Retinal function was assessed using electroretinography. RESULTS. Pdx1 mutants exhibit clear vascular phenotypes at 2 months of age, and disease progression, including arterial vasculopenia, capillary tortuosity, and hypersprouting, could be detected at stages extending over more than 1 year. Neural-retinal pathologies are consistent with photoreceptor dysfunction and loss, but do not progress to blindness. CONCLUSIONS. This study highlights pdx1 mutant zebrafish as a valuable complement to rodent and other mammalian models of DR, in particular for research into the mechanistic interplay of diabetes with vascular and neuroretinal disease. They are furthermore suited for molecular studies to identify new targets for treatment of early as well as late DR.

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  • 211.
    Alickovic, Emina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Automatic Control. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, 20 Rortangvej, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Gustafsson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Automatic Control. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A System Identification Approach to Determining Listening Attention from EEG Signals2016In: 2016 24TH EUROPEAN SIGNAL PROCESSING CONFERENCE (EUSIPCO), IEEE , 2016, p. 31-35Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We still have very little knowledge about how ourbrains decouple different sound sources, which is known assolving the cocktail party problem. Several approaches; includingERP, time-frequency analysis and, more recently, regression andstimulus reconstruction approaches; have been suggested forsolving this problem. In this work, we study the problem ofcorrelating of EEG signals to different sets of sound sources withthe goal of identifying the single source to which the listener isattending. Here, we propose a method for finding the number ofparameters needed in a regression model to avoid overlearning,which is necessary for determining the attended sound sourcewith high confidence in order to solve the cocktail party problem.

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  • 212.
    Alila-Fersi, Olfa
    et al.
    Molecular and Functional Genetics Laboratory, Faculty of Science of Sfax, University of Sfax, Tunisia.
    Tabebi, Mouna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Maalej, Marwa
    Molecular and Functional Genetics Laboratory, Faculty of Science of Sfax, University of Sfax, Tunisia.
    Belguith, Neila
    Department of Medical Genetics, Hédi Chaker Hospital, Sfax, Tunisia.
    Keskes, Leila
    Human Molecular Genetics Laboratory, Faculty of Medecine of Sfax, University of Sfax, Tunisia.
    Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna
    Molecular and Functional Genetics Laboratory, Faculty of Science of Sfax, University of Sfax, Tunisia.
    Fakhfakh, Faiza
    Molecular and Functional Genetics Laboratory, Faculty of Science of Sfax, University of Sfax, Tunisia.
    First description of a novel mitochondrial mutation in the MT-TI gene associated with multiple mitochondrial DNA deletion and depletion in family with severe dilated mitochondrial cardiomyopathy2018In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 497, no 4, p. 1049-1054Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mitochondria are essential for early cardiac development and impaired mitochondria] function was described associated with heart diseases such as hypertrophic or dilated mitochondrial cardiomyopathy. In this study, we report a family including two individuals with severe dilated mitochondrial cardiomyopathy. The whole mitochondrial genome screening showed the presence of several variations and a novel homoplasmic mutation m.4318-4322deIC in the MT-TI gene shared by the two patients and their mother and leading to a disruption of the tRNA(IIe) secondary structure. In addition, a mitochondrial depletion was present in blood leucocyte of the two affected brother whereas a de novo heteroplasmic multiple deletion in the major arc of mtDNA was present in blood leucocyte and mucosa of only one of them. These deletions in the major arc of the mtDNA resulted to the loss of several protein-encoding genes and also some tRNA genes. The mtDNA deletion and depletion could result to an impairment of the oxidative phosphorylation and energy metabolism in the respiratory chain in the studied patients. Our report is the first description of a family with severe lethal dilated mitochondrial cardiomyopathy and presenting several mtDNA abnormalities including punctual mutation, deletion and depletion.

  • 213.
    Alim, Abdul
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Ackermann, Paul W.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Eliasson, Pernilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Blomgran, Parmis
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kristiansson, Per
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Pejler, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Swedish University of Agriculture Science, Sweden.
    Peterson, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Increased mast cell degranulation and co-localization of mast cells with the NMDA receptor-1 during healing after Achilles tendon rupture2017In: Cell and Tissue Research, ISSN 0302-766X, E-ISSN 1432-0878, Vol. 370, no 3, p. 451-460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of inflammation and the mechanism of tendon healing after rupture has historically been a matter of controversy. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the role of mast cells and their relation to the NMDA receptor-1 (a glutamate receptor) during healing after Achilles tendon rupture. Eight female Sprague Dawley rats had their right Achilles tendon transected. Three weeks after rupture, histological quantification of mast cell numbers and their state of degranulation was assessed by histochemistry. Co-localization of mast cell tryptase (a mast cell marker) and NMDA receptor-1 was determined by immunofluorescence. The intact left Achilles tendon was used as control. An increased number of mast cells and a higher proportion of degranulated mast cells were found in the healing Achilles tendon compared to the intact. In addition, increased co-localization of mast cell tryptase and NMDA receptor-1 was seen in the areas of myotendinous junction, mid-tendon proper and bone tendon junction of the healing versus the intact tendon. These findings introduce a possible role for mast cells in the healing phase after Achilles tendon rupture.

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  • 214.
    Alim, Md Abdul
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Grujic, Mirjana
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Ackerman, Paul W.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kristiansson, Per
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Eliasson, Pernilla T.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Peterson, Magnus
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Acad Primary Hlth Care, Sweden.
    Pejler, Gunnar
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Sweden.
    Glutamate triggers the expression of functional ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors in mast cells2020In: Cellular & Molecular Immunology, ISSN 1672-7681, E-ISSN 2042-0226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mast cells are emerging as players in the communication between peripheral nerve endings and cells of the immune system. However, it is not clear the mechanism by which mast cells communicate with peripheral nerves. We previously found that mast cells located within healing tendons can express glutamate receptors, raising the possibility that mast cells may be sensitive to glutamate signaling. To evaluate this hypothesis, we stimulated primary mast cells with glutamate and showed that glutamate induced the profound upregulation of a panel of glutamate receptors of both the ionotropic type (NMDAR1, NMDAR2A, and NMDAR2B) and the metabotropic type (mGluR2 and mGluR7) at both the mRNA and protein levels. The binding of glutamate to glutamate receptors on the mast cell surface was confirmed. Further, glutamate had extensive effects on gene expression in the mast cells, including the upregulation of pro-inflammatory components such as IL-6 and CCL2. Glutamate also induced the upregulation of transcription factors, including Egr2, Egr3 and, in particular, FosB. The extensive induction of FosB was confirmed by immunofluorescence assessment. Glutamate receptor antagonists abrogated the responses of the mast cells to glutamate, supporting the supposition of a functional glutamate-glutamate receptor axis in mast cells. Finally, we provide in vivo evidence supporting a functional glutamate-glutamate receptor axis in the mast cells of injured tendons. Together, these findings establish glutamate as an effector of mast cell function, thereby introducing a novel principle for how cells in the immune system can communicate with nerve cells.

  • 215.
    Alizadeh, Javad
    et al.
    University of Manitoba, Canada.
    Zeki, Amir A.
    Centre Comparat Resp Biol and Med, CA USA.
    Mirzaei, Nima
    University of Manitoba, Canada.
    Tewary, Sandipan
    University of Manitoba, Canada.
    Rezaei Moghadam, Adel
    University of Manitoba, Canada; University of Manitoba, Canada.
    Glogowska, Aleksandra
    University of Manitoba, Canada.
    Nagakannan, Pandian
    University of Manitoba, Canada.
    Eftekharpour, Eftekhar
    University of Manitoba, Canada.
    Wiechec, Emilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gordon, Joseph W.
    University of Manitoba, Canada; University of Manitoba, Canada; University of Manitoba, Canada.
    Xu, Fred. Y.
    University of Manitoba, Canada; University of Manitoba, Canada.
    Field, Jared T.
    University of Manitoba, Canada.
    Yoneda, Ken Y.
    Centre Comparat Resp Biol and Med, CA USA.
    Kenyon, Nicholas J.
    Centre Comparat Resp Biol and Med, CA USA.
    Hashemi, Mohammad
    Zehedan University of Medical Science, Iran.
    Hatch, Grant M.
    University of Manitoba, Canada; University of Manitoba, Canada.
    Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine
    University of Manitoba, Canada.
    Klonisch, Thomas
    University of Manitoba, Canada.
    Ghavami, Saeid
    University of Manitoba, Canada; University of Manitoba, Canada; Shiraz University of Medical Science, Iran.
    Mevalonate Cascade Inhibition by Simvastatin Induces the Intrinsic Apoptosis Pathway via Depletion of Isoprenoids in Tumor Cells2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 44841Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mevalonate (MEV) cascade is responsible for cholesterol biosynthesis and the formation of the intermediate metabolites geranylgeranylpyrophosphate (GGPP) and farnesylpyrophosphate (FPP) used in the prenylation of proteins. Here we show that the MEV cascade inhibitor simvastatin induced significant cell death in a wide range of human tumor cell lines, including glioblastoma, astrocytoma, neuroblastoma, lung adenocarcinoma, and breast cancer. Simvastatin induced apoptotic cell death via the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. In all cancer cell types tested, simvastatin-induced cell death was not rescued by cholesterol, but was dependent on GGPP-and FPP-depletion. We confirmed that simvastatin caused the translocation of the small Rho GTPases RhoA, Cdc42, and Rac1/2/3 from cell membranes to the cytosol in U251 (glioblastoma), A549 (lung adenocarcinoma) and MDA-MB231( breast cancer). Simvastatin-induced Rho-GTP loading significantly increased in U251 cells which were reversed with MEV, FPP, GGPP. In contrast, simvastatin did not change Rho-GTP loading in A549 and MDA-MB-231. Inhibition of geranylgeranyltransferase I by GGTi-298, but not farnesyltransferase by FTi-277, induced significant cell death in U251, A549, and MDA-MB-231. These results indicate that MEV cascade inhibition by simvastatin induced the intrinsic apoptosis pathway via inhibition of Rho family prenylation and depletion of GGPP, in a variety of different human cancer cell lines.

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  • 216. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Aljabery, Firas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Staging and tumor biological mechanisms of lymph node metastasis in invasive urinary bladder cancer2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To study the possibility of detecting lymph node metastasis in locally advanced urinary bladder cancer (UBC) treated with radical cystectomy (RC) by using preoperative positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and peroperative sentinel node biopsy (SNB) technique. We also investigate the clinical significance of macrophage traits expression by cancer cells, M2-macrophage infiltration (MI) in tumor stroma and the immunohistochemical expression of biomarkers in cancer cells in relation to clinicopathologic data.

    Patients and Methods: We studied prospectively 122 patients with UBC, pathological stage pT1–pT4 treated with RC and pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) during 2005–2011 at the Department of Urology, Linköping University Hospital. In the first study, we compared the results of preoperative PET/CT and conventional CT with the findings of postoperative histopathological evaluation of lymph nodes (LNs). In the second study we investigated the value of SNB technique for detecting pathological LNs during RC in patients with UBC. W also examined the significance of the primary tumor location in the bladder in predicting the site of LN metastases, and the prognostic significance of lympho-vascular invasion (LVI) and lymph node metastasis density (LNMD) on survival. In the third study, we investigate the clinical significance of macrophage infiltration (MI) in tumor stroma and macrophage-traits expression by tumor cells. In the fourth study, we investigate the cell cycle suppression proteins p53, p21, pRb, p16, p14 ARF as well as tumors proliferative protein Ki67 and DNA repair protein ERCC1 expression in cancer cells. The results were compared with clinical and pathological characteristics and outcome.

    Results: Prior to RC, PET/CT was used to detect LN metastasis in 54 patients. PET/CT had 41% sensitivity, 86% specificity, 58% PPV, and 76% NPV, whereas the corresponding figures for conventional CT were 41%, 89%, 64%, and 77%. SNB was performed during RC in 103 patients. A median number of 29 (range 7–68) nodes per patient were examined. SNs were detected in 83 out of 103 patients (81%). The sensitivity and specificity for detecting metastatic disease by SNB varied among LN stations, with average values of 67% -90%. LNMD or ≥8% and LVI were significantly related to shorter survival. In 103 patients, MI was high in 33% of cases, while moderate and low infiltration occurred in 42% and 25% of tumors respectively. Patients with tumors containing high and moderate compared to low MI had low rate of LN metastases (P=0.06) and improved survival (P=0.06), although not at significant level. The expression of different tumor suppression proteins was altered in 47-91% of the patients. There were no significant association between cancer specific survival (CSS) and any of the studied biomarkers. In case of altered p14ARF, ERCC1 or p21, CSS was low in case of low p53 immunostaining but increased in case of p53 accumulation, although not at a significant level, indicating a possible protective effect of p53 accumulation in these cases.

    Conclusion: PET/ CT provided no improvement over conventional CT in detection and localization of regional LN metastases in bladder cancer. It is possible to detect the SN but the technique is not a reliable for perioperative localization of LN metastases; however, LVI and LNMD at a cut-off level of 8% had significant prognostic values. MI in the tumor microenvironment but not CD163 expression in tumor cells seems to be synergistic with the immune response against urinary bladder cancer. Our results further indicate that altered p53 might have protective effect on survival in case of altered p14ARF, p21, or ERCC1 indicating an interaction between these biomarkers.

    List of papers
    1. PET/CT versus conventional CT for detection of lymph node metastases in patients with locally advanced bladder cancer.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>PET/CT versus conventional CT for detection of lymph node metastases in patients with locally advanced bladder cancer.
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: BMC urology, ISSN 1471-2490, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 87-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: We studied patients treated with radical cystectomy for locally advanced bladder cancer to compare the results of both preoperative positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and conventional CT with the findings of postoperative histopathological evaluation of lymph nodes.

    METHODS: Patients who had bladder cancer and were candidates for cystectomy underwent preoperative PET/CT using 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and conventional CT. The results regarding lymph node involvement were independently evaluated by two experienced radiologists and were subsequently compared with histopathology results, the latter of which were reassessed by an experienced uropathologist (HO).

    RESULTS: There were 54 evaluable patients (mean age 68 years, 47 [85 %] males and 7 [15 %] females) with pT and pN status as follows: < pT2-14 (26 %), pT2-10 (18 %), and > pT2-30 (56 %); pN0 37 (69 %) and pN+ 17 (31 %). PET/CT showed positive lymph nodes in 12 patients (22 %), and 7 of those cases were confirmed by histopathology; the corresponding results for conventional CT were 11 (20 %) and 7 patients (13 %), respectively. PET/CT had 41 % sensitivity, 86 % specificity, 58 % PPV, and 76 % NPV, whereas the corresponding figures for conventional CT were 41 %, 89 %, 64 %, and 77 %. Additional analyses of the right and left side of the body or in specified anatomical regions gave similar results.

    CONCLUSIONS: In this study, PET/CT and conventional CT had similar low sensitivity in detecting and localizing regional lymph node metastasis in bladder cancer.

    National Category
    Urology and Nephrology Cancer and Oncology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120796 (URN)10.1186/s12894-015-0080-z (DOI)000359832000001 ()26294219 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2015-08-25 Created: 2015-08-25 Last updated: 2017-05-17
    2. Radio-guided sentinel lymph node detection and lymph node mapping in invasive urinary bladder cancer: a prospective clinical study.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Radio-guided sentinel lymph node detection and lymph node mapping in invasive urinary bladder cancer: a prospective clinical study.
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: BJU International, ISSN 1464-4096, E-ISSN 1464-410X, Vol. 120, no 3, p. 329-336Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the possibility of detecting sentinel lymph nodes (SNs) in patients with urinary bladder cancer (BCa) intra-operatively and whether the histopathological status of the identified SNs reflected that of the lymphatic field.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: We studied 103 patients with BCa pathological stage T1-T4 who were treated with cystectomy and pelvic lymph node (LN) dissection during 2005-2011 at the Department of Urology, Linköping University Hospital. Radioactive tracer Nanocoll 70 MBq and blue dye were injected into the bladder wall around the primary tumour before surgery. SNs were detected ex vivo during the operation with a handheld Geiger probe (Gamma Detection System; Neoprobe Corp., Dublin, OH, USA). All LNs were formalin-fixed, sectioned three times, mounted on slides and stained with haematoxylin and eosin. An experienced uropathologist evaluated the slides.

    RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 69 years, and 80 (77%) were male. Pathological staging was T1-12 (12%), T2-20 (19%), T3-48 (47%) and T4-23 (22%). A mean (range) number of 31 (7-68) nodes per patient were examined, totalling 3 253 nodes. LN metastases were found in 41 patients (40%). SNs were detected in 83 of the 103 patients (80%). Sensitivity and specificity for detecting metastatic disease by SN biopsy (SNB) varied between LN stations, with average values of 67% and 90%, respectively. LN metastatic density (LNMD) had a significant prognostic impact; a value of ≥8% was significantly related to shorter survival. Lymphovascular invasion (LVI) occurred in 65% of patients (n = 67) and was significantly associated with shorter cancer-specific survival (P < 0.001).

    CONCLUSION: We conclude that SNB is not a reliable technique for peri-operative localization of LN metastases during cystectomy for BCa; however, LNMD has a significant prognostic value in BCa and may be useful in the clinical context and in BCa oncological and surgical research. LVI was also found to be a prognostic factor.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2017
    Keywords
    #BladderCancer, #blcsm, cystectomy, lymph node metastasis, prognostic factors, sentinel node
    National Category
    Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-136947 (URN)10.1111/bju.13700 (DOI)000407781500011 ()27797436 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: County Council of Ostergotland, Linkoping, Sweden

    Available from: 2017-05-01 Created: 2017-05-01 Last updated: 2018-05-03
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    Staging and tumor biological mechanisms of lymph node metastasis in invasive urinary bladder cancer
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  • 217.
    Aljabery, Firas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Halili, Shefqet
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hildebrand, Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Vesico-Uterine Fistula after TURB in pregnancy, a rare cause of genitourinary fistula2018In: Scandinavian journal of urology, ISSN 2168-1805, E-ISSN 2168-1813, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 162-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 218.
    Aljabery, Firas
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindblom, Gunnar
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Skoog, Susann
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Shabo, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    PET/CT versus conventional CT for detection of lymph node metastases in patients with locally advanced bladder cancer.2015In: BMC urology, ISSN 1471-2490, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 87-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: We studied patients treated with radical cystectomy for locally advanced bladder cancer to compare the results of both preoperative positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and conventional CT with the findings of postoperative histopathological evaluation of lymph nodes.

    METHODS: Patients who had bladder cancer and were candidates for cystectomy underwent preoperative PET/CT using 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and conventional CT. The results regarding lymph node involvement were independently evaluated by two experienced radiologists and were subsequently compared with histopathology results, the latter of which were reassessed by an experienced uropathologist (HO).

    RESULTS: There were 54 evaluable patients (mean age 68 years, 47 [85 %] males and 7 [15 %] females) with pT and pN status as follows: < pT2-14 (26 %), pT2-10 (18 %), and > pT2-30 (56 %); pN0 37 (69 %) and pN+ 17 (31 %). PET/CT showed positive lymph nodes in 12 patients (22 %), and 7 of those cases were confirmed by histopathology; the corresponding results for conventional CT were 11 (20 %) and 7 patients (13 %), respectively. PET/CT had 41 % sensitivity, 86 % specificity, 58 % PPV, and 76 % NPV, whereas the corresponding figures for conventional CT were 41 %, 89 %, 64 %, and 77 %. Additional analyses of the right and left side of the body or in specified anatomical regions gave similar results.

    CONCLUSIONS: In this study, PET/CT and conventional CT had similar low sensitivity in detecting and localizing regional lymph node metastasis in bladder cancer.

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  • 219.
    Aljabery, Firas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Shabo, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    M2-macrophage infiltration and macrophage traits of tumor cells in urinary bladder cancer2018In: Urologic Oncology, ISSN 1078-1439, E-ISSN 1873-2496, Vol. 36, no 4, article id 159.e19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) constitute a subset of nonneoplastic cells in tumor stroma and influence cancer progression in solid tumors. The clinical significance of TAMs in urinary bladder cancer(UBC) is controversial.

    Methods

    We prospectively studied 103 patients with stage pT1–T4 UBC treated with cystectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection. Tumor sections were immunostained with M2-specific macrophage marker CD163 and proliferation marker Ki-67. The expression of these markers in cancer cells as well as macrophage infiltration (MI) in tumor stroma was analyzed in relation to clinical data and outcome.

    Results

    The mean rate of CD163 and Ki-67 expressed by cancer cells were 35% and 78%, respectively. With borderline significance, MI was associated with lower rate of lymph node metastasis (P = 0.06). CD163 expression in cancer cells was proportional to MI (P<0.014). Patients with CD163-positive tumors and strong MI had significantly longer cancer-specific survival (CSS) (76 months), compared to patient with CD163-positive tumors and weak MI (28 months) (P = 0.02).

    Conclusions

    M2-specific MI tends to be inversely correlated with LN metastasis and improved CSS in UBC. MI might have protective impact in CD163-positive tumors. Expression of CD163 in cancer cells is significantly correlated with MI and might have a tumor promoting impact.

  • 220.
    Aljabery, Firas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Shabo, Ivan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    The expression profile of p14, p53 and p21 in tumour cells is associated with disease-specific survival and the outcome of postoperative chemotherapy treatment in muscle-invasive bladder cancer2018In: Urologic Oncology, ISSN 1078-1439, E-ISSN 1873-2496, Vol. 36, no 12, p. 530.e7-530.e18, article id 530.e7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: We investigated the effects of alterations in the biological markers p14, p53, p21, and p16 in relation to tumour cell proliferation, T-category, N- category, lymphovascular invasion, and the ability to predict prognosis in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) treated with cystectomy and, if applicable, chemotherapy.

    Materials and methods: We prospectively studied patients with urinary bladder cancer pathological stage pT1 to pT4 treated with cystectomy, pelvic lymph node dissection and postoperative chemotherapy. Tissue microarrays from paraffin-embedded cystectomy tumour samples were examined for expression of immunostaining of p14, p53, p21, p16 and Ki-67 in relation to other clinical and pathological factors as well as cancer-specific survival.

    Results: The median age of the 110 patients was 70 years (range 51-87 years), and 85 (77%) were male. Pathological staging was pT1 to pT2 (organ-confined) in 28 (25%) patients and pT3 to pT4 (non-organ-confined) in 82 (75%) patients. Lymph node metastases were found in 47 patients (43%). P14 expression was more common in tumours with higher T-stages (P = 0.05). The expression of p14 in p53 negative tumours was associated with a significantly shorter survival time (P=0.003). Independently of p53 expression, p14 expression was associated with an impaired response to chemotherapy (P=0.001). The expression of p21 in p53 negative tumours was associated with significantly decrease levels of tumour cell proliferation detected as Ki-67 expression (P=0.03).

    Conclusions: The simultaneous expression of the senescence markers involved in the p53-pathway shows a more relevant correlation to the pathological outcome of MIBC than each protein separately. P14 expression in tumours with non-altered (p53-) tumours is associated with poor prognosis. P14 expression is associated with impaired response to chemotherapy. P21 expression is related to decreased tumour cell proliferation.

  • 221.
    Aljabery, Firas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Shabo, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Endocrine and Sarcoma Surgery Unit, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna Stockholm, Sweden .
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Radio-guided sentinel lymph node detection and lymph node mapping in invasive urinary bladder cancer: a prospective clinical study.2017In: BJU International, ISSN 1464-4096, E-ISSN 1464-410X, Vol. 120, no 3, p. 329-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the possibility of detecting sentinel lymph nodes (SNs) in patients with urinary bladder cancer (BCa) intra-operatively and whether the histopathological status of the identified SNs reflected that of the lymphatic field.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: We studied 103 patients with BCa pathological stage T1-T4 who were treated with cystectomy and pelvic lymph node (LN) dissection during 2005-2011 at the Department of Urology, Linköping University Hospital. Radioactive tracer Nanocoll 70 MBq and blue dye were injected into the bladder wall around the primary tumour before surgery. SNs were detected ex vivo during the operation with a handheld Geiger probe (Gamma Detection System; Neoprobe Corp., Dublin, OH, USA). All LNs were formalin-fixed, sectioned three times, mounted on slides and stained with haematoxylin and eosin. An experienced uropathologist evaluated the slides.

    RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 69 years, and 80 (77%) were male. Pathological staging was T1-12 (12%), T2-20 (19%), T3-48 (47%) and T4-23 (22%). A mean (range) number of 31 (7-68) nodes per patient were examined, totalling 3 253 nodes. LN metastases were found in 41 patients (40%). SNs were detected in 83 of the 103 patients (80%). Sensitivity and specificity for detecting metastatic disease by SN biopsy (SNB) varied between LN stations, with average values of 67% and 90%, respectively. LN metastatic density (LNMD) had a significant prognostic impact; a value of ≥8% was significantly related to shorter survival. Lymphovascular invasion (LVI) occurred in 65% of patients (n = 67) and was significantly associated with shorter cancer-specific survival (P < 0.001).

    CONCLUSION: We conclude that SNB is not a reliable technique for peri-operative localization of LN metastases during cystectomy for BCa; however, LNMD has a significant prognostic value in BCa and may be useful in the clinical context and in BCa oncological and surgical research. LVI was also found to be a prognostic factor.

  • 222. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Alkaissi, Hammoudi
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Identification of candidate genes involved in Mercury Toxicokinetics and Mercury Induced Autoimmunity2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Autoimmune diseases require the involvement and activation of immune cells and occur when the body builds up an immune response against its own tissues. This process takes place due to the inability to distinguish self-antigen from foreign antigen. Systemic autoimmunity represents an important cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. The mechanisms triggering autoimmune responses are complex and involve a network of genetic factors. Genome wide association study (GWAS) is a powerful method, used to identify genetic risk factors in numerous diseases, such as systemic autoimmune diseases. The goal of GWAS is to identify these genetic risk factors in order to make predictions about who is at risk and investigate the biological process of disease susceptibility. There are several valuable mouse models to investigate the underlying mechanisms causing systemic autoimmune diseases in which mercury induced autoimmunity (HgIA) is a well- established and relevant model. HgIA in mice includes development of autoantibodies, immune complex glomerulonephritis, lymphocyte proliferation, hypergammaglobulinemia and polyclonal B cell activation. In humans, mercury exposure accumulates with considerable concentrations in kidney, liver, and brain. Toxicokinetics of Hg has been studied extensively but the key for inter-individual variation in humans are largely unclear. Differences in accumulation of renal Hg between inbred mouse strains suggest a genetic inter-strain variation regulating retention or/and excretion of Hg.

    OBJECTIVES: To find loci and candidate genes associated with phenotypes involved in the development of autoimmunity and find candidate genes involved in the regulation of renal Hg excretion.

    METHODS: MHC II (H-2s) mice were paired (A.SW x B10.S) to obtain F2 offspring exposed to 2.0 or 4.0 mg Hg in drinking water for 6 weeks. Mercury induced autoimmune phenotypes were studied with immunofluorescence (anti-nucleolar antibodies (ANoA)), ELISA anti-DNP/anti-ssDNA (polyclonal B cell activation), anti-chromatin antibodies (ACA) (4.0 mg Hg), and serum IgG1 concentrations. Mercury accumulation in kidney was performed previously and data was included as phenotype. F2 mice exposed to 2.0 mg Hg were genotyped with microsatellites for genome-wide scan with Ion Pair Reverse Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography (IP RP HPLC). F2 mice exposed to 4.0 mg Hg were genotyped with single nucleotide polymorphisms for genomewide scan with SNP&SEQ technology platform. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) was established with R/QTL. Denaturing HPLC, next generation sequencing, conserved region analysis and genetic mouse strain comparison were used for haplotyping and fine mapping on QTLs associated with Hg concentration in kidney, development of ANoA and serum IgG1 hypergammaglobulinemia. Candidate genes (Pprc1, Bank1 and Nfkb1) verified by additional QTL were further investigated by real time polymerase chain reaction. Genes involved in the intracellular signaling together with candidate genes were included for gene expression analysis.

    RESULTS: F2 mice exposed to 2.0 mg Hg had low or no development of autoantibodies and showed no significant difference in polyclonal B cell activation in the B10.S and F2 strains. F2 mice exposed to 4.0 mg Hg developed autoantibodies and significantly increased IgG1 concentration and polyclonal B cell activation (anti-DNP). QTL analysis showed a logarithm of odds ratio (LOD) score between 2.9 – 4.36 on all serological phenotypes exposed to 4.0 mg Hg, and a LOD score of 5.78 on renal Hg concentration. Haplotyping and fine mapping associated the development of ANoA with Bank1 (B-cell scaffold protein with ankyrin repeats 1) and Nfkb1 (nuclear factor kappa B subunit 1). The serum IgG1 concentration was associated with a locus on chromosome 3, in which Rxfp4 (Relaxin Family Peptide/INSL5 Receptor 4) is a potential candidate gene. The renal Hg concentration was associated with Pprc1 (Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma, Co-activator-Related). Gene expression analysis revealed that the more susceptible A.SW strain expresses significantly higher levels of Nfkb1, Il6 and Tnf than the less susceptible B10.S strain. The A.SW strain expresses significantly lower levels of Pprc1 and cascade proteins than the B10.S strain. Development of ACA was associated with chromosomes 3, 6, 7 and 16 (LOD 3.1, 3.2, 3.4 and 6.8 respectively). Polyclonal B cell activation was associated with chromosome 2 with a LOD score of 2.9.

    CONCLUSIONS: By implementing a GWAS on HgIA in mice, several QTLs were discovered to be associated with the development of autoantibodies, polyclonal B cell activation and hypergammaglobulinemia. This thesis plausibly supports Bank1 and Nfkb1 as key regulators for ANoA development and HgIA seems to be initiated by B cells rather than T cells. GWAS on renal mercury excretion plausibly supports Pprc1 as key regulator and it seems that this gene has a protective role against Hg.

    List of papers
    1. Genome-Wide Association Study to Identify Genes Related to Renal Mercury Concentrations in Mice
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genome-Wide Association Study to Identify Genes Related to Renal Mercury Concentrations in Mice
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 124, no 7, p. 920-926Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Following human mercury (Hg) exposure, the metal accumulates in considerable concentrations in kidney, liver, and brain. Although the toxicokinetics of Hg have been studied extensively, factors responsible for interindividual variation in humans are largely unknown. Differences in accumulation of renal Hg between inbred mouse strains suggest a genetic interstrain variation regulating retention or/and excretion of Hg. A. SW, DBA/2 and BALB/C mouse strains accumulate higher amounts of Hg than B10.S.

    OBJECTIVES: We aimed to find candidate genes associated with regulation of renal Hg concentrations.

    METHODS: A. SW, B10.S and their F1 and F2 offspring were exposed for 6 weeks to 2.0 mg Hg/L drinking water. Genotyping with microsatellites was conducted on 84 F2 mice for genome-wide scanning with ion pair reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (IP RP HPLC). Quantitative trait loci (QTL) were established. Denaturing HPLC was used to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms for haplotyping and fine mapping in 184 and 32 F2 mice, respectively. Candidate genes (Pprc1, Btrc and Nfkb2) verified by fine mapping and QTL were further investigated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Genes enhanced by Pprc1 (Nrf1 and Nrf2) were included for gene expression analysis.

    RESULTS: Renal Hg concentrations differed significantly between A. SW and B10. S mice and between males and females within each strain. QTL analysis showed a peak logarithm of odds ratio score 5.78 on chromosome 19 (p = 0.002). Haplotype and fine mapping associated the Hg accumulation with Pprc1, which encodes PGC-1-related coactivator (PRC), a coactivator for proteins involved in detoxification. Pprc1 and two genes coactivated by Pprc1 (Nrf1 and Nrf2) had significantly lower gene expression in the A. SW strain than in the B10. S strain.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study supports Pprc1 as a key regulator for renal Hg excretion.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services * National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, 2016
    National Category
    Other Biological Topics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-131584 (URN)10.1289/ehp.1409284 (DOI)000380749300012 ()26942574 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council Branch of Medicine; County Council of Ostergotland; Linkoping University

    Available from: 2016-09-27 Created: 2016-09-27 Last updated: 2018-10-24Bibliographically approved
    2. Bank1 and NF-kappaB as key regulators in anti-nucleolar antibody development
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bank1 and NF-kappaB as key regulators in anti-nucleolar antibody development
    Show others...
    2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 7, article id e0199979Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Systemic autoimmune rheumatic disorders (SARD) represent important causes of morbidity and mortality in humans. The mechanisms triggering autoimmune responses are complex and involve a network of genetic factors. Mercury-induced autoimmunity (HgIA) in mice is an established model to study the mechanisms of the development of antinuclear antibodies (ANA), which is a hallmark in the diagnosis of SARD. A.SW mice with HgIA show a significantly higher titer of antinucleolar antibodies (ANoA) than the B10.S mice, although both share the same MHC class II (H-2). We applied a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to their Hg-exposed F2 offspring to investigate the non-MHC genes involved in the development of ANoA. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis showed a peak logarithm of odds ratio (LOD) score of 3.05 on chromosome 3. Microsatellites were used for haplotyping, and fine mapping was conducted with next generation sequencing. The candidate genes Bank1 (B-cell scaffold protein with ankyrin repeats 1) and Nfkbl (nuclear factor kappa B subunit 1) were identified by additional QTL analysis. Expression of the Bank1 and Nfkb1 genes and their downstream target genes involved in the intracellular pathway (Tlr9,II6, Tnf) was investigated in mercury-exposed A.SW and B10.S mice by real-time PCR. Bank1 showed significantly lower gene expression in the A.SW strain after Hg-exposure, whereas the B10.S strain showed no significant difference. Nfkb1, Tlr9, II6 and Tnf had significantly higher gene expression in the A.SW strain after Hg-exposure, while the B10.S strain showed no difference. This study supports the roles of Bank1 (produced mainly in B-cells) and Nfkbl (produced in most immune cells) as key regulators of ANoA development in HgIA.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 2018
    National Category
    Genetics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-150265 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0199979 (DOI)000438866600014 ()30016332 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council Branch of Medicine; County Council of Ostergotland; Linkoping University

    Available from: 2018-08-17 Created: 2018-08-17 Last updated: 2019-04-24
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    Identification of candidate genes involved in Mercury Toxicokinetics and Mercury Induced Autoimmunity
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  • 223.
    Alkaissi, Hammoudi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Ekstrand, Jimmy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Jawad, Aksa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Nielsen, Jesper Bo
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Havarinasab, Said
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Genome-Wide Association Study to Identify Genes Related to Renal Mercury Concentrations in Mice2016In: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 124, no 7, p. 920-926Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Following human mercury (Hg) exposure, the metal accumulates in considerable concentrations in kidney, liver, and brain. Although the toxicokinetics of Hg have been studied extensively, factors responsible for interindividual variation in humans are largely unknown. Differences in accumulation of renal Hg between inbred mouse strains suggest a genetic interstrain variation regulating retention or/and excretion of Hg. A. SW, DBA/2 and BALB/C mouse strains accumulate higher amounts of Hg than B10.S.

    OBJECTIVES: We aimed to find candidate genes associated with regulation of renal Hg concentrations.

    METHODS: A. SW, B10.S and their F1 and F2 offspring were exposed for 6 weeks to 2.0 mg Hg/L drinking water. Genotyping with microsatellites was conducted on 84 F2 mice for genome-wide scanning with ion pair reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (IP RP HPLC). Quantitative trait loci (QTL) were established. Denaturing HPLC was used to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms for haplotyping and fine mapping in 184 and 32 F2 mice, respectively. Candidate genes (Pprc1, Btrc and Nfkb2) verified by fine mapping and QTL were further investigated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Genes enhanced by Pprc1 (Nrf1 and Nrf2) were included for gene expression analysis.

    RESULTS: Renal Hg concentrations differed significantly between A. SW and B10. S mice and between males and females within each strain. QTL analysis showed a peak logarithm of odds ratio score 5.78 on chromosome 19 (p = 0.002). Haplotype and fine mapping associated the Hg accumulation with Pprc1, which encodes PGC-1-related coactivator (PRC), a coactivator for proteins involved in detoxification. Pprc1 and two genes coactivated by Pprc1 (Nrf1 and Nrf2) had significantly lower gene expression in the A. SW strain than in the B10. S strain.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study supports Pprc1 as a key regulator for renal Hg excretion.

    Download full text (pdf)
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  • 224.
    Alkaissi, Hammoudi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Havarinasab, Said
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nielsen, Jesper Bo
    Univ Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical genetics.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Bank1 and NF-kappaB as key regulators in anti-nucleolar antibody development2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 7, article id e0199979Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systemic autoimmune rheumatic disorders (SARD) represent important causes of morbidity and mortality in humans. The mechanisms triggering autoimmune responses are complex and involve a network of genetic factors. Mercury-induced autoimmunity (HgIA) in mice is an established model to study the mechanisms of the development of antinuclear antibodies (ANA), which is a hallmark in the diagnosis of SARD. A.SW mice with HgIA show a significantly higher titer of antinucleolar antibodies (ANoA) than the B10.S mice, although both share the same MHC class II (H-2). We applied a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to their Hg-exposed F2 offspring to investigate the non-MHC genes involved in the development of ANoA. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis showed a peak logarithm of odds ratio (LOD) score of 3.05 on chromosome 3. Microsatellites were used for haplotyping, and fine mapping was conducted with next generation sequencing. The candidate genes Bank1 (B-cell scaffold protein with ankyrin repeats 1) and Nfkbl (nuclear factor kappa B subunit 1) were identified by additional QTL analysis. Expression of the Bank1 and Nfkb1 genes and their downstream target genes involved in the intracellular pathway (Tlr9,II6, Tnf) was investigated in mercury-exposed A.SW and B10.S mice by real-time PCR. Bank1 showed significantly lower gene expression in the A.SW strain after Hg-exposure, whereas the B10.S strain showed no significant difference. Nfkb1, Tlr9, II6 and Tnf had significantly higher gene expression in the A.SW strain after Hg-exposure, while the B10.S strain showed no difference. This study supports the roles of Bank1 (produced mainly in B-cells) and Nfkbl (produced in most immune cells) as key regulators of ANoA development in HgIA.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 225.
    Al-Karkhi, Isam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Al-Rubaiy, Raad
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rosenqvist, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Comparisons of automated blood pressures in a primary health care setting with self-measurements at the office and at home using the Omron i-C10 device2015In: Blood Pressure Monitoring, ISSN 1359-5237, E-ISSN 1473-5725, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 98-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to compare blood pressure (BP) levels recorded using the semiautomatic oscillometric Omron i-C10 BP device in patients with or without hypertension in three different settings: (a) when used by a doctor or a nurse at the office (OBP); (b) when used for self-measurement by the patient at the office (SMOBP); and (c) when used for 7 consecutive days at home (HBP).

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 247 individuals were invited to participate, but 78 of these individuals declined and a further seven were excluded, leaving a final cohort of 162 participants.

    RESULTS: The mean OBP was higher than HBP (difference 8.1±14/3.1±8.8 mmHg, P<0.0001) and so was SMOBP compared with HBP (difference 7.0±13/4.2±7.3 mmHg, P<0.0001). Sixteen participants (9.9%) had at least 10 mmHg higher systolic SMOBP than OBP and 28 (17%) participants had at least 10 mmHg lower systolic SMOBP than OBP. Participants who were current smokers had a larger mean difference between systolic OBP and SMOBP than nonsmokers (OBP-SMOBP in smokers: 6.6±9.4 mmHg, OBP-SMOBP in nonsmokers: 0.5±9.2 mmHg, P=0.011 between groups).

    CONCLUSION: Self-measurement of BP in the office does not preclude an increase in BP when levels in the individual patients are compared with HBP using the same equipment. Thus, SMOBP with a semiautomatic device does not lead to a reduction in the white-coat effect in the same manner as fully automatic devices.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 3.0 License, where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0.

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  • 226.
    Alkner, Björn A.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Reg Jonkoping Cty, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Norrbrand, Lena
    KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Tesch, Per A.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Neuromuscular Adaptations Following 90 Days Bed Rest With or Without Resistance Exercise2016In: AEROSPACE MEDICINE AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE, ISSN 2375-6314, Vol. 87, no 7, p. 610-617Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: This study examined the effects of long-term bed rest with or without a concurrent resistance exercise protocol on different muscle function indices of the knee extensors and their influence on previously shown atrophy, neural impairment, and slow-to-fast phenotype shift. METHODS: Nine men underwent 90 d of bed rest only (BR), while eight men in addition performed maximal supine squats every third day (BRE). Before and at day 1 and 5 following bed rest, surface quadriceps electromyographic (EMG) activity was measured during a sustained (60-s) submaximal isometric action and rate of force development (RFD) was assessed during a maximal isometric action, both in the supine squat position. Maximal torque was measured during isokinetic knee extensions at different angular velocities before and after (day 2 and 11) bed rest. RESULTS: EMG amplitude at a fixed submaximal load increased in BR, but not in BRE. The increase in amplitude during the sustained action was elevated in BR but not in BRE. RFD decreased in BR; this effect was attenuated day 1 and normalized day 5 in BRE. RFD expressed relative to maximal force was maintained in both groups. Angle-specific torque decreased equally for all velocities in BR. The decrease in isokinetic strength was attenuated day 2 in BRE. DISCUSSION: Phenotype changes were not reflected in muscle function measurements, probably because they were overridden by the effects of atrophy and neural adaptation. The protective effect of resistance exercise was more pronounced in tasks similar to the training action, inferring great impact of neural mechanisms.

  • 227.
    Alkner, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Orthopaedics, Eksjö, Region Jönköping County, Linköping, Sweden.
    Bring, Daniel K- I
    Division of Orthopedics and Biotechnology, Clintec, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Muscle Activation During Gravity-Independent Resistance Exercise Compared to Common Exercises2019In: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance, ISSN 2375-6314, E-ISSN 2375-6322, Vol. 90, no 6, p. 506-512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: The aim was to study quadriceps muscle activation during resistance exercise using a flywheel device, developed as a gravity-independent resistance exercise device to be used during spaceflight, compared with traditional strength training exercises. METHODS: Eight healthy men experienced in resistance exercise performed the following exercises in random order: flywheel leg press (FW), knee extension isokinetic dynamometry (ID), barbell front squat (FS), weight stack leg press (LP), and weight stack knee extension (KE). They accomplished eight repetitions of coupled concentric and eccentric actions with simultaneous recordings of surface electromyography (EMG) from the three superficial quadriceps muscles and knee angles using electrogoniometry. Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) in knee extension was performed before and after these measurements. RESULTS: EMG averaged across muscles and angles and normalized to MVC was 99/76% in FW, 48/41% FS, 65/47% LP, 81/52% KE, and 93/84% ID in concentric/eccentric phases, respectively. FW and ID showed higher mean EMG activity than LP and FS concentrically and higher than all other exercises eccentrically. No difference in activity between FW and ID was found. Pre- and post-MVC torque was comparable. DISCUSSION: Quadriceps muscle activation was superior in FW and ID exercises compared to the other exercises. The difference was most pronounced in the eccentric phase, but even concentric activation was lower in traditional closed chain exercises. This data supports that FW is an effective training tool and should be considered when designing strength training programs for spaceflights and on Earth.

  • 228.
    Alkner, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Orthopaedics, Eksjö, Region Jönköping County, Sweden.
    Halvardsson, Christina
    Falun Cent Hosp, Sweden.
    Brakenhielm, Gustaf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Orthopaedics, Eksjö, Region Jönköping County, Sweden.
    Eskilsson, Therese
    Falun Cent Hosp, Sweden.
    Andersson, Erika
    Falun Cent Hosp, Sweden.
    Fritzell, Peter
    Falun and Futurum Acad Hlth and Care, Sweden.
    Effect of postoperative pneumatic compression after volar plate fixation of distal radial fractures: a randomized controlled trial2018In: Journal of Hand Surgery, European Volume, ISSN 1753-1934, E-ISSN 2043-6289, Vol. 43, no 8, p. 825-831Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated the difference between postoperative rehabilitation with or without adjunctive intermittent pneumatic compression therapy following distal radial fracture treated with volar plating. A total of 115 patients were randomized to a control or to an experimental group. After 4 weeks of immobilization the experimental group received intermittent pneumatic compression therapy in addition to conventional postoperative rehabilitation. Primary outcome up to 1 year postoperatively was assessed using the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. No significant differences between groups were found. There were no clinically relevant differences regarding the secondary outcome measures swelling, strength, pain and flexibility. We conclude that postoperative intermittent pneumatic compression treatment had no major benefits. The results of the present study do not support general use of intermittent pneumatic compression initiated 4 weeks following volar plating surgery for distal radial fracture. Level of evidence: I

  • 229.
    Allan, Douglas W.
    et al.
    University of British Columbia, Canada.
    Thor, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Transcriptional selectors, masters, and combinatorial codes: regulatory principles of neural subtype specification2015In: WILEY INTERDISCIPLINARY REVIEWS-DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY, ISSN 1759-7684, Vol. 4, no 5, p. 505-528Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The broad range of tissue and cellular diversity of animals is generated to a large extent by the hierarchical deployment of sequence-specific transcription factors and co-factors (collectively referred to as TFs herein) during development. Our understanding of these developmental processes has been facilitated by the recognition that the activities of many TFs can be meaningfully described by a few functional categories that usefully convey a sense for how the TFs function, and also provides a sense for the regulatory organization of the developmental processes in which they participate. Here, we draw on examples from studies in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, and vertebrates to discuss how the terms spatial selector, temporal selector, tissue/cell type selector, terminal selector and combinatorial code may be usefully applied to categorize the activities of TFs at critical steps of nervous system construction. While we believe that these functional categories are useful for understanding the organizational principles by which TFs direct nervous system construction, we however caution against the assumption that a TFs function can be solely or fully defined by any single functional category. Indeed, most TFs play diverse roles within different functional categories, and their roles can blur the lines we draw between these categories. Regardless, it is our belief that the concepts discussed here are helpful in clarifying the regulatory complexities of nervous system development, and hope they prove useful when interpreting mutant phenotypes, designing future experiments, and programming specific neuronal cell types for use in therapies.

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  • 230.
    Allemann, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Poli, Arianna
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Designing and evaluating information and communication technology-based interventions? Be aware of the needs of older people2020In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, article id 1474515119897398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

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  • 231.
    Allemann, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Sue and Bill Gross School of Nursing, University of California Irvine, USA.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Perceived Social Support in Persons With Heart Failure Living With an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator: A Cross-sectional Explorative Study2018In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 33, no 6, p. E1-E8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The links between chronic illness, psychological well-being, and social support have previously been established. Social isolation and loneliness have shown an increased mortality risk for those with heart failure (HF). Increasingly more people with HF are living with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), but only a few small-scale studies have focused on social support in this population.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to explore factors related to perceived social support in a large cohort of individuals with HF living with an ICD.

    METHODS: All eligible adult ICD recipients in the Swedish ICD registry were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study. For this analysis, those with HF and complete data on perceived social support were included (N = 1550; age, 67.3 (SD, 9.8) years; 19.5% female).

    RESULTS: Most reported a high level of social support, but 18% did not. In logistic regression, living alone was the greatest predictor of low/medium support. Lower social support for those living alone was associated with poorer perceived health status, having symptoms of depression, and experiencing low perceived control. For those living with someone, lower support was associated with female gender, symptoms of depression and anxiety, and less control. Heart failure status and perceived symptom severity were not related to the outcome.

    CONCLUSION: One in five participants reported low/medium social support. Our study underlines the complex relationships between perceived social support, psychological well-being and perceived control over the heart condition. Multiple aspects need to be taken into account when developing interventions to provide psychosocial support and optimize outcomes in this patient group.

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  • 232.
    Allemann, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sund-Levander, Märta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nurses' actions in response to nursing assistants' observations of signs and symptoms of infections among nursing home residents2015In: Nursing Open, ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 97-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    To describe what nurses do during episodes of suspected infection in elderly nursing home residents and if these actions are linked to who is initiating an episode and whether the episode is considered an infection or not.

    Design

    Prospective descriptive study. Data were collected in 2008–2010.

    Methods

    Summarized and categorized documentation by nursing assistants and nurses was used for summative content analysis.

    Results

    Nurses' actions seem to be related to who initiated the episode and if the episodes are categorized as ‘non-infection’, ‘possible infection’ or ‘infection’. Actions could be ‘observation’, ‘screenings’, ‘engaged in waiting’, ‘follow-ups’, ‘nurse-prescribed actions’, ‘diagnosing’, ‘contacting the physician’, ‘carrying out an action prescribed by the physician’, ‘contacting an ambulance or arranging an emergency visit to the hospital’ and ‘prescribing screening’. As NAs often initiate episodes of suspected infection by observing changed conditions, it seems important to include the NA in the decision-making process as these observations could detect possible early signs and symptoms of infections.

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  • 233.
    Allemann, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Ågren, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Liljeroos, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Perceptions of Information and Communication Technology as Support for Family Members of Persons With Heart Failure: Qualitative Study2019In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 21, no 7, article id e13521Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Heart failure (HF) affects not only the person diagnosed with the syndrome but also family members, who often have the role of informal carers. The needs of these carers are not always met, and information and communications technology (ICT) could have the potential to support them in their everyday life. However, knowledge is lacking about how family members perceive ICT and see opportunities for this technology to support them. Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of ICT solutions as supportive aids among family members of persons with HF. Methods: A qualitative design was applied. A total of 8 focus groups, comprising 23 family members of persons affected by HF, were conducted between March 2015 and January 2017. Participants were recruited from 1 hospital in Sweden. A purposeful sampling strategy was used to find family members of persons with symptomatic HF from diverse backgrounds. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results: The analysis revealed 4 categories and 9 subcategories. The first category, about how ICT could provide relevant support, included descriptions of how ICT could be used for communication with health care personnel, for information and communication retrieval, plus opportunities to interact with persons in similar life situations and to share support with peers and extended family. The second category, about how ICT could provide access, entailed how ICT could offer solutions not bound by time or place and how it could be both timely and adaptable to different life situations. ICT could also provide an arena for family members to which they might not otherwise have had access. The third category concerned how ICT could be too impersonal and how it could entail limited personal interaction and individualization, which could lead to concerns about usability. It was emphasized that ICT could not replace physical meetings. The fourth category considered how ICT could be out of scope, reflecting the fact that some family members were generally uninterested in ICT and had difficulties envisioning how it could be used for support. It was also discussed as more of a solution for the future. Conclusions: Family members described multiple uses for ICT and agreed that ICT could provide access to relevant sources of information from which family members could potentially exchange support. ICT was also considered to have its limitations and was out of scope for some but with expected use in the future. Even though some family members seemed hesitant about ICT solutions in general, this might not mean they are unreceptive to suggestions about their usage in, for example, health care. Thus, a variety of factors should be considered to facilitate future implementations of ICT tools in clinical practice.

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  • 234.
    Allvin, Renée
    et al.
    Clinical Skills Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro.
    Berndtzon, Magnus
    Metodikum - Skill Centre of Medical Simulation Region County Jönköping, Jönköping.
    Carlzon, Liisa
    Simulation Centre West, Department of Research, Education and Development, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    Edelbring, Samuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Hult, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hultin, Magnus
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Medical Faculty, Umeå University, Umeå.
    Karlgren, Klas
    Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm; Department of Research, Education and Development and Innovation, Södersjukhuset Hospital, Stockholm.
    Masiello, Italo
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet, Södersjukhuset Hospital, Stockholm.
    Södersved Källestedt, Marie-Louise
    Clinical Skills Centre, Centre for Clinical Research, Uppsala University, Västerås.
    Tamás, Éva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Confident but not theoretically grounded: experienced simulation educators perceptions of their own professional development2017In: Advances in Medical Education and Practice, ISSN 1179-7258, E-ISSN 1179-7258, Vol. 8, p. 99-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Medical simulation enables the design of learning activities for competency areas (eg, communication and leadership) identified as crucial for future health care professionals. Simulation educators and medical teachers follow different career paths, and their education backgrounds and teaching contexts may be very different in a simulation setting. Although they have a key role in facilitating learning, information on the continuing professional development (pedagogical development) of simulation educators is not available in the literature.

    Objectives: To explore changes in experienced simulation educators’ perceptions of their own teaching skills, practices, and understanding of teaching over time.

    Methods: A qualitative exploratory study. Fourteen experienced simulation educators participated in individual open-ended interviews focusing on their development as simulation educators. Data were analyzed using an inductive thematic analysis.

    Results: Marked educator development was discerned over time, expressed mainly in an altered way of thinking and acting. Five themes were identified: shifting focus, from following to utilizing a structure, setting goals, application of technology, and alignment with profession. Being confident in the role as an instructor seemed to constitute a foundation for the instructor’s pedagogical development.

    Conclusion: Experienced simulation educators’ pedagogical development was based on self-confidence in the educator role, and not on a deeper theoretical understanding of teaching and learning. This is the first clue to gain increased understanding regarding educational level and possible education needs among simulation educators, and it might generate several lines of research for further studies.

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  • 235.
    Almberg, Maria
    et al.
    Mobil Centre Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Selander, Helena
    Mobil Centre Gothenburg, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Curtin University, Australia; Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Ciccarelli, Marina
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin University, Australia.
    Experiences of facilitators or barriers in driving education from learner and novice drivers with ADHD or ASD and their driving instructors2017In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 59-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Little is known about whether individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD) experience any specific facilitators or barriers to driving education. Objective: To explore the facilitators or barriers to driving education experienced by individuals with ASD or ADHD who obtained a learners permit, from the perspective of the learner drivers and their driving instructors. Methods: Datawere collected from33 participants with ASD or ADHD, and nine of their driving instructors. Results: Participants with ASD required twice asmany driving lessons andmore on-road tests than those with ADHD. Participants with ADHD repeated the written tests more than those with ASD. Driving license theory was more challenging for individuals with ADHD, whilst individuals with ASD found translating theory into practice and adjusting to "unfamiliar driving situations to be the greatest challenges. Conclusion: Obtaining a driving license was associated with stressful training experience.

  • 236.
    Almborg, Ann-Helen
    et al.
    National Board of Health and Welfare, Stockholm, Sweden / Jönköping University, Jönköping Academy, Sweden.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    KVÅ och ICHI med fokus på arbetsterapi2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund/Syfte*

    Inom WHO pågår ett utvecklingsarbete av en ny klassifikation av åtgärder ”International Classification of Health Interventions” (ICHI), som kompletterar ICF och ICD. WHO har pågående tester av ICHI. Socialstyrelsen och nordiska klassifikationscentret har genomfört ett antal tester bland annat omfattande arbetsterapiåtgärder inom psykiatrin. Åtgärder dokumenteras med Klassifikation av vårdåtgärder (KVÅ) inom hälso- och sjukvård i Sverige.

    Syfte var att mappa ett antal KVÅ-åtgärder som tillämpas inom psykiatrisk arbetsterapi till ICHI.

    Metod/Tillvägagångssätt*

    En lista med åtgärder inom psykiatri, som används av arbetsterapeuter från sex olika sjukhus i Sverige mappades till ICHI 2018. Mappningsregler för ICHI användes där grad av samstämmighet värderas. Även kardinalitet dvs. hur många ICHI-interventioner användes för att beskriva KVÅ-åtgärden. Resultatet bearbetades med deskriptiv statistik.

    Resultat/Preliminärt resultat*

    Totalt mappades 136 KVÅ-åtgärder (27 undersökande, 98 behandlande och 11 administrativa). Kardinaliteten mellan KVÅ och ICHI varierade från 1:0 till 1:28. Nio procent av KVÅ-åtgärderna kunde inte mappas till ICHI (1:0). I 37 procent var förhållandet 1:1, dvs en KVÅ-åtgärd mappades till en ICHI-intervention. I 34 procent var förhållandet 1:2 eller 1:3 och i 17 procent mellan 1:4-1:9. Fyra KVÅ-åtgärder hade förhållandet 1:14, 1:25 och 1:28. Grad av samstämmighet mellan KVÅ-åtgärd och ICHI-intervention visade att 14 procent överensstämde exakt. 67 procent av KVÅ-åtgärderna var bredare dvs. mindre specifika än ICHI-interventionerna och 18 procent av KVÅ-åtgärderna var mer specifika än ICHI-intervention.

    Slutsats/Praktisk tillämpning*

    ICHI har fler specifika interventioner för att dokumentera arbetsterapeuters åtgärder inom psykiatrisk verksamhet än KVÅ. Att börja tillämpa ICHI inom svenska psykiatrisk arbetsterapiverksamhet skulle öka kvalitén på dokumentationen.

  • 237.
    Almborg, Ann-Helen
    et al.
    Jönköpings Högskola, Socialstyrelsen.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mapping Swedish mental health interventions to ICHI: occupational therapy perspective2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 238.
    Almby, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Edholm, David
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Anastomotic Strictures After Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass: a Cohort Study from the Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry2019In: Obesity Surgery, ISSN 0960-8923, E-ISSN 1708-0428, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 172-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundRoux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is the most common bariatric procedure worldwide. Anastomotic stricture is a known complication of RYGB. The aim was to explore the incidence and outcomes of strictures within the Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry (SOReg).MethodSOReg included prospective data from 36,362 patients undergoing bariatric surgery in the years 2007-2013. Outcomes were recorded at 30-day and at 1-year follow-up according to the standard SOReg routine. The medical charts of patients suffering from stricture after RYGB were requested and assessed.SettingNational bariatric surgery registryResultsAnastomotic stricture within 1year of surgery was confirmed in 101 patients representing an incidence of 0.3%. Risk factors for stricture were patient age above 60years (odds ratio (OR), 6.2 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.7-14.3), circular stapled gastrojejunostomy (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.4-5.5), postoperative anastomotic leak (OR 8.9 95%, CI 4.7-17.0), and marginal ulcer (OR 30.0, 95% CI 19.2-47.0). Seventy-five percent of the strictures were diagnosed within 70days of surgery. Two dilatations or less was sufficient to successfully treat 50% of patients. Ten pecent of patients developed perforation during dilatation, and the risk of perforating at each dilatation was 3.8%. Perforation required surgery in six cases but there was no mortality. Strictures in SOReg may be underreported, which could explain the low incidence in the study.ConclusionMost strictures present within 2months and are successfully treated with two dilatations or less. Dilating a strictured gastrojejunostomy entails a risk of perforation (3.8%).

  • 239.
    Almeida, Nuno
    et al.
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium; GE Vingmed Ultrasound AS, Norway.
    Papachristidis, Alexandros
    Kings Coll Hospital London, England.
    Pearson, Peter
    Kings Coll Hospital London, England.
    Imre Sarvari, Sebastian
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Edvardsen, Thor
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Monaghan, Mark
    Kings Coll Hospital London, England.
    Gerard, Olivier
    GE Vingmed Ultrasound AS, Norway.
    Samset, Eigil
    GE Vingmed Ultrasound AS, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Dhooge, Jan
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Left atrial volumetric assessment using a novel automated framework for 3D echocardiography: a multi-centre analysis2017In: European Heart Journal Cardiovascular Imaging, ISSN 2047-2404, E-ISSN 2047-2412, Vol. 18, no 9, p. 1008-1015Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims This study aims at validating a software tool for automated segmentation and quantification of the left atrium (LA) from 3D echocardiography. Methods and results The LA segmentation tool uses a dual-chamber model of the left side of the heart to automatically detect and track the atrio-ventricular plane and the LA endocardium in transthoracic 3D echocardiography. The tool was tested in a dataset of 121 ultrasound images from patients with several cardiovascular pathologies (in a multi-centre setting), and the resulting volumes were compared with those assessed manually by experts in a blinded analysis using conventional contouring. Bland-Altman analysis showed good agreement between the automated method and the manual references, with differences (mean +/- 1.96 SD) of 0.5 +/- 5.7 mL for LA minimum volume and -1.6 +/- 9.7 mL for LA maximum volume (comparable to the inter-observer variability of manual tracings). The automated tool required no user interaction in 93% of the recordings, while 4% required a single click and only 2% required contour adjustments, reducing considerably the amount of time and effort required for LA volumetric analysis. Conclusion The automated tool was validated in a multi-centre setting, providing quantification of the LA volume over the cardiac cycle with minimal user interaction. The results of the automated analysis were in agreement with those estimated manually by experts. This study shows that such approach has clinical utility for the assessment of the LA morphology and function, automating and facilitating the time-consuming task of analysing 3D echocardiographic recordings.

  • 240.
    Almroth, Gabriel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research.
    Lönn, Johanna
    Örebro Universitet, Sweden.
    Uhlin, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Physiology, County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Andersson, Bengt Andersson
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Hahn-Zoric, Mirjana
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Sclerostin, TNF-alpha and Interleukin-18 Correlate and are Together with Klotho Related to Other Growth Factors and Cytokines in Haemodialysis Patients2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 83, no 1, p. 58-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with chronic renal failure are known to have renal osteodystrophy (bone disease) and increased calcification of vessels. A new marker of bone disease, sclerostin, the two pro-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-18 (IL-18), and the fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) receptor-associated marker Klotho were tested in 84 haemodialysis (HD) patients and in healthy controls. The patients had significantly higher levels of the three former markers than of the controls while Klotho was significantly higher in the controls. Low level, but significant, correlations were observed in the patient group when the levels of these four markers were compared to each other and to those of 5 cytokines and growth factors tested earlier; high-sensitive CRP (hsCRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) and soluble urokinase plasminogen activator (suPAR). Ln sclerostin correlated positively to Ln hsTNF-alpha, Ln HGF and Ln suPAR. Ln hsTNF-alpha correlated positively to Ln sclerostin, Ln hsCRP, Ln IL-6, Ln FGF-23, Ln suPAR and Ln IL-18. Ln IL-18 correlated positively to Ln suPAR and Ln TNF-alpha. Ln Klotho correlated negatively to Ln hsCRP but did not correlate to Ln FGF-23. The markers studied here may be involved in the calcification of vessels seen in HD patients due to a combination of inflammation and bone disease. The mechanisms are still not fully known but may be of importance for future therapeutic possibilities in this group of patients.

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  • 241.
    Almroth, Gabriel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Recidivating thrombocytopenia, renal failure and thymitis2017In: Recidivating thrombocytopenia, renal failure and thymitis, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 242.
    Almroth, Gabriel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Recurrent thrombocytopenia, renal failure and thymitis of unknown cause. A case report2017In: Vaskulär medicin, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 24-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A 45-year old man was admitted to an intensive care unit with flank pain and thrombocytopenia. He was treated for a suspected septicaemia but turned out to have signs of an unknown collagenosis which responded to plasma exchange, thymectomi and corticosteroids. Kidney biopsy revealed an intense tubulointerstitial reaction with suspected microthrombotic lesions in the vessels. The condition reoccurred with thrombocytopenia a couple of months later but responded to plasma exchange, corticosteroids and mycophenolate mofetil. An unknown collagenosis with findings of autoimmune thymitis and tubulointerstitial nephritis is the most probable cause of the condition.

  • 243.
    Alonso, Fabiola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Latorre, Malcolm
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Göransson, Nathanael
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Investigation into Deep Brain Stimulation Lead Designs: A Patient-Specific Simulation Study2016In: Brain Sciences, ISSN 2076-3425, E-ISSN 2076-3425, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode designs offer operation in voltage and current mode and capability to steer the electric field (EF). The aim of the study was to compare the EF distributions of four DBS leads at equivalent amplitudes (3 V and 3.4 mA). Finite element method (FEM) simulations (n = 38) around cylindrical contacts (leads 3389, 6148) or equivalent contact configurations (leads 6180, SureStim1) were performed using homogeneous and patient-specific (heterogeneous) brain tissue models. Steering effects of 6180 and SureStim1 were compared with symmetric stimulation fields. To make relative comparisons between simulations, an EF isolevel of 0.2 V/mm was chosen based on neuron model simulations (n = 832) applied before EF visualization and comparisons. The simulations show that the EF distribution is largely influenced by the heterogeneity of the tissue, and the operating mode. Equivalent contact configurations result in similar EF distributions. In steering configurations, larger EF volumes were achieved in current mode using equivalent amplitudes. The methodology was demonstrated in a patient-specific simulation around the zona incerta and a “virtual” ventral intermediate nucleus target. In conclusion, lead design differences are enhanced when using patient-specific tissue models and current stimulation mode.

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  • 244.
    Alonso, Fabiola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Influence of Virchow-Robin spaces in the Electric Field Distribution in Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Previous investigations have shown the appearance of cysts i.e. Virchow-Robin spaces (VR) in the basal ganglia and their relationship with parkinsonian symptoms [1-3]. Simulations [4]using the finite element method (FEM) suggests that VR affects the electric field around deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes. The aim of the study was to evaluate how the electric field is modified by the presence of cysts in the STN. Methods: The effect of cysts on the electric field around the DBS lead placed in the STN was evaluated using FEM. 3D patient-specific brain models were built with COMSOL 5.2 (COMSOL AB, Sweden) and an in-house developed software [5] to convert a T2 weighted MRI of Parkinsonian patients (ethics approval no: 2012/434-3) into electrical conductivity matrix readable by FEM software. VR was classified as CSF [6]assigning a high electrical conductivity (2.0 S/m). The stimulation amplitudes were set to the clinically programmed values. Depending on the lead used, the stimulation was set to voltage control (3389) or current control (6180, ring mode). The coordinates corresponding to the lowest (first) electrode and the third higher up in the lead, taken from the postoperative CT electrode artefact, were used to localize the leads in the brain model [7]. The electric field was visualized with a 0.2V/mm isosurface. Results: Simulations showed that the electric field distribution is affected by the cysts. The higher conductivity at these regions in the vicinity of the electrode redistributes the electric field pushing it away from the cyst. The same effect occurs regardless of the operating mode or the lead design as long as the directional lead is configured in ring mode. Conclusions: The use of patient-specific models has shown the importance of considering nuances of the patients’ anatomy in the STN. This information can be used to determine the stimulation parameter and to support the analysis of side effects induced by the stimulation. The potential advantage of directional leads can also be assessed by including in the model patient-specific data.

  • 245.
    Alonso, Juan-Manuel
    et al.
    Int Assoc Athlet Federat, Med & Antidoping Commiss, Monaco, Monaco; Qatar Orthoped & Sports Med Hosp, Sports Med Dept, Aspetar, Doha, Qatar.
    Jacobsson, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health.
    Ronsen, Ola
    Int Assoc Athlet Federat, Med & Antidoping Commiss, Monaco, Monaco; Aker Solut, Lysaker, Norway.
    Kajenienne, Alma
    Int Assoc Athlet Federat, Med & Antidoping Commiss, Monaco, Monaco; Lithuanian Univ Hlth Sci, Inst Sport, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Spreco, Armin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Edouard, Pascal
    Univ Hosp St Etienne, Fac Med, Sports Med Unity, Dept Clin & Exercise Physiol, St Etienne, France; Univ Lyon, Exercise Physiol Lab, LPE EA 4338, St Etienne, France; French Athlet Federat, Med Commiss, Paris, France.
    Preparticipation injury complaint is a risk factor for injury: a prospective study of the Moscow 2013 IAAF Championships.2015In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 49, no 17, p. 1118-U45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the health status of athletes before the start of an international athletics championship and to determine whether preparticipation risk factors predicted in-championship injuries.

    METHODS: At the beginning of the 2013 International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) World Championships, all registered athletes (n=1784) were invited to complete a preparticipation health questionnaire (PHQ) on health status during the month preceding the championships. New injuries that occurred at the championships were prospectively recorded.

    RESULTS: The PHQ was completed by 698 (39%) athletes; 204 (29.2%) reported an injury complaint during the month before the championships. The most common mode of onset of preparticipation injury complaints was gradual (43.6%). Forty-nine athletes in the study reported at least one injury during the championships. Athletes who reported a preparticipation injury complaint were at twofold increased risk for an in-championship injury (OR=2.09; 95% CI 1.16 to 3.77); p=0.014). Those who reported a preparticipation gradual-onset injury complaint were at an almost fourfold increased risk for an in-championship time-loss injury (OR=3.92; 95% CI 1.69 to 9.08); p=0.001). Importantly, the preparticipation injury complaint severity score was associated with the risk of sustaining an in-championship injury (OR=1.14; 95% CI 1.06 to 1.22); p=0.001).

    SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS: About one-third of the athletes participating in the study reported an injury complaint during the month before the championships, which represented a risk factor for sustaining an injury during the championship. This study emphasises the importance of the PHQ as a screening tool to identify athletes at risk of injuries before international championships.

  • 246.
    Alping, Peter
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Askling, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Burman, Joachim
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Fink, Katharina
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Hlth Serv, Sweden.
    Fogdell-Hahn, Anna
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Martin
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Hillert, Jan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Langer-Gould, Annette
    Kaiser Permanente, CA USA.
    Lycke, Jan
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Petra
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Salzer, Jonatan
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Svenningsson, Anders
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology in Linköping.
    Olsson, Tomas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Hlth Serv, Sweden.
    Piehl, Fredrik
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Hlth Serv, Sweden.
    Frisell, Thomas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Severe Neurological Toxicity of Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors: Growing Spectrum2020In: Annals of Neurology, ISSN 0364-5134, E-ISSN 1531-8249, Vol. 87, no 5, p. 688-699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Expanding use of immune-checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) underscores the importance of accurate diagnosis and timely management of neurological immune-related adverse events (irAE-N). We evaluate the real-world frequency, phenotypes, co-occurring immune-related adverse events (irAEs), and long-term outcomes of severe, grade III to V irAE-N at a tertiary care center over 6 years. We analyze how our experience supports published literature and professional society guidelines. We also discuss these data with regard to common clinical scenarios, such as combination therapy, ICI rechallenge and risk of relapse of irAE-N, and corticosteroid taper, which are not specifically addressed by current guidelines and/or have limited data. Recommendations for management and future irAE-N reporting are outlined. ANN NEUROL 2020;87:659-669

  • 247.
    Alping, Peter
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Piehl, Fredrik
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Hlth Serv, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Langer-Gould, Annette
    Kaiser Permanente, CA USA; Kaiser Permanente, CA USA.
    Frisell, Thomas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Burman, Joachim
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Fink, Katharina
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Fogdell-Hahn, Anna
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Martin
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Hillert, Jan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kockum, Ingrid
    Stockholm Hlth Serv, Sweden.
    Lycke, Jan
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Petra
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Olsson, Tomas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Salzer, Jonatan
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Svenningsson, Anders
    Danderyd Hosp, Sweden.
    Virtanen, Suvi
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Validation of the Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Register Further Improving a Resource for Pharmacoepidemiologic Evaluations2019In: Epidemiology, ISSN 1044-3983, E-ISSN 1531-5487, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 230-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Register is a national register monitoring treatment and clinical course for all Swedish multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, with high coverage and close integration with the clinic. Despite its great value for epidemiologic research, it has not previously been validated. In this brief report, we summarize a large validation of amp;gt;3,000 patients in the register using clinical chart review in the context of the COMBAT-MS study. While further improving the data quality for a central cohort of patients available for future epidemiologic research, this study also allowed us to estimate the accuracy and completeness of the register data.

  • 248.
    Alriksson-Schmidt, Ann
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Jarl, Johan
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Rodby-Bousquet, Elisabet
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Vastmanland Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Josenby, Annika Lundkvist
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Westbom, Lena
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Himmelmann, Kate
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Stadskleiv, Kristine
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Ödman, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svensson, Ingrid
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Antfolk, Christian
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Malesevic, Nebojsa
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Jeglinsky, Ira
    Arcada Univ Appl Sci, Finland.
    Saha, Sanjib
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Hagglund, Gunnar
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Improving the Health of Individuals With Cerebral Palsy: Protocol for the Multidisciplinary Research Program MOVING ON WITH CP2019In: JMIR Research Protocols, ISSN 1929-0748, E-ISSN 1929-0748, Vol. 8, no 10, article id e13883Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cerebral palsy (CP) is one of the most common early onset disabilities globally. The causative brain damage in CP is nonprogressive, yet secondary conditions develop and worsen over time. Individuals with CP in Sweden and most of the Nordic countries are systematically followed in the national registry and follow-up program entitled the Cerebral Palsy Follow-Up Program (CPUP). CPUP has improved certain aspects of health care for individuals with CP and strengthened collaboration among professionals. However, there are still issues to resolve regarding health care for this specific population.

    Objective: The overall objectives of the research program MOVING ON WITH CP are to (1) improve the health care processes and delivery models; (2) develop, implement, and evaluate real-life solutions for Swedish health care provision; and (3) evaluate existing health care and social insurance benefit programs and processes in the context of CP.

    Methods: MOVING ON WITH CP comprises 9 projects within 3 themes. Evaluation of Existing Health Care (Theme A) consists of registry studies where data from CPUP will be merged with national official health databases, complemented by survey and interview data. In Equality in Health Care and Social Insurance (Theme B), mixed methods studies and registry studies will be complemented with focus group interviews to inform the development of new processes to apply for benefits. In New Solutions and Processes in Health Care Provision (Theme C), an eHealth (electronic health) procedure will be developed and tested to facilitate access to specialized health care, and equipment that improves the assessment of movement activity in individuals with CP will be developed.

    Results: The individual projects are currently being planned and will begin shortly. Feedback from users has been integrated. Ethics board approvals have been obtained.

    Conclusions: In this 6-year multidisciplinary program, professionals from the fields of medicine, social sciences, health sciences, and engineering, in collaboration with individuals with CP and their families, will evaluate existing health care, create conditions for a more equal health care, and develop new technologies to improve the health care management of people with CP.

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  • 249.
    Alstad, V.
    et al.
    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Abtahi, Jahan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Surgical removal of keratocystic odontogenic tumours via a Le Fort I osteotomy approach: a retrospective study of the recurrence rate2017In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 6p. 434-439Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KCOT) is one of the most aggressive odontogenic cysts and has a high recurrence rate. The treatment of these tumours is the subject of debate. A KCOT in the posterior maxilla with sinus involvement is rare. Few reports have been published in the literature. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the recurrence rate after surgical removal of maxillary KCOTs via a Le Fort I osteotomy. A search was performed to identify patients with a follow-up time of at least 5 years. Nine patients were included in the study. The following clinical variables were analyzed: age at surgery, sex, symptoms, site and size of the tumour, surgical approach, and recurrence rate. The surgical approaches were curettage (n=6) and enucleation (n=3). Recurrence was seen in three patients (33%); all had multilocular tumours. No recurrence was seen in patients with unilocular tumours. The Le Fort I osteotomy approach allows direct visualization and ensures wide excision, minimizing the risk of recurrence. In this series, cases with a multilocular KCOT showed a higher risk of recurrence due to the difficulty of removing the tumour in total. All recurrences took place within 2 years of the intervention; a 5-year follow-up is recommended.

  • 250.
    Alvaeus, Julia
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Rosenblatt, Robert
    Umea Univ, Sweden; Stockholm South Gen Hosp, Sweden.
    Johansson, Markus
    Umea Univ, Sweden; Sundsvall Hosp, Sweden.
    Alamdari, Farhood
    Vastmanland Hosp, Sweden.
    Jakubczyk, Tomasz
    Lanssjukhuset Ryhov, Sweden.
    Holmstrom, Benny
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Hemdan, Tammer
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Huge, Ylva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Abdul-Sattar Aljabery, Firas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Gabrielsson, Susanne
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Riklund, Katrine
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Winqvist, Ola
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Sherif, Amir
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Fewer tumour draining sentinel nodes in patients with progressing muscle invasive bladder cancer, after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radical cystectomy2019In: World journal of urology, ISSN 0724-4983, E-ISSN 1433-8726Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose To examine the relationship between the number of tumour draining sentinel nodes (SNs) and pathoanatomical outcomes, in muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC), in patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and radical cystectomy (RC). Materials and Methods In an ongoing prospective multicenter study, we included 230 patients with suspected urothelial MIBC from ten Swedish urological centers. All underwent TURb and clinical staging. From the cohort, 116 patients with urothelial MIBC; cT2-cT4aN0M0, underwent radical cystectomy (RC) and lymphadenectomy with SN-detection (SNd). 83 patients received cisplatin-based NAC and 33 were NAC-naive. The number and locations of detected SNs and non-SNs were recorded for each patient. The NAC treated patients were categorized by pathoanatomical outcomes post-RC into three groups: complete responders (CR), stable disease (SD) and progressive disease (PD). Selected covariates with possible impact on SN-yield were tested in uni -and multivariate analyses for NAC-treated patients only. Results In NAC treated patients, the mean number of SNs was significantly higher in CR patients (3.3) and SD patients (3.6) compared with PD patients (1.4) (p = 0.034). In a linear multivariate regression model, the number of harvested nodes was the only independent variable that affected the number of SNs (p = 0.0004). Conclusions The number of tumor-draining SNs in NAC-treated patients was significantly lower in patients with progressive disease.

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