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  • 201.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ödkvist, Lars
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Hydén, Dag
    Linköping University.
    Eriksson, Birgitta
    Linköping University.
    Tham, Richard
    Linköping University.
    Liedgren, Christer
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Optokinetic disturbances caused by styrene. An experimental study in rabbit1995In: NES, 1995;8, 1995, p. 433-441Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 202.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Ödkvist, Lars
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Hydén, Dag
    Linköping University.
    Liedgren, Christer
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Disturbances of the vestibular system by toxic agents1976In: 15. Scandinavian Congress of Physiology and Pharmacology, Århus 1976: Abstracts of Invited Lectures, Symposia and Free Communications, Fysiologisk Institut, Aarhus Universitet , 1976, p. 157-157Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 203.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Ödkvist, Lars
    Linköping University.
    Hydén, Dag
    Linköping University.
    Tham, Richard
    Linköping University.
    Rubin, Allan
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Aschan, Gunnar
    Linköping University.
    Industriella lösningsmedels inverkan på balansapparaten1977In: Svensk Otolaryngol förening, ISSN 0280-7939, Vol. 1, p. 43-44Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 204.
    Liedgren, Christer
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Kristensson, Krister
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Ödkvist, Lars
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Projection of thalamic neurons to cat primary vestibular cortical fields studied by means of retrograde axonal transport of horseradish peroxidase1976In: Experimental Brain Research, ISSN 0014-4819, E-ISSN 1432-1106, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 237-243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The two vestibular cortical projection areas in the anterior suprasylvian sulcus and post-cruciate dimple regions were defined by evoked potential technique in anaesthetized cats. The thalamic location of neurons with axon terminals in these fields was determined using the method of retrograde axonal transport of horseradish peroxidase. The ascending vestibular pathway appeared to be separated also at the thalamic level, where cells in the ventro-posterolateral nucleus were found to project to the post cruciate dimple and cells in the posterior nuclear group to the anterior suprasylvian vestibular cortical fields.

  • 205.
    Liedgren, Christer
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ödkvist, LM
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Influence of trichloroethylene on vestibular evoked potentials in the brainstem and cerebral cortex of the cat.1981In: Proc NES 1981;8:445-450., 1981, p. 445-450Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 206.
    Liedgren, Christer
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Rubin, Allan
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Aschan, Gunnar
    Linköping University.
    Ödkvist, Lars
    Linköping University.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University.
    Influence of neck afferents on activity in the cat vestibular nuclei1978In: Vestibular mechanisms in health and disease, 1978 / [ed] Hood, J D, Academic Press, 1978, p. 18-27Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 207.
    Lundquist, Per-Gotthard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    LabView as an integrated platform for research in otolaryngology1992In: Computer u.Medizin 2, 1992, 1992Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 208.
    Lundquist, Per-Gotthard
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenow, Erik
    Linköping University.
    Okamoto, A.
    Linköping University.
    Öberg, Åke
    Linköping University.
    LabView as an integrated platform for research in otolaryngology1992In: EUC conference in Bruges, 1992, p. 62-66Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 209.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Borg, Erik
    Örebro University.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Speech understanding in noise: Effects of cognitive skill and hearing loss2004In: International Journal of Psychology (publ abstract), vol 39, issue 5-6, 2004: Special Issue: Abstracts of the XXVIII INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS OF PSYCHOLOGY, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Results from a series of studies where the purpose was examine the relationship between cognitive skills, hearing loss and auditory and audio-visual speech understanding in noise will be reviewed and discussed. The general trend in the results demonstrate a significant relationship between cognitive skill and type of noise and type of listening situation such that cognitive skills is related to level of speech understanding in listening situations that requires an active listening (i.e., answering of questions) and that background noise constituted by human voices proved to be more tied to cognitive skills than other types of background noises (e.g., white noise).

  • 210.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lunds universitet.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Lunds universitet.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Lunds universitet.
    Cognitive development in children with cochlear implants:: Relations to reading and communication2008In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 47, no Suppl. 2, p. S47-S52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present article is to present an overview of a set of studies conducted in our own laboratory on cognitive and communicative development in children with cochlear implants (CI). The results demonstrate that children with CIs perform at significantly lower levels on the majority of the cognitive tasks. The exceptions to this trend are tasks with relatively lower demands on phonological processing. A fairly high proportion of the children can reach a level of reading comprehension that matches hearing children, despite the fact that they have relatively poor phonological skills.General working memory capacity is further correlated with the type of questions asked in a referential communication task. The results are discussed with respect to issues related to education and rehabilitation.

  • 211.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Development of phonological skills and working memory capacity in children with cochlear implants: Speed of performance and level of accuracy as indicators of development2007In: From Signal to Dialogue, 2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 212.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lunds universitet.
    Asker-Árnason, Lena
    Lunds universitet.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Lunds universitet.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cognitive and language development in deaf children with CI2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 213.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lunds universitet.
    Asker-Árnason, Lena
    Lunds universitet.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Lunds universitet.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cognitive and phonological skills in deaf children with CI2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 214.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lunds universitet.
    Asker-Árnason, Lena
    Lunds universitet.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Lunds universitet.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Development of cognitive composite skills in deaf children with CI2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 215.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lunds universitet, Institutionen för kliniska vetenskaper.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Asker-Arnason, Lena
    Lunds universitet, Institutionen för kliniska vetenskaper.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Lunds universitet, Institutionen för kliniska vetenskaper.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cognitive development, reading and prosodic skills in children with cochlear implants.2009In: Scandinavian journal of psychology, ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 463-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This report summarizes some of the results of studies in our laboratory exploring the development of cognitive, reading and prosodic skills in children with cochlear implantation (CI). The children with CI performed at significantly lower levels than the hearing comparison group on the majority of cognitive tests, despite showing levels of nonverbal ability. The differences between children with CI and hearing children were most pronounced on tasks with relatively high phonological processing demands, but they were not limited to phonological processing. Impairment of receptive and productive prosody was also evident in children with CI. Despite these difficulties, 75% of the children with CI reached a level of reading skill comparable to that of hearing children. The results are discussed with respect to compensation strategies in reading.

  • 216.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Asker-Arnason, Lena
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sweden.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sweden.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Development of cognitive and reading skills in deaf children with CIs2011In: Cochlear Implants International, ISSN 1467-0100, E-ISSN 1754-7628, Vol. 12, no Suppl 1, p. 98-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 217.
    Möller, Claes
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Ödkvist, Lars
    Linköping University.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University.
    Tham, Richard
    Linköping University.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University.
    Bergholtz, Lars
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Otoneurological findings in workers exposed to styrene1990In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 189-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An otoneurological test battery was administered to 18 workers with long-term exposure (6-15 years) to styrene at levels well below the current Swedish limit (110 mg/m3). The results were compared with those of a reference group. Disturbances were found in the central auditory pathways of seven workers. Tests reflecting central processing of impulses from different sensory equilibrium organs were abnormal for 16 workers. The most relevant tests seemed to be static posturography and the rotatory visual suppression test. In the posturography the styrene group had a significantly larger sway area than the reference group. In the visual suppression test, the styrene workers displayed a significantly poorer ability to suppress vestibular nystagmus than the reference group. It was concluded that styrene exposure in industrial environments at moderate or low levels causes central nervous system disturbances which are not always diagnosable with psychometric tests but can be apparent in special otoneurological tests.

  • 218.
    Möller, Claes
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Ödkvist, Lars
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tham, Richard
    Linköping University.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University.
    Bergholtz, Lars
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Otoneurologiska fynd hos styren-exponerade arbetare1990In: Sv Otolaryngol förening Vårmöte 1990, 1990Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 219.
    Möller, Claes
    et al.
    Department of Otolaryngology, University Hospital, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Ödkvist, Lars
    Linköping University.
    Thell, Jan
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University.
    Hydén, Dag
    Linköping University.
    Vestibular and audiologic functions in Gentamicin-treated Menier's disease1988In: The American journal of otology, ISSN 0192-9763, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 383-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fifteen patients with disabling Meniere's disease were treated with local intratym-panic administration of gentamicin once daily. They had suffered from frequent attacks of vertigo and vomiting, the hearing in the affected ears was decreased permanently, and spontaneous nystagmus was observed. The number of treatment days ranged between 3 and 11. Follow-up time was 1 to 6 years. For evaluation of the treatment, audiologic and vestibular examinations were used, including the broad frequency-band rotatory test (0.4-4.5 Hz). Fourteen patients were free from vertigo after treatment. In 5 patients, there was an increased hearing loss, and in 10 it remained unchanged. Tinnitus and fullness sensations were diminished. After treatment, all ears were unresponsive to caloric stimulation. The clinical examination and rotatory testing in light with sinusoidal stimulation revealed good central compensation of the vestibular loss. However, with pseudorandomized oscillations in darkness, the broad frequency-band rotatory test quantified the loss of peripheral vestibular function and was able to detect the side of the lesion in eight of nine patients.

  • 220.
    Möller, Claes
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting. Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ödkvist, Lars
    Linköping University. Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Thell, Jan
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting. Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University. Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hydén, Dag
    Linköping University. Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Bergholtz, Lars
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting. Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Otoneurological findings in psycho-organic syndrome caused by industrial solvent exposure1989In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, ISSN 0001-6489, E-ISSN 1651-2251, Vol. 107, no 1-2, p. 5-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nine subjects with long-term (8-30 years) occupational exposure to industrial solvents and a confirmed diagnosis of psycho-organic syndrome (POS) have been studied with audiological and otoneurological test batteries. The results were compared to a matched control group of nine industrial workers not exposed to solvents and to normal data from healthy volunteers. In the clinical examination, the Romberg test identified 5/9 workers as pathologic and concurrently the stabilometry showed significantly larger sway areas in the POS-group. In the audiological test battery, the significantly pathologic tests were discrimination of interrupted speech and evoked cortical responses to frequency glides (CRA-delta-f). The saccade test disclosed abnormal findings in 5/9 workers. In the smooth pursuit test, abnormality was found at some test frequencies using pseudorandomized stimulus. The VOR-suppression test was significantly abnormal at all test frequencies. The test battery used strongly indicates CNS lesions due to industrial solvents.

  • 221.
    Ng, Elaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Classon, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Relationships between working memory capacity and speech recognition threshold in first-time hearing aid usersArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 222.
    Ng, Hoi Ning, Elaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Classon, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dynamic relation between working memory capacity and speech recognition in noise during the first six months of hearing aid use2014In: Trends in Hearing, ISSN 2331-2165, Vol. 18, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study aimed to investigate the changing relationship between aided speech recognition and cognitive function during the first six months of hearing aid use. Twentyseven first-time hearing aid users with symmetrical mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss were recruited. Aided speech recognition thresholds in noise (SRTs) were obtained in the hearing aid fitting session as well as at three and six months post-fitting. Cognitive abilities were assessed using a reading span test, which is a measure of working memory capacity, and a cognitive test battery. Results showed a significant correlation between reading span and SRT during the hearing aid fitting session. This relation was significantly weakened over the first six months of hearing aid use. Multiple regression analysis showed that reading span was the main predictor of SRT when hearing aids were first fitted, but that pure-tone average hearing threshold (PTA) was the main predictor six months later. This indicates that working memory capacity plays a more important role in speech recognition in noise before than after six months of use. We argue that new hearing aid users engage working memory capacity to recognize unfamiliar processed speech signals but that as familiarization proceeds, engagement of working memory capacity is reduced.

  • 223.
    Niklasson, Magnus
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Tham, Richard
    Linköping University.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University.
    Eriksson, Birgitta
    Linköping University.
    Effects of GABAB activation and inhibition on vestibulo-ocular and optokinetic responses in the pigmented rat1994In: Brain Research, ISSN 0006-8993, E-ISSN 1872-6240, Vol. 649, no 1-2, p. 151-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of the GABAB agonist baclofen and the GABAB antagonist CGP 35348, given separately or simultaneously, on the central vestibular system of pigmented rats have been evaluated. Drugs were administered either intramuscularly or intracerebroventricularly. Eye movements were recorded during vestibular, optokinetic and combined visual-vestibular stimulation. Activation of the GABAB receptors by baclofen caused a dose related disturbance of the system, manifested by (1) a decrease of the optokinetic gain, (2) a reduced ability to suppress nystagmus during conflicting vestibular and visual input, and (3) a disability to maintain the eccentric eye position upon a spontaneous saccade. All these effects could be inhibited in a dose-dependent fashion by CGP 35348, suggesting that the findings are specifically related to the GABAB receptor. Given separately, the antagonist did not affect the mentioned parameters. During horizontal acceleratory/deceleratory stimulation in darkness baclofen caused a biphasic pattern in the dose-response curves. Small amounts of baclofen caused an increase of the gain and of the duration of poststimulatory nystagmus, while high doses had a depressive action on the same parameters. The stimulating effect of baclofen could be inhibited or even reversed by CGP 35348, which has a depressive effect per se, similar to the effects of baclofen given in the upper range of doses.

  • 224.
    Niklasson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University. Department of Otolaryngology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Tham, Richard
    Linköping University. Department of Otolaryngology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University. Department of Otolaryngology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Birgitta
    Linköping University. Department of Otolaryngology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Effects of toluene, styrene, trichloroethylene, and trichloroethane on the vestibulo- and opto-oculo motor system in rats1993In: Neurotoxicology and Teratology, ISSN 0892-0362, E-ISSN 1872-9738, ISSN ISSN 0892-0362, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 327-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The acute effects of inhalation of four solvents on the central vestibular system of rats were analyzed by recording eye movements upon different stimuli. The dose-response relationship was investigated. Optokinetic stimulation was obtained by placing the animals in front of a surrounding visual pattern, moving at different velocities. The slow-phase eye velocity (SPV) of nystagmus was calculated and divided by the stimulus velocity, giving the gain. All the solvents caused a decrease of the gain. Vestibular stimulation was performed on a turntable by an angular acceleration/deceleration in darkness. The SPV and the duration of the post-stimulatory nystagmus were calculated. The shape of the SPV dose-response curves differed among the four solvents. Toluene, styrene, and trichloroethylene prolonged the duration of nystagmus while trichloroethane did not. A conflicting vestibular and optokinetic stimulation was performed by an angular acceleration/deceleration with a surrounding visual pattern moving with the turntable. All solvents decreased the ability to cancel nystagmus, elicited by vestibular stimulation in conflict with a visual input. Quick movements of the eyes, saccades, were elicited by tactile stimulation. Toluene, styrene, and trichloroethylene changed the generation of the saccades while trichloroethane did not. Most of the findings indicate a common site of action in the central vestibular system, viz., the cerebellar-vestibular circuit. However, within this domain, there are evident differences in the effects among the solvents. This finding, together with previous results obtained in other experimental models of the central nervous system (CNS), suggest that different solvents should be considered as individual compounds. While the current results are consistent with the notion that solvents affect cerebellar-vestibular function, they also demonstrate differences on selected components of this system which may be of concern.

  • 225.
    Niklasson, Magnus
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Tham, Richard
    Linköping University.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Birgitta
    Linköping University.
    The effects of toluene, trichloroethylene, trichlorethane and styrene on the vestibulo- and opto-ocular motor system in rats1992In: 17th Bárány Society Meeting, 1992Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 226.
    Niklasson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University. Department of Otolaryngology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping, Sweden.
    Tham, Richard
    Linköping University. Department of Otolaryngology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping, Sweden..
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University. Department of Otolaryngology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping, Sweden..
    Eriksson, Birgitta
    Linköping University. Department of Otolaryngology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping, Sweden..
    The influence of visual and somatosensory input on the vestibulo-oculomotor reflex of pigmented rats1991In: Journal of Vestibular Research-Equilibrium & Orientation, ISSN 0957-4271, E-ISSN 1878-6464, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 251-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eye movements were recorded in the pigmented rat during vestibular, optokinetic and combined visual-vestibular stimulation. The dominant time constant in pigmented rats, tested during angular vestibular stimulation in darkness, is about two times longer than the cupular time constant. The gain and the duration of nystagmus, achieved by angular vestibular stimulation, can be enhanced by visual impulses. This is most evident during an optokinetic temporonasal stimulation, but is also seen with a nasotemporal stimulation. A mere optokinetic monocular stimulation without a synchronous vestibular excitation causes nystagmus only when the stimuli has a temporonasal direction. The duration of nystagmus, achieved by angular vestibular stimulation, is prolonged by disturbances of the neck proprioceptive system. This is more evident during a simultaneous visual input than in darkness. The ability to cancel nystagmus during conflicting vestibular and optokinetic impulses is well developed in the pigmented rat.

  • 227.
    Niklasson, Magnus
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Tham, Richard
    Linköping University.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Birgitta
    Linköping University.
    Vestibulär forskning: Råttan som försöksmodell1990In: Sv Otolaryngol förening Vårmöte 1990, 1990Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 228. Nisses Johansson, S
    et al.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Development of a hearing in noise test in Swedish with a male speaker2005Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

             

  • 229.
    Nylén, Per
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Birgitta
    Linköping University.
    Hagman, Maud
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Höglund, Gunnar
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tham, Richard
    Linköping University.
    Auditory and vestibular function in rats after simultaneous exposure to toluene and ethanol1992In: Aktuell arbetsmiljöforskning 1992(1):44, 1992, p. 44-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 230.
    Nylén, Per
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Birgitta
    Linköping University.
    Hagman, Maud
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Höglund, Gunnar
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tham, Richard
    Linköping University.
    Auditory and vestibular function in rats after simultaneous exposure to toluene and ethanol1991In: Third Meeting of the International neurotoxicology association, 1991, p. 65-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 231.
    Nylén, Per
    et al.
    National Institute of Occupational Health, Solna, Sweden.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University. Department of Otolaryngology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Johnsson, Ann-Christin
    National Institute of Occupational Health, Solna, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Birgitta
    Linköping University. Department of Otolaryngology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Höglund, Gunnar
    National Institute of Occupational Health, Solna, Sweden.
    Tham, Richard
    Linköping University. Department of Otolaryngology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Vestibular-oculomotor, opto-oculomotor and visual function in the rat after long-term inhalation exposure to toluene1991In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, ISSN 0001-6489, E-ISSN 1651-2251, Vol. 111, no 1, p. 36-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pigmented rats were exposed to toluene (1000 ppm, 21 h/day) for 6 or 11 weeks. The function of the vestibulo- and opto-oculomotor systems was tested one month after the end of the exposure by recording of nystagmus, induced by vestibular or optokinetic stimuli. The eye movements were recorded by a magnetic search coil technique. The optokinetic gain in the exposed animals was reduced compared to a control group. There was also a slight reduction in gain during sinusoidal oscillatory vestibular stimulation. No effect of the toluene exposure on the gain or duration of nystagmus during acceleratory or deceleratory rotatory stimulation was demonstrated, nor was there any change in the duration of the optokinetic after-nystagmus. The function of the visual system was tested 2 to 5 days after exposure by recording the electroretinogram and the visual evoked response. The conduction velocity in peripheral nerve was also measured. No effect of the toluene exposure on these variables was seen. The results indicate that long-term inhalation of toluene causes a long-lasting, possibly permanent, lesion within the vestibulo-cerebellum. They gave no evidence that such exposure affects peripheral vestibular or visual function.

  • 232.
    Rubin, Allan
    et al.
    Linköping University. University of Toronto, Canada.
    Liedgren, Christer
    Linköping University. University of Toronto, Canada.
    Ödkvist, Lars
    Linköping University. University of Toronto, Canada.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University. University of Toronto, Canada.
    Aschan, Gunnar
    Linköping University. University of Toronto, Canada.
    Limb input to the cat vestibular nuclei1979In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, ISSN 0001-6489, E-ISSN 1651-2251, ISSN ISSN 0001-6489, Vol. 87, no 1-2, p. 113-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The input from fore- and hindlimbs to the vestibular nuclear complex (VNC) was investigated in awake cats. Electrical stimulus was given to the sciatic, radial and vestibular nerves bilaterally and single unit responses were recorded in the VNC with extracellular technique. The position of the microelectrode was histologically confirmed. All four major vestibular nuclei received fore- as well as hindlimb input. Forty per cent of the neurons with limb input also received vestibular afferents. No major distinguishing features appeared between the different nuclei with regard to response characteristics. Certain differences in laterality of response, quantitative fore-hindlimb ratio and somatosensory-labyrinthine convergence were observed however. Response latencies to sciatic and radial nerve stimuli always exceeded a 3 msec and were grouped around 8 and 16 msec. A third population of vestibular neurons had latencies over 20 msec. Both excitatory and inhibitory responses were recorded, with the latter not always following an activation. The findings illustrate the complex nature of the ascending pathway to the VNC and the integrative properties of this complex.

  • 233.
    Stenbäck, Victoria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Cognitive inhibition, WMC, and speech-recognition-in-noise2015In: 3rd International conference in Cognitive Hearing Science and Communication, Linköping 14-17 June, 2015., 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cognitive abilities are important for a number of human attributes, such as making sense of communication, holding information active in memory, and making decisions. When it is the goal to focus on a single target voice, and resist intrusions from irrelevant information, cognitive inhibition can aid us in our endeavour. Cognitive inhibition is thought to support and co-operate with working memory. Abilities such as cognitive inhibition and working memory are also important for speech processing, even more so when listening to speech under adverse conditions. In order to assess different difficulties that can arise in every day listening situations, it´s of importance to have solid methods for measuring cognitive abilities. In the present study we present a task assessing cognitive inhibition, and how it relates to individual working memory capacity (WMC), and speech-recognition-in-noise. Forty-six young normally-hearing individuals were presented with a cognitive test battery, as well as a speech-in-noise test. Our results suggest that individuals with high WMC, also exhibit good cognitive inhibition. The results also indicate that those who perform well in the cognitive inhibition task need less favourable signal-to-noise-ratios in the speech-recognition task. Our findings indicate that capacity to resist semantic interference can be used to predict performance in speech-recognition tasks when listening under adverse conditions. 

  • 234.
    Stenbäck, Victoria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Executive function and speech- in- noise perception: the role of inhibition2013In: Aging and Speech Communication, 2013 / [ed] Larry E Humes, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

     

    Little is known about the relation between the ability to inhibit irrelevant information and perceiving speech-in-noise and the effects of hearing loss and ageing on this relationship. In settings where a listening task is difficult, individuals use both their hearing and cognitive abilities to process the auditory information. To perceive speech in noise, one must focus on the relevant information and at the same time inhibit the processing of irrelevant information. Results from recent studies indicate that older adults have difficulties singling out speech in noise, and selectively attend to target speech while inhibiting irrelevant information.

     

    The purpose of the project is to increase theoretical knowledge concerning the relation between age, perceiving speech-in-noise and inhibition. The pilot study involved the administration of a test battery consisting of audiological, cognitive and speech perception tests. The results of a series of ANOVAs and correlational analyses will be presented to show differences in performance and the relation between performance on the cognitive, audiological and speech-perception tasks. Upon completion, the results of this study will be used to compare younger individuals´ performance with older adults with and without hearing loss to determine the effect of age and hearing ability on the relation between capacity to inhibit irrelevant information and speech-in-noise recognition.

  • 235.
    Stenbäck, Victoria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Informational masking in spoken communication - Developing the Swedish "Hayling" sentences2013In: 11th EFAS Congress.  Föredrags Abstract. Otorhinolaryngologia Hungarica, 59:2, 101, 2013, p. 101-101Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 236.
    Stenbäck, Victoria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The role of cognitive abilities in younger and older normally hearing adults when listening to speech under adverse conditions2015In: 6th Aging and Speech Communication Research Conference 2015 (“ASC15”) Bloomington, Indiana, USA October 11-14, 2015 / [ed] Larry E Humes, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cognitive abilities, such as working memory capacity (WMC), lexical decision making, and cognitive inhibition, can help predict performance on speech-recognition-in-noise tasks. Working memory is assumed to play a major part in every day listening situations, storing and actively working with relevant information, while inhibitory control helps to suppress and separate irrelevant information from interfering with the information processing. With increasing age, comes decreasing cognitive abilities, such as declines in WMC, speed of information processing, and inhibitory control, leading to problems when selectively attending to speech while inhibiting interfering distractors. The aim of the present study was to examine age-related declines in WMC, inhibitory control, and lexical decision making, and their respective roles when listening to speech under adverse listening conditions. Twenty-four young normally-hearing (NH), and 24 elderly ( for their age) NH individuals participated in the study. They completing a cognitive test battery assessing WMC, cognitive inhibition, and lexical decision making, as well as a closed-set (Hagerman sentences) and an open-set (HINT) speech-recognition-in-noise task masked with different maskers. We will present results comparing cognitive abilities in younger normally-hearing individuals with elderly normally-hearing individuals, and how age and cognitive abilities relates to performance on speech-recognition-in-noise tasks.

  • 237.
    Stenbäck, Victoria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    the Speech recognition under adverse listening conditions in young normally-hearing listeners2015In: Third International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, Linköping, 14-17 June, 2015. Sweden., 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study we aimed to investigate individual differences in cognitive inhibition, WMC, and how they relate to performance on a speech-recognition-in-noise task. Sixteen young normally-hearing individuals were presented with a cognitive test battery, as well as a sentence corpus masked by 5 different maskers, targeting 80% speech-recognition. One masker was a slightly modulated (10%) speech-shaped noise (SSN), 2 maskers were constructed by modulating the SSN with the envelopes from a single female talker, and the international speech test signal (ISTS). We also masked the target sentences with the ISTS, and a single female talker reading a passage in a Swedish newspaper. Our results showed that cognitive inhibition is significantly related to performance when maskers with meaningful, semantic information is used. The results further indicate that young normally-hearing individuals can take advantage of temporal and spectral dips to fill in missing information. Our findings suggest that choice of speech material is of importance for the outcome in speech-recognition-in-noise tasks. We further propose that tasks of cognitive inhibition can be used to predict performance in a speech-recognition task.

  • 238.
    Stenbäck, Victoria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The Swedish Hayling task, and its relation to working memory, verbal ability, and speech-recognition-in-noise2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 264-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cognitive functions and speech-recognition-in-noise were evaluated with a cognitive test battery, assessing response inhibition using the Hayling task, working memory capacity (WMC) and verbal information processing, and an auditory test of speech recognition. The cognitive tests were performed in silence whereas the speech recognition task was presented in noise. Thirty young normally-hearing individuals participated in the study. The aim of the study was to investigate one executive function, response inhibition, and whether it is related to individual working memory capacity (WMC), and how speech-recognition-in-noise relates to WMC and inhibitory control. The results showed a significant difference between initiation and response inhibition, suggesting that the Hayling task taps cognitive activity responsible for executive control. Our findings also suggest that high verbal ability was associated with better performance in the Hayling task. We also present findings suggesting that individuals who perform well on tasks involving response inhibition, and WMC, also perform well on a speech-in-noise task. Our findings indicate that capacity to resist semantic interference can be used to predict performance on speech-in-noise tasks.

  • 239.
    Stenbäck, Victoria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Informational masking in spoken communication – developing the Swedish "Hayling"-sentences2013In: Abstract book: 2nd International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, 2013, p. 164-164Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 240.
    Stenbäck, Victoria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Informational masking inspoken communication- Developing the Swedish "Hayling" sentences2013In: Second International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for communication. 16-19 June 2013, Linköping, Sweden, Abstract, p164, 2013, p. 164-164Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 241.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Helsingor, Denmark.
    Ng, Elaine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lidestam, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Sörqvist, Patrik
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Träff, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Yumba, Wycliffe
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Classon, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Signoret, Carine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Pichora-Fuller, Kathleen
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Auditory, signal processing, and cognitive factors  influencing  speech  perception  in  persons with hearing loss fitted with hearing aids – the N200 study2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of the current study was to assess aided speech-in-noise outcomes and relate those measures to auditory sensitivity and processing, different types of cognitive processing abilities, and signal processing in hearing aids.

    Material and method: Participants were 200 hearing-aid wearers, with a mean age of 60.8 years, 43% females, with average hearing thresholds in the better ear of 37.4 dB HL. Tests of auditory functions were hearing thresholds, DPOAEs, tests of fine structure processing, IHC dead regions, spectro-temporal modulation, and speech recognition in quiet (PB words). Tests of cognitive processing function were tests of phonological skills, working memory, executive functions and inference making abilities, and general cognitive tests (e.g., tests of cognitive decline and IQ). The outcome test variables were the Hagerman sentences with 50 and 80% speech recognition levels, using two different noises (stationary speech weighted noise and 4-talker babble), and three types of signal processing (linear gain, fast acting compression, and linear gain plus a non-ideal binary mask). Another sentence test included typical and atypical sentences with contextual cues that were tested both audio-visually and in an auditory mode only. Moreover, HINT and SSQ were administrated.

    Analysis: Factor analyses were performed separate for the auditory, cognitive, and outcome tests.

    Results: The auditory tests resulted in two factors labeled SENSITIVITY and TEMPORAL FINE STRUCTURE, the cognitive tests in one factor (COGNITION), and the outcome tests in the two factors termed NO CONTEXT and CONTEXT that relates to the level of context in the different outcome tests. When age was partialled out, COGNITION was moderately correlated with the TEMPORAL FINE STRUCTURE and NO CONTEXT factors but only weakly correlated with the CONTEXT factor. SENSITIVITY correlated weakly with TEMPORAL FINE STRUCTURE and CONTEXT, and moderately with NO CONTEXT, while TEMPORAL FINE STRUCTURE showed weak correlation with CONTEXT and moderate correlation with NO CONTEXT. CONTEXT and NO CONTEXT had a  moderate correlation. Moreover, the overall results of the Hagerman sentences showed 0.9 dB worse SNR with fast acting compression compared with linear gain and 5.5 dB better SNR with linear  gain and noise reduction compared with only linear gain.

    Conclusions: For hearing aid wearers, the ability to recognize speech in noise is associated with both sensory and cognitive processing abilities when the speech materials have low internal context. These associations are less prominent when the speech material has contextual cues.

  • 242.
    Söderberg, Rufus
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dynamic Compression, Spatial Hearing, and Cognitive Performance2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 243.
    Söderberg, Rufus
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dynamic compression, spatial Hearing, and cognitive performance2010In: Hearing and deafness from memory to society: ongoing thesis projects / [ed] Magnus Emilsson, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION. Spatial hearing outcome of hearing aid fitting might benefit from further knowledge of sound lateralization. Effects from signal processing and cognitive speed on sound lateralization performance have been examined in this study.

    METHOD. Sound lateralization performance and cognitive performance were measured in adult participants. They assessed direction of noise pulses presented through earphones. Direction was simulated with interaural level differences with and without interaural time differences. Dynamic compression was set to bypass, independent channels, or linked left and right channels. Cognitive performance was assessed by means of letter matching, lexical or phonological tasks. The mean response time and the number of correct responses were recorded for each test condition.

    RESULTS. For sound lateralization accuracy, presence of interaural time differences improved performance. Independent channels dynamic compression reduced lateralization accuracy. For sound lateralization speed, presence of interaural time differences improved performance by 145 ms. The response time for the lateralization tasks correlated more to the letter matching task than the other cognitive tasks.

    ADDITIONAL DATA. A preview of data from a follow-up experiment will be presented.

  • 244.
    Söderberg, Rufus
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sound lateralization and cognitive performance2010In: From speech to understanding: Biological and cognitive mechanisms / [ed] Agneta Wiberg, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. Spatial hearing outcome of hearing aid fitting might benefit from further knowledge of sound lateralization. Effects from signal processing and cognitive speed on sound lateralization performance have been examined in this study.

    Method. Sound lateralization performance and cognitive performance were measured in adult participants. They assessed direction of noise pulses presented through earphones. Direction was simulated with interaural level differences with and without interaural time differences. Dynamic compression was set to bypass, independent channels, or linked left and right channels. Cognitive performance was assessed by means of letter matching, lexical or phonological tasks. The mean response time and the number of correct responses were recorded for each test condition. For the lateralization task, two-way fixed-effects ANOVA for repeated measurements were performed. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated between the lateralization tasks and the cognitive tasks.

    Results. For sound lateralization accuracy, presence of interaural time differences improved performance. Independent channels dynamic compression reduced lateralization accuracy. For sound lateralization, presence of interaural time differences improved the response time by 145 ms and the response accuracy by 9.5 %-units. Dynamic compression with separate sides level detection worsened the response accuracy by 14 %-units compared to bypassed or common level detector compression. The response time for the lateralization tasks correlated more to the letter matching task (Pearson r = 0.7) than the other cognitive tasks (Pearson r ≤ 0.5).

  • 245.
    Söderberg, Rufus
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Teknisk audiologi.
    Sound lateralization and cognitive performance. From speech to understanding: Biological and cognitive mechanisms2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 246.
    Tham, Richard
    et al.
    Linköping University. Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Bunnfors, Irja
    Linköping University. Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Birgitta
    Linköping University. Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University. Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Lindgren, S.
    Linköping University. Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Ödkvist, Lars
    Linköping University. Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Vestibulo-ocular disturbances in rats exposed to organic solvents1984In: Acta Pharmacologica et Toxicologica, ISSN 0001-6683, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 58-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of different kinds of industrial solvents on the vestibular function of rats has been studied by recording nystagmus, induced by accelerated rotation. The effect was related to the blood levels of the solvents. One group of solvents, including halogenated saturated hydrocarbons like dichloromethane, caused depression of the vestibulo-oculomotor reflex (VOR). Another group, including benzene compounds like xylene, toluene, styrene and cumene and halogenated unsaturated hydrocarbons like trichloroethylene caused an excitation of the VOR. The most striking chemical similarity between the different solvents in the last group is the occurence of double-bonds. If the animals were exposed simultaneously to solvents from both groups the excitatory effect prevailed and was even potentiated. It is suggested that solvents cause depression or excitation of the VOR by interaction with central pathways in the reticular formation and the cerebellum.

  • 247.
    Tham, Richard
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University.
    Eriksson, Birgitta
    Linköping University.
    Bunnfors, Irja
    Linköping University.
    Ödkvist, Lars
    Linköping University.
    Liedgren, Christer
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Electronystagmographic findings in rats exposed to styrene or toluene1982In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, ISSN 0001-6489, E-ISSN 1651-2251, Vol. 93, p. 107-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A previously described experimental model for studying the effect of industrial solvents in the vestibular system of rabbits has been applied to rats. To achieve a constant concentration, the solvent was infused intravenously, dissolved in a lipid emulsion. Arterial blood levels were estimated by gas chromatography. The vestibulo-oculomotor behaviour of rats during repeated rotatory acceleration was investigated by electronystagmography. The effect of two solvents-toluene and styrene-on the rotatory induced nystagmus was examined. Both solvents caused an exaggerated reaction at arterial blood  levels above 75 ppm. The investigation indicated that the rat will be suitable species for further electronystagmographic investigation of the influence of organic solvents on the vestibular system, for example in screening studies of the toxicity of these solvents.

  • 248.
    Tham, Richard
    et al.
    Linköping University. Department of Otolaryngology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University. Department of Otolaryngology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Birgitta
    Linköping University. Department of Otolaryngology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Niklasson, Magnus
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting. Department of Otolaryngology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    The effect of toluene on the vestibulo- and opto-oculomotor system in rats, pretreated with GABAergic drugs1990In: Neurotoxicology and Teratology, ISSN 0892-0362, E-ISSN 1872-9738, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 307-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Toluene, an aromatic solvent, prolongs the duration of nystagmus induced by a rotatory acceleration or by an optokinetic stimulation in the pigmented rat. Baclofen, an agonist of GABAB receptors, and 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]-pyridin-3-ol (THIP), an agonist of GABAA receptors are able to block this toluene effect on the vestibular system. On the contrary diazepam, which by itself causes an evident reduction of the duration of acceleratory nystagmus, is not able to block the toluene effect. The results indicate that the toluene effect is related to GABA transmission and that the solvent interacts by a rather receptor specific mechanism of action.

  • 249.
    Tham, Richard
    et al.
    Linköping University. Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University. Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Birgitta
    Linköping University. Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Ödkvist, Lars
    Linköping University. Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Effects on the vestibulo- and opto-oculomotor system in rats by lesions of the commissural vestibular fibres1989In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, ISSN 0001-6489, E-ISSN 1651-2251, Vol. 108, no 5-6, p. 372-377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eye movements were recorded from rats with a magnetic search coil system before and after sectioning of the midline commissural pathways in the brain stem at the level of the vestibular nuclei. After lesion, the findings were as follows: 1) During sinusoidal vestibular stimulation the eyes moved in a sinusoidal way similar to the head movement without any regular saccades. There was a reduced gain and a phase lead. 2) During optokinetic stimulation the eyes moved in the stimulus direction to an excentric position and stayed there until stimulation ceased. 3) During acceleratory/deceleratory rotation in the light there was a drift of the eyes in the direction of the expected slow phase movement to an excentric position. In some animals there was a directional asymmetry. The findings may be explained by a failure of the central neural integrator for horizontal eye movements. The results support the hypothesis that vestibular commissural fibres are of crucial importance for the function of this integrator system.

  • 250.
    Tham, Richard
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University.
    Hydén, Dag
    Linköping University.
    Aschan, Gunnar
    Linköping University.
    Ödkvist, Lars
    Linköping University.
    Pharmacokinetics of solvents in the experimental animal modell1977In: International symposium on the control of air pollution in the working environment, 1977, 1977, p. 92-98Conference paper (Other academic)
23456 201 - 250 of 296
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